Author Topic: Jack London - Bohemian Grove - Antiques Road Show  (Read 5361 times)

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Offline TahoeBlue

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Jack London - Bohemian Grove - Antiques Road Show
« on: March 23, 2009, 04:04:02 pm »
Did anyone catch a recent "Antiques Road Show" episode where a guy has a first edition copy of Jack London's "Call of the Wild" and goes out of his way to mention that Jack London was a Bohemian Grove member and noted proadly that HE HIMSELF attended Bohemian Grove. I kept wondering why he was exposing himself this way and who was he?

http://www.jacklondons.net/annualhighjinks.html

The Bohemian Club's Annual Summer High Jinks in 1904



August 18, 1904 Jack goes with George Sterling to Summer High Jinks at the Bohemian Grove.

Beginning in 1904, Jack London became an active member of the Bohemian Club. Charmian London wrote: ". . .whenever feasible, our world-wanderings led us homeward in mid-summer, that he might spend at least one week of Hi-Jinks at the Bohemian Grove, situated but a few miles from the Ranch. He dreaded foregoing the marvellous annual Grove Play, words and music, acting and staging, all done by members of the Grove only." Other noted members of the Bohemian Club during this period of time included: George Sterling, Ambrose Bierce, John Muir, Gelett Burgess, and Frank Norris.

Sources: Kingman, Russ. A Pictorial Life of Jack London. (Crown, 1979).

London, Charmian. The Book of Jack London (New York: The Century Co., 1921), 2 vols.


http://www.sonomacountyfreepress.com/bohos/inside-spymag.html

Masters of the Universe Go to Camp: Inside the Bohemian Grove
by Philip Weiss
Spy Magazine, November 1989


...

Early Bohemians were hungry for exaltation and grabbed on to any tradition they could find to dignify their exile in the vulgar West. The club was founded in 1872, just three years after the transcontinental railroad was completed, by a group of newspapermen and artists who plainly felt social anxiety about their surroundings. Early club menus offered dolled-up western dishes such as "boiled striped bass au vin blanc" and "cafe noir." The club's "men of talent" (i.e., artists and writers) included writers of a populist bent: Mark Twain, Bret Harte, Henry M. Stanley. Bohemian Jack London was a socialist; Bohemian Henry George, a radical reformer.

But the club's newspapermen were also socially ambitious, aiming to chronicle California's rise in the arts and sciences. Bohemian, they agreed in their early annals, didn't mean an unwashed shirt and poetry; it signified London, the beau monde, men of eminence whose purses were always open to their friends. By such standards, San Francisco businessmen surely looked crude.

Just the same, the club needed such "men of use" to support their activities.

The Bohemian Club's waiting list, which had first appeared away back in the 1920s, grew to ridiculous lengths. I was told that if a Californian is not admitted before he is 30, he can despair of membership unless he achieves commercial or political prominence. Many older men die waiting. And membership comes dear. The initiation fee for regular voting membership is said to be $8,500, and dues are set at more than $2,000 a year. Because the regular members require entertainment, "men of talent" pay greatly reduced fees. On Wouk's acceptance, for instance, he was put to work writing a history of the club.

Behold, happy is the man whom God correcteth: therefore despise not thou the chastening of the Almighty: For he maketh sore, and bindeth up: he woundeth, and his hands make whole ; He shall deliver thee in six troubles: yea, in seven there shall no evil touch thee. - Job 5

Offline TahoeBlue

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Re: Jack London - Bohemian Grove - Antiques Road Show
« Reply #1 on: March 23, 2009, 04:17:28 pm »
Found the reference:

http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/roadshow/archive/200606A40.html



video:  http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/roadshow/archive/200606A40_wm_hi.html


GUEST: I got them from my mom, and she got them from some relative a long time ago. They're pretty important to me because this is a first-edition Jack London "Call of the Wild." And the letter inside it is to a fellow author, O'Hara, who Jack London was inviting to stay at his house in Sonoma County and also go to the Bohemian Grove as his guest. And I've been to the Bohemian Grove many times, so I totally related to the letter and to Jack London's place in California and the whole thing.

APPRAISER: Well, O'Hara is John Myers O'Hara. And John Myers O'Hara has a publication that was published by the Mosher Press in Maine. And he translated the poems of Sappho. And London talks about seeing him there and allowing him to work at the ranch undisturbed and in quiet. But he then goes on to mention "Call of the Wild," his greatest book, and "White Fang," his second greatest book.

GUEST: Right.

APPRAISER: And here you are with the first edition of "Call of the Wild" with its familiar... doggy title page.

GUEST: Yeah.

APPRAISER: And 1903. It doesn't have the dust jacket, which would make it more valuable, but it's a nice copy. A little spine wear. But back to the letter. He also mentions George Sterling. And George Sterling was a big correspondent of Jack London. This particular letter-- three pages, autographed by Jack London-- is in very, very good condition. It's completely familiar with this penciled hand. And I think it's really an exceptional letter. And I would value it for purposes of auction sale at about $5,000 to $7,000.

GUEST: Wow.

APPRAISER: And the book at $1,000 to $1,500.

GUEST: Huh. Uh-huh.

APPRAISER: Finally, I'll just show you that due to this, these two little pencil annotations here, I do not believe that the letter relates specifically to this copy of the book.

GUEST: Oh, I never even saw those.

APPRAISER: I think that the original copy of the book he refers to of Call of the Wild was lost somewhere.

GUEST: Oh.

APPRAISER: And this is a very nice replacement first edition.

GUEST: Oh. Huh. Great.

APPRAISER: If the dust jacket was on it, I'd put $10,000 on the book.
Behold, happy is the man whom God correcteth: therefore despise not thou the chastening of the Almighty: For he maketh sore, and bindeth up: he woundeth, and his hands make whole ; He shall deliver thee in six troubles: yea, in seven there shall no evil touch thee. - Job 5

Offline gEEk squad

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Re: Jack London - Bohemian Grove - Antiques Road Show
« Reply #2 on: March 23, 2009, 04:25:29 pm »
I must have missed that episode of the Antiques Road show.  ::) :D

Very interesting find.

Offline menace

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Re: Jack London - Bohemian Grove - Antiques Road Show
« Reply #3 on: March 23, 2009, 04:50:48 pm »
Last year there was an auction that you could have bid on to be a guest for a day at Bohemian Grove


http://tinyurl.com/cajjll

Offline TahoeBlue

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Re: Jack London - Bohemian Grove - Antiques Road Show
« Reply #4 on: October 15, 2011, 04:57:05 pm »
I don't know where to put this - but an original Bohemian club "Founder":

William Henry Rhodes  a founder of the Bohemian Club....

http://myweb.wvnet.edu/~jelkins/lp-2001/rhodes.html


William Henry Rhodes (1822-1876) North Carolina, Texas & California

"Rhodes, William Henry, lawyer, was born in North Carolina in 1822, but afterward lived in Texas, and finally removed to California, where he died about 1875. . . .

Besides attaining success at the Bar, he indulged his taste for literature by writing at intervals more for mental diversion than for pecuniary profit. His works include:
'Theodosia,' a play,
'The Indian Gallows, and other Poems' (1846), and
'Caxton's Book' (San Francisco, A.L. Bancroft and Company, 1876), a work which appeared after his death, containing stories and sketches, essays and poems, edited by Daniel O'Connell." [Source: Edwin Anderson Alderman & Joel Chandler Harris (eds.), Library of Southern Literature 3677 (New Orleans: Martin & Hoyt Co., 1910)(1907)(Vol. 15, Biographical Dictionary of Authors, Lucian Lamar Knight ed.)]

Rhodes graduated, in 1846 from the Harvard Law School, one of the first two Texans to do so. He practiced law in San Francisco and was a founder of the Bohemian Club.

Rhodes wrote science fiction under the pen name "Caxton."

"William Henry Rhodes was born in Windsor, North Carolina, July 16, 1862.

In 1844, his father, Col. E.A. Rhodes, was appointed United States Consul to Texas. William Henry was then just budding into manhood. Possessing a great ambition, and a mind superior to his companions, he became a leader among the young men of Galveston, where his father was located in his office as Consul. Here he gathered around him an Association of young men, whose zealous natures were congenial to his lofty ambition

In 1844, he entered Harvard law school, where he remained for two years. . . . After he completed his study at Harvard he returned to Galveston, where he entered upon the practice of his profession. . . . In 1847 he was elevated to a Probate Judgeship. He filled this office with distinction for one term, at the close of which he returned to his native state and entered upon the practice of his profession. He remained there but a short time when he caught the inspiration of adventure in the new El Dorado, and sailed for California. He continued to the time of his death a citizen of that state." [Sam H Dixon (ed.), The Poets and Poetry of Texas 246-253, at 246-247 (Austin, Texas: Sam H. Dixon & Co., Publishers, 1885)]

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/William_Henry_Rhodes

List of works
Rhodes, William H., The Indian Gallows and Other Poems in Two Parts (New York: E. Walker, 1846)
Rhodes, W. H. The Political Letters of "Caxton" (San Francisco: Alta California Power Presses, 1855)
Anonymous, The Emerald Isle: A Poem (San Francisco: Printed by Mullin, Mahon & Co., 1869)
McKinstry, Elisha Williams, Twenty-First Anniversary of the Corporate Society of California Pioneers Oration by Hon. E.W. McKinstry; Poem by Wm. H. Rhodes, Esq. (San Francisco: Published by order of the society, 1871)
Anonymous, Caxton's Book: A Collection of Essays, Poems, and Sketches (San Francisco: A. L. Bancroft and Company, 1876)
Anonymous, The Case of Summerfield (San Francisco: Paul Elder & Co., 1907)
Palmquist, Peter E. (ed.), Phases in the Life of John Pollexfen, or, How Did John Pollexfen, the Photographer, Make His Fortune? (Arcata, California: P.E. Palmquist, 1999)

http://www.dsloan.com/Auctions/A22/item-de-cordova-jacob-houston-mayor.html
...
North Carolinian Rhodes (1822-1876) graduated from Harvard and moved to California in 1850 where he practiced law, after living in Texas for several years.

He was also a prominent author known especially for “The Case of Summerfield,” an early science fiction work based on the premise that a villain by the name of Black Bart plans to destroy the world by setting the oceans on fire.

Anthony Boucher in the summer of 1950 issue of the Magazine of Fantasy and Science Fiction, referred to Rhodes as “one of the great pioneers of modern science fiction
Behold, happy is the man whom God correcteth: therefore despise not thou the chastening of the Almighty: For he maketh sore, and bindeth up: he woundeth, and his hands make whole ; He shall deliver thee in six troubles: yea, in seven there shall no evil touch thee. - Job 5

Offline menace

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Re: Jack London - Bohemian Grove - Antiques Road Show
« Reply #5 on: October 15, 2011, 05:10:10 pm »
If you have photos of the Bohemian Grove post them here

http://forum.prisonplanet.com/index.php?topic=163116.40