Author Topic: Clinton/Obama, CIFTA Treaty Deception... Bottom line, NO AMMO!!!!  (Read 8043 times)

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Offline Optimus

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Obama to seek ratification of arms treaty
http://www.thenewamerican.com/usnews/foreign-policy/1014
http://news.yahoo.com/s/ap/20090416/ap_on_go_pr_wh/obama_mexico

By BEN FELLER, Associated Press Writer Ben Feller, Associated Press Writer – Thu Apr 16, 3:01 pm ET

MEXICO CITY – Confronting a security threat on the America's doorstep, President Barack Obama arrived Thursday in Mexico for a swift diplomatic mission to show solidarity on drugs and guns with a troubled neighbor — and to prove the U.S. is serious about the battle against trafficking.

After a meeting with Mexican President Felipe Calderon, Obama planned to announce he would support an inter-American weapons treaty meant to take on the bloody drug trade. Officials described the plan on the condition of anonymity so they wouldn't pre-empt the announcement.

The regional treaty, adopted by the Organization of American States, was signed by former President Bill Clinton in 1997 but never ratified by the U.S. Senate. Officials said Obama would push lawmakers to act on it — an opening gesture for meetings that also would include discussion of the economic crisis and possibly clean energy.

Among the other touchy points are disagreement over a lapsed U.S. assault weapons ban, a standoff over cross-border trucking, and immigration.

Presidential spokesman Robert Gibbs said Obama also would tell Mexican officials that he has asked Congress to provide money for Black Hawk helicopters to help Mexico in its drug war.

The escalating drug fight in Mexico is spilling into the United States, and confronting Obama with an international crisis much closer than North Korea or Afghanistan. Mexico is the main hub for cocaine and other drugs entering the U.S., and the United States is the primary source of guns used in Mexico's drug-related killings.

Calderon's aggressive stand against drug cartels has won him the aid of the United States and the prominent political backing of Obama — never as evident as on Thursday, when the new president was to stand with Calderon in Mexico's capital city.

Interviewed Wednesday by CNN en Espanol, Obama said Calderon was doing a "heroic job" in his battle with the cartels.

As for the U.S. role, Obama said, "We are going to be dealing not only with drug interdiction coming north, but also working on helping to curb the flow of cash and guns going south."

Homeland Security Secretary Janet Napolitano said consultations with Mexico are "not about pointing fingers, it's about solving a problem: What can we do to prevent the flow of guns and cash south that fuel these cartels?"

Obama's overnight Mexican stop came on the way to the Summit of the Americas in the two-island Caribbean nation of Trinidad and Tobago, where he hopes to set a new tone for relations with Latin America.

"We will renew and sustain a broader partnership between the United States and the hemisphere on behalf of our common prosperity and our common security," he wrote in an Op-ed column printed in a dozen newspapers throughout the region.

In the past, Obama said, America has been "too easily distracted by other priorities" while leaders throughout the Americas have been "mired in the old debates of the past."

More than 10,000 people have been killed in Mexico in drug-related violence since Calderon's stepped-up effort against the cartels began in 2006. The State Department says contract killings and kidnappings on U.S. soil, carried out by Mexican drug cartels, are on the rise as well.

A U.S. military report just five months ago raised the specter of Mexico collapsing into a failed state with its government under siege. It named only one other country in such a worst-case scenario: Pakistan. The assertion incensed Mexican officials; Obama's team disavowed it.

Indeed, the Obama administration has gone the other direction, showering attention on Mexico.

Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton said in Mexico City that the U.S. shared responsibility for the drug war. She said America's "insatiable demand" for illegal drugs fueled the trade and that the U.S. had an "inability" to stop weapons from being smuggled south.

Obama has dispatched hundreds of federal agents, along with high-tech surveillance gear and drug-sniffing dogs, to the Southwest to help Mexico fight drug cartels. He sent Congress a war-spending request that made room for $350 million for security along the U.S.-Mexico border. He added three Mexican organizations to a list of suspected international drug kingpins. He dispatched three Cabinet secretaries to Mexico. And he just named a "border czar."

The Justice Department says such Mexican drug trafficking organizations represent the greatest organized crime threat to the United States.

The White House is vowing more enforcement of gun laws. But it is not pursuing a promise Obama made as a candidate: a ban on assault-style weapons.

That ban on military-style guns became law during the Clinton administration in 1994 but expired under the Bush administration in 2004. When Attorney General Eric Holder raised the idea of reinstating the ban this year, opposition from Democrats and Republicans emerged quickly.

Reopening the debate on gun rights is apparently a fight the White House does not want to take on right now.

"I think that there are other priorities that the president has," Obama spokesman Robert Gibbs said this week.

Mexican leaders, though, say the ban saved lives.

The swooning economy, blamed largely on failures inside the United States, has taken a huge toll on Mexico. About 80 percent of Mexico's exports — now in decline — go to the United States.

Obama and Calderon are likely to tout the value of that trade, but a spat between their countries remains unresolved. Mexico has raised tariffs on almost 90 American products, a retaliation for a U.S. decision to cancel access to Mexican truckers on U.S. highways despite the terms of a free trade agreement.

On immigration, Obama is expected to make clear he is committed to reforms. The effort is likely to start this year but won't move to the top of his agenda.

"It's important because of the human costs," Obama said in the CNN en Espanol interview. "It's something that we need to solve."

http://cosmos.bcst.yahoo.com/up/player/popup/?rn=3906861&cl=13001146&ch=4226716&src=news
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Offline 2Revolutions

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Obama: Assault weapons ban made sense
« Reply #1 on: April 17, 2009, 06:41:34 am »
http://news.yahoo.com/s/ap/20090416/ap_on_go_pr_wh/lt_obama_newser_assault_weapons

Obama: Assault weapons ban made sense
Thu Apr 16, 6:03 pm ET
MEXICO CITY – President Barack Obama says he prefers to focus on enforcing existing laws to keep assault weapons out of Mexico, rather than trying to renew a U.S. ban on the weapons.

Obama says he still believes such a ban made sense. The most recent one expired in 1994.

But he says he'd rather enforce laws on the books that make it illegal to send assault weapons across the Mexican border.

Guns flowing into Mexico from the U.S. have been fingered in a rise in killings by Mexican drug cartels.

As a presidential candidate, Obama promised to push to reinstate the ban. He now says doing so would be politically difficult.

Obama commented in Mexico City at a news conference with President Felipe Calderon after their meeting.

Those who wish to remain ignorant and free, in a state of civilization, want what never was and what never will be.  - Thomas Jefferson

Offline menace

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Re: Obama: Assault weapons ban made sense
« Reply #2 on: April 17, 2009, 06:58:56 am »
Obama to seek ratification of arms treaty

The U.S. government will stand shoulder to shoulder with Mexico in its war on criminal gangs and guns, including a push to ratify a Latin American arms trafficking treaty, President Barack Obama said Thursday on his first visit to the Mexican capital.

In addition to reiterating his administration’s vow to stop the trafficking of weapons bought in Texas and other border states to Mexican cartels, he also called on the U.S. Senate to ratify a hemispheric treaty against arms trafficking that has languished in a committee for more than a decade.

“We are absolutely committed to working in partnership with Mexico to make sure we are dealing with this scourge on both sides of the border,” Obama said after meeting with Mexican President Felipe Calderon. “You can’t fight this war with just one hand.”

“We want to act with urgency,” Obama said. “I think we can make some progress.”

Obama echoed the tough talk of the last few weeks by Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton, Attorney General Eric Holder and Homeland Security Secretary Janet Napolitano, all of whom have promised a down and dirty fight against Mexico’s cartel violence and its impact on the United States.

The arms treaty, which has been signed by all but four countries in the hemisphere, outlaws the unauthorized export of guns as well as outlining stricter licensing rules and better means of tracing weapons by police agencies.

The U.S. Mexico-relationship, at times a contentious one, also is crucial: The United States buys more than 80 percent of Mexico’s exports and is home to as many as a 10th of Mexico’s population. It also shares a besieged border in Texas, Arizona, New Mexico and California.

“I appreciate the support,” Calderon said. “The struggle against transnational organized crime, should be based on cooperation, shared responsibility and mutual trust.”

Thousands have died
Gangland violence has killed about 10,000 Mexicans — most of them gangsters or police — since Calderon took aim at cartels after taking office in December 2006.

Obama arrived in Mexico just hours after Mexican officials announced that at least 13 people were killed in a clash between soldiers and suspected drug dealers in an isolated mountain village southwest of Mexico City. The Mexican army has has all but occupied the drug producing mountains in the region.

Ciudad Juarez, across the Rio Grande from El Paso, and other border cities have been the primary battleground since last year.

Although Obama said he still would like Congress to reinstate a ban on the sale of assault weapons — which expired in 2004 after 10 years — he suggested it would be politically tenuous.

Obama is headed today to the Summit of the Americas on the island of Trinidad, off the coast of Venezuela. Analysts say the summit, the fifth since 1994, is expected produce few policy proposals but will allow Obama to set the tone for his administration’s dealing with the region.

His overnight stop in Mexico City was intended to signal that this country remains the United State’s most important relationship in the region and currently the most delicate, analysts said.

“Obama has had a quick learning curve on Mexico,” said Michael Shifter, an analyst at the Inter American Dialogue, a Washington think tank. “He understands that this is absolutely crucial.”

In Trinidad, Obama will confer about the battered world economy, organized crime, the environment and other worries with 33 of the hemisphere’s 34 national leaders. Cuban President Raul Castro will not attend.

“Obama will be there as much to listen and respond as to put forth U.S. proposals and ideas,” said Shannon O’Neil, a Latin America specialist at the Council on Foreign Relations in New York. “The real goal for the Obama administration at the Summit of the Americas is to set a new tone for U.S. policy.”

http://www.chron.com/disp/story.mpl/front/6376969.html

Offline DireWolf

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Re: Obama: Assault weapons ban made sense
« Reply #3 on: April 17, 2009, 12:04:58 pm »
This treaty is to be looked into, surely there will be attempts to include in the language many of the goals they wish to impose upon us.

Obama's talk of no new gun restrictions is yet another ploy to placate those foolish enough to believe he will not eventually attempt a total firearm ban, as a tiger cannot change its stripes he will not change his views as to firearms. He now is using camouflage to hide his true intent.
Freedom and Liberty, or slavery and death, your choice, choose wisely.

Offline stymo1

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President Obama Continues Assault on the Second Amendment
« Reply #4 on: April 29, 2009, 12:38:42 pm »
President Obama Continues Assault on the Second Amendment

http://gunowners.org/

By John Velleco
Director of Federal Affairs

President Obama is determined to eradicate the Second Amendment rights of law-abiding American citizens.

In recent meetings with Mexican President Felipe Calderón, the American President promised to urge the U.S. Senate to pass an international arms control treaty.

The treaty, cumbersomely titled the “
Inter-American Convention Against the Illicit Manufacturing of and Trafficking in Firearms, Ammunition, Explosives, and Other Related Materials” (known by the acronym CIFTA), was signed by President Bill Clinton, but never ratified by the Senate.

President Obama is hoping to capitalize on an increased Democrat majority and push its quick ratification.  The U.S. is one of four nations that have not ratified the treaty.

If ratified and the U.S. is found not to be in compliance with any provisions of the treaty -- such as a provision that would outlaw reloading ammunition without a government license -- President Obama would be empowered to implement regulations without Congressional approval.

Supporters of CIFTA claim the treaty is not a threat to the Second Amendment, but only a “symbolic” gesture.  But symbolic of what?  That America really is to blame for problems of violence and drug gangs in a foreign country?  That the American government can be pressed by a foreign country to alter the Second Amendment?

If the kind of “change” that Obama wants is for the United States to take its marching orders from third world countries regarding our gun rights, we’re in big trouble!

The fact is, this treaty will do NOTHING to combat the violence in Mexico, but it will go a LONG WAY toward eroding our ability to protect the right to keep and bear arms through our elected officials. [Read more about CIFTA]
" It's called the American Dream because you have to be asleep to believe it." -- George Carlin

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=acLW1vFO-2Q

Offline KoWBoY

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Re: President Obama Continues Assault on the Second Amendment
« Reply #5 on: April 29, 2009, 12:56:55 pm »
Write, call and/or Email your representatives. This is a threat to the Second Amendment.
Placement is Key.
Violence Begets Compliance.
Ignorance is Temporary. Stupid is Forever.
I HUNT! Because the voices in my head tell me to.
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JTCoyoté

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Re: April swine flu scare obfuscates CIFTA Treaty... no ammo.
« Reply #6 on: September 24, 2009, 12:17:34 pm »
 We may be a day late and a dollar short on this one folks!

Without ammo, our firearms become nothing more than an expensive clubs!

--Oldyoti

"If ever time should come, when vain and
aspiring men shall possess the highest seats
in Government, our country will stand in need
of its experienced patriots to prevent its ruin."
~Samuel Adams

luckee1

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Re: April swine flu scare obfuscates CIFTA Treaty... no ammo.
« Reply #7 on: September 24, 2009, 12:19:44 pm »
We may be a day late and a dollar short on this one folks!

Without ammo, our firearms become nothing more than an expensive clubs!

--Oldyoti

"If ever time should come, when vain and
aspiring men shall possess the highest seats
in Government, our country will stand in need
of its experienced patriots to prevent its ruin."
~Samuel Adams


With the shortage, It will be hard to get any!

JTCoyoté

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Re: April swine flu scare obfuscates CIFTA Treaty... no ammo.
« Reply #8 on: September 24, 2009, 12:27:34 pm »
Here is the entire CIFTA treaty as it was first proposed under Bill Clinton, January 1, 1997.



http://www.state.gov/p/wha/rls/49907.htm
YOU ARE IN: Under Secretary for Political Affairs > Bureau of Western Hemisphere Affairs > Releases Pertaining to Western Hemisphere Affairs > Other Releases > Organization of American States' Documents
Inter-American Convention Against Illicit Manufacturing of and Trafficking in Firearms (CIFTA)

January 1, 1997
Inter-American Convention Against the Illicit Manufacturing of and Trafficking in Firearms, Ammunition, Explosives, and Other Related Materials (1997)

THE STATES PARTIES,

AWARE of the urgent need to prevent, combat, and eradicate the illicit manufacturing of and trafficking in firearms, ammunition, explosives, and other related materials, due to the harmful effects of these activities on the security of each state and the region as a whole, endangering the well-being of peoples, their social and economic development, and their right to live in peace;

CONCERNED by the increase, at the international level, in the illicit manufacturing of and trafficking in firearms, ammunition, explosives, and other related materials and by the serious problems resulting therefrom;

REAFFIRMING that States Parties give priority to preventing, combating, and eradicating the illicit manufacturing of and trafficking in firearms, ammunition, explosives, and other related materials because of the links of such activities with drug trafficking, terrorism, transnational organized crime, and mercenary and other criminal activities;

CONCERNED about the illicit manufacture of explosives from substances and articles that in and of themselves are not explosives--and that are not addressed by this Convention due to their other lawful uses--for activities related to drug trafficking, terrorism, transnational organized crime and mercenary and other criminal activities;

CONSIDERING the urgent need for all states, and especially those states that produce, export, and import arms, to take the necessary measures to prevent, combat, and eradicate the illicit manufacturing of and trafficking in firearms, ammunition, explosives, and other related materials;

CONVINCED that combating the illicit manufacturing of and trafficking in firearms, ammunition, explosives, and other related materials calls for international cooperation, exchange of information, and other appropriate measures at the national, regional, and international levels, and desiring to set a precedent for the international community in this regard;

STRESSING the need, in peace processes and post-conflict situations, to achieve effective control of firearms, ammunition, explosives, and other related materials in order to prevent their entry into the illicit market;

MINDFUL of the pertinent resolutions of the United Nations General Assembly on measures to eradicate the illicit transfer of conventional weapons and on the need for all states to guarantee their security, and of the efforts carried out in the framework of the Inter-American Drug Abuse Control Commission (CICAD);

RECOGNIZING the importance of strengthening existing international law enforcement support mechanisms such as the International Weapons and Explosives Tracking System (IWETS) of the International Criminal Police Organization (INTERPOL), to prevent, combat, and eradicate the illicit manufacturing of and trafficking in firearms, ammunition, explosives, and other related materials;

RECOGNIZING that international trade in firearms is particularly vulnerable to abuses by criminal elements and that a "know-your-customer" policy for dealers in, and producers, exporters, and importers of, firearms, ammunition, explosives, and other related materials is crucial for combating this scourge;

RECOGNIZING that states have developed different cultural and historical uses for firearms, and that the purpose of enhancing international cooperation to eradicate illicit transnational trafficking in firearms is not intended to discourage or diminish lawful leisure or recreational activities such as travel or tourism for sport shooting, hunting, and other forms of lawful ownership and use recognized by the States Parties;

RECALLING that States Parties have their respective domestic laws and regulations in the areas of firearms, ammunition, explosives, and other related materials, and recognizing that this Convention does not commit States Parties to enact legislation or regulations pertaining to firearms ownership, possession, or trade of a wholly domestic character, and recognizing that States Parties will apply their respective laws and regulations in a manner consistent with this Convention;

REAFFIRMING the principles of sovereignty, nonintervention, and the juridical equality of states,
HAVE DECIDED TO ADOPT THIS INTER-AMERICAN CONVENTION AGAINST THE ILLICIT MANUFACTURING OF AND TRAFFICKING IN FIREARMS, AMMUNITION, EXPLOSIVES, AND OTHER RELATED MATERIALS:

ARTICLE I
Definitions


For the purposes of this Convention, the following definitions shall apply:
1. "Illicit manufacturing": the manufacture or assembly of firearms, ammunition, explosives, and other related materials:

a. from components or parts illicitly trafficked; or

b. without a license from a competent governmental authority of the State Party where the manufacture or assembly takes place; or

c. without marking the firearms that require marking at the time of manufacturing.

2. "Illicit trafficking": the import, export, acquisition, sale, delivery, movement, or transfer of firearms, ammunition, explosives, and other related materials from or across the territory of one State Party to that of another State Party, if any one of the States Parties concerned does not authorize it.
3. "Firearms":

a. any barreled weapon which will or is designed to or may be readily converted to expel a bullet or projectile by the action of an explosive, except antique firearms manufactured before the 20th Century or their replicas; or

b. any other weapon or destructive device such as any explosive, incendiary or gas bomb, grenade, rocket, rocket launcher, missile, missile system, or mine.

4. "Ammunition": the complete round or its components, including cartridge cases, primers, propellant powder, bullets, or projectiles that are used in any firearm.

5. "Explosives": any substance or article that is made, manufactured, or used to produce an explosion, detonation, or propulsive or pyrotechnic effect, except:

a. substances and articles that are not in and of themselves explosive; or

b. substances and articles listed in the Annex to this Convention.

6. "Other related materials": any component, part, or replacement part of a firearm, or an accessory which can be attached to a firearm.
7. "Controlled delivery": the technique of allowing illicit or suspect consignments of firearms, ammunition, explosives, and other related materials to pass out of, through, or into the territory of one or more states, with the knowledge and under the supervision of their competent authorities, with a view to identifying persons involved in the commission of offenses referred to in Article IV of this Convention.

ARTICLE II
Purpose


The purpose of this Convention is:
to prevent, combat, and eradicate the illicit manufacturing of and trafficking in firearms, ammunition, explosives, and other related materials;

to promote and facilitate cooperation and exchange of information and experience among States Parties to prevent, combat, and eradicate the illicit manufacturing of and trafficking in firearms, ammunition, explosives, and other related materials.

ARTICLE III
Sovereignty


1. States Parties shall carry out the obligations under this Convention in a manner consistent with the principles of sovereign equality and territorial integrity of states and that of nonintervention in the domestic affairs of other states.
2. A State Party shall not undertake in the territory of another State Party the exercise of jurisdiction and performance of functions which are exclusively reserved to the authorities of that other State Party by its domestic law.

ARTICLE IV
Legislative Measures


1. States Parties that have not yet done so shall adopt the necessary legislative or other measures to establish as criminal offenses under their domestic law the illicit manufacturing of and trafficking in firearms, ammunition, explosives, and other related materials.
2. Subject to the respective constitutional principles and basic concepts of the legal systems of the States Parties, the criminal offenses established pursuant to the foregoing paragraph shall include participation in, association or conspiracy to commit, attempts to commit, and aiding, abetting, facilitating, and counseling the commission of said offenses.



ARTICLE V
Jurisdiction

1. Each State Party shall adopt such measures as may be necessary to establish its jurisdiction over the offenses it has established in accordance with this Convention when the offense in question is committed in its territory.

2. Each State Party may adopt such measures as may be necessary to establish its jurisdiction over the offenses it has established in accordance with this Convention when the offense is committed by one of its nationals or by a person who habitually resides in its territory.

3. Each State Party shall adopt such measures as may be necessary to establish its jurisdiction over the offenses it has established in accordance with this Convention when the alleged criminal is present in its territory and it does not extradite such person to another country on the ground of the nationality of the alleged criminal.

4. This Convention does not preclude the application of any other rule of criminal jurisdiction established by a State Party under its domestic law.


ARTICLE VI
Marking of Firearms

1. For the purposes of identification and tracing of the firearms referred to in Article I.3.a, States Parties shall:

a. require, at the time of manufacture, appropriate markings of the name of manufacturer, place of manufacture, and serial number;

b. require appropriate markings on imported firearms permitting the identification of the importer's name and address; and

c. require appropriate markings on any firearms confiscated or forfeited pursuant to Article VII.1 that are retained for official use.

2. The firearms referred to in Article I.3.b should be marked appropriately at the time of manufacture, if possible.

ARTICLE VII
Confiscation or Forfeiture


1. States Parties undertake to confiscate or forfeit firearms, ammunition, explosives, and other related materials that have been illicitly manufactured or trafficked.

2. States Parties shall adopt the necessary measures to ensure that all firearms, ammunition, explosives, and other related materials seized, confiscated, or forfeited as the result of illicit manufacturing or trafficking do not fall into the hands of private individuals or businesses through auction, sale, or other disposal.


ARTICLE VIII
Security Measures


States Parties, in an effort to eliminate loss or diversion, undertake to adopt the necessary measures to ensure the security of firearms, ammunition, explosives, and other related materials imported into, exported from, or in transit through their respective territories.


ARTICLE IX
Export, Import, and Transit Licenses or Authorizations

1. States Parties shall establish or maintain an effective system of export, import, and international transit licenses or authorizations for transfers of firearms, ammunition, explosives, and other related materials.


2. States Parties shall not permit the transit of firearms, ammunition, explosives, and other related materials until the receiving State Party issues the corresponding license or authorization.

3. States Parties, before releasing shipments of firearms, ammunition, explosives, and other related materials for export, shall ensure that the importing and in-transit countries have issued the necessary licenses or authorizations.

4. The importing State Party shall inform the exporting State Party, upon request, of the receipt of dispatched shipments of firearms, ammunition, explosives, and other related materials.


ARTICLE X
Strengthening of Controls at Export Points


Each State Party shall adopt such measures as may be necessary to detect and prevent illicit trafficking in firearms, ammunition, explosives, and other related materials between its territory and that of other States Parties, by strengthening controls at export points.


ARTICLE XI
Recordkeeping


States Parties shall assure the maintenance for a reasonable time of the information necessary to trace and identify illicitly manufactured and illicitly trafficked firearms to enable them to comply with their obligations under Articles XIII and XVII.


ARTICLE XII
Confidentiality


Subject to the obligations imposed by their Constitutions or any international agreements, the States Parties shall guarantee the confidentiality of any information they receive, if requested to do so by the State Party providing the information. If for legal reasons such confidentiality cannot be maintained, the State Party that provided the information shall be notified prior to its disclosure.
ARTICLE XIII
Exchange of Information


1. States Parties shall exchange among themselves, in conformity with their respective domestic laws and applicable treaties, relevant information on matters such as:
a. authorized producers, dealers, importers, exporters, and, whenever possible, carriers of firearms, ammunition, explosives, and other related materials;

b. the means of concealment used in the illicit manufacturing of or trafficking in firearms, ammunition, explosives, and other related materials, and ways of detecting them;

c. routes customarily used by criminal organizations engaged in illicit trafficking in firearms, ammunition, explosives, and other related materials;

d. legislative experiences, practices, and measures to prevent, combat, and eradicate the illicit manufacturing of and trafficking in firearms, ammunition, explosives, and other related materials; and

e. techniques, practices, and legislation to combat money laundering related to illicit manufacturing of and trafficking in firearms, ammunition, explosives, and other related materials.

2. States Parties shall provide to and share with each other, as appropriate, relevant scientific and technological information useful to law enforcement, so as to enhance one another's ability to prevent, detect, and investigate the illicit manufacturing of and trafficking in firearms, ammunition, explosives, and other related materials and prosecute those involved therein.

3. States Parties shall cooperate in the tracing of firearms, ammunition, explosives, and other related materials which may have been illicitly manufactured or trafficked. Such cooperation shall include accurate and prompt responses to trace requests.


ARTICLE XIV
Cooperation


1. States Parties shall cooperate at the bilateral, regional, and international levels to prevent, combat, and eradicate the illicit manufacturing of and trafficking in firearms, ammunition, explosives, and other related materials.


2. States Parties shall identify a national body or a single point of contact to act as liaison among States Parties, as well as between them and the Consultative Committee established in Article XX, for purposes of cooperation and information exchange.


ARTICLE XV
Exchange of Experience and Training


1. States Parties shall cooperate in formulating programs for the exchange of experience and training among competent officials, and shall provide each other assistance that would facilitate their respective access to equipment or technology proven to be effective for the implementation of this Convention.


2. States Parties shall cooperate with each other and with competent international organizations, as appropriate, to ensure that there is adequate training of personnel in their territories to prevent, combat, and eradicate the illicit manufacturing of and trafficking in firearms, ammunition, explosives, and other related materials. The subject matters of such training shall include, inter alia:

a. identification and tracing of firearms, ammunition, explosives, and other related materials;

b. intelligence gathering, especially that which relates to identification of illicit manufacturers and traffickers, methods of shipment, and means of concealment of firearms, ammunition, explosives, and other related materials; and

c. improvement of the efficiency of personnel responsible for searching for and detecting, at conventional and nonconventional points of entry and exit, illicitly trafficked firearms, ammunition, explosives, and other related materials.

ARTICLE XVI
Technical Assistance


States Parties shall cooperate with each other and with relevant international organizations, as appropriate, so that States Parties that so request receive the technical assistance necessary to enhance their ability to prevent, combat, and eradicate the illicit manufacturing of and trafficking in firearms, ammunition, explosives, and other related materials, including technical assistance in those matters identified in Article XV.2.
ARTICLE XVII
Mutual Legal Assistance


1. States Parties shall afford one another the widest measure of mutual legal assistance, in conformity with their domestic law and applicable treaties, by promptly and accurately processing and responding to requests from authorities which, in accordance with their domestic law, have the power to investigate or prosecute the illicit activities described in this Convention, in order to obtain evidence and take other necessary action to facilitate procedures and steps involved in such investigations or prosecutions.
2. For purposes of mutual legal assistance under this article, each Party may designate a central authority or may rely upon such central authorities as are provided for in any relevant treaties or other agreements. The central authorities shall be responsible for making and receiving requests for mutual legal assistance under this article, and shall communicate directly with each other for the purposes of this article.


ARTICLE XVIII
Controlled Delivery


1. Should their domestic legal systems so permit, States Parties shall take the necessary measures, within their possibilities, to allow for the appropriate use of controlled delivery at the international level, on the basis of agreements or arrangements mutually consented to, with a view to identifying persons involved in the offenses referred to in Article IV and to taking legal action against them.

2. Decisions by States Parties to use controlled delivery shall be made on a case-by-case basis and may, when necessary, take into consideration financial arrangements and understandings with respect to the exercise of jurisdiction by the States Parties concerned.

3. With the consent of the States Parties concerned, illicit consignments under controlled delivery may be intercepted and allowed to continue with the firearms, ammunition, explosives, and other related materials intact or removed or replaced in whole or in part.


ARTICLE XIX
Extradition

1. This article shall apply to the offenses referred to in Article IV of this Convention.


2. Each of the offenses to which this article applies shall be deemed to be included as an extraditable offense in any extradition treaty in force between or among the States Parties. The States Parties undertake to include such offenses as extraditable offenses in every extradition treaty to be concluded between or among them.

3. If a State Party that makes extradition conditional on the existence of a treaty receives a request for extradition from another State Party with which it does not have an extradition treaty, it may consider this Convention as the legal basis for extradition with respect to any offense to which this article applies.

4. States Parties that do not make extradition conditional on the existence of a treaty shall recognize offenses to which this article applies as extraditable offenses between themselves.
5. Extradition shall be subject to the conditions provided for by the law of the Requested State or by applicable extradition treaties, including the grounds on which the Requested State may refuse extradition.

6. If extradition for an offense to which this article applies is refused solely on the basis of the nationality of the person sought, the Requested State Party shall submit the case to its competent authorities for the purpose of prosecution under the criteria, laws, and procedures applied by the Requested State to those offenses when they are committed in its own territory. The Requested and Requesting States Parties may, in accordance with their domestic laws, agree otherwise in relation to any prosecution referred to in this paragraph.


ARTICLE XX
Establishment and Functions of the Consultative Committee


1. In order to attain the objectives of this Convention, the States Parties shall establish a Consultative Committee responsible for:

a. promoting the exchange of information contemplated under this Convention;

b. facilitating the exchange of information on domestic legislation and administrative procedures of the States Parties;

c. encouraging cooperation between national liaison authorities to detect suspected illicit exports and imports of firearms, ammunition, explosives, and other related materials;

d. promoting training and exchange of knowledge and experience among States Parties and technical assistance between States Parties and relevant international organizations, as well as academic studies;

e. requesting from nonparty states, when appropriate, information on the illicit manufacturing of and trafficking in firearms, ammunition, explosives, and other related materials; and

f. promoting measures to facilitate the application of this Convention.

2. Decisions of the Consultative Committee shall be recommendatory in nature.
3. The Consultative Committee shall maintain the confidentiality of any information it receives in the exercise of its functions, if requested to do so.


ARTICLE XXI
Structure and Meetings of the Consultative Committee


1. The Consultative Committee shall consist of one representative of each State Party.

2. The Consultative Committee shall hold one regular meeting each year and shall hold special meetings as necessary.

3. The first regular meeting of the Consultative Committee shall be held within 90 days following deposit of the 10th instrument of ratification of this Convention. This meeting shall be held at the headquarters of the General Secretariat of the Organization of American States, unless a State Party has offered to host it.

4. The meetings of the Consultative Committee shall be held at a place decided upon by the States Parties at the previous regular meeting. If no offer of a site has been made, the Consultative Committee shall meet at the headquarters of the General Secretariat of the Organization of American States.

5. The host State Party for each regular meeting shall serve as Secretariat pro tempore of the Consultative Committee until the next regular meeting. When a regular meeting is held at the headquarters of the General Secretariat of the Organization of American States, a State Party that will serve as Secretariat pro tempore shall be elected at that meeting.

6. In consultation with the States Parties, the Secretariat pro tempore shall be responsible for:

a. convening regular and special meetings of the Consultative Committee;

b. preparing a draft agenda for the meetings; and

c. preparing the draft reports and minutes of the meetings.

7. The Consultative Committee shall prepare its own internal rules of procedure and shall adopt them by absolute majority.

ARTICLE XXII
Signature


This Convention is open for signature by member states of the Organization of American States.


ARTICLE XXIII
Ratification


This Convention is subject to ratification. The instruments of ratification shall be deposited with the General Secretariat of the Organization of American States.


ARTICLE XXIV
Reservations

States Parties may, at the time of adoption, signature, or ratification, make reservations to this Convention, provided that said reservations are not incompatible with the object and purposes of the Convention and that they concern one or more specific provisions thereof.


ARTICLE XXV
Entry into Force


This Convention shall enter into force on the 30th day following the date of deposit of the second instrument of ratification. For each state ratifying the Convention after the deposit of the second instrument of ratification, the Convention shall enter into force on the 30th day following deposit by such state of its instrument of ratification.


ARTICLE XXVI
Denunciation


1. This Convention shall remain in force indefinitely, but any State Party may denounce it. The instrument of denunciation shall be deposited with the General Secretariat of the Organization of American States. After six months from the date of deposit of the instrument of denunciation, the Convention shall no longer be in force for the denouncing State, but shall remain in force for the other States Parties.

2. The denunciation shall not affect any requests for information or assistance made during the time the Convention is in force for the denouncing State.


ARTICLE XXVII
Other Agreements and Practices


1. No provision in this Convention shall be construed as preventing the States Parties from engaging in mutual cooperation within the framework of other existing or future international, bilateral, or multilateral agreements, or of any other applicable arrangements or practices.


2. States Parties may adopt stricter measures than those provided for by this Convention if, in their opinion, such measures are desirable to prevent, combat, and eradicate the illicit manufacturing of and trafficking in firearms, ammunition, explosives, and other related materials.


ARTICLE XXVIII
Conference of States Parties


Five years after the entry into force of this Convention, the depository shall convene a conference of the States Parties to examine the functioning and application of this Convention. Each conference shall determine the date on which the next conference should be held.


ARTICLE XXIX
Dispute Settlement


Any dispute that may arise as to the application or interpretation of this Convention shall be resolved through diplomatic channels or, failing which, by any other means of peaceful settlement decided upon by the States Parties involved.


ARTICLE XXX
Deposit


The original instrument of this Convention, the English, French, Portuguese, and Spanish texts of which are equally authentic, shall be deposited with the General Secretariat of the Organization of American States, which shall forward an authenticated copy of its text to the Secretariat of the United Nations for registration and publication, in accordance with Article 102 of the United Nations Charter. The General Secretariat of the Organization of American States shall notify the member states of the Organization of the signatures, of the deposits of instruments of ratification and denunciation, and of any reservations.


ANNEX


The term "explosives" does not include: compressed gases; flammable liquids; explosive actuated devices, such as air bags and fire extinguishers; propellant actuated devices, such as nail gun cartridges; consumer fireworks suitable for use by the public and designed primarily to produce visible or audible effects by combustion, that contain pyrotechnic compositions and that do not project or disperse dangerous fragments such as metal, glass, or brittle plastic; toy plastic or paper caps for toy pistols; toy propellant devices consisting of small paper or composition tubes or containers containing a small charge or slow burning propellant powder designed so that they will neither burst nor produce external flame except through the nozzle on functioning; and smoke candles, smokepots, smoke grenades, smoke signals, signal flares, hand signal devices, and Very signal cartridges designed to produce visible effects for signal purposes containing smoke compositions and no bursting charges.

--Oldyoti

"What, sir, is the use of a militia? It is to prevent the establishment of
a standing army, the bane of liberty... Whenever Governments mean to
invade the rights and liberties of the people, they always attempt to
destroy the militia, in order to raise an army upon their ruins."

~Rep Elbridge Gerry of Massachusetts.
1-Annals of Congress, at 750, 8/17/1789


luckee1

  • Guest
Re: April Swine Flu Scare Obfuscated CIFTA Treaty Story... NO AMMO!!!!
« Reply #9 on: September 24, 2009, 12:46:17 pm »

America armed, but guns not necessarily loaded
http://news.yahoo.com/s/ap/20090923/ap_on_re_us/us_ammo_shortage


  By MARY FOSTER, Associated Press Writer Mary Foster, Associated Press Writer   – Wed Sep 23, 2:51 pm ET

NEW ORLEANS – Bullet-makers are working around the clock, seven days a week, and still can't keep up with the nation's demand for ammunition.

Shooting ranges, gun dealers and bullet manufacturers say they have never seen such shortages. Bullets, especially for handguns, have been scarce for months because gun enthusiasts are stocking up on ammo, in part because they fear President Barack Obama and the Democratic-controlled Congress will pass antigun legislation — even though nothing specific has been proposed and the president last month signed a law allowing people to carry loaded guns in national parks.

Gun sales spiked when it became clear Obama would be elected a year ago and purchases continued to rise in his first few months of office. The FBI's National Instant Criminal Background Check System reported that 6.1 million background checks for gun sales were issued from January to May, an increase of 25.6 percent from the same period the year before.

"That is going to cause an upswing in ammunition sales," said Larry Keane, senior vice president of the National Shooting Sports Foundation, a trade association representing about 5,000 members. "Without bullets a gun is just a paper weight."  AMEN!

The shortage for sportsmen is different than the scarcity of ammo for some police forces earlier this year, a dearth fueled by an increase in ammo use by the military in Iraq and Afghanistan.

"We are working overtime and still can't keep up with the demand," said Al Russo, spokesman for North Carolina-based Remington Arms Company, which makes bullets for rifles, handguns and shotguns. "We've had to add a fourth shift and go 24-7. It's a phenomenon that I have not seen before in my 30 years in the business."

Americans usually buy about 7 billion rounds of ammunition a year, according to the National Rifle Association. In the past year, that figure has jumped to about 9 billion rounds, said NRA spokeswoman Vickie Cieplak.

Jason Gregory, who manages Gretna Gun Works just outside of New Orleans, has been building his personal supply of ammunition for months. His goal is to have at least 1,000 rounds for each of his 25 weapons.

"I call it the Obama effect," said Gregory, 37, of Terrytown, La. "It always happens when the Democrats get in office. It happened with Clinton and Obama is even stronger for gun control. Ammunition will be the first step, so I'm stocking up while I can."

So far, the new administration nor Congress has not been markedly antigun. Obama has said he respects Second Amendment rights, but favors "common sense" on gun laws. Still, worries about what could happen persist.

Demand has been so heavy at some Walmarts, a limit was imposed on the amount of ammo customers can buy. The cutoff varies according to caliber and store location, but sometimes as little as one box — or 50 bullets — is allowed.

At Barnwood Arms in Ripon, Calif., sales manager Dallas Jett said some of the shortages have leveled off, but 45-caliber rounds are still hard to find.

"We've been in business for 32 years and I've been here for 10 and we've never seen anything like it," Jett said. "Coming out of Christmas everything started to dry up and it was that way all through the spring and summer.

Nationwide, distributors are scrambling to fill orders from retailers.

"We used to be able to order 50 or 60 cases and get them in three or four days easy, it was never an issue," said Vic Grechniw of Florida Ammo Traders, a distributor in Tampa, Fla. "Now you are really lucky if you can get one case a month. It just isn't there because the demand is way up."

A case contains 500 or 1,000 bullets.

At Jefferson Gun Outlet and Range in Metairie just west of New Orleans, owner Mike Mayer is worried individuals are going to start buying by the case.

"If someone wants to shoot on the weekend you have to worry about having the ammunition for them. And I know some people aren't buying to use it at the range, they're taking it home and hoarding it."

With demand, prices have also risen.

"Used to be gold, but now lead is the most expensive metal," said Donald Richards, 37, who was stocking up at the Jefferson store. "And worth every penny."

How did the saying go? "I deal in lead, friend"  I am thinking that ammo is the next real currency when the SHTF
 ;)

JTCoyoté

  • Guest
Re: April Swine Flu Scare Obfuscated CIFTA Treaty Story... NO AMMO!!!!
« Reply #10 on: September 24, 2009, 12:55:20 pm »
GOA's CIFTA Treaty Analysis

Obama Proposes Signing Treaty To Ban Reloading
-- Even BB guns could be on the chopping block

Gun Owners of America Fact Sheet
8001 Forbes Place, Suite 102, Springfield, VA 22151
Phone: 703-321-8585 / FAX: 703-321-8408


When President Obama went to Mexico in April, he proposed that the United States sign the Inter-American Convention Against Illicit Manufacturing of and Trafficking in Firearms, Ammunition, Explosives, and Other Related Materials.  

Despite the fact that it purportedly deals with “illicit manufacturing and trafficking,” GOA is convinced that this convention defines these terms much more broadly and potentially presents serious dangers to Americans lawfully exercising their Second Amendment rights.        

PURPOSES AND DEFINITIONS

Although the word “illicit” is used extensively in order to make the convention sound less anti-gun than it actually is, we need to look very carefully at the purposes and definitions to see whether it is, in fact, limited in scope to persons illegally moving guns across borders in order to arm violent criminal cartels:

The seventh precatory clause “STRESS[ES] the need, in peace processes and post-conflict situations, to achieve effective control of firearms, ammunition, explosives, and other related materials in order to prevent their entry into the illicit market;” -- thereby endorsing comprehensive gun and ammunition control, in violation of McClure-Volkmer (which deregulated ammunition) and of the Second Amendment to the Constitution.

Furthermore, the tenth precatory clause supports a “know-your-customer policy for dealers [in firearms]” -- something which would rapidly lead to an abolition of firearms in a country as large and transient as the United States.  

And the twelfth precatory clause acknowledges the rights of parties to enact their own gun laws, but only with respect to aspects of a “wholly domestic character.”    

We have seen, as recently as the April 15 New York Times, how battles with the Mexican drug cartels have been fanned into an issue which is being used to justify the passage of every major gun control initiative in modern American history.

We see how these “slippery slope” findings are actually implemented when we look at the definitions:


“Illicit manufacturing” of firearms is defined as “assembly of firearms [or] ammunition... without a license...”

Hence, reloading ammunition -- or putting together a lawful firearm from a kit -- is clearly “illicit manufacturing.”  Modifying a firearm in any way would surely be “illicit manufacturing.”  And, while it would be a stretch, assembling a firearm after cleaning it could, in any plain reading of the words, come within the screwy definition of “illicit manufacturing.”  

“Firearm” has a similarly questionable definition.  Borrowing from the open-ended definitions in federal law which have continue to vex us (and people like Olofson in Wisconsin), any barreled weapon “which... may be readily converted to expel a bullet” would be a firearm.  Even worse, “any other weapon” (a term which is not defined) is a “firearm.”  This surely includes BB guns -- and who knows what else.  

“Cartridge cases” and “projectiles” are defined as “ammunition.”  

SUBSTANTIVE PROVISIONS

In Article IV, parties commit to adopting “necessary legislative or other measures” to criminalize illicit manufacturing and trafficking in firearms.  Remember that “illicit manufacturing” includes reloading and modifying or assembling any firearm in any way.  And, while treaties should not trump the Bill of Rights (in contrast to what the Supreme Court held in Missouri v. Holland), they do have the force of statute -- which would mean that the Obama administration could promulgate regulations on the basis of this treaty which would ban any modification or machining of any firearm in any manner whatsoever except by license of the government.

Article IV goes on to state that the criminalized acts should include “association or conspiracy” in connection with “said offenses” -- which is arguably a term broad enough to allow, by regulation, the criminalization of entire pro-gun organizations or gun clubs, based on the facilities which they provide their membership.  

Article V requires each party to “adopt such measures as may be necessary to establish its jurisdiction over the offenses it has established in accordance with this Convention” under a variety of circumstances.  We know that Mexico is blaming U.S. gun dealers for the fact that its streets are flowing with blood.  And we know it is possible for it to define offenses “committed in its territory” in a very broad way.  And we know that we have an extradition obligation under Article XIX of the convention.  And we also know that other countries such as Spain have tried to use their treaty powers to put American officials on trial.

Article VI requires “appropriate markings” on firearms.  And, it is not inconceivable that this provision could be used to require microstamping of firearms and/or ammunition -- a requirement which is clearly intended to impose specifications which are not technologically possible or which are possible only at a prohibitively expensive cost.

Article VII requires confiscation and forfeiture of illicit firearms.  

Articles VIII, IX, and X would increase the role of government, in ways which cannot be foreseen, in supervising the import and export of firearms and ammunition.

Article XI requires the maintenance of any records, for a “reasonable time,” that the government determines to be necessary to trace firearms.  This provision would almost certainly repeal portions of McClure-Volkmer and could arguably be used to require a national registry or database.  

Article XIII authorizes the “exchange of information” with respect to FFL’s -- presumably providing information on Americans to the corrupt Mexican police which are the source of many, if not most, of the illicit firearms.  

Finally, under Article XXIX, if Mexico demands the extradition of a lawful American gun dealer, the U.S. would be required to resolve the dispute through “other means of peaceful settlement.”  Does anyone want to risk sweltering in a Mexican jail at the mercy of the Obama administration?      

This fact sheet was prepared by Mike Hammond, GOA’s legislative counsel.


WE HAVE SOME CATCHING UP TO DO!!!

--Oldyoti

"If ye love wealth greater than liberty, the tranquillity
of servitude greater than the animating contest for freedom,
go home and leave us in peace. We seek not your council,
nor your arms. Crouch down and lick the hand that feeds you;
and may posterity forget that ye were our country men."

-- Samuel Adams

JTCoyoté

  • Guest
Re: April Swine Flu Scare Obfuscated CIFTA Treaty Story... NO AMMO!!!!
« Reply #11 on: September 24, 2009, 01:33:05 pm »
HERE IS A WHOLE PAGE OF "CATCH-UP" FROM YOUTUBE!!!!
WITHOUT AMMO... AND GIVEN THIS DRACONIAN TREATY/LAW AGAINST MAKING YOUR OWN... THE SECOND AMENDMENT IS BEING GLOBALLY GUTTED!!!!

(click on the image)



http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5P2PyfQhiyg&feature=related

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MFO9DJugNc0&feature=related

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qIv9F7pMauk&feature=related

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=u6IfTdceGZU

Oldyoti

"As civil rulers, not having their duty to the people duly before them,
may attempt to tyrannize, and as the military forces which must be
occasionally raised to defend our country, might pervert their power
to the injury of their fellow citizens, the people are confirmed by the
next article [the Second Amendment] in their right to keep and bear
their private arms."
~Trence Coxe -- June 18, 1789
From "Remarks on the first part of the Amendments to the federal Constitution",
"A Pennsylvanian" is Coxe's pseudonym in the Philadelphia Federal Gazette.



Please give Duke a click

Offline Overcast

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Re: CIFTA TREATY DECEPTION... Bottom line, NO AMMO!!!!
« Reply #12 on: September 24, 2009, 02:22:20 pm »
Wow.. this and other stuff..

We have definitely shifted to a higher gear now.
And dying in your beds, many years from now, would you be willin' to trade ALL the days, from this day to that, for one chance, just one chance, to come back here and tell our enemies that they may take our lives, but they'll never take... OUR FREEDOM!

JTCoyoté

  • Guest
Re: CIFTA TREATY DECEPTION... Bottom line, NO AMMO!!!!
« Reply #13 on: September 24, 2009, 03:53:53 pm »
 Now the globalists have the provocateured riots in Pittsburgh to obfuscate any other news that is happening now, every once in a while, we need to break away from this obviously provocateur sideshow spectacle, and check the rest of the news on the blotter...

This is a big story no doubt, but.... everyone is covering it, and it will take Alex a while to get the download from the boys in Pittsburgh. Like he said, he will have it up as things develop, later on today at the earliest on a special broadcast, or for sure tomorrow morning on the show...

Please do not let this wall-to-wall coverage obfuscate your normal search for news... they will be pushing something with their other hand, while they dazzle us with this... you can be sure of that.

JTCoyoté

"What has been the effect of coercion?
To make one-half the world fools and
the other half hypocrites. To support
roguery and error all over the earth."

~Thomas Jefferson

Offline Overcast

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Re: CIFTA TREATY DECEPTION... Bottom line, NO AMMO!!!!
« Reply #14 on: September 24, 2009, 03:58:05 pm »
Perhaps the news of what REALLY happens at G20 is what they want to bury. This would be a perfect proxy story - so they can dodge coverage of what's going on INSIDE the G20 meeting, by moving the focus to what's going on OUTSIDE G20 - in reality, that's probably what's the important part of all of this.
And dying in your beds, many years from now, would you be willin' to trade ALL the days, from this day to that, for one chance, just one chance, to come back here and tell our enemies that they may take our lives, but they'll never take... OUR FREEDOM!

JTCoyoté

  • Guest
Re: CIFTA TREATY DECEPTION... Bottom line, NO AMMO!!!!
« Reply #15 on: September 24, 2009, 04:37:17 pm »
Perhaps the news of what REALLY happens at G20 is what they want to bury. This would be a perfect proxy story - so they can dodge coverage of what's going on INSIDE the G20 meeting, by moving the focus to what's going on OUTSIDE G20 - in reality, that's probably what's the important part of all of this.

They're getting ready to announce world government, which will be announced by the G20 anyway... they will not be able to obfuscate that with a riot outside since the riot outside would naturally make people wonder what was going on inside.

Keep your eye on the rest of the blotter... they are doing something somewhere else, that they don't want us to see.

JTCoyoté

"Resistance to Tyranny, is obedience to God!"
~Thomas Jefferson

luckee1

  • Guest
Re: CIFTA TREATY DECEPTION... Bottom line, NO AMMO!!!!
« Reply #16 on: September 25, 2009, 12:21:23 am »
You all will forgive me for spamming this?  In addition to this treaty and the G20 where more treaties will take place.  WE ALREADY HAVE PROBLEMS WITH THE DRACONIAN FED LAWS AND STATUTES.  In case you haven't heard, this is happening in Tennessee!  I am posting this here in case you think the is not coming to a state near you, you are mistaken.

This needs full post!

ATF tells Tennessee that a federal gun law trumps the state’s

By Richard Locker (Contact), Memphis Commercial Appeal
Originally published 02:36 p.m., September 23, 2009
Updated 02:36 p.m., September 23, 2009

NASHVILLE – The federal Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives has told Tennessee gun dealers to disregard a state statute that exempts firearms made and sold inside Tennessee from federal gun laws and registration.

The ATF says the federal laws still apply regardless of the state’s move.

The Tennessee legislature considered and approved several bills this year to reduce restrictions on firearms, including one bill that its sponsors labeled the “Tennessee Firearms Freedom Act.” It passed overwhelmingly, the House 87-1 and the Senate 22-7, despite warnings by some lawmakers that it could subject Tennessee citizens to federal prosecution and imprisonment.

This bill simply asserts that if a firearms and/or ammunition is made totally within the state of Tennessee, then the federal government has no jurisdiction over that item in any fashion, so long as it remains in the state and outside of interstate commerce,” Sen. Mae Beavers, R-Mt. Juliet, the bill’s sponsor, said on the Senate floor when it passed there in June.

The bill was a two-fer for conservatives in the legislature: a gun bill and a state sovereignty bill rolled into one.

“An effort by the federal government to regulate intrastate commerce under the guise of powers implied by the interstate commerce clause could only result in encroachment of the state’s power to regulate commerce within its borders,” said Beavers, the first non-lawyer to chair the state Senate Judiciary Committee in decades.

The bill specifically declared that “A personal firearm, a firearm accessory, or ammunition that is manufactured commercially or privately in Tennessee and that remains within he borders of Tennessee is not subject to federal law or federal regulation, including registration, under the authority of Congress to regulate interstate commerce.

It defined “firearms accessories” to include flash or sound suppressors (silencers), telescopic or laser sights, magazines, folding or aftermarket stocks and grips, speedloaders, ammunition carriers and lights for targeted illumination. It requires that any firearm made or sold in Tennessee under the provisions of the new state law to have “Made in Tennessee” stamped on it.

It was signed by both Senate Speaker Ron Ramsey and House Speaker Kent Williams, but Gov. Phil Bredesen refused to sign or veto it and it became law without his signature in June.Tennesseans remember this next time we vote.  He didn't have it in him to vote either way.

But ATF Asst. Director Carson W. Carroll, head of the agency’s enforcement programs and services, sent a “Open Letter to all Tennessee Firearms Licensees” a month later that explained the agency’s position on the law in response, the letter said, to questions from the firearms industry about how it would affect their businesses.

“The act purports to exempt personal firearms, firearms accessories and ammunition manufactured in the state and which remain in the state from most federal firearms laws and regulations,” Carroll wrote. “However, because the act conflicts with federal firearms laws and regulations, federal law supercedes the act and all provisions of the (federal) Gun Control Act and the National Firearms Act and their corresponding regulations continue to apply.”  If we do not slap these beureuacrats down, we will not even have a sovereign state!

The letter specifies that federal law requires a license in order to engage in the business of manufacturing firearms or ammunition, or to deal in firearms, “even if the firearms or ammunition remain within the same state.” It detailed other requirements of the federal laws and noted that “these as well as other federal requirements and prohibitions apply whether or not the firearms or ammunition have crossed state lines.”

The letter is posted on the Tennessee Firearms Association’s Web site with this unsigned commentary by the association: “The ATF — as expected — has issued a letter in which it disregards the 10th Amendment restrictions on federal power (as seems to be the trend since the late 1930s) and has notified Tennessee’s federal firearms dealers that the Tennessee Firearms Freedom Act is meaningless. Essentially, ATF is saying to the state of Tennessee that the 10th Amendment no longer exists. We expected such from a tyranny that no longer lives within the bounds of its express authority.”

But ATF Nashville Special Agent-in-Charge James M. Cavanaugh said several U.S. Supreme Court rulings have upheld the federal gun laws. “The Constitution says the Supreme Court interprets the law. The ATF hasn’t ruled this, the Supreme Court has, and we’re a law enforcement agency.”

Cavanaugh said Tennessee has nearly 2,000 licensed gun dealers and manufacturers and the agency has received no complaints from them about the letter.

“It’s analogous to a speed limit. If the speed limit on the interstate is set at 70, a city along the interstate can’t come along and say there is no speed limit on the interstate through our city. The highway patrol could still enforce the speed limit,” he said.

Although Montana was the first state to pass its version of the Firearms Freedom Act, Tennessee was the first to implement it because the Montana law specifies an effective date of Oct. 1.  Those of you in other states, take note of what is coming up!

Although the bill passed overwhelmingly — and with no debate in the House — it had its critics in the Senate who warned of its likely outcome. And Cavanaugh said some legislators inquired about the bill before its passage.

“If one of the citizens of our state reads about the passage of this legislation and uses it and relies upon it and goes out and does something … couldn’t they be convicted under federal law?” asked Sen. Andy Berke, D-Chattanooga. “I see this as a real danger to our citizens.”

Beavers replied that a “test case” legal showdown was expected on a similar Montana law.

Senate Democratic Leader Jim Kyle of Memphis warned his colleagues that the bill was a “political statement” better suited for a legislative resolution — which states the legislature’s views without the force of law — than a statute.

“You’re going to vote to put this bill in the law. Someone’s going to read it, someone’s going to think they can do it and someone’s going to have an ATF officer in a blue windbreaker one day knocking on their door asking them what they’re doing and they’re going to say, ‘Oh but the Tennessee legislature said I can manufacture guns and just mark them “Made in Tennessee” and I’m fine’,” Kyle said.

.  This is a direct hit. BTW to all forum members, this is why we should be helping save JTs house.  JT's house is his base of operations.  JT is the vanguard of activism on the 2nd and 10th Amendments.  He had just gotten his teeth into the Articles regarding the Monarchy existing in the US Government!  They struck him before the rest of us.  Read his story at patriotmoneybomb.com  The shit is indeed hitting the fan.  This is the first state they are testing.  If we fall, will all the states' sovereignty fail like dominos?   Alex has reported today what is going on already.  Bermas and crew were on site with the weaponized sound devise, in Pittsburgh. 

Offline Overcast

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Re: CIFTA TREATY DECEPTION... Bottom line, NO AMMO!!!!
« Reply #17 on: September 25, 2009, 09:05:22 am »
You all will forgive me for spamming this?  In addition to this treaty and the G20 where more treaties will take place.  WE ALREADY HAVE PROBLEMS WITH THE DRACONIAN FED LAWS AND STATUTES.  In case you haven't heard, this is happening in Tennessee!  I am posting this here in case you think the is not coming to a state near you, you are mistaken.



Keep it coming - I'm going to a lil' get together we have every year with some of my family, where we do some trap shooting and such. It's a pretty big event, 50+ people - maybe more. Dunno about the weather this year though.

But - in this group of people; there are a couple of police officers and some others with a bit of 'sway' in the area. They are all pro-constitution, pro-rights, etc.

And no, it's not a 'domestic terrorist' meeting or anything stupid like that, it's not centered on anything political at all, but I need a REAL good 1/2 page article I can print up about how our gun rights are decaying. It will catch the attention of many there.

but... Luckee1 - that article above may be perfect.
And dying in your beds, many years from now, would you be willin' to trade ALL the days, from this day to that, for one chance, just one chance, to come back here and tell our enemies that they may take our lives, but they'll never take... OUR FREEDOM!

luckee1

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Re: CIFTA TREATY DECEPTION... Bottom line, NO AMMO!!!!
« Reply #18 on: September 25, 2009, 11:29:17 am »
Thanks, and good luck to you.  Perhaps you should bring extra copies of the article, so your people can take with them and copy and pass around to there circles of infulence?