Author Topic: Civil War is being Incited in Pakistan - a new murderous phase begins  (Read 687749 times)

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Offline Biggs

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IF THE AUTHOR HERE IS CORRECT THIS IS A VERY BAD DEVELOPMENT, CIVIL WAR COULD BE RAGING IN PAKISTAN WITHIN MONTHS, AND AS ALWAYS IT IS A SITUATION WHICH HAS BEEN INCITED THROUGH THE SUBVERSION OF THE NWO SERVANTS IN THEIR QUEST TO CREATE THE CHAOS FROM WHICH ORDER IS TO FOLLOW - POST ABOUT THE SITUATION AND THE SUBVERSIONS OF THE NEOCONS AND COLD WARRIORS AND OTHER NWO FACTIONS HERE.

Here the writer, Syed Saleem Shahzad, who is generally the best writer on Pakistani affairs, states that the new government in Islamabad under PM Gillani will do more of the US/NATO's bidding and will escalate attacks on militants in NWFP. No surpise there then, there will be a lot more bloodshed in Pakistan. HOWEVER, the real cruncher is that the new administration may be ordered by US/NATO to go after groups it has previously left alone. Those such as Jalaluddin's Haqqani's network, or Hezb e Islami, both of which are very powerful and in full support of the Afghan Taliban's campaign. Both of which have so far been left alone by the Pakistani government's offensives against rebel groups.

If this assessment is accurate such new actions will essentially result in a vast broadening of the scale of violence in Pakistan thus running a very real and serious risk of full scale civil war.

It is now quite clear to me that the neocons and NWO forces have covertly financed the lawyers groups and others so as to unseat Musharraf in the expectation of causing a wider and more bloody war in Pakistan. This really is very serious indeed but will likely take some time to play out. If the new Pakistani government and eventual new president do not stand up to and resist US/NATO pressure to act against these other groups such as Haqqani's network and the Afghan Taliban groups in Quetta, Baluchistan, then we will without doubt see a full scale civil war in Pakistan. Which is a country of well over 100million people, a large and advanced army and of course 30 - 50 nuclear warheads.

Let us hope that prime minster Gillani's Pakistan People's Party government and the new president (yet to be appointed) show some nerve and refuse unreasonable requests from the subverters and maniacs governing US & NATO policy.

Remember too that Webster Tarpley and other's have commented that Brzezinski and other cold warriors are now leading the neocons and they see Pakistan as a major new target in their maniacal game of global strategy.


Militants ready for Pakistan's war

By Syed Saleem Shahzad

http://www.atimes.com/atimes/South_Asia/JH23Df01.html

KARACHI
- Pakistan has two options. The country can give in to militancy or it can conduct military operations against it, influential advisor to the Interior Ministry, Rahman Malik, said on Thursday. And the government is not going to negotiate with militants, he added.

His remarks follow a suicide bomb attack outside the country's main defense industry complex at Wah, 30 kilometers northwest of the capital Islamabad, which killed as many as 100 people. The Pakistani Taliban immediately claimed responsibility, saying the attack was in response to the military's recent air bombardment of Bajaur Agency, which led to the displacement of 250,000 people.

Rahman's comments amount to a declaration of war on growing

   

Islamic militancy, but it could be that the new civilian Pakistani leadership is steering the "war on terror" in the wrong direction.

Rahman's remarks cannot be dismissed as a knee-jerk reaction in the heat of the moment. Only a few hours before the suicide attack, the chief minister of North-West Frontier Province (NWFP), Amir Haider Khan Hoti, announced in a policy statement that even if militants shunned violence and laid down their weapons, they would not be pardoned.

Similarly, Prime Minister Syed Yousuf Raza Gillani, who spoke to US President George W Bush by telephone on Thursday morning, rejected any possibility of dialogue with militants.

In the wake of Pervez Musharraf, who retired as president on Monday after flip-flopping on the country's approach to militancy for many years, the American-sponsored coalition of the willing in Islamabad appears ready for all-out war at any cost.

Ironically, this uncharacteristically clear Pakistani policy emerges as the political quagmire in the capital deepens. Former premier Nawaz Sharif has threatened to pull his Pakistan Muslim League out of the ruling coalition if judges sacked by Musharraf last year are not reinstated. He set a deadline for next Wednesday. The other main coalition partners, the Pakistan People's Party, the Awami National Party and the Jamiat-i-Ulema-i-Islam, said they would put the matter to parliament for debate, a proposal Sharif is not keen on.

Who do they intend to fight?
The government's approach will be different from that adopted by Musharraf when he signed onto the "war on terror" in 2001, officials in Pakistan's top strategic circles tell Asia Times Online.

Then, Musharraf, who was also chief of army staff, acted as he saw fit, often not to the liking of Washington, which often accused Islamabad of dragging its feet in the fight against Taliban and al-Qaeda militancy.

The new elected government is expected to be an active partner in the South Asian war theater and its military will help the North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO). The coordination will be similar to that between Afghan President Hamid Karzai's government and NATO.

NATO command will identify problem areas and Pakistan will hit those targets. A plan, drawn up between the Americans and Pakistan in 2007, will be implemented under which Peshawar, capital of NWFP, will serve as a base camp from where, under American guidance, the Taliban's bases will be targeted. The Taliban use these bases to launch operations into Afghanistan.

Channels have also been established for the US Embassy in Islamabad to coordinate with the Pakistani government. As a sign of the renewed goodwill, the US Embassy has announced US$50,000 as immediate aid relief for the people displaced from Bajaur. Other financial packages are expected to follow.

Up until 2007, under Musharraf, Pakistan made a clear distinction between the Taliban, al-Qaeda, the Takfiris (those who believe non-practicing Muslims are infidels) among al-Qaeda and criminal gangs who became a part of the Taliban and al-Qaeda.

The Taliban were viewed as a phenomenon spanning the southwestern Pashtun lands from Pakistan's Balochistan province to Afghanistan's provinces of Kandahar, Helmand, Urzgan and Zabul. This is the heartland of the Taliban in which leader Mullah Omar and majority of his shura (council) live.

They have never troubled Pakistan and have not tried to impose sharia law or interfere in Shi'ite-Sunni feuds or meddle with the thousands of Hindus living in the border town of Chaman. These are the "real" Taliban and the core of the resistance fighting against the foreign occupation of Afghanistan.

Pakistan has never conducted any military operations against the Taliban in Balochistan - one NATO's main complaints.

In NWFP, the problem was more complex. There are Taliban such as Jalaluddin Haqqani steering the insurgency in Afghanistan, and Pakistan has never tried to target his outfit, despite repeated NATO requests.

Top al-Qaeda leaders also live here and in the tribal regions on the border with Afghanistan. They are not specifically anti-Pakistan and there was until 2007 a tacit agreement with the Pakistani security forces that they would be left alone. American intelligence was given a free hand to arrest them - al-Qaeda members had to look after themselves, with Pakistan acting more like a referee.

However, the Takfiris, who include aging Egyptian Sheikh Essa's group, are a different story. Pakistan has made a clear distinction with them, including Uzbeks under the command of Qari Tahir Farooq (Tahir Yaldeshiv) and has gone after them with its proxies in the tribal areas. The same went for Pakistani criminal groups such as the Lashkar-i-Jhangvi, who joined the Takfiri camp, or camps under Pakistani Taliban Baitullah Mehsud, who is very close to the Takfiris.

Pakistan's relations with the Pakistani Taliban have depended on which leader they followed. If they were part of Mullah Omar's or Jalaluddin Haqqani's groups, they were left alone; if they were part of the Takfiri groups, the treatment was different.

In essence, this was Pakistan's war, and it fought it on its own terms, which was only partially beneficial to NATO. Under the new leadership, Pakistan's participation in the "war on terror" will be more for the benefit of NATO.

This could come at a very high cost. Those militants who were previously left alone will now be targets. In turn, they will conduct operations against Pakistan.

Osama bin Laden does not have the resources he had in 1989, when he tried to finance Nawaz Sharif to dethrone Benazir Bhutto's government (See The pawns who pay as powers play Asia Times Online, June 2, 2005). But his people certainly have ties within the security forces to allow them to launch operations like the failed one in the mid-1990s against Bhutto's government.

Last year, Bin Laden appointed an Amir of Khuruj (Revolt) for Pakistan, but he died of illness early this year. He has been replaced by Khalid Habib, a Moroccan, and he is now on standby for orders.

Thursday's attack at Wah is a portend of what lies in store for the country. That attack, although claimed by the Pakistan Taliban, was carried out by Pakistani criminal gangs with religious orientations and allied with the Takfiris.

Al-Qaeda has executed high-profile attacks, such as the assassination of Benazir Bhutto last December and the one on Bagram base in Kabul during US Vice President Dick Cheney's 2007 visit.

Should the Pakistani government really commit to its all-out war on militants, it will feel more of such wrath.

Syed Saleem Shahzad is Asia Times Online's Pakistan Bureau Chief. He can be reached at [email protected]
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Offline Biggs

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Re: Civil War is being Incited in Pakistan - a new murderous phase begins
« Reply #1 on: August 25, 2008, 06:06:17 am »
Pakistan bombers hit arms factory

http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/world/south_asia/7574267.stm


At least 63 people have been killed and dozens injured in twin suicide bombings outside Pakistan's main munitions factory in the town of Wah, police say.

The attack is the deadliest on a military site in Pakistan's history.

Police say one man is in custody for the attack, which occurred some 30km (18 miles) north-west of Islamabad.

A spokesman for the Pakistani Taleban said they had carried out the attacks, which he said were a response to army violence in the country's north-west.
   

In pictures: Factory bombings


Speaking to the BBC, Maulvi Umar of the Tehrik-e-Taleban Pakistan said the bombings in Wah were in retaliation for the deaths of "innocent women and children" in the tribal area of Bajaur.

He said more attacks would take place in Pakistan's major urban conurbations unless the army withdrew from the tribal areas.

Pakistani Prime Minister Prime Minister Yousef Raza Gilani promised to punish the perpetrators.

US President Bush later telephoned Mr Gilani to pledge his support in tackling what he called terrorist attacks.

The leaders "reaffirmed their mutual support for going after these extremists that are a threat to Pakistan, the United States and the entire world," a White House spokesman said.

Wah is a strategically important town normally under heavy security as it is home to a large industrial complex producing conventional arms and ammunition, correspondents say.

'Great suffering'

The first blast took place outside the gate of the factory as workers were leaving work during a shift change.

Minutes later, another blast took place at a market nearby another gate of the same factory.
    There was smoke, bodies and blood. Those who were left alive were in great suffering
Mohid Ahmed, eyewitness

Pakistan's spiral of violence


Local police chief Nasir Khan Durrani told the BBC: "Many others have been injured and we expect casualties to rise."

Mr Durrani said none of the dead were military personnel.

Mohid Ahmed, a student from Wah, was on a tour of the ordnance factories and witnessed the immediate aftermath of the blast from his bus.

"There was smoke, bodies and blood," he told the BBC.

"Those who were left alive were in great suffering. I saw a man clutching his leg and crying in pain and asking for help."

Army crackdown

On Tuesday, 32 people were killed in a suicide attack on a hospital in the northern town of Dera Ismail Khan.
 


The BBC's Syed Shoaib Hasan says it is the second recent direct attack on a Pakistani military installation.

Last September, 17 officers and soldiers were killed in a suicide attack on a special forces base in the nearby town of Tarbela-Ghazi.

The ordnance factories at Wah lie on the road into Pakistan's troubled north-west, where fighting between security forces and Islamic militants has raged in recent weeks.

Established in the early 1950s, it is a sprawling complex manufacturing everything from tanks and small arms to artillery shells.

Militants have often threatened to increase the level of violence unless the army pulls back from tribal areas close to the border with Afghanistan.

Pakistani politicians are, however, currently more preoccupied with political issues after the resignation of President Pervez Musharraf on Monday, the BBC's Charles Haviland in Islamabad says.

Mr Musharraf, a key ally of President Bush's "war on terror" stepped down after nine years in power to avoid being impeached.
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Offline Biggs

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Re: Civil War is being Incited in Pakistan - a new murderous phase begins
« Reply #2 on: August 25, 2008, 06:08:10 am »
A NEW NWO PUPPET IS BEING APPOINTED AS PRESIDENT, THIS GUY HAS DONE 11 YEARS IN JAIL AND MAKES EVEN THE BHUTTOS LOOK CLEAN BY COMPARISON

August 23, 2008
Benazir Bhutto widower Asif Ali Zardari set to replace Pervez Musharraf

http://www.timesonline.co.uk/tol/news/world/asia/article4589872.ece
(Anjum Naveed)


Zahid Hussain in Islamabad

Asif Ali Zardari, the controversial widower of Benazir Bhutto, became the front-runner to replace Pervez Musharraf as Pakistan’s President yesterday when he was nominated to run in an election scheduled for next month.

Ms Bhutto’s Pakistan People’s Party (PPP) nominated Mr Zardari unanimously four days after Mr Musharraf resigned. Mr Musharraf’s departure deprived the West of its key Muslim ally in the War on Terror.

“Zardari thanked Pakistan People’s Party of which he is the co-chairman and said he will announce his decision within the next 24 hours,” Sherry Rehman, the Information Minister, told reporters. “Presidency is the right of our party and that is why party lawmakers asked Zardari to run for this post.”

Earlier, the election commission chose September 6 as the date for the presidential poll, which is carried out by the national Parliament’s two houses and the four provincial assemblies.
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An election victory would be a huge turn of fortune for a man who was nicknamed “Mr Ten Per Cent” because of allegations, denied by him, that he received kickbacks when his wife was the Prime Minister.

Mr Zardari, 52, has spent a total of 11 years in prison on a variety of charges, longer than any other Pakistani politician.

Many analysts believe that his ascent to the presidency could strain the civilian Government’s relations with the powerful military.

The president is not only the supreme commander of the armed forces, but also has the power to remove and appoint the armed forces chief. Analysts say that military leaders would not trust a man with Mr Zardari’s record.

Mr Zardari faced trial on more than a dozen criminal charges, ranging from corruption to murder when he was arrested in 1996 after the fall of Ms Bhutto’s second Government. Most of the cases were withdrawn under Mr Musharraf’s amnesty.

According to Pakistani investigators, Mr Zardari had amassed more than $100 million (£55 million) in bank deposits and properties abroad, much of it bought with pay-offs from foreign companies doing business in Pakistan. In 1998 a Swiss judge indicted Mr Zardari on money laundering charges, which he denied.

He was freed on bail in 2004 and spent most of his time in New York before returning to Pakistan after the assassination of his wife in December 2007. He became co-chairman of the PPP with his 19-year-old son Bilawal.

The election announcement came as the ruling coalition, which forced Mr Musharraf to step down, looked likely to fall apart over growing differences on the key issue of how to treat the judges he sacked. The rift widened yesterday when the Pakistan Muslim League (N), the second-largest partner in the coalition, said that it would quit the Government unless the judges were reinstated by next week.

Nawaz Sharif, the PML (N) leader and former Prime Minister who was ousted by Mr Musharraf in a coup in 1999, wants to reinstate all 60 judges deposed during a brief emergency in November.

But Mr Zardari does not want to reappoint Iftikhar Muhammad Chaudhry, the former Chief Justice, because he might overturn an amnesty on corruption charges granted to PPP leaders last year. That allowed Ms Bhutto to return home from years in exile. Wrangling over who should be president has added to the tension between the coalition partners, who have failed to agree on a joint candidate.

Mr Zardari is now considered the front-runner as he will have no difficulty in getting elected even if the PML (N) opposes him, political analysts say. The PPP won most seats in elections in February and Mr Zardari also has the backing of other smaller parties.
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Offline Biggs

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Re: Civil War is being Incited in Pakistan - a new murderous phase begins
« Reply #3 on: August 25, 2008, 06:09:13 am »
70 killed in Swat violence

http://www.thenews.com.pk/top_story_detail.asp?Id=16796


Sunday, August 24, 2008

By Musa Khankhel & Delawar Jan


MINGORA/PESHAWAR: Seventy people, including 45 militants and 16 security forces personnel, were killed in fierce clashes, a suicide attack and bomb blasts in different parts of the restive Swat Valley on Saturday.

The security forces launched their offensive in the morning on the alleged headquarters of the Fazlullah-led Taliban militants in Kabal area to destroy their command and control system, training centres and purge the area of miscreants. They used artillery and gunship helicopters to hit positions of the militants. ISPR spokesman in Swat Nasir Ali told The News by phone from Mingora that the forces had killed 45-50 hardcore militants, as they were putting up resistance during the operation which, he said, would continue till the elimination of the militants.

“The militants had established their command and control system in the thickly-populated areas with an intention to use the civilian population as human shield. We are leaving no stone unturned to avoid the civilian casualties in the operation and advance it in a systematic manner. We have inflicted considerable damage on their command and control system and, according to our information, 45-50 hardcore militants including a leading commander have been killed,” he said, adding that many of the militants killed in the clashes were foreigners, including Chechens, Uzbeks and Tajiks.

He admitted that the forces also suffered 10 casualties and another seven sustained injuries during the daylong clashes. An official source said that 23 personnel, including a captain and lieutenant and 22 civilians, were injured in the clashes.

The spokesman said that the militants were recruiting, indoctrinating and training suicide bombers there to send them to other parts of the country for attacks.

They had also established prisons, where they were keeping people after abducting them for ransom. He said the people of the area had requested them to initiate action against the miscreants.

“We enjoy the support of the people but I still urge them to pick up arms against the militants and don’t allow them to hide among them,” he said and added the forces were committed to dismantling their command and control system and training centres.

To a question, he said the operation was under way as there were still some pockets of resistance. He said the ongoing second phase of the “Rah-e-Haq” operation was a full-scale action and would continue till the entire valley was purged of militants.

Talking to The News, Taliban spokesman Muslim Khan claimed to have killed 30-35 soldiers and destroyed three tanks in clashes with the forces in Kabal.

Meanwhile, six people, including three cops, were killed and 20 others, including 11 cops wounded, in a suicide attack on a police post in Charbagh.

The dead cops included Hawaldar Rahmat Ali, Pervez and Ali Said, while the injured included Bahrul Hayat, Muhammad Rashid, Fakharuz Zaman, Muhammad Siraj, Azizur Rahman, Shahid, Rizwanullah, Ajmeer Shah, Amir Nawab and Mian Gul Bacha. Another report put the casualties of police at seven. Police sources and eyewitnesses said the bomber rammed his explosive-laden jeep into the main gate of the post situated on Mingora-Kalam Road at 7:45 am, which razed the building to the ground and killed and wounded scores of people.

The injured, mostly serious, were shifted to the Saidu Sharif Hospital. The blast destroyed over 100 shops, a police van and the main transmission line supplying electricity to Charbagh. Police sources said that 100 kg explosives were used in the blast.

The militants also ambushed a convoy of police led by Superintendent of Police (Operation) when it was returning from Charbagh after inspecting the suicide blast scene. Three cops, Amir Hatham, Bakht Zareen and Faiz Muhammad, were killed and one was injured in the attack. Faiz bravely fought with the militants, but was gunned down when he ran out of bullets.

In another incident, the militants blew up the Abuha police station, killing three civilians, Abdul Ghafoor, Adnan and an unknown person and wounding another five.

Muslim Khan claimed that two among the dead were police officials.

In Deolai, the militants blew up another abandoned police post and a nearby Utility Store.

The militants destroyed five more bridges in Shahdherai, Deolai, Kalakalay, Dagai and Kitiar. The forces killed a man for violating the curfew in Sarsenai area.

A seven-year-old girl, Uzma, was killed and six others, including two children, were wounded in shelling in Dhero area of Kabal. There were also reports about damages to several houses in the area.

An indefinite curfew was imposed on the valley. Meanwhile, all banks across the district were closed in view of the precarious security situation in the valley.
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Offline Biggs

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Re: Civil War is being Incited in Pakistan - a new murderous phase begins
« Reply #4 on: August 25, 2008, 06:11:40 am »
ICRC says 200,000 have fled violence in Pakistan

http://wiredispatch.com/news/?id=310349

REUTERS
Reuters North American News Service

Aug 22, 2008 08:29 EST

GENEVA, Aug 22 (Reuters)
- More than 200,000 people have fled fighting in northwestern Pakistan this month and are in urgent need of relief assistance, the International Committee of the Red Cross (ICRC) said on Friday.
 

The humanitarian agency said it had launched an initial aid operation to help 64,000 of the 200,000 people forced to flee Bajaur. Pakistan has launched military operations against militants in the restive tribal region on the Afghan border, a known sanctuary for al Qaeda and Taliban militants.

The figure includes 50,000 people who have left for relatively safer areas of Pakistan in the North West Frontier Province, including Peshawar, as well as 14,000 who have crossed into eastern Afghanistan, the ICRC said in a statement.

"...these displaced people are in urgent need of basic necessities such as food, clean water and shelter," said Pascal Cuttat, head of ICRC's delegation in Pakistan. "Lack of medical care is a problem for sick people, particularly children."

Along with the Pakistan Red Crescent Society, the ICRC has delivered medical supplies to hospitals receiving the bulk of the injured, according to the Geneva-based agency.

Blankets, clothing, tarpaulins, soap and other supplies were being distributed to the displaced, and food was on its way.

Host families who have taken in the displaced were already poor and their food resources are dwindling further, it said.

The ICRC was planning to deliver emergency food and non-food aid on Saturday to 14,000 people from Bajaur who have fled into Kunar province in eastern Afghanistan.

The ICRC called on all parties to the conflict to protect civilians and allow the delivery of emergency relief and medical supplies, in compliance with international humanitarian law. (Reporting by Stephanie Nebehay, editing by Robert Hart)
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Offline David Rothscum

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Re: Civil War is being Incited in Pakistan - a new murderous phase begins
« Reply #5 on: August 25, 2008, 06:36:55 am »
13 more killed in Swat
http://www.thenews.com.pk/top_story_detail.asp?Id=16805
By Musa Khankhel & Delawar Jan

MINGORA/PESHAWAR: Thirteen more people were killed in violence in the militancy-plagued Swat Valley on Sunday while two more bodies were retrieved from the rubble of the Charbagh police post, blown up in a suicide attack on Saturday.

Tension prevailed in Kabal area of the valley where the forces, backed by gunship helicopters and artillery, carried out a full-fledged daylong operation against hardened militants on Saturday in which both sides suffered casualties. The military said that it had destroyed the centre, which served as one of the militants’ main command and control, logistic-cum-training and launching pads for terrorist activities and killed about 10-15 foreign militants, including Chechens, Uzbeks and Tajiks. According to the ISPR,

the slain foreigners belonged to Tahir Yuldeshev’s Islamic Movement of Uzbekistan (IMU). “We have credible information about the killing of 10-15 foreign militants out of the 45 killed on Saturday,” the ISPR spokesman in Swat, Nasir Ali, told The News by phone. “We have not found the bodies of the foreign militants but intercepts provided us sufficient evidence that they were foreign militants.”

Asked about the presence of more foreigners, the spokesman said that he could not say it for sure. He said most parts of the Kabal Tehsil had been cleared of the militants and action would continue till the elimination or eviction of the militants in other parts.

However, a spokesman for the Swat chapter of the Tehrik-e-Taliban Pakistan (TTP), Muslim Khan, rejected the military claim about the killing of foreign militants as baseless and unsupported. He also disputed the claim about the killing of 45-50 militants in Kabal as unfounded and said instead 30 corpses of the security forces personnel were lying scattered in Kabal. He asked the authorities to collect them.

The spokesman also asked parents and other relatives of soldiers to stop their loved ones from coming to Swat for taking part in the military operation in the valley or no “requests” of their relatives after their arrest would be accepted.

Meanwhile, the security forces pounded parts of Kabal and Matta Tehsils on Sunday but the militants did not suffer any casualty.

However, there were reports about civilian casualties in the shelling. A mortar shell hit a house in Kabal killing four, including a woman, and wounding several others.

The victims were identified as Abdur Razzaq, Bacha Zada, Salahuddin and wife of Ismail.

In Totano Bandai area, another shell struck the house of Altaf Hussain, killing his son and a guest from Karachi. Three more were injured in the same incident.

In Galoch area of Kabal, one Pervez was killed by a shell that landed on his house while another person, Bakht Amin, who had been wounded in the choppers’ shelling, succumbed to his injuries in the Saidu Sharif Hospital.

Reports said over 50 people have been injured and over a dozen houses damaged during intense shelling in the militant-infested Kabal area of the valley.

Unidentified assailants killed a local leader of the Awami National Party, Ismail, in Kalakalay area of Kabal. Four bullet-riddled bodies were also found in Katkalay area of Matta. The TTP Swat spokesman denied hand in the killings.

The Taliban attacked a police van in Gulibagh area of Charbagh, wounding one official. The TTP claimed responsibility for the attack.

Meanwhile, two more bodies were retrieved from the debris of the Charbagh police post, which was blown up in a bomb blast. Bodies of six cops had already been retrieved from there on Saturday.

10 killed as Pakistan politician targeted
http://edition.cnn.com/2008/WORLD/asiapcf/08/25/pakistan.violence/
 ISLAMABAD, Pakistan (CNN) -- Militants attacked the home of a lawmaker in Pakistan's violence-plagued northwest Monday, killing 10 people in the latest unrest to hit the country since the resignation of President Pervez Musharraf, authorities said.

The politician survived the attack but his brother died, said military spokesman Col. Baseer Haider. The Islamic movement, the Taliban, claimed responsibility.

Militants used rockets and grenades to launch their attack at the home in the village of Shah Dheri in the Swat valley, a tourist area where security has continued to deteriorate despite a three-month-old peace pact.

The home belongs to Waqar Ahmed Khan, a member of the Awami National Party and a member of the provincial assembly of the North West Frontier Province, where the Swat valley is located.

The valley, a rugged area near the Afghanistan border where the central government has long exerted little control, has been the site of an intense military offensive since late July.

The Taliban has carried out a series of deadly bombings in recent days as retaliation for the military operations -- and said the attacks will continue until the troops pull out.

Violence has surged in Paksitan following Musharraf's resignation last week to avoid possible impeachment. His exit has left a power vacuum in the country, reviving factional disputes in the multi-party government ahead of September 6 elections.

Offline David Rothscum

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Re: Civil War is being Incited in Pakistan - a new murderous phase begins
« Reply #6 on: August 25, 2008, 06:53:45 am »
http://www.dawn.com/2008/08/25/welcome.htm
Four militants killed, six injured in Bajaur tribal region ISLAMABAD, Aug 25 (PPI): Four militants were killed and six others injured in the ongoing operation by security forces in Pakisan’s Bajaur tribal area Monday, officials said. According to sources, the security forces targeted the militants’ hideouts in the areas of Mena, Chenaghai, Badaly, Damangy and Charmang. (Posted @ 17:00 PST)

Offline David Rothscum

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Re: Civil War is being Incited in Pakistan - a new murderous phase begins
« Reply #7 on: August 25, 2008, 01:25:22 pm »
Pakistan's Ruling Coalition Collapses Amid Dissent
http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2008/08/25/AR2008082500173.html?hpid=topnews
By Candace Rondeaux
Washington Post Foreign Service
Monday, August 25, 2008; 12:29 PM

ISLAMABAD, Pakistan, Aug. 25 -- Pakistan plunged deeper into political chaos Monday as a top party in the country's coalition government vowed to quit the coalition and support an opposition candidate for the presidency.

Former prime minister Nawaz Sharif, leader of the Pakistan Muslim League-N party, said he plans to vigorously oppose his one-time political partner, Asif Ali Zardari, leader of the Pakistan People's Party and widower of slain former prime minister Benazir Bhutto. The announcement, which came a week after Pervez Musharraf resigned as Pakistan's president, set off a heated race for the presidency and raised questions about the future of the shaky alliance between the United States and Pakistan's top political leaders.

Sharif said he decided to quit the coalition government after Zardari, who assumed leadership of his party after Bhutto's assassination in December, announced plans to run for president on Saturday and reneged on a promise to reinstate dozens of judges deposed by Musharraf.

"We have been forced to take this decision, which we take with great regret," Sharif said during a nationally televised news conference in Islamabad on Monday. "Zardari pledged in writing to reinstate the judges within one day of Musharraf leaving."

Sharif's party selected former Supreme Court chief justice Saeed-uz-Zaman Siddiqui to run for president. Siddiqui, a long-time political ally of Sharif, was appointed chief justice of the Supreme Court in July 1999. He was later ousted from the bench when he refused to legally endorse the military coup led by Musharraf that ended Sharif's term as prime minister in 1999. A stalwart critic of Musharraf and Pakistan's military and intelligence agencies, Siddiqui is a highly respected figure in Pakistan's increasingly powerful legal community and could pose a serious challenge to Zardari.

"I believe he is the most suitable candidate. He is the one who refused to take an oath under Musharraf's rule," Sharif said. "This is a great Pakistani. His service to this country is unmatched."


The split in the coalition came a little more than two weeks after Sharif and Zardari mounted an aggressive political putsch against Musharraf, who stepped down after the coalition leaders called for his impeachment on Aug. 7. United in their opposition to Musharraf, the two politicians nonetheless failed to reach an agreement on when and how to reinstate some 60 judges sacked by Musharraf. Sharp divisions between Sharif and Zardari emerged within days of Musharraf's resignation when Sharif vowed last week to quit the coalition if the judges were not restored by a parliamentary measure Monday.

At the center of the split is the status of Pakistan's deposed Supreme Court chief justice, Iftikhar Mohammed Chaudhry. Chaudhry became a symbol of opposition to Musharraf's rule after he was suspended, then fired, by the former army chief last year. Since then he has become the public face of a powerful movement led by thousands of Pakistani lawyers that has pushed aggressively for greater balance between the country's judiciary and executive branches.

Sharif has been a vocal advocate for Chaudhry's return to the bench. But Zardari, who spent 11 years in prison on financial corruption charges and is facing money-laundering charges in Switzerland, has been reluctant to endorse reinstatement of the deposed chief justice.

With only 10 days to go before the presidential election, the outcome of a three-way race for the presidency appeared far from certain Monday as leaders of several smaller parties in the coalition began to reassess their alliances.

Late last week, members of Musharraf's Pakistan Muslim League-Q party said they plan to field their own candidate for the presidency when elections are held on Sept. 6. No official announcement has been made on the party's presidential selection, but speculation was high Monday that the party's general-secretary, Mushahid Hussain, would run for the country's second most powerful political office. Hussain, a Georgetown University-educated former journalist who chairs the Pakistani Senate's Committee on Foreign Relations, is a well-known figure in both Islamabad and Washington political circles.

Currently, Zardari's Pakistan People's Party holds the largest share of seats in the National Assembly and in at least two provincial assemblies. But a last-minute shift in alliances could stymie Zardari's efforts to come to power eight months after his wife's assassination.

The winning candidate needs a total of 352 votes out of 702 combined votes in the National Assembly, Senate and four provincial assemblies of Pakistan to take the presidency.

Offline David Rothscum

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Re: Civil War is being Incited in Pakistan - a new murderous phase begins
« Reply #8 on: August 25, 2008, 03:11:58 pm »
31 more killed in Kurram clashes
http://thepost.com.pk/MainNewsT.aspx?bdtl_id=12358&fb_id=2&catid=14
Associated Press of Pakistan

PARACHINAR: The gun battle between two warring tribesmen in Kurram Agency has entered 19th day as 31 more people were perished and 44 injured in fresh fighting in restive agency on Monday.

Political administration sources while confirming the incident said that intermittent incidents of fighting have been reported from Inzari, Bagzai, Alizai, Sadda, Khar Kally, Balishkhel, Sangeena, Karman, Parachamkani, Pewar Thangi, Teri Mangal, Sir Saqng and Kach Kalizai.

The armed supporters of both warring groups with entrenched mindsets are using heavy and light weaponry against each others in these troubled areas, killing 31 people including 24 extremists and wounded 44 others.

Meanwhile, the extremists have blown up water pipeline at Pewar Tangi that disrupted water supply to Khwari and Pewar areas.

More than 400 people have been killed and over 700 wounded in violent clashes in the Agency.

The people of Kurram Agency are facing shortage of edible items, medicines in the hospitals and low voltage of electricity.

Noted tribal elder and former MNA Munir Syed Mian urged the government to take strict action against elements for destroying peace of the agency.

He said that tribesmen will extend full support to government for restoration of durable peace in the agency.

Offline David Rothscum

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Re: Civil War is being Incited in Pakistan - a new murderous phase begins
« Reply #9 on: August 26, 2008, 07:33:27 am »
Three killed, several wounded in Pakistan blast
http://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/World/Pakistan/Three_killed_several_wounded_in_Pakistan_blast/articleshow/3406508.cms

ISLAMABAD: At least three people were killed and more than 25 wounded in an explosion in southwestern Pakistan's Balochistan province Tuesday, a TV channel reported.

The remote-controlled blast took place at a shop near a political party rally in Balochistan's Jaffarabad district, Geo TV channel said.

The Jamhoori Watan Party was holding a rally in the area when the bomb went off, killing three and injuring more than 25, the report added.

Violent incidents have been increasing in nuclear-armed Pakistan in recent weeks, while its ruling politicians have been distracted by infighting.

US ally Pervez Musharraf's resignation as president under threat of impeachment last week was followed by bickering in the ruling coalition and the departure of one of its main parties.

Allies and analysts fear the squabbling could keep the government from dealing effectively with economic problems and violent Islamist militants, especially in northwestern areas on the Afghan border where militants have sanctuaries.

US diplomatic staff usually travel in armoured vehicles but Fintor said he did not know if the vehicle attacked on Tuesday was armoured. Bombers have tried to attack the US consulate in the southern city of Karachi since the Sept. 11, 2001, attacks on the United States and a US diplomat was killed in a suicide blast in Karachi in 2006.

In Baluchistan, a photographer at the rally in the town of Dera Allah Yar, 300 km (200 miles) south of the Baluchistan capital Quetta, said he saw several bodies at the scene of the blast.

The device was planted on a motorcycle and went off when activists of a nationalist party were marching.

Nationalists politicians and autonomy-seeking rebels have been pushing for greater control of Baluchistan's gas and mineral resources for decades.

Offline David Rothscum

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Re: Civil War is being Incited in Pakistan - a new murderous phase begins
« Reply #10 on: August 26, 2008, 07:40:06 am »
Pakistan turmoil deepens after coalition split
http://news.yahoo.com/s/afp/20080826/wl_afp/pakistanpolitics_080826114518;_ylt=AsPwViMNTdz5ZXJwGza6.y3zPukA

Pakistan's political turmoil deepened Tuesday after the two main parties in the ruling coalition split, weakening the fragile government just a week after president Pervez Musharraf resigned.

The world's only nuclear-armed Islamic nation, already facing a fresh campaign of bombings by a resurgent militant movement, now faces the prospect of a bitter political battle over the choice of Musharraf's successor.

Former prime minister Nawaz Sharif pulled his party out of the coalition on Monday, saying they were moving to the opposition because of what he said were the broken promises of the other main party's leader, Asif Ali Zardari.

He said Zardari had gone back on a pledge to reinstate dozens of judges sacked last year by Musharraf -- an issue that has been at the centre of a political dispute in Pakistan for the past year.

"We have taken this decision after we failed to find any ray of hope and none of the commitments made to us were fulfilled," Sharif said Monday. "This situation forced us to withdraw our support."

Zardari, in a televised address late Monday, appealed for Sharif's return to the government.

"We are sad over Nawaz Sharif's decision. We want to move together and solve the problems facing the nation," he said. "We will request Nawaz Sharif to return to the government."

Meanwhile, Pakistani stocks reacted negatively over the break up and slumped four percent on Tuesday. The benchmark Karachi Stock Exchange KSE-100 Index finished down 383.37 points to close at 9,430.29.

Lawyers meanwhile called for a nationwide protest on Thursday to demand the reinstatement of the judges, who were pushed out as Musharraf purged his opponents in the judiciary.

Sharif's PML-N party has put forward a candidate to challenge Zardari, widower of another former premier, Benazir Bhutto, on September 6, when lawmakers will select who will be the country's next president.

Zardari and the PML-N candidate, former judge Saeed uz Zaman Siddiqui, will face off against the party formerly behind Musharraf, which has nominated its secretary general, Mushahid Hussain.

Candidates filed their election papers on Tuesday.

Political chaos is nothing new in Pakistan, which has been under military rule -- including under General Musharraf -- for more than half of its existence since being partitioned from India after World War II.

But the months of turmoil that eventually forced Musharraf to resign last week under threat of impeachment, and the new split between Sharif and Zardari, have made Western allies jittery about Pakistan's role in the "war on terror."

The United States, which turned Musharraf into an ally after the September 11 attacks and has supplied the country with tens of billions of dollars in aid since then, played down the importance of the split.

"I don't anticipate it would have any impact on our joint efforts to combat extremism," said US State Department spokesman Robert Wood.

The strategically important country -- which has the second-largest Muslim population in the world -- has seen a resurgence of Taliban and Al-Qaeda militant activity in the lawless tribal areas along the Afghan border.

While critics have long charged that Pakistan's powerful intelligence service actually helps to support the militants, the military is nevertheless also pursuing a tough campaign against the Islamist guerrillas.

Clashes in one region alone have left around 500 people dead in the last fortnight, and the Pakistani Taliban have said the latest wave of suicide bombings will continue until the assault is stopped.

In some of the latest violence on Tuesday, unknown gunmen opened fire on the car of a US diplomat in the northwestern city of Peshawar, but she escaped unhurt, police said.

The government said Monday it had banned the main Taliban militant umbrella group, Tehreek-e-Taliban Pakistan, and frozen its bank accounts and assets.

Offline David Rothscum

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Re: Civil War is being Incited in Pakistan - a new murderous phase begins
« Reply #11 on: August 27, 2008, 07:33:26 am »
http://www.monstersandcritics.com/news/southasia/news/article_1427245.php/40_militants_killed_in_army_attack_7_die_in_Pakistan_bombing__2nd_Roundup_
40 militants killed in army attack; 7 die in Pakistan bombing (2nd Roundup)
South Asia News

Aug 27, 2008, 12:08 GMT

 Islamabad - The Pakistan Army said it killed 40 insurgents Wednesday in clashes near the Afghan border, while at least seven civilians died when an explosion ripped through an eatery near the capital Islamabad.

'Artillery fire and helicopter gunships engaged a militants' hideout in Raghan area of Bajaur district. Twenty five miscreants, including important local Taliban commanders and some foreign fighters were killed in the action,' Army spokesman Major Murad Khan said.

Bajaur, which is close to the Afghan border, is a known safe haven for al-Qaeda and Taliban fighters.

'Following the incident, the Taliban cordoned off the area, and no one is allowed to go there,' a local security official said.

The official, who spoke on condition of anonymity, said four rebels were killed when two planes bombs their position in the Loi Sam area of the district.

Bajaur has seen deadly clashes since the military launched attacks on insurgents there last month. According to the government, more than 500 militants have been killed so far, but the claim could not be independently confirmed.

Dozens of soldiers have also died in the fighting.

The ongoing battles caused an exodus of more than 250,000 people to makeshift camps set up by the government and relief agencies in the adjoining North-West Frontier Province.

In South Waziristan, 11 militants died when the security forces repelled an overnight attack on Tiarza Fort and Tiarza Bridge Check Post in the tribal district, Major Murad said.

Between 15 and 20 more insurgents were injured in the exchange of fire that continued Wednesday.

Separately, at least seven people were killed and about 20 were wounded when an explosion ripped through a hotel near Islamabad.

The blast late Tuesday severely damaged the roadside hotel in the Sihala area.

'The preliminary investigations indicate that 3 to 4 kilograms of explosives was used in the bomb,' said Ahmad Latif, a senior police officer.

He said all the victims were civilians.

Pakistan is facing a resurgence of violence from militants who have their bases in the country's tribal areas bordering Afghanistan.

Last week, two suicide bombers blew themselves up at the gates of a military-run weapons' factory, killing about 80 people and wounding 100 more. Most of the victims were civilians.

Offline Biggs

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Re: Civil War is being Incited in Pakistan - a new murderous phase begins
« Reply #12 on: August 27, 2008, 01:55:19 pm »
Setback for Pakistan's terror drive
By Syed Saleem Shahzad

http://atimes.com/atimes/South_Asia/JH27Df01.html

KARACHI
- The resignation of Pervez Musharraf as president a week ago was an opportunity for his Western allies to take the "war on terror" a step forward by working with the five-month-old civilian coalition government in Pakistan.

But that administration has now been thrown into confusion following the withdrawal on Monday of its second-largest partner, the Pakistan Muslim League (PML-N) of former premier Nawaz Sharif. The Pakistan People's Party (PPP) of Asif Ali Zardari has enough support in parliament to maintain a simple majority, but with Sharif now on the opposition benches, its days are numbered.

Sharif withdrew his party because of what he said were Zardari's

 

broken promises to reinstate dozens of judges sacked last year by Musharraf.

With Sharif's move, ideological divides between liberal-secularists (PPP) and right-wing conservatives (PML-N) that had been blurred during Musharraf's nearly nine-year tenure have resurfaced. Former backers of Musharraf, the Pakistan Muslim League Quaid-i-Azam, and the PML-N have already made contact to work on a "joint future political strategy".

Sharif's PML-N has now proposed its own candidate (former chief justice Saeeduz Zaman Siddiqui) to challenge Zardari, widower of another former premier, Benazir Bhutto, on September 6, when parliament chooses a new president.

In another development, the Jamaat-i-Islami, an Islamist political party which boycotted February's general elections, has invited Sharif to join the All Pakistan Democratic Movement, an opposition alliance, which Sharif is likely to do.

This fragmentation has blown apart Western plans to make Pakistani domestic politics useful in the "war on terror" as the opposition, which is also opposed to Pakistan's involvement in the "war on terror", will provide strong resistance to Islamabad's decision to increase military operations against Taliban and al-Qaeda militants in Pakistan's tribal areas.

New face against the Taliban
As things stand, Zardari, backed by a coalition of secular and liberal parties, will hold the presidency. This is important as the president is also the supreme commander of the armed forces with hiring and firing powers.

Zardari, with the Americans breathing down his neck, will be expected to control the often defiant secret service, Inter-Services Intelligence (ISI), as well as the military, regularly accused by the West of not doing enough against militants, if not supporting of the Taliban. Neither task will be easy, if not impossible.

On Monday, Pakistan "declared war" on the Taliban. The Tehrik-i-Taliban Pakistan (TTP), the main Taliban militant umbrella group, was banned, its bank accounts and assets frozen and it was barred from appearing in the media. It was also announced that "head" money would be placed on prominent leaders of the TTP.

The stage is now set for yet another round against militants in Pakistan, seen as key to defeating the insurgency in Afghanistan, which draws heavily on its bases in Pakistan's tribal areas to sustain its fighting capabilities.

However, the war theater is stretching from the tribal areas to the main urban centers. After suicide attacks on an arms factory in Wah, 30 kilometers northwest of the capital Islamabad, and an unsuccessful bomb attack on a leading anti-terror police official in the southern city of Karachi, the Taliban called at the weekend for a ceasefire in Bajaur Agency. The Taliban attacks were in response to heavy bombing by the air force in Bajaur over the past few weeks.

The powerful adviser to the Interior Ministry, Rehman Malik, refused outright the Taliban offer and vowed to continue military operations against militants without any concessions.

The militants on Sunday showed their muscle in their second home after the Waziristan tribal areas - Karachi, the financial hub of the country. A container truck carrying two armored personal carriers out of Karachi port was attacked by about 25 armed youths and set on the fire. The carriers were on their way to North Atlantic Treaty Organization troops in Afghanistan as part of one of the largest NATO consignments - 530 containers - to have arrived from Jabal-i-Ali in the United Arab Emirates en route to Afghanistan. (Asia Times Online broke the story that al-Qaeda planned to defeat NATO by cutting its supply lines in Karachi. (See New al-Qaeda focus on NATO supplies August 12, 2008.)

Asia Times Online has learned that top Taliban shura (council) commanders, including leader Mullah Omar's deputy, Mullah Bradar, Ameer Khan Muttaqi and Akhtar Mansoor recently visited Karachi, and some of them remained in the city to plan further attacks.

Washington had devised a plan with Islamabad under which the Pakistani military would independently coordinate with NATO operation commanders in Afghanistan to carry out actions against militants in Pakistan. But aerial bombings apart, any concrete military drives against the militants will be difficult, given that lower-level cadres are unwilling to fight against the tribals, mainly because of their ethnic Pashtun links.

Video footage made by the Taliban and seen by Asia Times Online shows military operations from August 2007 to early 2008 in the tribal areas. There is detailed footage of how easily the Pakistani armed forces laid down their arms. After surrender, once their commanders had been removed, they mingled with the militants.

This happens because most of the men deployed in the tribal areas are ethnically Pashtuns and unwilling to fight against local Pashtun tribals. The Punjabis, the majority population of the country and also in the armed forces, cannot perform in the tribal areas as they neither understand the language nor the area.

Indiscriminate aerial bombing intimidates and disrupts an area, as shown in Bajaur, but apart from sending the militants into temporary shelter the effectiveness is debatable. Pakistan claimed it had killed senior al-Qaeda leader Sheikh Saeed aka Abu Mustafa al-Yazeed, but it turned out not to be true; Saeed never lived in Bajaur to begin with. Indeed, the only casualty was the local population, with more than 250,000 people forced to leave the area and as a result hatred of the new government and the army is at an all-time high.

This could be the crux of the coming battle between Zardari and the militants - whether the army goes along with the man who would be president, or, as it has done so often over the years, turns against its political masters.

Syed Saleem Shahzad is Asia Times Online's Pakistan Bureau Chief. He can be reached at [email protected]
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Offline Biggs

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Re: Civil War is being Incited in Pakistan - a new murderous phase begins
« Reply #13 on: August 28, 2008, 07:32:12 am »
and the violence goes on and on and on..............

Pakistan car bomb hits jail bus
 
http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/world/south_asia/7585385.stm

At least seven people have been killed after a car bomb targeted a prison bus in Pakistan, police said.


Six policemen and a civilian died in the morning blast near Bannu town in North West Frontier Province (NWFP).

Police told the BBC Urdu service that the device was in a vehicle parked on a bridge and was detonated by remote control as the prison van approached.

Bannu is close to the border with Afghanistan, where Islamist militants have been attacking security forces.

Police said no prisoners were on the bus at the time of the blast, at about 0900 (0300 GMT) in the garrison town, 250km (155 miles) south-west of the Pakistani capital Islamabad.

A local police superintendent told the BBC: "Six policemen and a civilian have been killed. The prison bus was on its way to the jail to pick up prisoners for their court hearings.

"Near the bridge on Kurram River, an explosive-laden vehicle was already parked. When the bus approached the vehicle, the explosives were detonated by a remote control."

AFP news agency reported that the force of the blast had caused the prison van to plunge into the river below.

No one immediately claimed responsibility for the attack.

Security has deteriorated sharply in recent weeks in NWFP, which the Afghan government and the US say is a haven for pro-Taleban militants and al-Qaeda.
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Offline Biggs

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Re: Civil War is being Incited in Pakistan - a new murderous phase begins
« Reply #14 on: August 29, 2008, 05:56:12 am »
the devastating consequences of CIA/MI6/NWO subversion on a nations economy and people's standards of living

Pakistan Imposes Emergency Stock Limits to Halt Slide (Update1)

By Farhan Sharif and Chua Kong Ho

http://www.bloomberg.com/apps/news?pid=20601013&sid=aprcwiXfTgmM&refer=emergingmarkets

Aug. 28 (Bloomberg)
-- Pakistan imposed emergency trading limits to halt a slide in stocks that sent the benchmark index down 42 percent since April, the second attempt in two months to restore confidence in a market battered by political upheaval.

Curbs to prevent shares from falling below yesterday's closing prices will remain for seven to 10 days ``until the situation improves,'' said Razi-ur-Rahman Khan, chairman of the Securities and Exchange Commission. The Karachi Stock Exchange 100 index rose 0.6 percent, snapping a six-day, 16 percent drop.

Pakistan's stock market value has almost halved to $38.8 billion from the peak on April 4 amid a political crisis leading to the ouster of President Pervez Musharraf and breakup of the coalition government. Investors stoned the exchange last month after a first attempt to impose limits failed to halt the slump that threatened to undo a 14-fold rally since 2001.

``With these draconian measures to support the market, there's a real question whether you can get out,'' said Mark Tan, director at UOB Asset Management Ltd., which oversees about $3 billion in Asian equities excluding Pakistan stocks. ``It adds to the uncertainty.''

Securities can trade within their daily limit of 5 percent ``but not below the floor-price level'' of yesterday's close, the Karachi Stock Exchange said on its Web site, without giving details. The Lahore and Islamabad stock markets will follow the same guidelines, regulator Rahman Khan said.

``The market required a cooling off period,'' Rahman Khan said in a telephone interview from Islamabad today. ``When the situation improves, then the cap will be lifted.''

Imposed Curbs

Pakistan was forced on July 11 to remove the first curbs it imposed after trading in Karachi slumped to the lowest in 10 years. Regulators banned short-selling, narrowed the limit on declines from 5 percent to 1 percent and doubled the cap on gains to 10 percent, in measures announced late on June 23. Short sellers borrow shares and sell them, hoping to replace the stock at a lower price and pocket the difference.

As of 12:43 p.m. today, 38.2 million shares had traded on the Karachi exchange, according to its Web site. That compares with an average of 211 million a day over the past year, according to data compiled by Bloomberg.

``This could cause liquidity to dry up because who wants to buy if they can only pay a higher price?'' said Daphne Roth, Singapore-based head of equity research in Asia at ABN Amro Private Bank, with about $30 billion of Asian assets. ``Risk appetite is low and investors are avoiding markets where there is political instability.''

Rival Candidates

Pakistan's biggest political parties on Aug. 26 proposed rival candidates to replace Musharraf in a Sept. 6 parliamentary vote. Asif Ali Zardari, head of the Pakistan Peoples Party, will compete with nominees including former chief justice Saeed-uz- Zaman Siddiqui, put forward by Nawaz Sharif, leader of a faction of the Pakistan Muslim League.

Sharif quit the coalition on Aug. 25, accusing Zardari of reneging on a pledge to reinstate judges fired by Musharraf. Stocks have plunged on concern the political instability will blunt government efforts to tackle a rising Taliban insurgency, grapple with inflation at its highest in 30 years and revive the faltering economy.

``The market is definitely in a condition where it will need some extraordinary measures,'' said Nasim Beg, who manages the equivalent of $370 million in stocks and bonds as chief executive officer of Arif Habib Investments Ltd. in Karachi.

Ringed Exchange

Police and paramilitary forces ringed the exchange on July 17, a day after hundreds of investors stoned the building and shouted anti-government slogans. The protests followed a 15th straight decline in the benchmark index, the worst losing streak in at least 18 years.

``Freezing the index would not be a good idea,'' said Habib-ur-Rehman, who manages the equivalent of $91.5 million of stocks and bonds at Karachi-based Atlas Asset Management Ltd. ``Direct intervention in market movements would lead to further complications as we have seen in the recent past.''
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Offline David Rothscum

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Re: Civil War is being Incited in Pakistan - a new murderous phase begins
« Reply #15 on: August 29, 2008, 07:14:33 am »
http://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/World/Iraq_militants_moving_to_Pak/articleshow/3418923.cms
WASHINGTON: A top US military officer has said that the al-Qaida militants in Iraq are moving to safe haven in tribal areas of Pakistan, posing threat not only to coalition forces in Afghanistan but to Islamabad.

In a press meeting, the commandant of the marine corps Gen James Conway said the coalition forces will not be able to solve the problems in the Federally Administered Tribal Areas (FATA) of Pakistan and it was essentially up to the government in Islamabad to come to the terms with what is happening on their sovereign soil.

"We do see more foreign fighters now, though, I think, coming to Pakistan and operating in Afghanistan than we're seeing in Iraq... no intelligence agency would say this, but it may be that there's been a refocus. I think the al-Qaida knows that they have blown a movement in Iraq through a number of missteps over time..." Gen Conway said.

"... the influence and the presence and the numbers of al-Qaida in Iraq are very much diminished and they had to go somewhere, and my guess is, my belief is that they probably have gone to that safe haven in the FATA," he said making the point that there are people in the area who pose danger not only to the coalition forces but also to Pakistan.

"That's long been an ungoverned area. I think we're all concerned that if it's not managed - and it must be managed by the Pakistanis, it's on their side of the border - if it's not managed, that you could see attacks against other parts of Pakistan and certainly attacks into Afghanistan.

"So, I think it is a real threat," he added. "Pakistan is a hard nut to crack and it's probably not one that we, coalition forces, are going to be able to solve."

Offline David Rothscum

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Re: Civil War is being Incited in Pakistan - a new murderous phase begins
« Reply #16 on: August 30, 2008, 06:25:22 pm »
http://www.timesonline.co.uk/tol/news/world/asia/article4641034.ece
Asif Ali Zardari’s purge ‘betrays’ Benazir Bhutto's legacy
Asif Ali Zardari is ousting party aides loyal to his wife
Dean Nelson in Islamabad

Asif Ali Zardari, widower of the murdered former Pakistan prime minister Benazir Bhutto, has purged almost all of his wife’s top advisers from her party, including her political secretary and closest friend, who cradled her as she died.

Bhutto was killed by an assassin’s bullet as she waved to supporters at an election rally in Rawalpindi on December 27 last year.

Shortly after her death Zardari took control of her Pakistan People’s party (PPP) and led it to an election victory, invoking Bhutto’s memory and capitalising on the public grief that followed her death.

He is expected to become Pakistan’s president this week in an election that will formally acknowledge him as the country’s most powerful man.

It will be an extraordinary reversal of fortune for a man who spent 11 years in jail on corruption and other charges and is widely blamed for Bhutto’s two governments being dismissed in 1990 and 1996.

Last week the party’s members of the National Assembly pledged their loyalty to him in an atmosphere of competitive sycophancy. But behind the scenes, party stalwarts whom Bhutto had relied upon are angry at the way her closest aides have been humiliated and alarmed that her political legacy is being betrayed.

They are outraged that some of Zardari’s aides have blamed Bhutto’s most trusted advisers for her death, accusing them of failing to protect her from the assassins who killed her in a sniper and suicide bomb attack.

Their target was Naheed Khan, Bhutto’s devoted political secretary and inseparable friend for more than 20 years. Khan, who has been sidelined since the assassination, was sitting next to her leader in a bullet-proof Land Cruiser when Bhutto was shot while waving to supporters through the sun-roof. Khan cradled Bhutto’s head on her lap before realising she was dead.

Last month Zulfiqar Mirza, the Sindh home minister and a close aide of Zardari, claimed Khan had been in charge of Bhutto’s security on the day she was killed and that she had declined his offer of volunteer guards. Khan’s husband, Safdar Abbasi, another Bhutto adviser, had argued with her police detail and dismissed them, he alleged.

When Zardari failed to disown his friend’s comments, another Bhutto loyalist, Makhdoom Amin Fahim, stepped in, dismissed his allegations and said they were the work of the “new faces” controlling the PPP.

Last week Khan and Abbasi denied the allegations. “Mr Zardari’s friends are saying we did not protect her. But we are political people. Three of us were in the car and none of us was looking after her security. Mr Rehman Malik [now interior minister] was the security adviser. Second in charge was Zulfiqar Mirza. I don’t know why these people are being rewarded,” said Khan.

Abbasi and Khan said their concern was that the party remains true to Bhutto’s vision. They and several other former members of Bhutto’s staff said that Zardari had wasted the first six months in government. They believed their former leader would have hit the ground running.

“We were with Bibi [Benazir] through all the trials and tribulations and we loved our work with her,” said Khan, who added that Zardari was cut off from the masses. “Party workers are disillusioned and don’t know what to do. They have no access to him or to people working for him.”

Another Bhutto adviser, Nawab Yusuf Talpur, a former agriculture minister, said only four or five members of her team had made the transition to the Zardari camp. “Most of the people trusted by Bibi are not trusted by him. Benazir had a vision and had the capacity to hold this party together . . . Her legacy is not being handled in the way we expected,” Talpur said.

Despite growing concern at his leadership, Zardari’s chances of becoming president improved last week after the army signalled that it would stay out of the contest. Speculation that the army might interfere had grown after medical records revealed that Zardari had suffered mental problems after his years in jail and exile.

Further questions about Zardari’s suitability for the office were raised after the Swiss government said it was releasing some of his bank accounts containing $60m. “How can he explain that kind of money?” asked one Bhutto aide.

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Re: Civil War is being Incited in Pakistan - a new murderous phase begins
« Reply #17 on: August 31, 2008, 07:39:14 am »
http://www.timesonline.co.uk/tol/news/world/asia/article4641034.ece
Asif Ali Zardari’s purge ‘betrays’ Benazir Bhutto's legacy
Asif Ali Zardari is ousting party aides loyal to his wife
Dean Nelson in Islamabad

Asif Ali Zardari, widower of the murdered former Pakistan prime minister Benazir Bhutto, has purged almost all of his wife’s top advisers from her party, including her political secretary and closest friend, who cradled her as she died.


I saw this, I am not quite sure what his motivations are, if he is under orders from DC or what, however, you would have thought he needs all the allies he can get, not to purge them

no doubt there is an agenda here at play
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Offline David Rothscum

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Re: Civil War is being Incited in Pakistan - a new murderous phase begins
« Reply #18 on: August 31, 2008, 08:41:12 am »
I saw this, I am not quite sure what his motivations are, if he is under orders from DC or what, however, you would have thought he needs all the allies he can get, not to purge them

no doubt there is an agenda here at play
Yeah, it's odd, it's like they just want to further destabilize the country.

Offline Biggs

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Re: Civil War is being Incited in Pakistan - a new murderous phase begins
« Reply #19 on: August 31, 2008, 09:26:00 am »
Yeah, it's odd, it's like they just want to further destabilize the country.

and at any price, perhaps they felt that Bhutto's people would resist US commands too much
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Offline Biggs

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Re: Civil War is being Incited in Pakistan - a new murderous phase begins
« Reply #20 on: August 31, 2008, 10:30:16 am »
Pakistan jets kill 40 Taliban in new fighting
ASIF SHAHZAD
Originally published 11:29 a.m., August 30, 2008, updated 11:08 a.m., August 30, 2008

http://www.washtimes.com/news/2008/aug/30/pakistan-jets-kill-40-taliban-in-new-fighting-1/

ISLAMABAD, PAKISTAN (AP)
- Fighter jets bombed Taliban hide-outs in Pakistan's troubled northwest while troops pushed into militant territory on the ground, killing at least 40 insurgents in a 24-hour siege, the army said Saturday.

Separately, five others died when an explosion ripped through a house near the Afghan border, local officials said. Claims that it was a missile strike could not immediately be confirmed.

Pakistan's five-month-old civilian government has been plagued by violence and political instability since Pervez Musharraf was forced to resign as president two weeks ago, adding to the many challenges ahead in the Muslim nation of 160 million people.

The economy is sinking, power outages are common, there are food shortages, and many drivers cannot afford to fill up their tanks.

But with a string of suicide bombings, including one that left 67 dead near the capital, Islamabad, tackling extremism is a priority.

Leaders initially offered to hold peace talks with insurgents _ something Musharraf also briefly tried before his ouster _ but have since resorted to what some are calling all-out war.

Army spokesman Maj. Nasir Ali said at least 40 Taliban were killed Friday when fighter jets pounded militants in Swat Valley, which was a popular tourist destination not long ago.

A cache of ammunition exploded when it was hit in one of the strikes, he said, adding that ground troops were advancing into the region Saturday to root out other militant fighters.

Taliban spokesman Muslim Khan said eight of his men, including a local commander, were killed.

The violence followed news that Asif Ali Zardari, who seems poised to be voted Pakistan's next president in a Sept. 6 election by lawmakers, had moved into a tightly guarded government compound because of security fears.

His late wife, Benazir Bhutto, a two-time former prime minister and an outspoken critic of Islamic extremism, was assassinated in a Dec. 27 gun-and-bomb attack during a campaign rally.

Officials say that fighting in Swat and Bajur, a rumored hide-out of Osama bin Laden, have left nearly 500 militants dead in August alone. There are no separate statistics for civilians, but witnesses say dozens have died.

More than 200,000 others have been forced to flee their homes, most of them women and children, and are now living in desperate conditions in sweltering, mosquito-infested relief camps.

Human rights groups expressed concern Saturday about the rising violence.

Locals "insist there is no targeted operation against militants, rather it is a haphazard armed invasion on the people of Swat," Asma Jahangir, chairwoman of the Human Rights Commission of Pakistan, wrote in a letter to the prime minister.

"They have given numerous examples where militants could have been apprehended or attacks on civilians could have been averted had the security forces acted with diligence," she wrote.

In other violence Saturday, a blast ripped through a home in Wana, a main town in the South Wazirtistan tribal region, killing at least five militants, said Afzal Khan, a local official, who had no further details.

Army spokesman Major Murad Khan was also aware of the explosion, but could not confirm claims by two local intelligence officials that it was caused by a missile. They spoke on condition of anonymity because they were not authorized to speak to the media.

The Taliban, meanwhile, have threatened to intensify a campaign of suicide bombings unless military operations in the northwest cease. They have carried out three strikes in recent days, the deadliest on one of the country's largest weapons factories.

At least 67 people were killed in those twin suicide bombings and more than 100 others wounded, almost all civilians.

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Offline bigron

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Re: Civil War is being Incited in Pakistan - a new murderous phase begins
« Reply #21 on: September 01, 2008, 06:05:29 am »
Pakistan-U.S. relations at a critical juncture 

30/08/2008 11:02:00 PM GMT
http://aljazeera.com/news/newsfull.php?newid=154869

 
 Now with Musharraf gone, the U.S. is without an ally and without a policy, for its policy in the region was Musharraf.


By Muqtedar Khan

General Musharraf's resignation on august 18th brings to an end an era of unprecedented Pakistani cooperation with U.S. foreign policy and security needs. It also marks the beginning of a new negotiation between Pakistan and the U.S. as the U.S. seeks fresh reassurances of Pakistan's cooperation in its war on terror and Pakistan seeks a new relationship, under different terms and circumstances with the U.S.

At present both Pakistan and U.S.-Pakistan relations are in a flux and the two are mutually related. This is a critical year for U.S.-Pakistan relations. With General Musharraf's resignation and in a few months President Bush's departure from power will mean that both countries will be reformulating their policies and priorities and by summer of 2009 we will witness a new geopolitical paradigm in place that will dictate how U.S., Pakistan and Afghanistan relate to each other.

The war on terror first brought prominence and popularity for General Musharraf and then it brought defeat and disgrace. General Musharraf's decision to abandon the Taliban to join the U.S. made him an instant hit among majority of Pakistanis and in the West.

For two years, 1999-2001, he was seen as a dictator who had subverted Pakistan's democracy and thumbed his nose at the West and was shunned by the U.S. and its allies. But over night he became America's staunchest ally against terrorism and was welcome as a friend in London and Washington.

A broad segment of Pakistanis praised his realism. His decision to abandon the Taliban was seen as the right thing to do because it was in Pakistan's national interest.

Since 2007 Musharraf had become a serial failure. The Taliban and Al Qaeda continued to consolidate and both the U.S. and Afghanistan started blaming him for all the failures of the western alliance in the region.

For Pakistanis it became obvious that Pakistan had now become a partially failed state heading towards disaster and the government was still more concerned about Washington's needs than its own national interest. This perception that Musharraf had become a Washington tool united the extremists and the moderates, the secularists and the Islamists. The key virtue that made General Musharraf popular was his insistence that his policies were in the national interest and when this claim lost its credibility in the eyes of the Pakistani people, he quickly became a U.S. agent.

When one talks to Pakistanis, their anger and frustration with the U.S. and with the political realities of their own nation is palpable. "Yes," they say, "three thousand innocent Americans died on September 11th 2001, but hundreds of thousands of Muslims have died in the aftermath."

Pakistanis have started to react and kicking Musharraf out is the first step. The end of Musharraf, I suspect, is just the beginning of a dangerous turn that Pakistan has now taken.

Now with Musharraf gone the U.S. is without an ally and without a policy, for its policy in the region was Musharraf.

The Pakistani leadership is now in fundamental disagreement with U.S.' methods. They feel that Pakistan's extremism problem cannot be done away with by use of force. They also feel that the U.S. is part of the problem. U.S. policies in the region fuel extremism and the heavy handed use of force further alienates those who are not radicalized. The solution, they feel, will come slowly through peaceful means and through compromise. Basically they are pursuing accommodation with the Taliban, while the U.S. seeks elimination.

Unless the U.S. agrees to play ball on Pakistani terms, it will have to pursue its goals without any active help from Islamabad and perhaps even in the face of covert, active opposition from Pakistani intelligence and military.

From the outset U.S.'s policy of reliance on Musharraf and force was an unwise strategy. It has failed completely. Bin Laden is still free and Al Qaeda is strong and active. Taliban are still there and much stronger now and chipping away at NATO's resolve. Pakistan, a nuclear state and a longtime U.S. ally is destabilized, no more friendly, and heavily radicalized.

Unless Washington acknowledges its errors and adopts a new policy -- one made in consultation with Islamabad and sensible voices in America, NATO, the U.S., Pakistan and Afghanistan are all in for really tough times ahead.

U.S.-Pakistan relations are now at a critical juncture. It is imperative that both sides handle the crisis with respect for each others' interests and with recognition of the fact that they both need each other.

-- Dr. Muqtedar Khan is Director of Islamic Studies at the University of Delaware and Fellow of the Institute for Social Policy and Understanding.
praised his realism. His decision to abandon the Taliban was seen as the right thing to do because it was in Pakistan's national interest.






-- Middle East Online

 

Offline Biggs

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Re: Civil War is being Incited in Pakistan - a new murderous phase begins
« Reply #22 on: September 02, 2008, 09:07:28 am »
wow, truther & anti-war researcher Prof Michel Chossudovsky quoted in Pakistan''s senate in relation to the US/UK incitement of civil war in Pakistan

America's Plan to breaking up Pakistan cited in Senate
Saturday, 30 August 2008 05:25
 
http://www.globalresearch.ca/index.php?context=va&aid=10010

Senator Nisar A. Memon of the Pakistan Muslim League-Q alleged in the upper house on Friday that the Americans harboured the designs of breaking up Pakistan.


He urged the government to take cognisance of a research report by Prof Michel Chossudovsky of Global Research (Canada) which said that the recent regime change would be followed by a ‘deliberate’ political impasse. The report said that the political impasse was part of an evolving US foreign policy agenda which favoured disruption and disarray in the structure of the state.

“Indirect rule by the Pakistani military and intelligence apparatus is to be replaced by more direct forms of US interference, including an expanded US military presence inside Pakistan,” it says.

An earlier report by the Central Intelligence Agency (CIA) had predicted a “Yugoslavia-like fate for Pakistan in a decade with civil war, bloodshed and inter-provincial rivalries as seen in Balochsitan”.

“Nascent democratic reforms will produce little change in the face of opposition from entrenched political elite and radical Islamic parties. In a climate of continuing domestic turmoil, the central government’s control probably will be reduced to the Punjabi heartland,” the report said.

Senator Memon quoted the report as saying that chaos and anarchy would be created through economic disruption, as result of which the International Monetary Fund would take Pakistan in its grip.

The report alleged that British intelligence agencies were providing covert support to Balochistan’s terrorist separatists.

It said that the ongoing turmoil in Balochistan was part of a strategy to finally separate the province as ‘Greater Balochistan’.

The senator urged the government to take measures to counter such conspiracies and said the defence or foreign minister should state how would the regime face the challenges.

He claimed that the breaking up of sound institutions like Inter-Services Intelligence would be followed by other similar steps.

Leader of the House Mian Raza Rabbani said a minister would rebut the report and lay down a national strategy to protect the country’s integrity.

Deputy Chairman Jan Mohammad Jamali said Prime Minister Yousuf Raza Gilani should respond to the queries in the house.

Earlier, the law minister introduced two bills in the house.

One bill would bar chaining or shifting to death cells of condemned prisoners till the confirmation of their sentences by the Supreme Court and the other pertained to registration of immovable property.
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Offline David Rothscum

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Re: Civil War is being Incited in Pakistan - a new murderous phase begins
« Reply #23 on: September 02, 2008, 09:43:11 am »
wow, truther & anti-war researcher Prof Michel Chossudovsky quoted in Pakistan''s senate in relation to the US/UK incitement of civil war in Pakistan

America's Plan to breaking up Pakistan cited in Senate
Saturday, 30 August 2008 05:25
 
http://www.globalresearch.ca/index.php?context=va&aid=10010

Senator Nisar A. Memon of the Pakistan Muslim League-Q alleged in the upper house on Friday that the Americans harboured the designs of breaking up Pakistan.


He urged the government to take cognisance of a research report by Prof Michel Chossudovsky of Global Research (Canada) which said that the recent regime change would be followed by a ‘deliberate’ political impasse. The report said that the political impasse was part of an evolving US foreign policy agenda which favoured disruption and disarray in the structure of the state.

“Indirect rule by the Pakistani military and intelligence apparatus is to be replaced by more direct forms of US interference, including an expanded US military presence inside Pakistan,” it says.

An earlier report by the Central Intelligence Agency (CIA) had predicted a “Yugoslavia-like fate for Pakistan in a decade with civil war, bloodshed and inter-provincial rivalries as seen in Balochsitan”.

“Nascent democratic reforms will produce little change in the face of opposition from entrenched political elite and radical Islamic parties. In a climate of continuing domestic turmoil, the central government’s control probably will be reduced to the Punjabi heartland,” the report said.

Senator Memon quoted the report as saying that chaos and anarchy would be created through economic disruption, as result of which the International Monetary Fund would take Pakistan in its grip.

The report alleged that British intelligence agencies were providing covert support to Balochistan’s terrorist separatists.

It said that the ongoing turmoil in Balochistan was part of a strategy to finally separate the province as ‘Greater Balochistan’.

The senator urged the government to take measures to counter such conspiracies and said the defence or foreign minister should state how would the regime face the challenges.

He claimed that the breaking up of sound institutions like Inter-Services Intelligence would be followed by other similar steps.

Leader of the House Mian Raza Rabbani said a minister would rebut the report and lay down a national strategy to protect the country’s integrity.

Deputy Chairman Jan Mohammad Jamali said Prime Minister Yousuf Raza Gilani should respond to the queries in the house.

Earlier, the law minister introduced two bills in the house.

One bill would bar chaining or shifting to death cells of condemned prisoners till the confirmation of their sentences by the Supreme Court and the other pertained to registration of immovable property.
Wow, that's big. He shouldn't count on any useful response from Gilani though.

Offline David Rothscum

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Re: Civil War is being Incited in Pakistan - a new murderous phase begins
« Reply #24 on: September 02, 2008, 10:03:41 am »
This is old, but everyone needs to see this, (We could réally use that full report by the way, we have a similar report by the British about the whole world, reports like these are really useful):
http://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/articleshow/1019516.cms
NEW DELHI: Pakistan will be a "failed" state by 2015 as it would be affected by civil war, complete Talibanisation and struggle for control of its nuclear weapons, premier US intelligence agencies have said in an assessment report.

Forecasting a "Yugoslavia-like fate" for Pakistan, the US National Intelligence Council (NIC) and Central Intelligence Agency (CIA) in a jointly prepared Global Futures Assessment Report have said "by year 2015 Pakistan would be a failed state, ripe with civil war, bloodshed, inter-provincial rivalries and a struggle for control of its nuclear weapons and complete Talibanisation".

"Pakistan will not recover easily from decades of political and economic mismanagement, divisive policies, lawlessness, corruption and ethnic friction," said the report quoted by former Pakistan High Commissioner to United Kingdom Wajid Shamsul Hasan in an article in the ' South Asia Tribune '.

Titled 'Will Pakistan Army invade Balochistan as per the NIC-CIA Plan', the former senior diplomat said "in the context of Balochistan, one would like to refer to the 2015 NIC report. It forecast a Yugoslavia-like fate for Pakistan.

"The military operation that has been put in motion there would further distance the Baloch people from rest of the country. That perhaps is the (NIC-CIA) Plan," Hasan said.

"Nascent democratic reforms will produce little change in the face of opposition from an entrenched political elite and radical Islamic parties. In a climate of continuing domestic turmoil, the Central government's control probably will be reduced to the Punjabi heartland and the economic hub of Karachi," the former diplomat quoted the NIC-CIA report as saying.

Expressing apprehension, Hasan asked, "are our military rulers working on a similar agenda or something that has been laid out for them in the various assessment reports over the years by the National Intelligence Council in joint collaboration with CIA?"

His article comes in the backdrop of growing violence between the Balochis and the Pakistani security forces stationed in the gas-rich province.

The recent moves by the security forces to evict all residents within a 15-km radius of the Pakistan's biggest Sui gas plant and the decision to create a cantonment near it has given a fillip to the anti-Islamabad insurgent activities of Balochi groups like the Balochistan Liberation Army, reports said.

The reports said Pakistan was taking the "most drastic step yet" in its bid to crush a deadly tribal rebellion by forcibly evicting all residents from around 500 dwellings within 15 kilometres of the country's biggest Sui gasfield.

The Army says such a step would prevent further attacks and protect residents from the devastating consequences of a major explosion, the reports said.

Offline Biggs

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Re: Civil War is being Incited in Pakistan - a new murderous phase begins
« Reply #25 on: September 02, 2008, 02:09:25 pm »
Wow, that's big. He shouldn't count on any useful response from Gilani though.

yeah the chances of the work of Prof Chossodovsky being actioned by Gilani and Zardari are zero, especially as they are the new facilitators of such a policy, which I am guessing is the reason that Sharif walked out of the coalition
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Offline Biggs

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Re: Civil War is being Incited in Pakistan - a new murderous phase begins
« Reply #26 on: September 02, 2008, 03:02:46 pm »
interesting article on the situation in Peshawar, certainly sounds as though on the ground the rebels already have a degree of control

Pakistani city of Peshawar could fall to Taliban as fear and attacks grow
When the summer holidays end tomorrow, the parents of 1,400 pupils at the Badabher Government Girls' School will face a difficult choice.
 
http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/worldnews/asia/pakistan/2650734/Pakistani-city-of-Peshawar-could-fall-to-Taliban-as-fear-and-attacks-grow.html

By Nick Meo in Peshawar
Last Updated: 7:22PM BST 30 Aug 2008

 

Should they let their daughters go back to lessons in the rubble of their school, blown up by the Taliban in the middle of the night, or should they keep them safe at home?

Hashim, the caretaker who was held at gunpoint by masked gunmen, was warned that they would be back if the school is rebuilt. He fears that next time they could blow it up with pupils inside.

Yet this is not Kandahar, the Taliban capital of southern Afghanistan, but Peshawar - a city of 1.4 million people in neighbouring Pakistan, once celebrated as a cultural haven for artists, musicians and intellectuals.

A year ago schools were considered safe in the city, the capital of North-West Frontier Province. But the Taliban insurgency that has been growing in the wild mountains that rise in the distance is spreading into urban Pakistan.

Clerics and political leaders critical of the Taliban have been kidnapped and shot dead, around 15 suicide bombers have attacked inside the city, and to escape kidnappers businessmen are giving up and moving to the capital Islamabad, two hours drive away, or overseas to Dubai if they can afford to.

Nobody has ever known the city so fearful.

Musli Khan, a clerk who lives near the remains of the school, was disconsolately picking through the mess. The main building collapsed from the force of the explosion and the walls that were left were riddled with giant cracks.

Some chairs and schoolbooks had been pulled from the rubble, he said, gesturing at a damaged Koran.

"And these people say they are Muslims," Mr Khan muttered, shaking his head sadly before checking himself: it is dangerous now to be too critical of the Taliban, especially in suburbs on the outskirts of Peshawar. Here, at night, the police must lock themselves into fortified outposts for safety, and armed fighters prowl at will.

During a hasty and nervous drive to Badabher, only six miles from the city centre, The Sunday Telegraph passed three police stations which have been attacked with rockets in the past few weeks. "You must not stop for long at the school," said our guide, a local reporter. "Out here the Taliban have their spies everywhere."

On the same morning that the school was blown up last week, America's chief diplomat in the province narrowly escaped assassination when her car was ambushed as she drove to work.

A day earlier four Pakistani employees of an international aid organisation were kidnapped.

The stuttering new government in Islamabad has promised a bold strategy to fight militants with new vigour, but their words were greeted with jaded sceptism by those who can't afford to leave the besieged and fearful city.

A protective ring of security checkpoints is supposed to hold back the anarchy in the mountains, at the edge of a huge swathe of the nation that the Government has lost to bandits and rebels, but the checkpoints are slowly retreating nearer to the city and some police stations are now abandoned entirely at night.

Muhammad Asaf, president of the Sarhad Chamber of Commerce, said that for the first time ordinary people are really scared.

"The Taliban is getting stronger day by day," he said. "They are more confident now – every time there is a suicide bomb they are on television claiming responsibility. They didn't used to do that."

Mr Asaf, whose daughter lives in Britain, counts himself as a friend of America but he blames the US for goading former president Pervez Musharraf into a bloody war with the Pushtun tribes around Peshawar, some of which support the Taliban and al-Queda. "The tribal people are peaceful but if you bomb their lands their families will want revenge," he said.

Sultan Agha, the head of a moderate Sufi religious sect and a man of influence who is consulted before a chief minister is appointed for the province, said he now travels no more than six miles from Peshawar's boundary.

"It is unsafe to say anything against the Taliban because they will come and kill you," he said over a cup of green tea, before listing the moderate clerics who have been murdered for speaking out against suicide bombers – now known as "suiciders" in Pakistani English.

"The Taliban are growing in number and it is quite possible that they could take control of Peshawar," he said. "The Government could stop them, certainly, but it is too preoccupied with political infighting."

Since Pervez Musharraf was forced from office a fortnight ago, the ruling coalition has fallen apart amid bitter recriminations, leaving Pakistan hovering on the brink of violent political turmoil.

The former coalition partners, Nawaz Sharif and Asif Ali Zardari, are now preparing to fight an electoral battle for control of the country - but their feuding has raised a disturbing question: can the eventual winner cope with the terrorism that threatens to destroy their troubled nation?

Britain and America, deeply alarmed at the deterioration, are throwing money at development projects in the almost lawless tribal areas, but in conditions of anarchy it is hard to know whether the cash is being well spent.

It is too dangerous for the influx of aid workers who have arrived in Peshawar's safer suburbs to get out and visit the projects, so they have no idea whether their efforts to build schools or drainage systems are winning over tribesmen.

More lethal Westerners are also said to be at large. Crew-cut, Pushtun-speaking Americans have arrived again in the big hotels, keeping themselves to themselves and reminding people of the 1980s when CIA operatives haunted Peshawar as they armed the tribesmen against the Soviets.

As Pakistanis never tire of pointing out, those same tribesmen are now fighting jihad once again, but this time against American soldiers on the other side of the border.

Taliban influence has even crept into Qissa Kawani, the street of the storytellers, in the heart of Peshawar's bazaars, where the mournful chanting of a Taliban CD was playing.

"I hate that noise," said Insanullah, the owner of a shop selling Pushtun music DVDs which he is now too scared to play.

Music store owners have been killed in bombings and he receives threatening letters but said he will continue because he has invested all his money in his little shop and has no other livelihood. On the city outskirts most have closed down.

"People still like music, but they are afraid for their lives and business is terrible," he said.

One of the city's most famous singers, Baryali, moved to Kabul to be safe and another, Wazir Khan, was briefly kidnapped by the Taliban and has gone into hiding since his release.

The city's cinemas are almost empty because customers fear bombs and even Peshawar's poets are censoring themselves.

Taous Dilsouz used to write songs about the war against the Soviets, then about Pakistani politics, but these days he sticks to safe subjects. "No poets will write songs about what is happening to our city," he said. "And even if they did they could not find singers who are brave enough to sing them."

Outside Peshawar it is much worse. Assadullah Khan, a watchman from the town of Mardan which is still nominally under government control, said: "Out of five brothers in my town, one will support the Taliban. The people are poor and illiterate, and they listen to what the clerics say. Some of my friends have joined the Taliban – they pay them for fighting."

In Bajaur Agency, a Taliban stronghold a few hours from Peshawar, the new government has launched a military offensive which it said has killed hundreds of militants.

According to the UN 260,000 have fled the fighting, and refugees interviewed by The Sunday Telegraph spoke of civilians killed in bombing raids. Dislike of the Taliban runs so deep that many want the government to continue the offensive nevertheless.

"We want to be part of Pakistan and we want the army to get rid of the Taliban," said one 18-year-old, who described seeing dogs eating the bodies of bombing victims lying in his village before he fled.

However, with ordinary people suffering in the air raids, a new generation is turning its anger on the government. It is a sign that the blunt instrument of the Pakistani army may sometimes be counter-productive.

Mohammad Ali, a 20-year-old man who was squatting in the middle of a flyblown camp rolling a lump of hashish in the palm of his hand said he could still hear the sound of the planes and the bombing in his head.

"Why didn't they just arrest those Taliban, why were they bombarding us?" he asked. He claimed that about a dozen civilians had died in his village but that the Taliban fighters had left long before the planes arrived.

"We want peace, but we can not have it because of this terrorist America which orders our government to attack its own people," he said. "The Taliban are Godly people, they are Islamic, and we are happy that they send suicide bombers for revenge.

"If it is God's Will, definitely I will join them now. We have to defend our villages and our religion."
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Offline David Rothscum

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Re: Civil War is being Incited in Pakistan - a new murderous phase begins
« Reply #27 on: September 02, 2008, 05:04:04 pm »
It never ceases to amaze me that I read articles on a daily basis about NATO or the Pakistani government claiming they killed another 100 Taliban and only had 2 or 3 casualties themself, but meanwhile both Kabul and Peshawar are at risk of being taken over by the Taliban.

Offline Biggs

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Re: Civil War is being Incited in Pakistan - a new murderous phase begins
« Reply #28 on: September 03, 2008, 05:26:08 am »
Pakistani PM 'survives attack'
 
Mr Gilani was travelling in a convoy

http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/world/south_asia/7595572.stm

Pakistani Prime Minister Yousuf Raza Gilani has survived an assassination attempt, officials say
.

Two bullets from an unidentified gunman hit his car as he was travelling just outside the capital, Islamabad, his press secretary told the BBC.

Mr Gilani's government is grappling with a growing threat from militants in the country.

In December former Prime Minister Benazir Bhutto was killed at an election rally in Rawalpindi.


Major lapse

Mr Gilani was travelling in a bullet-proof car in a convoy between Islamabad and the nearby city of Rawalpindi.

Television pictures indicated that the bullets hit the windows of the driver's door.

Officials say another car in the convoy was also hit by several bullets. There are no reports of injuries.

The BBC's Syed Shoaib Hasan in Islamabad says the incident represents a major lapse in security.

Mr Gilani was returning from the city of Lahore where he had been canvassing support for Asif Zardari, Ms Bhutto's widower, ahead of presidential elections on Saturday.

Ms Bhutto had been favourite to win Pakistan's general elections and become prime minister for a third time before she was killed on 27 December. The elections were subsequently postponed until February.

Her Pakistan People's Party (PPP) emerged as the winners and formed a coalition with the PML-N party of another former Prime Minister, Nawaz Sharif. Mr Gilani, himself a senior PPP member, became prime minister

The coalition broke up amid political acrimony late last month.
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Offline bigron

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Re: Civil War is being Incited in Pakistan - a new murderous phase begins
« Reply #29 on: September 03, 2008, 06:39:14 am »
US-led forces alleged involved in Pakistan attack

US-led forces alleged involved in Pakistan attack; at least 15 said killed

ISHTIAQ MAHSUD
AP News
http://wiredispatch.com/news/?id=326920

Sep 02, 2008 23:47 EST

At least 15 people, including women and children, were killed in an attack involving U.S.-led forces in a remote Pakistani village near the border with Afghanistan, intelligence officials and a witness said Wednesday.

The U.S.-led coalition in Afghanistan said it had no report of such an incursion, said to have happened in the militant-infested South Waziristan tribal region. Pakistan's army confirmed an attack but did not specify if it believed foreign troops were involved.

The U.S. and Pakistan, allies in the war on terror, have had tensions over cross-border attacks, including suspected American missile strikes in Pakistani territory. In one high-profile incident earlier this year, Pakistan said 11 of its soldiers died when U.S. aircraft bombed their border post.

Habib Khan Wazir, an area resident, said the latest incident happened before dawn, shortly after an American helicopter landed in the village of Musa Nikow in South Waziristan.

He said as the owner of a home nearby came outside with his wife, the "American and Afghan soldiers starting firing."

Khan said later the troops entered the house and killed seven other people, including women and children. He said the troops also killed six other residents.

Two local intelligence officials confirmed the account on condition of anonymity because they were not authorized to speak to media. One official said 19 people died.

The U.S. embassy in Islamabad declined to comment.

Maj. Murad Khan, a spokesman for Pakistan's army, said it could confirm an attack on a house near the Pakistan-Afghan border.

"We are collecting details," Khan said, without specifying if Americans were involved.

American officials say Pakistan's tribal regions along the Afghan border have turned into havens for al-Qaida and Taliban-linked militants involved in attacks on U.S. and NATO forces in Afghanistan. South Waziristan is the base for Pakistan's top Taliban leader, Baitullah Mehsud.

The U.S. has pushed Pakistan to crack down on the militancy inside its territory, and there have been debates in Washington over how far the U.S. can go in carrying out its own strikes.

U.S. rules of engagement allow ground forces to go a few miles into Pakistan when in "hot pursuit" and when forces were targeted or fired on by the enemy. U.S. rules also allow aircraft to go several miles into Pakistan air space.

Source: AP News


Offline Biggs

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Re: Civil War is being Incited in Pakistan - a new murderous phase begins
« Reply #30 on: September 03, 2008, 06:47:04 am »
US forces pursuing targets into Pakistan AND then killing civilians is not going to help much, but then helping is not on the agenda, causing a bloodbath however clearly is.

some other recent examples of real live civil war as we speak ongoing in Pakistan

100 killed in Sunni-Shia tribal fighting in Kurram Agency (400 killed in the last 4 weeks)
http://www.hindu.com/2008/09/02/stories/2008090256971400.htm

200,000 people have fled their homes in FATA, Pakistan government declares Ramadan ceasefire, rebel groups reject ceasefire
http://www.iht.com/articles/2008/08/31/asia/pakistan.php


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Offline Nailer

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Re: Civil War is being Incited in Pakistan - a new murderous phase begins
« Reply #31 on: September 03, 2008, 07:17:55 am »
I am worried more about when will the civil war II start in America myself.  You know the  Government vs. the People  civil war.
I am a realist that is slightly conservative yet I have some republican demeanor that can turn democrat when I feel the urge to flip independant.
 
The truth shall set you free, if not a 45ACP round will do the trick.. HEHE

Offline Biggs

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Re: Civil War is being Incited in Pakistan - a new murderous phase begins
« Reply #32 on: September 03, 2008, 09:30:06 am »
a very useful commentary on the recent bloody events in Bajaur Agency

A sting in Pakistan's al-Qaeda mission

By Syed Saleem Shahzad

http://www.atimes.com/atimes/South_Asia/JI04Df04.html

KARACHI
- The Pakistani military has halted operations in Bajaur Agency in the northwest of the country, saying "the back has been broken" of the militancy there.

A military spokesman said that in light of the Muslim holy month of Ramadan, which began on Sunday, all action would stop, which would allow about 500,000 displaced people to return home. Officials claim that in three weeks of fighting 560 militants have been killed, with the loss of 20 members of the security forces.

The ground reality, though, is that the operation failed in its

 

primary objective, to catch the big fish so wanted by the United States - al-Qaeda leader Osama bin Laden and his deputy Ayman al-Zawahiri. This would have been the perfect present for Islamabad to give the George W Bush administration in the run-up to the US presidential elections in November.

Pakistan said they had Zawahiri in their sights, but he evaded them. Zawahiri, who has a US$25 million bounty on his head, escaped a US missile strike in January 2006 near Pakistan's border with Afghanistan.

The Bajaur operation was a comprehensive joint show of power by North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO) and Pakistan forces as they were convinced that the al-Qaeda leaders and other senior Taliban militants were in an area spanning Kunar and Nooristan provinces in Afghanistan and the Bajaur and Mohamad agencies immediately across the border in Pakistan. (See Ducking and diving under B-52s Asia Times Online, May 22, 2008.)

NATO and the Pakistani military had hoped that a pincer operation would force their prey to move their base, thereby exposing them. The thinking was that the militants would seek refuge inside Pakistan, where they could be cornered.

The mission began disastrously, though. Two days before troops were ordered from the corps headquarters of Peshawar in North-West Frontier Province (NWFP) early last month, news of the impending attack was leaked to the militants and the al-Qaeda leadership was hastily moved. The Pakistani forces also received an unwelcome - and unexpected - reception when they began operations in Bajaur; the militants were armed and waiting.

The al-Qaeda leaders were taken under the wing of Qari Ziaur Rahman, a senior Taliban leader and regional commander of Nooristan, Kunar and adjoining Pakistani regions. Over the past few months he has emerged as a key figure and has generated considerable publicity by staging public executions in Kunar and Bajaur of suspected spies for the Americans. Rahman even took the unusual step of contacting the Pakistani press to claim responsibility for successful attacks on Pakistani troops.

Pakistan and NATO had placed high store on a successful mission, launching the heaviest-ever aerial bombardment inside Pakistan's tribal regions - hence the high level of displaced persons. The militants claim that many dozens of paramilitary troops were killed and many captured, along with their heavy weapons and tanks.

The assault continued for several more weeks, but on August 28 during a secret meeting on the aircraft carrier USS Abraham Lincoln the chairman of the US Joint Chiefs of Staff, Admiral Michael Mullen, and the chief of the Pakistani Army Staff, General Ashfaq Pervez Kiani, it was agreed the Bajaur mission had failed. No key militants had been hit and they had now completely fallen off all radar screens.

Inter-Services Public Relations of the Pakistani army then issued a statement confirming that the leading militants had escaped from Bajaur and that the army did not have any idea where they had gone, be it Afghanistan or elsewhere.

The Pakistani government then changed tack and lavished millions of rupees on tribal chiefs through its political agents to form lashkars (groups) to fight against the Taliban and militants. This experiment had earlier failed dismally in the North Waziristan and South Waziristan tribal areas, resulting in the assassination of over 200 tribal chiefs and religious clerics. The survivors fled to the cities, leaving the self-acclaimed Pakistani Taliban to take charge of those areas. There is no reason to believe the story will be any different in Bajaur.

The Bajaur operation was carried out at a time when the Taliban's offensive in Afghanistan was winding down for Ramadan. The militants tend to fast and sleep in peace for the month until Eid, which marks the end of Ramadan.

By this time winter has set in and, as they do each year, the Taliban gradually leave Afghanistan and melt into the Pakistani tribal areas.

Unlike previous years though, the militants are unlikely to remain inactive during their winter break from the battlefields of Afghanistan.

The Bajaur operation, mainly because of the severity of the aerial bombing that caused widespread civilian displacement, has aroused intense anger in militant circles and bloody reprisal attacks can be expected within Pakistan.

The initial skirmishes have already started in NWFP, where members and political allies of the ruling Pashtun sub-nationalist Awami National Party have been targeted. Four top leaders have already been killed and many homes have been gutted. Scores of anti-Taliban political workers have fled from the Swat Valley and other areas.

Taliban sources have confirmed to Asia Times Online that high-level targets are also planned, including army chief Kiani, the leader of the lead party in the ruling coalition, the Pakistan People's Party's Asif Zardari and Rehman Malik, the powerful advisor to the Ministry of Interior. Zardari has vacated his private Islamabad residence in favor of the prime minister's house and he has also curtailed his public appearances.

On Wednesday, shots were fired at Prime Minister Yousaf Raza Gilani's motorcade, his spokesman said. The attack took place on the road to the airport in Islamabad. Gilani was not believed to be in the motorcade.

The Bajaur operation, which was intended to eliminate key figures in the "war on terror", could end in leading figures in Pakistan being killed.

Syed Saleem Shahzad is Asia Times Online's Pakistan Bureau Chief. He can be reached at [email protected] 
 
 
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Offline Biggs

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Re: Civil War is being Incited in Pakistan - a new murderous phase begins
« Reply #33 on: September 03, 2008, 09:31:48 am »
I am worried more about when will the civil war II start in America myself.  You know the  Government vs. the People  civil war.

you really shouldn't be, the civil war being incited in Pakistan by US, UK et al will claim far more American lives far sooner guaranteed than a potential future US civil war that may never happen
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Offline bigron

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Re: Civil War is being Incited in Pakistan - a new murderous phase begins
« Reply #34 on: September 03, 2008, 10:55:23 am »
NATO ground troops attack Taliban stronghold in Pakistan, officials say

The raid may be the first time the US has sent troops into Pakistan. Prior attacks attributed to US forces were conducted with drones.


By Huma Yusuf
posted September 03, 2008 at 10:24 am EDT

NATO and US ground troops attacked three houses near a Taliban and Al Qaeda stronghold in South Waziristan, a tribal area in Pakistan, on Wednesday, Pakistani officials said. At least 15 people – mostly civilians – are said to have been killed in the attack. Unlike previous NATO airstrikes in the region, this involved the deployment of ground troops. The attack comes in the wake of the Pakistan military's announcement of a cease-fire with militants in the northern and tribal areas to observe the Muslim holy month of Ramadan.

According to The New York Times, the attack has been confirmed by the governor of the North West Frontier Province, a Taliban commander, and eyewitnesses. US and NATO officials in Afghanistan have not yet commented on the reported strike.

The attacks were aimed at three houses in the village of Jala Khel in the Angoor Adda area of South Waziristan, less than a mile from the border with Afghanistan, the Taliban commander and local residents said.

The helicopter attacks occurred at about 3 a.m. and killed 20 people, according to the provincial governor, Owais Ahmed Ghani said....

A Taliban commander, known by the nom de guerre Commander Malang, said the attack took place close to a Pakistani military position on the border and killed 15 people. But the Pakistani military took no action, he said.

The BBC reports that ground troops were deployed as part of the attack. The report emphasizes that while airstrikes by coalition forces in Afghanistan against Pakistani militant targets have previously occurred, "a raid by ground troops would be rare."

Locals say three helicopter gunships dropped international troops in the Musa Nikeh area of South Waziristan, located on the border with Afghanistan, overnight.

They say the soldiers killed more than a dozen people with gunfire and bombs, including women and children.

"Troops came in helicopters and carried out action in three houses," Gul Nawaz, a shopkeeper, told Reuters news agency.

Witnesses told the BBC Urdu service that troops entered the house of a local tribesman, opened fire and then lobbed a bomb in the house. They said at least nine bodies had been recovered from the debris. The witnesses said the family was not known for links with militants.

According to a private Pakistani cable channel, local tribesmen, who were awake at the time of the attack to prepare for the day's fast, responded by chanting anti-American slogans, reports United Press International.

Pakistani authorities believe the attack was aimed at a particular militant target, reports Voice of America.

Pakistan Defense Minister Ahmed Mukhtar told reporters in Lahore that the country's foreign office is investigating.

He says he does not have details. Mukthar says three houses were targeted by NATO forces and theorizes the strike had a specific target.

NATO and US-led airstrikes against militant targets in Pakistan are controversial as they are perceived to violate national sovereignty, reports the Associated Press.

The United States and Pakistan, allies in the war on terror, have had tensions over cross-border attacks, including a series of suspected American missile strikes which have killed two senior al-Qaida operatives in Pakistani territory this year....

AP reported last year that U.S. rules of engagement allowed ground forces to go a little over six miles into Pakistan when in hot pursuit, and when forces were targeted or fired on by the enemy. U.S. rules allow aircraft to go 10 miles into Pakistan air space.

Pakistani officials protest that cross-border strikes are a violation of their sovereignty. They plead with U.S. and NATO commanders to share intelligence and allow Pakistani troops to carry out all raids on their territory.

In a separate incident on Wednesday, bullets were fired at the motorcade of Pakistani Prime Minister Yousaf Raza Gilani on the Islamabad Highway, reports Pakistani daily The News. The prime minister and his entourage were not harmed in the attack. The News also reports that militants from the Swat Valley, the site of recent military operations, have claimed responsibility for the attack.
 

 
Find this article at:
http://www.csmonitor.com/2008/0903/p99s04-duts.html 
 

Offline Sub-X

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Re: Civil War is being Incited in Pakistan - a new murderous phase begins
« Reply #35 on: September 03, 2008, 11:18:29 am »
At least 20 dead in US-led attack in Pakistan
http://www.irishtimes.com/newspaper/breaking/2008/0903/breaking3.htm
3 September 2008




Suspected US commandos from Afghanistan killed 20 people, including women and children, in a pre-dawn raid inside Pakistan, officials said, an attack branded as an assault on the nation's sovereignty.

The attack is likely to spark uproar in Pakistan, where it will be seen as undermining sovereignty at a time when a new civilian government is struggling to assert authority in the turbulent nuclear-armed state.

"It is outrageous," Owais Ahmed Ghani, governor of North West Frontier province, said in a statement.

"This is a direct assault on the sovereignty of Pakistan and the people of Pakistan expect that the armed forces ... would rise to defend the sovereignty of the country and give a befitting reply," he said.

Security officials in the region said they suspected US soldiers backed by helicopter gunships mounted the attack.

A spokeswoman for Afghanistan's NATO-led force said she had no information about the incident.

A spokesman for a separate US-led coalition force declined to comment, referring questions to the US Central Command.

The United States says al-Qaeda and Taliban militants are based in sanctuaries in northwest Pakistan's ethnic Pashtun tribal areas on the Afghan border, where they orchestrate attacks in Afghanistan and Pakistan and plot violence in the West.

Since the emergence of a civilian-led government following elections in Pakistan in February, there has been mounting concern that us military operations were becoming more aggressive in the tribal lands bordering Afghanistan.

The number of missile attacks launched by pilotless drone aircraft have multiplied, and there have been fears us forces would use helicopter gunships or put troops on the ground for "hot pursuit" or commando-style raids to destroy al-Qaeda nests.

The attack took place in a village in the South Waziristan region, a known sanctuary for al-Qaeda and Taliban militants.

The village is across the border from Bermal, a village near a US base at Shikin in Afghanistan's Paktika province.

"Troops came in helicopters and carried out action in three houses," said Angor Adda village shopkeeper Gul Nawaz.

Other residents said the foreign troops detained some people and took them away.

us-operated drone aircraft have launched attacks in Pakistani border regions several times this year, killing dozens of militants, but US ground troops had not been known to cross into Pakistan to fight militants.

Pakistan is a staunch US ally, even though the campaign against militancy is deeply unpopular with many people, but it rules out any encroachment by foreign soldiers onto its soil.

Pakistani Defence Minister Ahmed Mukhtar said aircraft belonging to foreign forces in Afghanistan attacked three houses at 4.30 a.m. (2230 GMT).

He declined to comment further, saying the Foreign Ministry was investigating.
“If you strike at,imprison,or kill us,out of our prisons or graves we will still evoke a spirit that will thwart you,and perhaps,raise a force that will destroy you! We defy you! Do your worst!”-James Connolly 1909


DARK HALF-END GAME

Offline oyk152

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U.S. ground operation in Pakistan! Pentagon employees confirm
« Reply #36 on: September 04, 2008, 09:49:05 am »
 High-ranking Pentagon employees have a deployment of American ground troops in Pakistan.  They wanted to but not mentioned by name, as the U.S. Defense Department so far no official opinion on the use in the night to Wednesday respectively.  Reportedly was the first land deployment of the US-led troops in Pakistan.

The New York Times quoted top officials that the surprise attack by the start of a larger campaign on Pakistani territory could be.  One such secret plan have U.S. Defense Secretary Robert Gates repeatedly endorsed.  Radical Islamic rebels and Al-Qaeda terrorists use the unwegsame border with Afghanistan as a refuge area. The Pakistani Parliament meanwhile condemned the military action.


Full Article here  http://translate.google.com/translate?hl=en&sl=de&u=http://www.n-tv.de/&sa=X&oi=translate&resnum=1&ct=result&prev=/search%3Fq%3Dn-tv.de%26hl%3Den%26rls%3Dcom.microsoft:*:IE-SearchBox%26rlz%3D1I7SUNA
http://www.freedomfiles.org/war/fema.htm
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Stone walls do not a prison make
Nor iron bars a cage
Minds innocent and quiet take
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Offline Loungin

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Re: U.S. ground operation in Pakistan! Pentagon employees confirm
« Reply #37 on: September 04, 2008, 09:54:57 am »
Hahah... watch them catch Bin Laden right before the election.  This truely is a masterpiece of a play they are performing.

Offline bigron

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Pakistan: Uproar grows over first ground assault by US troops
« Reply #38 on: September 04, 2008, 09:56:23 am »
Pakistan: Uproar grows over first ground assault by US troops

Pakistani military officials fear American intervention in the tribal areas could spark a rebellion, derailing counterterrorism operations.

By Liam Stack
posted September 04, 2008 at 9:54 am EDT

United States forces conducted their first ground assaults into Pakistani territory from bases in Afghanistan early Wednesday morning in a raid on a suspected Taliban stronghold in South Waziristan, one of Pakistan's lawless tribal areas. The attack has caused an uproar in Pakistan and raised concerns of a new period of tension between the US and its valuable, nuclear-armed ally in the war on terror, which has entered a period of political uncertainty after the resignation of long-serving president Pervez Musharraf last month.

The US has not officially commented on the raid, and leaders of the US-led NATO peacekeeping force in Afghanistan deny any knowledge of the attack, reports Reuters. But one US official, speaking to CNN on the condition of anonymity, confirmed that the attack had occurred.

The Pentagon has refused to comment officially on the attack, but several defense officials acknowledged that U.S. military activity had taken place inside Pakistan.

The senior U.S. official said a small number of U.S. helicopters landed troops in the village near Angoor Adda in South Waziristan, where Taliban and al Qaeda fighters have hunkered down over the years.

Local media reports said the troops came out of a chopper and fired on civilians. The U.S. official said there may have been a small number of women and children in the immediate vicinity, but when the mission began "everybody came out firing" from the compound.

He said the U.S. troops specifically attacked three buildings in the compound. They were believed to contain individuals responsible for training and equipping insurgents who have been crossing the border into Afghanistan in increasing numbers in recent months and staging large-scale, high-profile attacks against U.S. and coalition forces.

There has been no indication that the US troops were targeting Osama bin Laden or his deputy, Ayman al-Zawahiri.

Outraged at the violation of sovereignty, the Pakistani government summoned the US ambassador to protest the raid, reports the BBC.

Some officials and analysts say that the raid into Angoor Adda may signal a more aggressive American strategy towards militants in Pakistan's tribal areas and their cross-border raids into Afghanistan, reports The New York Times.


The commando raid by the American forces signaled what top American officials said could be the opening salvo in a much broader campaign by Special Operations forces against the Taliban and Al Qaeda inside Pakistan, a secret plan that Defense Secretary Robert M. Gates has been advocating for months within President Bush's war council.

It also seemed likely to complicate relations with Pakistan, where the already unstable political situation worsened after the resignation last month of President Pervez Musharraf, a longtime American ally.

"What you're seeing is perhaps a stepping up of activity against militants in sanctuaries in the tribal areas that pose a direct threat to United States forces and Afghan forces in Afghanistan," said one senior American official, who had been briefed on the attack and spoke on condition of anonymity because of the mission's political sensitivity. "There's potential to see more."

But with political uncertainty and the rising tide of violence, some fear that an aggressive American posture could do more harm than good. Speaking to the Associated Press (AP), Pakistani Gen. Athar Abbas said he feared American attacks could provoke a tribal rebellion against Islamabad, which would completely derail counterterrorism operations in the region.

He said the attack would undermine Pakistan's efforts to isolate Islamic extremists and could threaten NATO's major supply lines, which snake from Pakistan's Indian Ocean port of Karachi through the tribal region into Afghanistan.

"We cannot afford a huge uprising at the level of tribe," Abbas told AP. "That would be completely counterproductive and doesn't help the cause of fighting terrorism in the area."

Bloodshed in the tribal areas has become increasingly common in recent weeks. Until a cease-fire was announced last weekend, the Pakistani Army had killed hundreds of militants in the Bajaur tribal region. In a separate incident on Wednesday, Pakistani forces killed 30 militants in a gun battle in the Swat Valley, another site of fierce military-militant clashes, reports Agence France-Presse. On Thursday morning, 25 police recruits were kidnapped by Taliban forces in the tribal areas while on their way to a training center.
 


Find this article at:
http://www.csmonitor.com/2008/0904/p99s01-duts.html 
 

Offline Biggs

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Re: Civil War is being Incited in Pakistan - a new murderous phase begins
« Reply #39 on: September 04, 2008, 06:09:24 pm »
Taliban rebels abduct 25 police recruits in Pakistan
Irish Sun
Thursday 4th September, 2008 
(IANS)

http://story.irishsun.com/index.php/ct/9/cid/2411cd3571b4f088/id/402801/cs/1/


Taliban militants captured 25 police recruits in restive north-western Pakistan, officials said Thursday.

The trainees were abducted in the tribal North-Western Frontier Province late Wednesday when they were returning to the Police Training College after vacations in Hangu district, the provincial police chief Naveed Malik said.

'The militants intercepted three vehicles carrying the police cadets somewhere between Orakzai and Khyber tribal districts and took them away,' he added. The drivers were later freed.

Pakistan's tribal districts are known sanctuaries of Taliban and Al Qaeda militants who are fighting the country's security forces as well as launching cross-border attacks on US-led international forces in Afghanistan.
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