Author Topic: Economic sense of solar, wind power  (Read 5618 times)

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Offline Col3_11n12

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Economic sense of solar, wind power
« on: October 11, 2008, 08:25:23 am »
Hello,

I know it's Alex Jones' position that Global Warming is a fabrication.  No matter--polluting is still not cool.  And getting solar panels & windmills can help get you off the grid.

I looked into getting solar panels for my house, but it looks like the break-even point, before you make your initial investment back in lower electrical bills, is a good 8 years out.   That didn't seem to justify the risk.  To many things could happen, like maintenance, disasters, having to relocate, etc. in that time.

It looks like windmills have a 5-year break-even point.   Now that is starting to make more sense.  But it depends on how windy your land is (and you do have to have that:  land). 

Has anyone else looked into this stuff and have some good input on this?  Are there good ways to lower that initial investment cost?

Offline platinumpi4u

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Re: Economic sense of solar, wind power
« Reply #1 on: November 17, 2008, 10:27:39 am »
Yes, you can get solar panels going for under $200 by building them your self... do not pay $1000s...

check out this site:  http://www.solarpower-windenergy.com

Offline JIDinPhilly

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Re: Economic sense of solar, wind power
« Reply #2 on: November 04, 2009, 11:12:52 am »
Hello,

I know it's Alex Jones' position that Global Warming is a fabrication.  No matter--polluting is still not cool.  And getting solar panels & windmills can help get you off the grid.

I looked into getting solar panels for my house, but it looks like the break-even point, before you make your initial investment back in lower electrical bills, is a good 8 years out.   That didn't seem to justify the risk.  To many things could happen, like maintenance, disasters, having to relocate, etc. in that time.

It looks like windmills have a 5-year break-even point.   Now that is starting to make more sense.  But it depends on how windy your land is (and you do have to have that:  land). 

Has anyone else looked into this stuff and have some good input on this?  Are there good ways to lower that initial investment cost?


I own a solar company. If you decide to buy a solar system in the US, you get a 30% federal tax creditnot a deduction. Depending on the state you live in, you get a rebate from the state. For example, the state of PA gives you $2.25 per watt DC. On top of those rebates, some states have a version of solar renewable energy credits. For every 1 megawatt (1,000 kw's) your system produces, you get 1 credit/certificate. In the state of NJ, each one of those credits is worth $500. The way you figure out how many credits your system will produce is multiply 1.25 times the system size. So if you have a 5 kw sized system (average size for an average house) 1.25 x's 5= 6.25 solar renewable energy credits per year. 6.25 x's $500= $3125 in income per year. You can sell those credits for a total of 15 years. PA's credits are worth $280 as well as Ohio. Florida, oddly enough, doesn't have any renewable energy credits. Go figure. But, the state of Florida is offering $4.00 per watt DC. If you want to know what your state offers, go check out www.dsireusa.org . If you add up the state rebate, federal tax credit, electric savings, and renewable energy credits in the state of NJ, your solar system will be paid off in 4 years! And it doesn't matter how big or small the system is, the numbers work out the same. If anybody has any questions about solar, feel free to email me. My company www.sunpowernation.com .

Offline Highland

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Re: Economic sense of solar, wind power
« Reply #3 on: December 19, 2009, 07:29:31 am »
Hello,

I know it's Alex Jones' position that Global Warming is a fabrication.  No matter--polluting is still not cool.  And getting solar panels & windmills can help get you off the grid.

I looked into getting solar panels for my house, but it looks like the break-even point, before you make your initial investment back in lower electrical bills, is a good 8 years out.   That didn't seem to justify the risk.  To many things could happen, like maintenance, disasters, having to relocate, etc. in that time.

It looks like windmills have a 5-year break-even point.   Now that is starting to make more sense.  But it depends on how windy your land is (and you do have to have that:  land). 

Has anyone else looked into this stuff and have some good input on this?  Are there good ways to lower that initial investment cost?


It is probably best to start small, this way you can begin to realize just how solar panels work and what you can do with them. Start off with a 45 watt solar panel kit and two batteries. I have already had solar power for almost 10 years. The panels do not wear out as they have no moving parts and they have been no trouble for me.. I do not focus on converting the power to 110 or 220 volts as the conversion consumes a lot of power and 110 volt appliances use more power than 12 volt appliances. I mostly use the solar electric to run a solar heater blower motor but I also have 12 volt radios TV VCR  lights etc. The solar equipment that i have can be moved fairly easily except for the solar heater panels that would stay with the house.