Author Topic: Lindsey Williams Shock Oil Back to $50 / USA to collapse  (Read 14939 times)

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Offline Nailer

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Re: Lindsey Williams Shock Oil Back to $50 / USA to collapse
« Reply #40 on: October 17, 2008, 07:03:18 am »
Greedy bastards .


http://www.iht.com/articles/2008/10/16/business/oil.php
OPEC calls emergency meeting as oil prices plummet
By Jad Mouawad

Thursday, October 16, 2008
NEW YORK: Oil prices plummeted Thursday, falling below $70 a barrel for the first time in 16 months, prompting the OPEC oil cartel to call for an emergency meeting next week.

The rapid decline in prices had alarmed both petroleum company executives and oil producers, who are becoming increasingly nervous that oil's roller-coaster ride undermines the stability of energy markets.

Oil prices have dropped sharply in recent weeks amid the economic crisis and lower consumption in developed nations. In New York, oil futures fell as much as 8 percent to $68.57 a barrel Thursday, their lowest level since June 2007. Oil has lost half its value since hitting a record $147.27 a barrel in July.

While not quite a rout yet, the precipitous drop undermines the elusive quest for stability that both oil producers and petroleum executives say they need to invest over the long term. The sharp decline Thursday prompted OPEC members to move up an emergency meeting - initially set for Nov. 18 - to next Friday, to look for ways to stem the price decline. Analysts expect the cartel's producers to reduce their production by about 1 million barrels a day.

The surprise announcement came a week after OPEC, the Organization of Petroleum Exporting Countries, which controls about 40 percent of the world's oil exports, said its members would meet in November "amid growing unease over the situation." But some OPEC members have been alarmed at the panic selling in commodity markets and successfully lobbied for an earlier meeting.

The concern now for producers is that the decline in prices could reduce future revenues and possibly crimp investments.

The Iranian oil minister, Gholamhossein Nozari, said in Tehran on Tuesday, "I think the low price is a real damage to the future of production."

The same question is also weighing on the mind of many energy experts. Does a period of lower prices mean the oil industry will repeat the errors of the past and sharply curtail its investments?

Since oil is a cyclical business, some energy analysts fear that today's downturn could set the stage for a new price rally if oil companies cut their exploration spending.

From its inception more than a century ago, the oil industry has gone through countless up and down cycles, and oil companies have often underinvested in periods of falling prices. The price collapse of the 1980s led companies to reduce investments and sparked a wave of mega-mergers through the sector.

But the industry's retrenchment in the face of lower prices left the world scrambling for oil when demand from Asian and Latin American economies soared over the past decade.

Now, after nearly a decade of growth, the economic slowdown means there will be less demand for energy in the foreseeable future.

These concerns were on the minds of petroleum executives who gathered at an industry conference in Venice last weekend. The titans of the oil industry worried that a prolonged recession, tighter credit, and lower energy consumption would mean slower growth in energy supplies in coming years. The credit freeze has already forced some projects to be scaled back, some energy analysts said.

"This is a real test," Jeroen van der Veer, the chief executive of Royal Dutch Shell, said during an interview on the sidelines of the conference. "Some people will be overstretched and there will be some delays in some projects."

The problem is that if companies pared their investments they would set the stage for a new surge in prices when demand eventually picks up, according to J. Robinson West, the chairman of PFC Energy, the consulting company hosting the conference.

Many experts have warned that such a crunch may happen within the next five years, and could once again propel oil prices into triple-digit territory. Over the past decade, the growth in oil consumption has outpaced the ability of producers to boost production.

A senior oil executive said that the industry was determined not to let history repeat itself. Many oil executives do not expect the current crisis to fundamentally alter the fact that developing economies will need more energy in the future. By 2030, more than three-quarters of the world's energy will still be derived from hydrocarbons, including oil, gas and coal.

"Investments in exploration and production are very much linked to the price of oil," said Didier Houssin, the head of oil markets at the International Energy Agency, which advises industrial nations on energy policy. "What we can fear is that the financial crisis leads to delays in many projects."

The drop in prices has already created problems for oil producers, who have become accustomed to high prices. Iran and Venezuela both need oil prices at $95 a barrel to balance their budgets, Russia needs $70 and Saudi Arabia needs $55 a barrel, according to Deutsche Bank estimates. The Algerian oil minister, Chakib Khelil, estimated Thursday that the "ideal" price for crude oil was between $70 and $90 a barrel.

In Russia, which is not part of OPEC, the drop in prices is threatening the country's ability to increase production. The Russian government has reportedly agreed to allocate $9 billion to its four major producers - Lukoil, Gazprom, Rosneft and TNK-BP - to help them cope with investment needs amid the credit crisis.

In the United States, Chesapeake Energy, a gas producer, has recently indicated that it would reduce its capital investments over the next few years in response to falling prices.

Global oil demand is undeniably slowing down, particularly in developed nations. Japanese oil consumption tumbled by 12 percent in August, while in the United States demand fell by 8 percent in September.

Still, consumption is growing in developing nations, albeit at a slower pace than in recent years. The International Energy Agency expects global oil demand to grow by just 400,000 barrels a day this year, to 86.5 million barrels a day. At the beginning of the year, the agency was expecting growth of more than two million barrels for 2008.

"We pretty much know where supplies are going to come from in future years, but today the biggest uncertainty is demand," said Christophe de Margerie, the chief executive of the French oil company Total.
I am a realist that is slightly conservative yet I have some republican demeanor that can turn democrat when I feel the urge to flip independant.
 
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Offline chris jones

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Re: Lindsey Williams Shock Oil Back to $50 / USA to collapse
« Reply #41 on: October 17, 2008, 02:56:54 pm »


I'll SAY THIS UNTILL I'M HAVING A DIRT NAP.

There have been solutions to oil usage and to energy, for the past 50 years.

Not the expensive solar systems, or hydrogen generators, or battery cars. They are hype, and money makers.
Can the average Joe Afford them, what of city dwellers.
Come on please, the Bureau of Patents WDC, sold out. A patent is made and is ubavoidably sucesful in this area, oil barons buy it, or kill the inventor.

If we maintained a goverment that gave a twit about us and humanity they woud search and sieze every patent to release us from the dominance of oil and evergy.
Who is shittttin who. Im sick if this shite, in the 50s i saw an experimental carbeurator built in Detroit getting over 60 miles oer gallon performance.
Notherners, in fact all of America awaited the millionare inventor of the home heater at 30% the cost of oil, the day he was to give this patent and prototype to the world( mind you give , he ws well of and a good man), him, his wife, and son fell of the face of the earth.
They want us under their thumb, energy is their weapon, dont let them shitte you.
You tell me how to control a population, energy, OK, transportatio meaning oil ok,,now you got em.

Offline Raincheck

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Re: Lindsey Williams Shock Oil Back to $50 / USA to collapse
« Reply #42 on: November 11, 2008, 09:06:28 am »
Six days later...down below $70

ahem

just dipped below $60

Boubear

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Re: Lindsey Williams Shock Oil Back to $50 / USA to collapse
« Reply #43 on: November 11, 2008, 09:08:25 am »
Gas was $0.84 cents a litre here yesterday!!  The lowest I've seen it in a long long time!!

Offline UK Lyn

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Re: Lindsey Williams Shock Oil Back to $50 / USA to collapse
« Reply #44 on: November 11, 2008, 10:03:38 am »
For me Lindsey has got his target.  But how long will oil stay low?  Like I said, once the reserves come down a bit, the folks that explore for, drill and process that oil aren't about to work for free.

This is what I want to see, when these issue come head-to-head

Offline Neutron

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Re: Lindsey Williams Shock Oil Back to $50 / USA to collapse
« Reply #45 on: November 11, 2008, 10:07:52 am »
Gas was $0.84 cents a litre here yesterday!!  The lowest I've seen it in a long long time!!

$0.48 a litre ($1.81 a gallon) in Saint Paul Minnesota, USA

Offline Nailer

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Re: Lindsey Williams Shock Oil Back to $50 / USA to collapse
« Reply #46 on: November 11, 2008, 10:54:36 am »
*NYMEX Crude Oil -3.41 -5.46% 59.00
http://money.cnn.com/data/markets/
I am a realist that is slightly conservative yet I have some republican demeanor that can turn democrat when I feel the urge to flip independant.
 
The truth shall set you free, if not a 45ACP round will do the trick.. HEHE

Offline America2

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Re: Lindsey Williams Shock Oil Back to $50 / USA to collapse
« Reply #47 on: November 11, 2008, 12:36:42 pm »
http://biz.yahoo.com/ap/081111/oil_prices.html

Oil falls below $59, gasoline continues plunge
Tuesday November 11, 1:05 pm ET
By John Porretto, AP Energy Writer 
Oil falls below $59 as gasoline prices dip below $2 in a handful of states

HOUSTON (AP) -- Retail gasoline prices dipped for a 17th week since July 4, falling below $2 a gallon in a number of states and as low as $1.77 in Des Moines, Iowa.

While consumers, worried about a weak job market and slumping investments, are grateful for the price relief, there are indications they are hanging on to the money that they are not putting in the gas tank.

Oil prices hit a 20-month low Tuesday as Wall Street offered yet more evidence that consumers have gone into hiding.

Retail gasoline prices fell to a national average of $2.22 a gallon, dragged down by the falling price of crude, which now costs 60 percent less per barrel than it did in mid-July.

Light, sweet crude for December delivery fell more than 5 percent, or $3.25, to $59.16 a barrel on the New York Mercantile Exchange. In earlier electronic trading, crude fell to $58.32, it's lowest point since March 2007.

Oil prices fell two days ahead of a report from the International Energy Agency, which some analysts expect will cut its 2009 oil demand forecast for the third consecutive month.

Volatile price swings are occurring almost every day on the trading floor.

While the Nymex contract is now trading near first-half 2007 prices, the difference then between daily highs and lows was around $1.50 a barrel, while now the average daily range is around $5.50 a barrel with recent daily peaks at $9.50, said analyst Olivier Jakob of Petromatrix in Switzerland.

Investors have grown increasingly leery about the swooning U.S. economy, which faces its worst recession in decades.

Industry analysts had expected China and India would continue buying crude if the U.S. and other western nations went into recession, but the booming economies of Asia have begun to show signs of fatigue.

Some forecasts had called for China's gross domestic product to grow 10 percent next year. More recent forecasts have it closer to 6 percent, the firm Cameron Hanover said in a report Tuesday.

A $586 billion stimulous package in China boosted markets globally early Monday, but those gains fizzled quickly and a sell-off that began by midday in the U.S. continued in Asia and Europe Tuesday.

On Tuesday, the Dow sank more than 200 points after Homebuilder Toll Brothers Inc. and Starbucks Corp. gave investors more evidence the housing market and consumer spending are getting weaker.

Toll Brothers said fourth-quarter revenue fell 41 percent from the year-ago period, while Starbucks reported lower sales across the coffee chain, leading to profits that fell below analysts' expectations.

Gasoline fell again overnight, dipping 2 cents to a national average of $2.22 for a gallon of regular unleaded, according to auto club AAA, the Oil Price Information Service and Wright Express. The average price has fallen nearly 32 percent in the past month and, according to AAA, could be headed to $2 a gallon nationally by year's end.

Crude demand from the U.S., the world's largest consumer of energy, is a key driver of oil prices.

"We saw extremely poor car sales and pretty shocking unemployment numbers from the U.S. last week," said Toby Hassall, an analyst with Commodity Warrants Australia in Sydney. "It wouldn't surprise me if oil edged down toward $50."

U.S. car sales fell to a 25-year low in October while the unemployment rate shot to a 14-year high of 6.5 percent last month.

Oil prices fell despite signs that OPEC members are going ahead with production cuts agreed to at an emergency meeting in Vienna, Austria, last month.

Many analysts are expecting another cut by the Organization of Petroleum Exporting Countries, which will meet on Dec. 17 in Oran, Algeria.

The prime minister of Qatar said Tuesday that "fair" oil prices of between $70 to $90 per barrel would ensure that expensive oil exploration could continue, avoiding price spikes in the future.

Sheikh Hamad Bin Jassim Bin Jabr Al-Thani said that while oil prices below $70 a barrel may seem like a gift to consumers, it could trigger price spikes in the near future when demand picks up.

But for now it is waning energy demand, not the supply controlled by OPEC, that is dominating crude prices.

Events that earlier this year threatened to cut off supply in oil producing nations no longer appear to have the power to send prices surging.

Militants in Nigeria on Monday resumed attacks on the country's oil installations. The military said it killed eight people while guarding a facility in the oil-rich south of the country.

Militants frequently attack oil facilities, seeking to hobble Africa's biggest petroleum industry and force Nigeria's federal government to send more oil funds to the southern states where the crude is pumped.

"The focus of the market has really been on the demand side," Hassall said. "I'd be surprised if supply side issues in Nigeria could change the mood of the market."

In other Nymex trading, heating oil futures fell 7.48 cents to $1.93 a gallon, while gasoline prices dropped 7.3 cents to $1.2945 a gallon. Natural gas for December delivery tumbled 39.8 cents to $6.85 per 1,000 cubic feet.

In London, December Brent crude tumbled 6 percent, or $3.54 to $55.54 a barrel on the ICE Futures exchange.


zafada

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Re: Lindsey Williams Shock Oil Back to $50 / USA to collapse
« Reply #48 on: November 12, 2008, 06:06:47 pm »
Hmm, this is looking sketchy.

So what of the Barack Obama thing?  Is the media going to flip this around somehow?

Offline Geolibertarian

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Re: Lindsey Williams Shock Oil Back to $50 / USA to collapse
« Reply #49 on: November 12, 2008, 06:41:23 pm »
Since there are some who might be confused as to why the sudden drop in oil prices could have negative consequences for the U.S. economy, allow me to give my current understanding of the issue.

As far as I can tell, all oil producing countries in the Middle East rely on borrowed money to keep their economies going, which means they need the revenue they get from oil sales to service their debts.

Thus, a dramatic drop in oil sales means a dramatic drop in revenue, and a dramatic drop in revenue means they'll be desperate to raise the money they need to service their debts from an alternative source.

That being the case, it is likely, if not certain, that they'll soon start selling all of the U.S. government bonds they invested in years ago. If they sell these bonds to other private investors, then it will have little if any impact on our economy. If they sell them to the Federal Reserve, however, then it could conceivably cause Yugoslavian-style hyperinflation.

To understand why, consider the following excerpt (all emphasis original):

-------------------------------------------------------

Because the Federal Reserve can be counted on to "monetize" (convert into money) virtually any amount of government debt, and because this process of expanding the money supply is the primary cause of inflation, it is tempting to jump to the conclusion that federal debt and inflation are but two aspects of the same phenomenon. This, however, is not necessarily true. It is quite possible to have either one without the other.

The banking cartel holds a monopoly in the manufacture of money. Consequently, money is created only when IOUs are "monetized" by the Fed or by commercial banks. When private individuals, corporations, or institutions purchase government bonds, they must use money they have previously earned and saved. In other words, no new money is created, because they are using funds that are already in existence. Therefore, the sale of government bonds to the banking system is inflationary, but when sold to the private sector, it is not. That is the primary reason the United States avoided massive inflation during the 1980s when the federal government was going into debt at a greater rate than ever before in its history. By keeping interest rates high, these bonds became attractive to private investors, including those in other countries.  Very little new money was created, because most of the bonds were purchased with American dollars already in existence. This, of course, was a temporary fix at best. Today, those bonds are continually maturing and are being replaced by still more bonds to include the original debt plus accumulated interest. Eventually this process must come to an end and, when it does, the Fed will have no choice but to literally buy back all the debt of the '80s -- that is, to replace all of the formerly invested private money with newly manufactured fiat money -- plus a great deal more to cover the interest. Then we will understand the meaning of inflation.

-- G. Edward Griffin, The Creature From Jekyll Island, pp. 200-01

-------------------------------------------------------
 

This is yet another reason why monetary reform is easily one of the top three issues facing our nation right now.
"Abolish all taxation save that upon land values." -- Henry George

"If our nation can issue a dollar bond, it can issue a dollar bill." -- Thomas Edison

http://schalkenbach.org
http://www.monetary.org
http://forum.prisonplanet.com/index.php?topic=203330.0

zafada

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Re: Lindsey Williams Shock Oil Back to $50 / USA to collapse
« Reply #50 on: November 12, 2008, 06:45:34 pm »
This suspense is killing me.  I want to know what's going to happen and when so I can keep my schedule open...

 8)

Offline plantop14

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Re: Lindsey Williams Shock Oil Back to $50 / USA to collapse
« Reply #51 on: November 12, 2008, 06:48:38 pm »
This suspense is killing me.  I want to know what's going to happen and when so I can keep my schedule open...

 8)
Don't worry, we are all on the "Express Elevator To Hell" and I plan on riding the motherf**ker to the bottom of the pit!
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Offline trailhound

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Re: Lindsey Williams Shock Oil Back to $50 / USA to collapse
« Reply #52 on: November 12, 2008, 06:56:53 pm »
Quote
Gas was $0.84 cents a litre here yesterday!!  The lowest I've seen it in a long long time!!

damn it might be worth it to drive to canada and buy some gas :P ( i live in atlanta)  prices are down to about 2 bucks and a few cents around here...still twice what it should be but at this point im giddy about paying 2 bucks a gallon :P

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Offline America2

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Re: Lindsey Williams Shock Oil Back to $50 / USA to collapse
« Reply #53 on: November 12, 2008, 07:14:13 pm »
Since there are some who might be confused as to why the sudden drop in oil prices could have negative consequences for the U.S. economy, allow me to give my current understanding of the issue.

As far as I can tell, all oil producing countries in the Middle East rely on borrowed money to keep their economies going, which means they need the revenue they get from oil sales to service their debts.

Thus, a dramatic drop in oil sales means a dramatic drop in revenue, and a dramatic drop in revenue means they'll be desperate to raise the money they need to service their debts from an alternative source.

That being the case, it is likely, if not certain, that they'll soon start selling all of the U.S. government bonds they invested in years ago. If they sell these bonds to other private investors, then it will have little if any impact on our economy. If they sell them to the Federal Reserve, however, then it could conceivably cause Yugoslavian-style hyperinflation.

To understand why, consider the following excerpt (all emphasis original):

-------------------------------------------------------

Because the Federal Reserve can be counted on to "monetize" (convert into money) virtually any amount of government debt, and because this process of expanding the money supply is the primary cause of inflation, it is tempting to jump to the conclusion that federal debt and inflation are but two aspects of the same phenomenon. This, however, is not necessarily true. It is quite possible to have either one without the other.

The banking cartel holds a monopoly in the manufacture of money. Consequently, money is created only when IOUs are "monetized" by the Fed or by commercial banks. When private individuals, corporations, or institutions purchase government bonds, they must use money they have previously earned and saved. In other words, no new money is created, because they are using funds that are already in existence. Therefore, the sale of government bonds to the banking system is inflationary, but when sold to the private sector, it is not. That is the primary reason the United States avoided massive inflation during the 1980s when the federal government was going into debt at a greater rate than ever before in its history. By keeping interest rates high, these bonds became attractive to private investors, including those in other countries.  Very little new money was created, because most of the bonds were purchased with American dollars already in existence. This, of course, was a temporary fix at best. Today, those bonds are continually maturing and are being replaced by still more bonds to include the original debt plus accumulated interest. Eventually this process must come to an end and, when it does, the Fed will have no choice but to literally buy back all the debt of the '80s -- that is, to replace all of the formerly invested private money with newly manufactured fiat money -- plus a great deal more to cover the interest. Then we will understand the meaning of inflation.

-- G. Edward Griffin, The Creature From Jekyll Island, pp. 200-01

-------------------------------------------------------
 

This is yet another reason why monetary reform is easily one of the top three issues facing our nation right now.

Bingo! We have a winner here!

Offline open your eyes

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Re: Lindsey Williams Shock Oil Back to $50 / USA to collapse
« Reply #54 on: November 12, 2008, 08:54:14 pm »
Since there are some who might be confused as to why the sudden drop in oil prices could have negative consequences for the U.S. economy, allow me to give my current understanding of the issue.

As far as I can tell, all oil producing countries in the Middle East rely on borrowed money to keep their economies going, which means they need the revenue they get from oil sales to service their debts.


forgive my lack of knowledge but if the Middle East is producing oil, How do they rely on borrowed money? What am I missing

TheGoodFight1984

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Re: Lindsey Williams Shock Oil Back to $50 / USA to collapse
« Reply #55 on: November 13, 2008, 10:27:26 am »
I also don't get how the price of oil being $50 will bankrupt the middle east. they just slow production to prevent being hurt, right? can someone gimme the lo-down on that?

Offline Neutron

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Re: Lindsey Williams Shock Oil Back to $50 / USA to collapse
« Reply #56 on: November 13, 2008, 10:39:38 am »
damn it might be worth it to drive to canada and buy some gas :P ( i live in atlanta)  prices are down to about 2 bucks and a few cents around here...still twice what it should be but at this point im giddy about paying 2 bucks a gallon :P

There are 3.785 liters to a gallon. So multiply $0.84 a liter times 3.785 and you get $3.18 a US gallon.  I am in Minnesota and our cost per gallon is $1.86 http://www.minnesotagasprices.com/

Offline national732

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Re: Lindsey Williams Shock Oil Back to $50 / USA to collapse
« Reply #57 on: November 13, 2008, 10:40:17 am »
   Oil is cheap right now because a bunch of people are not working (no commutes), and
the automakers, who have many stockholders also owning oil company stocks are trying
to ease the auto manufacturer crisis.  Once the automakers are out of the woods, it will
skyrocket higher than ever, just watch.
Do you have enough food on hand to feed your family for a year?

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Offline Geolibertarian

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Re: Lindsey Williams Shock Oil Back to $50 / USA to collapse
« Reply #58 on: November 13, 2008, 10:47:39 am »
I also don't get how the price of oil being $50 will bankrupt the middle east. they just slow production to prevent being hurt, right? can someone gimme the lo-down on that?

That might mitigate the problem for a while, but my hunch is that this would eventually backfire as more and more increasingly cash-strapped drivers simply started driving less, due to gas being priced out of their reach. And bear in mind that loan interest doesn't stop compounding merely because the borrower's monthly income drops.

In answer to the previous poster's question, there was a time when the U.S. was a (if not "the") leading exporter of goods and services to the world economy, yet that never prevented us from having billions in national debt and billions more in private debt hanging over our heads, and the simple reason for that is that all money is created out of debt. The same is true of virtually every other country in the world.
"Abolish all taxation save that upon land values." -- Henry George

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http://schalkenbach.org
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Offline Neutron

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Re: Lindsey Williams Shock Oil Back to $50 / USA to collapse
« Reply #59 on: November 13, 2008, 11:01:11 am »
I also don't get how the price of oil being $50 will bankrupt the middle east. they just slow production to prevent being hurt, right? can someone gimme the lo-down on that?

They need a certain amount of money coming in to service their debt for all their spectacular building projects they have built over the years. If they do not have it then they will start selling their assets such a gold and US bonds. I would suspect bonds. If there is no private buyers for these and I would suspect there will be a shortage of these buyers as the US treasury has had to cancel some bond auctions lately, then they would sell their bonds back to the US treasury. Since the US treasury has no assets it would cause the US treasury to turn to the printing press and "monetize" their debt with paper "securities" (not so secure) that can be used besides paying their interest payments to buy commodities, properties etc as a safe investment (this is what I would do). When and if that happens the sudden influx of all this money would cause prices to suddenly rise and to very high levels. It is called hyperinflation. The winners at those times are the ones' with real assets, gold, silver, productive property and so on. You wouldn't want to be living in the Saudi desert with a trunk load of US hundred dollar bills. I hear the nights can get cold there so the US bills would have some use...        

TheGoodFight1984

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Re: Lindsey Williams Shock Oil Back to $50 / USA to collapse
« Reply #60 on: November 13, 2008, 11:51:27 am »
ace, thanks for the replies guys. doing my best to get the info to click but economics aren't my strong point

Offline scoffer

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Re: Lindsey Williams Shock Oil Back to $50 / USA to collapse
« Reply #61 on: November 13, 2008, 11:55:33 am »
ace, thanks for the replies guys. doing my best to get the info to click but economics aren't my strong point

That's ok, it's not Greenspans strong point either.

TheGoodFight1984

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Re: Lindsey Williams Shock Oil Back to $50 / USA to collapse
« Reply #62 on: November 13, 2008, 11:56:28 am »
That's ok, it's not Greenspans strong point either.

hahaha, thanks for the confidence boost...

I may apply for a job at the fed.

Offline Raincheck

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Re: Lindsey Williams Shock Oil Back to $50 / USA to collapse
« Reply #63 on: November 19, 2008, 03:12:36 pm »

Offline pac522

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Re: Lindsey Williams Shock Oil Back to $50 / USA to collapse
« Reply #64 on: November 20, 2008, 10:54:26 am »
In this shocking interview, Lindsey Williams makes some incredible claims after a conversation with a high level oil executive.  Before you laugh at what you are about to read - Lindsey Williams accurately predicted Gasoline going to $3 / gallon back when it was worth 60 cents.

  *  Crude Oil is going back to $50 a barrel.
  *  McCain is selected to be the next President of the United States, and everything in their power will be done to prevent Barack, OR HILLARY from having any chance of gaining the presidency.
  *  Two giant oil fields will be 'released as new found discoveries' - namely a 90 Billion Barrel Deposit in Russia, and a second one in Indonesia.
  *  A fresh cold war will be started with Russia regaining superpower status.
  *  Iran, and several middle east nations will be deliberately and financially ruined.
  *  The world will be flooded with cheap oil.
  *  Iran will not be attacked, but starved out financially - do note that financial institutions around the world have been forced to stop trading and exchanging with Iranian banks.  This isolation of currency inhibits their ability to buy and sell their oil in a practical and efficient manner.
  *  Lindsey Williams has been the author of several DVDs, and books, which are no longer availble on the market, this is under death threat to himself and his family.
  *  Prudhoe Bay Alaska, and Gull Island Alaska have enough oil to break dependency on foreign imports, this is not counting the massive oil reserves under Montana.

 Listen to the MP3 yourself and copy and send everywhere.  It has been uploaded to three different hosting services to prevent any form of censorship of this information.

http://www.mediafire.com/?sharekey=6074186bc692943a19747bd91027d4ddfd559a4421a32d9c
http://myfreefilehosting.com/f/96fb5a1f87_5.35MB
http://www.savefile.com/files/1703648

If you do not think that this is possible please study the following, and BELIEVE NONE OF IT UNTIL YOU DO YOUR HOMEWORK.

http://www.scribd.com/doc/3209608/abioticoil





Biggity bump. Can the electorial college still vote out Barack?
This country did not achieve greatness with the mindset of "safety first" but rather "live free or die".

Truth is the currency of love. R[̲̅ə̲̅٨̲̅٥̲̅٦̲̅]ution!

We are all running on Gods laptop.
The problem is the virus called the Illuminati.  ~EvadingGrid

The answer to 1984 is 1776.

Offline open your eyes

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Re: Lindsey Williams Shock Oil Back to $50 / USA to collapse
« Reply #65 on: November 20, 2008, 10:59:05 am »


Biggity bump. Can the electorial college still vote out Barack?

there are some people trying like hell (Phil Berg).  I think they (TPTB) can get more accomplished with Barack. People are just hypnotized

Offline wouldntyouliketoknow

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Re: Lindsey Williams Shock Oil Back to $50 / USA to collapse
« Reply #66 on: November 20, 2008, 11:05:01 am »
We should start watching for news about Middle Eastern countries finances

Offline pogolina

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Re: Lindsey Williams Shock Oil Back to $50 / USA to collapse
« Reply #67 on: November 20, 2008, 12:55:21 pm »


Biggity bump. Can the electorial college still vote out Barack?

I think they are bound by the people's vote, right?

I do know that people are suing left and right to get an official copy of Obama's birth certificate....

Offline America2

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Re: Lindsey Williams Shock Oil Back to $50 / USA to collapse
« Reply #68 on: November 20, 2008, 01:06:45 pm »
I think they are bound by the people's vote, right?

I do know that people are suing left and right to get an official copy of Obama's birth certificate....

Honestly, it doesn't matter anymore, why? B/c Obama was their guy from day 1. Really-why didn't they expose it way back when?