Author Topic: The US Edges Closer to Invading Pakistan - Post All Pak War News Here  (Read 48658 times)

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Offline Optimus

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US not convinced with Pak's war on terror
http://www.ndtv.com/convergence/ndtv/story.aspx?id=NEWEN20080059833
Press Trust of India
Saturday, August 02, 2008, (Washington)

The Pakistani government has not been able to convince elements within the establishment that the war against terror is basically in the interest of the country, a leading US newspaper commented.

The worst thing that can happen to Pakistan is an attack on the United States that is traced back to its tribal areas, it said.

"The new prime minister, Yousuf Raza Gilani, who was in Washington this week to meet President Bush, says he is doing his best to convince his country that 'this is Pakistan's war.' But he seems not to have won the argument within his own government," The Washington Post has said in a lead editorial.

"This complex situation calls for a careful and flexible response from the United States and, to its credit, the outgoing Bush administration is making a relatively good start at fashioning that response," the paper has said.

The editorial clearly said that that Bush did in fact blindly back Pakistan President Pervez Musharraf at the expense of the support of most of the common people in that country.

The media opinion comes at a time when there an ongoing debate between Washington and Islamabad on unilateral strikes with Pakistan making the point that it has the wherewithal to acting on its own provided it has been given information.



US warns Pakistan of serious action
http://www.hindustantimes.com/StoryPage/StoryPage.aspx?sectionName=&id=20f7a227-d40f-45af-bd34-f7ce939c469f&&Headline=US+warns+Pakistan+of+serious+action&strParent=strParentID
Vijay Dutt, Hindustan Times
London, August 03, 2008

Blaming the ISI for “masterminding” the suicide attack on Indian embassy in Kabul, US President George W Bush has warned Pakistan of “serious action” if one more attack in Afghanistan or elsewhere is traced back to it.

Bush confronted Pakistan Prime Minister Yusuf Raza Gilani last week during his Washington visit with evidence of involvement by the ISI in the deadly July 7 attack on Indian embassy in Kabul which left nearly 60 people, including four Indians, dead, The Sunday Times reported.

Christina Lamb who is the most knowledgeable of western analysts of Pakistan’s internal affairs wrote: “Gillani on his first official US visit since being elected in February, was left in no doubt that the Bush administration had lost patience with the ISI’s alleged double game.

Bush warned that if one more attack in Afghanistan or elsewhere were traced back to Pakistan, he would have to take ‘serious action’.

Gillani also met Michael Hayden, director of the CIA, who confronted him with a dossier on ISI support for the Taliban.

An intercepted telephone conversation apparently revealed that ISI agents masterminded the operation. The United States also claimed to have arrested an ISI officer inside Afghanistan.

“The Constitution is not an instrument for the government to restrain the people,
it's an instrument for the people to restrain the government.” – Patrick Henry

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Offline Optimus

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Re: Coming War With Pakistan??? - Post News About Pakistan Here
« Reply #81 on: August 03, 2008, 01:15:02 pm »
Travelers with Pakistan ties scrutinized
Congressman from Texas says U.S. compling list of dual citizens now at madrassas

http://www.chron.com/disp/story.mpl/headline/world/5921398.html
By STEWART M. POWELL Copyright 2008 Houston Chronicle Washington Bureau
Aug. 2, 2008, 11:24PM

WASHINGTON — U.S. officials are on the alert to intercept suspected al-Qaida recruits with American or European ties who have attended terrorist training camps after becoming radicalized at Islamic schools in Pakistan, a Texas congressman says.

Rep. Michael McCaul, R-Austin, who has been briefed on the issue, said the security efforts stem from concerns that al-Qaida agents might try to recruit impressionable teenagers from the madrassas for training at nearby al-Qaida boot camps. The youths, McCaul said, could be sneaked into the United States for attacks coinciding with the Olympics or the Democratic and Republican political conventions.

None of the 19 al-Qaida hijackers involved in
9/11 attacks was schooled at Pakistani madrassas. But terrorism experts say a small share of the institutions in Pakistan may be recruiting grounds for al-Qaida. About 700 Americans are believed to be among the 1,400 foreign students studying at the Islamic academies.

Two teenage brothers who returned recently to Atlanta from four years at a madrassa in Karachi were interviewed by the FBI, said McCaul, a former Justice Department attorney.


No imminent threat
U.S. security agencies also are trying to assemble accurate lists of the dual-national Americans, such as Pakistani-Americans, who may be studying at the religious schools, McCaul said.

"The fact that we have young people over there who have U.S. passports is of tremendous concern because of their ability to come back into the United States," McCaul told the Houston Chronicle. "That's what (al-Qaida) is looking for."

William R. Knocke, a spokesman for the Homeland Security Department, declined to discuss the classified briefing that McCaul attended last week.

"We have previously said that increased activity in the (Pakistani) tribal areas ... gives us some reason for concern," Knocke said. "We have also previously talked about our concerns that al-Qaida is seeking to recruit Western-looking sympathizers, with no criminal records, who could more easily blend in and attempt to travel to the United States."

Knocke emphasized that the department responsible for domestic security had received "no credible information at this time to suggest an imminent threat to the homeland, or U.S. interests at the Olympics."


Biometric data
Federal security agents are collecting biometric identifying information from all arriving foreigners. They also require electronic travel documents with biometric information embedded in foreigners' passports who wish to qualify for a visa waiver program.

Taha Gaya, the executive director of the Pakistani American Leadership Center here, urged U.S. security agencies to focus their scrutiny on individuals who pose potential threats, rather than on all Pakistani Americans returning from their native land.

An estimated 1 million Pakistanis live in the United States.

"I understand there is a problem of extremism at some madrassas," Gaya said. "But to put everyone under this broad net of suspicion is beginning to infringe on people's civil liberties."

Some Pakistani-Americans returning to the U.S. have encountered stepped-up screening procedures that push acceptable limits, Gaya said.

American security agencies have stepped up their tracking efforts since British-born Pakistanis who trained at Islamic academies and al-Qaida camps in Pakistan participated in suicide bombings on London buses and subways in 2005 and in a disrupted plot in 2006 to blow up 10 passenger jets flying from Europe to the U.S.

McCaul said he learned of the enhanced U.S. security efforts during briefings by the FBI and the Homeland Security Department since returning from a visit to Pakistan.

McCaul described the developments after his Democratic congressional opponent questioned his role in helping to arrange the return of the two Pakistani-American teens in early July.

McCaul had cited the teens' experience as an example of the kind of background that al-Qaida might try to exploit.


Opponent's criticism
Jon Niven, a spokesman for Democrat Larry Joe Doherty, accused McCaul of overstating his role in clearing the way for the Atlanta youths to return home.

McCaul's claims about winning the brothers' freedom "have been either false, exploitative or inflated," Niven said. "Michael McCaul's failed publicity stunt shows it is past time for new leadership in Texas' 10th congressional district."

McCaul called Niven's statement "a nice sound bite that trivializes a very serious issue for this country."

The brothers, Noor Elahi Kahn, 17, and Mahboob Elahi Kahn, 16, flew to the United States after McCaul brought their case to the attention of Pakistani President Pervez Musharraf during a Fourth of July visit to Pakistan by a congressional delegation that also included Reps. Gene Green, D-Houston, and Henry Cuellar, D-Laredo.

“The Constitution is not an instrument for the government to restrain the people,
it's an instrument for the people to restrain the government.” – Patrick Henry

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Offline STEVEX

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The U.S. has found out its cheaper to kill off people which they appare to consider a disease (third world nation). Since the human is still trying to find out who he/she really is, they appear to live in a land of make-believe (TV and TOYS). I will like to use the true fighter of war (soldiers). the venom (weapon) of war will destroy the users and the victims. Today, warfare weapons are made out of different metals and substances. most of these materials can be found on the chemistry chart. 90% of these chemicals and materials are DEADLY to the human body. I will not say environment, because the byproducts of some man-made chemicals are still a form of the earths byproducts. I will also like to say. I strongly feel the earth has the full ability to filter it self of human/living waste, even if the lifes of human is involve in natural mayham . The earth will survive, the living been is another long story. A true environmentalist Knows the earth can not be poison by man. The face of the earth may change it appearance. the same way the human change faces during war and crimes (no Peace)

Venom -the weapon of warfare will polarize its victims Leaving the weapon`s user to be the ultimate LOSE. It is true the pain of life. death  only last a matter of seconds. The war that if being fought today will contaminate the soldiers of warfare, eating are wearing the inside of the human machine, cause pain, lose of senses, reduce/lose of RE-PRODUCTION to give birth, in some cause the new bore will see/suffer certificates early or later on in life. This is the greatest pain a man can live through, so is it fare to say. this pain is the preparing for Hell?.  The same way a solider perpares for war with many years of booth camp.

All men are not the same. if you view life on the evil and good basis.

 
H.E.L.P. = How. Every. Loser. Prospect.   (Goverment)         
 
J.O.B. = Jorney. Of the. Broke (We the People)
 
illegal business control america. The people have NO RIGHTS, only the right to DEATH.

Offline bigron

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Re: Coming War With Pakistan??? - Post News About Pakistan Here
« Reply #83 on: August 04, 2008, 07:11:56 am »
US Vilifies Faithful Old Ally

By Eric Margolis
http://www.torontosun.com/News/Columnists/Margolis_Eric/2008/08/02/6339931-sun.php

03/08/08 "Toronto Sun" -- - It’s blame Pakistan week. As resistance to western occupation of Afghanistan intensifies, the increasingly frustrated Bush administration is venting its anger against Inter-Service Intelligence (ISI), Pakistan’s military intelligence agency.

The White House leaked claims ISI was in cahoots with pro-Taliban groups in Pakistan’s tribal area along the Afghan border.

Pakistan’s Defence Minister Ahmed Mukhtar said the White House accuses ISI of warning Pashtun tribes of impending U.S. air attacks. President George W. Bush angrily asked Pakistan’s visiting Prime Minister Yousuf Gilani, “Who’s in charge of ISI?”

In Ottawa, the Harper government dutifully echoed Bush’s accusation against Pakistan, including the so far unsubstantiated claim that ISI agents had bombed India’s embassy in Kabul.

I was one of the first western journalists invited into ISI headquarters in 1986. ISI’s then director, the fierce Lt.- Gen. Akhtar Rahman, personally briefed me on Pakistan’s secret role in fighting Soviet occupation of Afghanistan. ISI’s “boys” provided communications, logistics, heavy weapons, and direction in the Afghan War. ISI played the key role in the victory over the Soviets.

On my subsequent trips to Pakistan I was routinely briefed by succeeding ISI chiefs and joined ISI officers in the field, sometimes under fire.

ISI is accused of meddling in Pakistani politics. The late Benazir Bhutto, who often was thwarted by Pakistan’s spooks, always scolded me, “you and your beloved generals at ISI.” But before Musharraf, ISI was the Third World’s most efficient, professional intelligence agency. It defends Pakistan against internal and external subversion by India’s powerful spy agency, RAW, and by Iran. ISI works closely with CIA and the Pentagon, but also must serve Pakistan’s interests, which often are not identical to Washington’s.

The last ISI director general I knew was the tough, highly capable Lt.-Gen. Mahmood Ahmed. He was purged by the new dictator, Gen. Pervez Musharraf, because Washington felt Mahmood was insufficiently responsive to U.S. interests. Ensuing ISI directors were all pre-approved by Washington. All senior ISI veterans deemed “Islamist” or too nationalistic by Washington were purged, leaving ISI’s upper ranks top heavy with yes men and paper passers.

Even so, there is strong opposition inside ISI to Washington’s bribing and arm-twisting the Musharraf dictatorship into waging war against fellow Pakistanis and gravely damaging Pakistan’s national interests.

ISI’s primary duty is defending Pakistan. Pashtun tribesmen on the border sympathizing with their fellow Taliban Pashtun in Afghanistan are Pakistanis. Many, like the legendary Jalaluddin Haqqani, are old U.S. allies and freedom fighters from the 1980s.

TRIBAL UPRISINGS

Violence and uprisings in these tribal areas are not caused by “terrorism,” but directly result from the U.S.-led occupation of Afghanistan and Washington’s forcing the hated Musharraf regime to attack its own people.

ISI is trying to restrain pro-Taliban Pashtun tribesmen while dealing with growing U.S. attacks into Pakistan that threaten a wider war.

India, Pakistan’s bitter foe, has an army of agents in Afghanistan and is arming, backing and financing the Karzai puppet regime in Kabul. Pakistan’s historic strategic interests in Afghanistan have been undermined by the U.S. occupation. The U.S., Canada and India are trying to eliminate Pakistani influence in Afghanistan.

ISI, many of whose officers are Pashtun, has every right to warn Pakistani citizens of impending U.S. air attacks that kill large numbers of civilians.

But ISI also has another vital mission. Preventing Pakistan’s Pashtun (15% to 20% of the population of 165 million) from rekindling the old “Greater Pashtunistan” movement calling for union of the Pashtun tribes of Pakistan and Afghanistan — divided by British imperialism — into a new Pashtun nation. That would tear apart Pakistan and invite Indian military intervention.

Washington’s bull-in-a-china-shop behaviour pays no heeds to such realities.

Instead, Washington demonizes faithful old allies, ISI and Pakistan, while supporting Afghanistan’s communists and drug dealers, and allowing India to stir the Afghan pot — all for the sake of new energy pipelines.

As Henry Kissinger cynically noted, being America’s ally is more dangerous than being its enemy.

Copyright © 2008, Canoe Inc.

Offline bigron

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Re: Coming War With Pakistan??? - Post News About Pakistan Here
« Reply #84 on: August 04, 2008, 07:44:37 am »
Presstitute and war pimp alert: Demonizing Pakistan

Pakistanis Aided Kabul Attack, U.S. Officials Say

By MARK MAZZETTI and ERIC SCHMITT

http://www.nytimes.com/2008/08/01/world/asia/01pstan.html?_r=1&partner=rssuserland&emc=rss&pagewanted=all&oref=slogin

01/08/08 "New York Times" -- WASHINGTON — American intelligence agencies have concluded that members of Pakistan’s powerful spy service helped plan the deadly July 7 bombing of India’s embassy in Kabul, Afghanistan, according to United States government officials.

The conclusion was based on intercepted communications between Pakistani intelligence officers and militants who carried out the attack, the officials said, providing the clearest evidence to date that Pakistani intelligence officers are actively undermining American efforts to combat militants in the region.

The American officials also said there was new information showing that members of the Pakistani intelligence service were increasingly providing militants with details about the American campaign against them, in some cases allowing militants to avoid American missile strikes in Pakistan’s tribal areas.

Concerns about the role played by Pakistani intelligence not only has strained relations between the United States and Pakistan, a longtime ally, but also has fanned tensions between Pakistan and its archrival, India. Within days of the bombings, Indian officials accused the Directorate of Inter-Services Intelligence, or ISI, of helping to orchestrate the attack in Kabul, which killed 54, including an Indian defense attaché.

This week, Pakistani troops clashed with Indian forces in the contested region of Kashmir, threatening to fray an uneasy cease-fire that has held since November 2003.

The New York Times reported this week that a top Central Intelligence Agency official traveled to Pakistan this month to confront senior Pakistani officials with information about support provided by members of the ISI to militant groups. It had not been known that American intelligence agencies concluded that elements of Pakistani intelligence provided direct support for the attack in Kabul.

American officials said that the communications were intercepted before the July 7 bombing, and that the C.I.A. emissary, Stephen R. Kappes, the agency’s deputy director, had been ordered to Islamabad, Pakistan’s capital, even before the attack. The intercepts were not detailed enough to warn of any specific attack.

The government officials were guarded in describing the new evidence and would not say specifically what kind of assistance the ISI officers provided to the militants. They said that the ISI officers had not been renegades, indicating that their actions might have been authorized by superiors.

“It confirmed some suspicions that I think were widely held,” one State Department official with knowledge of Afghanistan issues said of the intercepted communications. “It was sort of this ‘aha’ moment. There was a sense that there was finally direct proof.”

The information linking the ISI to the bombing of the Indian Embassy was described in interviews by several American officials with knowledge of the intelligence. Some of the officials expressed anger that elements of Pakistan’s government seemed to be directly aiding violence in Afghanistan that had included attacks on American troops.

Some American officials have begun to suggest that Pakistan is no longer a fully reliable American partner and to advocate some unilateral American action against militants based in the tribal areas.

The ISI has long maintained ties to militant groups in the tribal areas, in part to court allies it can use to contain Afghanistan’s power. In recent years, Pakistan’s government has also been concerned about India’s growing influence inside Afghanistan, including New Delhi’s close ties to the government of Hamid Karzai, the Afghan president.

American officials say they believe that the embassy attack was probably carried out by members of a network led by Maulavi Jalaluddin Haqqani, whose alliance with Al Qaeda and its affiliates has allowed the terrorist network to rebuild in the tribal areas.

American and Pakistani officials have now acknowledged that President Bush on Monday confronted Pakistan’s prime minister, Yousaf Raza Gilani, about the divided loyalties of the ISI.

Pakistan’s defense minister, Chaudhry Ahmed Mukhtar, told a Pakistani television network on Wednesday that Mr. Bush asked senior Pakistani officials this week, “ ‘Who is in control of ISI?’ ” and asked about leaked information that tipped militants to surveillance efforts by Western intelligence services.

Pakistan’s new civilian government is wrestling with these very issues, and there is concern in Washington that the civilian leaders will be unable to end a longstanding relationship between members of the ISI and militants associated with Al Qaeda.

Spokesmen for the White House and the C.I.A. declined to comment for this article. Pakistan’s ambassador to the United States, Husain Haqqani, did not return a call seeking comment.

Further underscoring the tension between Pakistan and its Western allies, Britain’s senior military officer said in Washington on Thursday that an American and British program to help train Pakistan’s Frontier Corps in the tribal areas had been delayed while Pakistan’s military and civilian officials sorted out details about the program’s goals.

Britain and the United States had each offered to send about two dozen military trainers to Pakistan later this summer to train Pakistani Army officers who in turn would instruct the Frontier Corps paramilitary forces.

But the British officer, Air Chief Marshal Sir Jock Stirrup, said the program had been temporarily delayed. “We don’t yet have a firm start date,” he told a small group of reporters. “We’re ready to go.”

The bombing of the Indian Embassy helped to set off a new deterioration in relations between India and Pakistan.

This week, Indian and Pakistani soldiers fired at each other across the Kashmir frontier for more than 12 hours overnight Monday, in what the Indian Army called the most serious violation of a five-year-old cease-fire agreement. The nightlong battle came after one Indian soldier and four Pakistanis were killed along the border between sections of Kashmir that are controlled by India and by Pakistan.

Indian officials say they are equally worried about what is happening on the Pakistan-Afghanistan border because they say the insurgents who are facing off with India in Kashmir and those who target Afghanistan are related and can keep both borders burning at the same time.

India and Afghanistan share close political, cultural and economic ties, and India maintains an active intelligence network in Afghanistan, all of which has drawn suspicion from Pakistani officials.

When asked Thursday about whether the ISI and Pakistani military remained loyal to the country’s civilian government, Adm. Mike Mullen, the chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, sidestepped the question. “That’s probably something the government of Pakistan ought to speak to,” Admiral Mullen told reporters at the Pentagon.

Jalaluddin Haqqani, the militia commander, battled Soviet troops during the 1980s and has had a long and complicated relationship with the C.I.A. He was among a group of fighters who received arms and millions of dollars from the C.I.A. during that period, but his allegiance with Osama bin Laden and Al Qaeda during the following decade led the United States to sever the relationship.

Mr. Haqqani and his sons now run a network that Western intelligence services say they believe is responsible for a campaign of violence throughout Afghanistan, including the Indian Embassy bombing and an attack on the Serena Hotel in Kabul earlier this year.

David Rohde contributed reporting from New York, and Somini Sengupta from New Delhi.


Offline bigron

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Re: Coming War With Pakistan??? - Post News About Pakistan Here
« Reply #85 on: August 04, 2008, 08:11:37 am »
Bush warns Pakistan of ‘serious action’
 

Monday, August 04, 2008
http://www.thenews.com.pk/top_story_detail.asp?Id=16403

 LONDON: The United States has accused Pakistan’s main spy agency of deliberately undermining Nato efforts in Afghanistan by helping the Taliban and al-Qaeda militants they are supposed to be fighting, the Sunday Times reported.

President George W Bush confronted Yusuf Raza Gilani in Washington last week with evidence of involvement by the ISI in a deadly attack on the Afghan capital and warned of retaliation if it continues.

The move comes amid growing fears that Pakistanís tribal areas are turning into a global launch pad for terrorists. Gilani, on his first official US visit since being elected in February, was left in no doubt that the Bush administration had lost patience with the ISIís alleged double game. Bush warned that if one more attack in Afghanistan or elsewhere were traced back to Pakistan, he would have to take ìserious actionî.

Gilani also met Michael Hayden, director of the CIA, who confronted him with a dossier on ISI support for the Taliban. The key evidence concerned last monthís bombing of the Indian embassy in Kabul, which killed 54 people, including the military attache.

An intercepted telephone conversation apparently revealed that ISI agents masterminded the operation. The United States also claimed to have arrested an ISI officer inside Afghanistan. Pakistani ministers said they had left Washington reeling from what they described as a ìgrillingî and shocked at ìthe trust deficitî between Pakistan and its most important backer.

ìThey were very hot on the ISI,î said a member of the Pakistan delegation. ìVery hot. When we asked them for more information, Bush laughed and said, ëWhen we share information with your guys, the bad guys always run awayí.î

ìThe question is why itís taken the Americans so long to see what the ISI is doing,î said Afrasiab Khattak, provincial president for the Awami National party. ìWeíve been telling them for years but they wouldnít buy it.î

The American accusations were categorically denied by Rehman Malik, Pakistanís de facto interior minister. ìThere is no involvement by the ISI of any form in Afghanistan,î he told The Sunday Times. ìWe requested evidence which has not yet been given.î

Malik admitted that in meetings in London, senior British government and intelligence officials had also told him they were convinced of ISI involvement in the embassy bombing. It is the first time the White House has openly confronted Pakistan since just after the 9/11 terrorist attacks on Washington and New York when General Pervez Musharrafís regime was told to drop its support for the Taliban or be bombed back to the Stone Age.

Musharraf agreed and went on to change the director of the ISI and build a close relationship with Bush who described him as his ìbest friendî. But many middle-ranking officers continued to hold close links with militants built up over 20 years since the Mujahideen were fighting the Russians in Afghanistan.

There were persistent reports of Pakistani territory being used for terrorist training camps and recruitment. Foreign journalists were banned from Quetta ìfor our own securityî ñ those of us who have ventured there to investigate have generally ended up arrested.

President Hamid Karzai of Afghanistan has repeatedly accused Pakistan of harbouring Taliban leaders, providing lists of addresses and at one time claiming that its leader, Mullah Omar, was living in a military cantonment.

For the West, confronting Islamabad is a risky strategy as Pakistanís support is critical to the war on terrorism. Afghanistan is landlocked and much of the logistical support and food for the 53,000 Nato troops, including water for the British forces in Helmand, has to be shipped into Karachi and driven through Pakistan.

ìItís a calculated risk,î said a western diplomat in Islamabad, pointing out that Pakistan could not afford to do without US aid, which averages £1 billion a year. The military has also benefited: only last week four more F-16 fighter jets were handed over to the air force.

An open challenge to the ISI was welcomed by Nato troops operating in Afghanistan, particularly the American forces fighting in the east. For years their commanders have expressed frustration at militants coming across the border to take pot shots at them, before moving back to the sanctuary of the tribal areas. These areas are seen as the new battleground in the war on terror. Originally created by the British as a buffer between the Indian empire and Afghanistan, they stretch along Pakistanís 1,500-mile border with Afghanistan.

As the poorest and most backward part of Pakistan with a literacy rate of just 3%, but fiercely martial, they are the breeding ground for militant groups. Political parties are not allowed. As militant groups have grown in influence, local people have nowhere else to turn.

Most of the attacks on US soldiers in eastern Afghanistan are ordered by Maulvi Jalalud-din Haqqani, who operates from Miramshah in North Waziristan, and whom the United States believes to have close ties with al-Qaeda.

Neighbouring South Waziristan is dominated by Baitullah Mehsud, a former gym teacher, whose Pakistan Taliban is believed by the CIA to be responsible for the assassination of Benazir Bhutto, the former prime minister, last December.

ìThe security of Pakistan, Afghanistan, the entire region and maybe that of the whole world will be determined by developments in the tribal areas over the next few months,î said Khattak.

The United States has carried out a number of bombings and missile strikes inside the areas, although each time the key targets seem to have escaped. So concerned is the Bush administration that the ISI is tipping militants off that in January it sent two senior intelligence officials to Pakistan. Mike Mc-Connell, the director of national intelligence, and Hayden asked Musharraf to allow the CIA greater freedom to operate in the tribal areas.

Of particular US concern was the ISIís alleged involvement with Haqqani, one of its former allies, and its links to Lashkar-i-Taiba, a Punjab-based militant group, which is thought to have been behind the attack on an American outpost in Kunar last month in which nine US soldiers were killed.

Many US intelligence officials have long suspected that ISI officers accept their money and then help their foes, but it has been difficult to find proof. In June the Afghan government publicly accused the ISI of being behind an assassination attempt on Karzai in April and threatened to send their own troops into the border. But they were unable to produce any concrete evidence.

ìThe Indian embassy bombing seems to have finally provided it. This is the smoking gun weíve all been looking for,î a British official said last week. On the eve of the Washington visit, the Pakistan government tried to tame the ISI by announcing that it would henceforth come under interior ministry control. It was forced to revoke the decision within three hours after angry phone calls from the Army chief.

Malik, on behalf of the government, claimed the decision had been misinterpreted. ìWhat we were trying to do was bring national security and the war on terror under the interior ministry but it was wrongly announced,î he said.

US officials say the number of attacks on their soldiers in Afghanistan have increased by 60% since the civilian government took power this year. In a reflection of who really calls the shots, while the government party was in Washington Lieutenant-General Martin Dempsey, acting commander of Centcom, the US military command, was in Islamabad handing over F-16 fighter planes and holding meetings with the top brass. A British officer who was present at the meeting said Pakistani generals had spoken of their frustration with the civilian government: ìThey said they were still waiting for a signal to act in the tribal areas. To be honest, none of us could think of a thing they had done in six months.î

The sensitivity of the intelligence issue became clear on Friday night when Sherry Rehman, the information minister, acknowledged to journalists that the ISI might still contain pro-Taliban operatives. ìWe need to identify these people and weed them out,î she said, only to change her statement later to maintain that the problems were in the past and there would be no purge.

Pakistan ministers were particularly incensed when the United States launched a missile strike inside one of the countryís tribal areas on Monday, while the government party was still en route to Washington. ìIt was the first thing I read on my BlackBerry when I got off the plane,î said a member of the delegation. ìWhat a nice gift.î

 

Offline bigron

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Re: Coming War With Pakistan??? - Post News About Pakistan Here
« Reply #86 on: August 04, 2008, 08:13:14 am »
Rice hints at US action in Fata
 

Monday, August 04, 2008

By Sami Abraham
http://www.thenews.com.pk/top_story_detail.asp?Id=16409

WASHINGTON: Underscoring the need for immediate military action in Fata and areas adjacent to the Pak-Afghan border, US Secretary of State Condoleezza Rice has indicated that use of some US power along with the full Pakistani power may be on the cards to eliminate the terrorists groups there. Talking in a gathering of Aspen Institute in Colorado, Dr Rice said: “Fata has become a region where efforts to forge peace agreements with the militants, I think, are frankly not working. And instead, the militants are finding a place that they can train and equip.” Dr Rice was of the view that terrorists in Fata were not only dangerous for Afghanistan but also for Pakistan. She said: “It’s extremely important that Pakistan do something about that. It’s going to take all elements of Pakistan’s power, national power, as well as some of ours, to improve that situation.”

 

Offline Dig

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Re: Coming War With Pakistan??? - Post News About Pakistan Here
« Reply #87 on: August 05, 2008, 06:51:48 am »
there is almost 200,000,000 people in Pakistan

Pakistan — Population: 164,741,924 (July 2007 est.)
According to https://www.cia.gov/library/publications/the-world-factbook/print/pk.html

Rothschild / Rockefeller / Gates / Buffett / Queen Beatrice depopulation plan in full effect
All eyes are opened, or opening, to the rights of man. The general spread of the light of science has already laid open to every view the palpable truth, that the mass of mankind has not been born with saddles on their backs, nor a favored few booted and spurred, ready to ride them legitimately

Offline Optimus

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Re: Coming War With Pakistan??? - Post News About Pakistan Here
« Reply #88 on: August 05, 2008, 08:50:49 am »
Karzai says 'confident' of evidence linking Pakistan to bombing
http://afp.google.com/article/ALeqM5h0bTdYIh-_2bzq4ET0o24YHRX5_A
August 5, 2008

NEW DELHI (AFP) — Afghan President Hamid Karzai on Tuesday repeated allegations that Pakistan was linked to a car bomb attack on the Indian embassy in Kabul, saying he was "confident" of the evidence.

"We and some of our allies have evidence not only from the scene of the explosion but evidence beyond it that unfortunately indicate a hand like that," Karzai told the NDTV television news network.

When asked if explosives found at the bombed embassy carried markings of Pakistani ordinance factories, Karzai said: "we are fairly confident of what you are talking about."

About 60 people, including two Indian diplomats, were killed in the July 7 suicide car bombing at the mission.

Afghanistan has repeatedly accused Pakistan of backing Taliban rebels. Karzai said the problem was "elements" in the Pakistani establishment.

"Unfortunately, there are elements within the establishment in Pakistan who do not see things as we see (them), and who perhaps are not opting for a life that the absolute majority of our people seek and are working for," Karzai said.
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Re: Coming War With Pakistan??? - Post News About Pakistan Here
« Reply #89 on: August 05, 2008, 09:19:32 am »
US accused of backing terrorism in Pakistan
http://www.hindustantimes.com/StoryPage/StoryPage.aspx?sectionName=&id=95c61181-205b-4c33-8c29-01d3161e8786&&Headline=US+accused+of+backing+terrorism+in+Pak&strParent=strParentID
Indo-Asian News Service
Islamabad, August 05, 2008

Pakistan has accused the US of backing militancy within the country, saying this goes against the grain of the Washington-led global war against terror.

Quoting "impeccable official sources", The News reported on Tuesday that "strong evidence and circumstantial evidence of American acquiescence to terrorism inside Pakistan" was outlined by President Pervez Musharraf, army chief General Ashfaq Pervez Kayani and Inter-Services Intelligence (ISI) chief Lt. Gen. Nadeem Taj in separate meetings with two senior US officials in Islamabad on July 12.

The visit of the Chairman Joint Chiefs of Staff Admiral Michael Mullen and CIA Deputy Director Stephen R. Kappes, "carrying what were seen as India-influenced intelligence inputs had hardened the resolve of Pakistan's security establishment to keep supreme Pakistan's national security interest even if it meant straining ties with the US and NATO", the newspaper said.

It quoted a senior official with direct knowledge of the meetings as saying that Pakistan's military leadership and the president asked the American visitors "not to distinguish between a terrorist for the United States and Afghanistan and a terrorist for Pakistan".

"For reasons best known to Langley, the CIA headquarters, as well as the Pentagon, Pakistani officials say the Americans were not interested in disrupting the Kabul-based fountainhead of terrorism in Balochistan nor do they want to allocate the marvellous Predator (unmanned armed aerial combat vehicle) resource to neutralise the kingpin of suicide bombings against the Pakistani military establishment now hiding near the Pakistan-Afghan border," The News said.

During the meetings, the US officials were also asked why the CIA-run Predators and the US military did not swing into action when they were provided the exact location of tribal leader Baitullah Mehsud, "Pakistan's enemy number one and the mastermind of almost every suicide operation against the Pakistan Army and the ISI since June 2006", the newspaper added.

One such precise piece of information was made available to the CIA May 24 when Mehsud drove to a remote South Waziristan mountain post in his Toyota Land Cruiser to address the media and returned to his safe abode.

"The United States military has the capacity to direct a missile to a precise location at very short notice as it has done close to 20 times in the last few years to hit Al Qaeda targets inside Pakistan," The News noted.

Pakistani officials, according to the newspaper, "have long been intrigued by the presence of highly encrypted communications gear with Mehsud. This communication gear enables him to collect real-time information on Pakistani troop movements from an unidentified foreign source without being intercepted by Pakistani intelligence".

Mullen and the CIA official were in Pakistan on an unannounced visit July 12 to present what the US media claimed was evidence of the ISI's ties with Taliban commander Maulana Sirajuddin Haqqani and the alleged involvement of Pakistani agents in the bombing of the Indian embassy in Kabul.

"Pakistani military leaders rubbished the American information and evidence on the Kabul bombing but provided some rationale for keeping a window open with Haqqani, just as the British government had decided to open talks with some Taliban leaders in southern Afghanistan last year," The News said.

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Re: Coming War With Pakistan??? - Post News About Pakistan Here
« Reply #90 on: August 05, 2008, 10:57:43 am »

Pakistani spy unit sustains militants
Saeed Shah, Foreign Correspondent

http://www.informationclearinghouse.info/article20422.htm

Last Updated: August 04. 2008 12:14AM UAE / August 3. 2008 8:14PM GMT 

Afghan soldiers carry a bouquet during a memorial ceremony for Indian Embassy employees killed in a suicide attack in Kabul. Rahmat Gul / AP
ISLAMABAD // In May 2002, a senior officer from Pakistan’s Inter-Services Intelligence (ISI) agency called together two dozen commanders from Islamic militant organisations at an army base in Muzaffarabad, the capital of the Pakistani part of the disputed Kashmir region.

The extremist outfits were fighting a “jihad” against India and had for years been funded and trained by the ISI. Pakistan was using them in a proxy war with its giant neighbour and archenemy. But Pakistan came under intense international pressure to rein in the militants after they had staged daring assaults deep within India. Major Gen Khalid Mahmood of the ISI told the guerrilla leaders at the 2002 meeting that it had to stop, that the tap was being turned off. The shocked militant leaders accused Islamabad of “betrayal”.

Last week, the ISI’s role in Afghanistan, the other theatre of Pakistan’s proxy war with India, came under intense international scrutiny. In fact, the tension also overshadowed the summit of South Asian countries in Colombo on the weekend.

“There is a cold war between India and Pakistan. They say hands off Kashmir, we say hands off Afghanistan,” said Shujaat Ali Khan, a retired general who headed the internal wing of the ISI.

The ISI, Pakistan’s largest and most powerful intelligence agency, is a branch of the army and its main aims are to “contain” India and to ensure that Afghanistan does not fall into the hands of a hostile power.

In the 1990s, that standoff with India saw the ISI use extremist groups in Kashmir. The agency also backed the Taliban, who seized power in Afghanistan, on Pakistan’s other flank, in the mid-1990s. Islamabad was supposed to have dropped its support for militants after September 11 and India’s threat of war with Pakistan.

Only jihad is not something that can be turned on and off at will, as Pakistan discovered in 2002 when the Kashmiri jihadists turned their fire on their own country when the Indian outlet was cut off. By the end of that year, the guerrillas were being allowed to infiltrate India again, albeit on a smaller scale, to stop them from making trouble at home.

Similarly, in Afghanistan, the ISI could not just let go of the Taliban. To the Pakistan military, the US-led war against the Taliban appeared to be working against Pakistan’s strategic interests. The government of Hamid Karzai is viewed as dangerously close to India, creating a nightmare scenario for Pakistan’s army – should the Taliban be defeated, Islamabad would be encircled by Indian interests. It is not a case of Pakistan’s backing extremists for some religious purpose. This is a military doctrine, a secular ideology about national survival that requires Afghanistan be in “friendly” hands. And there is no civilian control over it.

Pakistan does not trust US intentions in Afghanistan. Given the apparent imperial designs of US intervention in Iraq, its presence in Afghanistan is viewed with great suspicion by Pakistan’s military and also the country’s policy establishment.

“There is just enough Pakistan co-operation with the US to get away with it,” said Ayesha Siddiqa, a defence analyst and author of Military Inc. “But the US agenda is not innocent either. They desire a larger role for themselves in the Muslim world.”

Pakistan has played a major role in Washington’s “war on terror”. It has arrested 500 al Qa’eda and other extremists, including most of the high-value targets that have been captured, including Khalid Sheikh Mohammed, the suspected mastermind of the September 11 attacks among them. Pakistan also provides vital logistical support for the United States and Nato forces in landlocked Afghanistan. And, it has tolerated US missile strikes in Pakistan’s tribal territory, which runs along the Afghan border.

However, it is also playing on the other side. As well as providing some aid to the Taliban, Pakistan’s biggest help to the insurgency has been to allow its tribal belt to be used as a place for guerrillas to take refuge, train and gather supplies. Leading Afghan Taliban commanders, including the notorious veteran Jalaluddin Haqqani, are said to be based in the tribal area. Washington believes Osama bin Laden is there as well.

The ISI became the benefactors of jihadists during the “mujahideen” days of the 1980s war against the Soviet invasion of Afghanistan – that time with heavy CIA backing. But the agency was never able to wean itself away from them and their descendants.

“The ISI is going to determine the destiny of Pakistan, perhaps in the near future,” said Maloy Krishna Dhar, the former joint director of India’s Intelligence Bureau. “During the Afghan jihad, so many things were created by Pakistan. Now these elements are out of control.”

So Pakistan’s military, working through the ISI, is playing an elaborate double game, a façade that the country’s critics believe was exposed in the bombing of the Indian Embassy last month in Kabul. This time, US intelligence officials claimed, in anonymous briefings last week, to have firm evidence of ISI backing for the militants who carried out the attack.

At the summit in Sri Lanka, Manmohan Singh, the Indian prime minister, said Pakistan had agreed to hold an inquiry into the Kabul embassy bombing. But yesterday, Yousaf Raza Gilani, the Pakistani prime minister, denied that any such investigation would take place. “The Indian statement is not only surprising but shocking, too,” Mr Gilani told Sri Lanka’s Sunday Leader.

Pakistan’s civilians have only theoretical control over the ISI. Mr Gilani’s recent order, which placed the ISI under the ambit of the interior ministry, had to be reversed after the army refused to accept it. He does not have the authority or the means to investigate the ISI. The agency has also played a major role in Pakistan’s domestic politics, helping to bring down two governments in the 1990s that were run by Mr Gilani’s Pakistan People’s Party. There are real concerns in PPP circles that the ISI is plotting against them once more.

Mr Karzai followed the regional summit with a visit to India with talks scheduled for today in New Delhi with the Indian prime minster. At the top of the agenda will be security co-operation and concerns over Pakistan’s role in Afghanistan.

Watching Mr Karzai and Mr Manmohan Singh together will only confirm the worst fears of Pakistan’s spymasters: that Afghanistan and India, with the help of the United States, are plotting to bring down Pakistan. The ISI will continue to do anything necessarily to safeguard Pakistan from this perceived terminal threat.

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Re: Coming War With Pakistan??? - Post News About Pakistan Here
« Reply #91 on: August 05, 2008, 09:56:49 pm »
Ex-official: US has rogue elements in ISI
http://www.presstv.ir/detail.aspx?id=65653&sectionid=351020401
Tue, 05 Aug 2008 04:47:45 GMT
 
 
Former ISI official, Khalid Khawaja
A former official with Pakistani Inter-Services Intelligence has warned against presence of US-backed rogue elements in the spy agency.

"Some rogue elements in the ISI are working against the interest of the country. They are being funded by a terror sponsor state, the US," Khalid Khawaja, who is also Chief Coordinator at the Defense of Human Rights, an NGO, in Islamabad, said in an interview with Press TV.

He added that there was a confusion over the country's powerful spy agency since nobody really knew who controlled the ISI.

"Anytime the Supreme Court called the Interior Ministry or the Defense Ministry, they could not get the ISI into the court," he said, adding the Americans do not want the court to reach the people who have been abducted by the ISI.

He made the statement in reference to Amnesty International which accused the US and Britain of helping Pakistani intelligence agency in the "enforced disappearances" of more than 560 people.

The group earlier called on Pakistani intelligence agencies to either free them or move them to official jails.

Khawaja also asserted that the Americans had planted the bomb in the Indian Embassy in Kabul to widen the rift between Indians and Pakistanis.

The debate comes after a New York Times report according to which the US State Department, based on intercepted communications between Pakistani intelligence officers and militants, concluded that Pakistani intelligence officers are actively undermining coalition efforts to combat militants in the region.

Analysts say the developments could be also a sign that the relationship between the CIA and the ISI may be deteriorating.
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Re: Coming War With Pakistan??? - Post News About Pakistan Here
« Reply #92 on: August 05, 2008, 10:04:05 pm »
Pakistan poised to send 800 guerrillas to India: BSF
http://www.dailytimes.com.pk/default.asp?page=2008%5C08%5C06%5Cstory_6-8-2008_pg7_7
August 6, 2008

* Paramilitary officials say security force has intensified patrols along Rajasthan’s borders with Pakistan

JODHPUR: India on Tuesday stepped up security on its border, a top Indian paramilitary official said, alleging that Pakistan may be looking for an ‘opportunity’ to push nearly 800 militants onto its soil.

“We have received information that nearly 800 militants are waiting to cross over to India at the borders,” Border Security Force (BSF) chief AK Mitra said in Indore, a strategic city in the Rajasthan state bordering Pakistan.

The Inter-Services Intelligence (ISI) is waiting for an ‘opportunity’ to launch the cross-border intrusion, Mitra claimed, adding that India’s borders were being fortified to prevent any infiltration.

The 120,000-member BSF is India’s first line of defence along its frontier with Pakistan. “The wired fencing at border areas is being further strengthened” and other steps are being taken that have “effectively checked” the threat of infiltration, Mitra said.

Intensified patrols: Other paramilitary officials in Jodhpur, a city also located in Rajasthan, said on Tuesday that the security force had intensified patrols along the state’s borders with Pakistan and elsewhere in northern India.

The charge that Pakistan plans a major guerrilla infiltration came after deadly serial blasts against Indian targets and clashes along the Line of Control last month badly strained the peace process.

India says it has the “clearest evidence” of the ISI’s involvement in an attack on its embassy in Kabul last month that killed 60 people — a charge denied by Pakistan..

New Delhi has also repeatedly accused Pakistan of training and funding militants and pushing them into the revolt-hit Muslim-majority region of Indian-held Kashmir as well as other parts of India — allegations that Islamabad rejects. afp

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Re: Coming War With Pakistan??? - Post News About Pakistan Here
« Reply #93 on: August 06, 2008, 08:59:14 am »
Afghanistan accusing Pakistan of aiding insurgents
http://www.iht.com/articles/ap/2008/08/06/asia/AS-Afghan-Pakistan.php
The Associated Press  Published: August 6, 2008

KABUL, Afghanistan: Afghanistan's spy agency alleged on Wednesday that a member of Pakistan's consulate in the country's south helped a Taliban commander in his attempts to weaken the government.

The allegation will likely further strain the acrimonious relations between the two key U.S. allies in the region.

Afghanistan's National Directorate of Security said in a statement that a diplomat at the consulate in the southern Kandahar province gave "orders and money" to Mullah Rahmatullah, a Taliban militant in the region.

Rahmatullah was captured by Afghan intelligence agents on Tuesday in Kandahar city, and the information linking the official with the militants was gleaned during the questioning, the NDS said in a statement, which did not name the diplomat.

Pakistan's Foreign Ministry spokesman Mohammed Sadiq declined to comment, saying he had not seen the report.

Rahmatullah was responsible for kidnappings of influential elders in the province, extortion, "guerrilla attacks and some other terroristic activities," the statement said.

"Mullah Rahmatullah tried to show that the (Afghan) Government is weak in Kandahar," the statement said.

"After the arrest, Mullah Rahmatullah confessed to his crimes and said he received orders and money for all terroristic activities and for the kidnappings from one of the members of Pakistan's consulate in Kandahar," the statement said.

Afghanistan has long accused the Pakistan spy agency of backing the Taliban-led insurgency. It also has complained repeatedly that Pakistan-based militants are crossing the border to launch terrorist attacks in Afghanistan.

Afghanistan — and, reportedly, the United States — believe Pakistan's powerful spy service, the Inter-Services Intelligence, orchestrated the July 7 bombing outside India's Embassy in Kabul that killed over 60 people, in an effort to undermine growing ties between the two countries.

Pakistan, which is suspicious of India's growing role in Afghanistan, denied the accusations.
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Re: Coming War With Pakistan??? - Post News About Pakistan Here
« Reply #94 on: August 07, 2008, 10:23:07 am »
US hopes pinned on Musharraf

By Syed Saleem Shahzad

http://www.atimes.com/atimes/South_Asia/JH08Df01.html

KARACHI -
Since assuming office at the beginning of the year, Pakistan's coalition civilian government has gone to extreme lengths to develop a consensus for the impeachment of President Pervez Musharraf, the general who until February had ruled the country after staging a coup in 1999.

The coalition, led by the Pakistan People's Party (PPP) and former prime minister Nawaz Sharif's Pakistan Muslim League-N (PML-N), want Musharraf to be held accountable for last year imposing a state of emergency and sacking the judiciary.

To reassure Washington and secure its continued support, the

 

politicians even tried to clip the wings of the powerful Inter-Services Intelligence, and sent Prime Minister Yousuf Raza Gilani on an unscheduled visit to the United States in an attempt to convince the George W Bush administration that the "war on terror" could be fought without Musharraf.

Washington, however, has other ideas, and Musharraf remains central to them as the point man for smooth and direct coordination between Pakistani and American forces to sort out the Taliban's and al-Qaeda's sanctuaries in North-West Frontier Province (NWFP) and beyond on the border areas with Afghanistan. These sanctuaries are vital in supporting the Taliban-led insurgency in that country.

Bickering between the PPP and the PML-N has to date prevented them from agreeing on Musharraf's impeachment, but intense negotiations over the past few days are expected to result in a united move to have him removed from office. In this tense situation, Musharraf canceled a trip to Beijing to attend the opening of the Summer Olympic Games on Friday, but then reports emerged that he would attend the ceremony.

Washington will be watching developments with acute interest. Since the US-led invasion of Afghanistan in 2001, Musharraf has sided with the US in its "war on terror", and Washington believes he is still the man to deliver.

Musharraf stepped down as chief of the army last November and officially holds few executive powers - these reside in the prime minister's office.

However, Musharraf retains support in the military and in the civilian bureaucracy. Beyond loyalty to the man himself, he is a force to be reckoned with as American economic and military aid worth billions of dollars flows though the president's office.

Washington has gone as far as telling the new army chief, General Ashfaq Parvez Kiani, and Premier Gilani that its contact is Musharraf, through whom the money flows. Major General Mehmood Ali Durrani, the national security advisor and immediate past Pakistani ambassador to Washington, is second overseer of the aid money and looks after operational matters related to their distribution.

It is these men the Bush administration wants in a renewed effort to once and for all deal with the militancy in NWFP and the tribal areas.

Acting US Central Command commander Lieutenant General Martin Dempsey and Central Intelligence Agency deputy director Stephen Kappes recently visited Pakistan. Contacts familiar with these developments tell Asia Times Online that several approaches to the NWFP were discussed.

One was that "extraordinary measures" might be adopted, under which the president would exercise extraordinary powers embedded in the constitution to abandon all provincial assemblies and instead of holding fresh elections impose a state of emergency in the country, citing militant-led violence in the NWFP.

Another approach would be to use the existing democratic system and somehow install the sub-Pashtun nationalist and secular Awami National Party (ANP), led by Asfandyar Wali Khan, in the government.

First, though, the ANP, which rules the NWFP, would have to be given special powers to deal with the militancy in its province. This would be done through the president's office in Islamabad. The relatively liberal ANP is anti-Taliban and supported the pro-Russian government in Afghanistan in the 1980s and early 1990s.

Much then depends on Musharraf retaining his position, and how the Taliban and al-Qaeda respond to any increased powers that the ANP administration might turn against them.

Syed Saleem Shahzad is Asia Times Online's Pakistan Bureau Chief. He can be reached at [email protected]
 
 
 
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Re: Coming War With Pakistan??? - Post News About Pakistan Here
« Reply #95 on: August 07, 2008, 10:25:55 am »
Deadly clash in tribal Pakistan 

http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/world/south_asia/7546522.stm




 
Clashes erupted when troops reoccupied a border post 
At least five Pakistani troops and about 25 pro-Taleban militants have died in fierce clashes at a tribal area along the Afghan border, officials say.

The battle took place in the Loi Sum area in Bajaur, which has seen missile attacks in the past.

But this is the first time troops have fought militants there on the ground.

Talks between Pakistan's new government and Taleban leaders broke down in June and security has deteriorated sharply in recent weeks along the frontier.

In other violence in the north-west, suspected militants burnt down a girls' college and a school in Swat district, police said.

'Beheadings threat'

Pakistani officials say the fighting started after more than 200 troops moved to reoccupy a key border post abandoned several months ago following frequent Taleban attacks.

They said their convoy was ambushed late on Wednesday by militants using rockets and automatic weapons. Government forces used helicopter gunships to target the militants, and their suspected hideouts.

 

Residents said a Taleban leader in Bajaur, Maulvi Faqir Mohammad, has warned locals over the radio not to leave the area. He said anyone found to have passed information to the government would be beheaded.

A Taleban spokesman told the BBC militants had killed 22 members of the security forces and kidnapped another 17 in the Federally Administered Tribal Area.

Maj Murad Khan told the BBC five Pakistani troops had been killed but an unnamed security official told AFP news agency 10 soldiers had died.

The area is strategically located between Bajaur and Mohmand tribal districts close to the Afghan border.

Wednesday's move by the security forces indicates they plan to close this route, says the BBC's M Ilyas Khan.

BBC West Asia analyst Elettra Neysmith says there is mounting pressure on the Pakistani government from the US to crack down on fighters using the lawless tribal regions to launch cross-border raids into Afghanistan to target coalition forces.



 
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Re: Coming War With Pakistan??? - Post News About Pakistan Here
« Reply #96 on: August 07, 2008, 10:44:52 am »
Pak consulate staffer accused of aiding Taliban to weaken Afghan govt
http://www.pakistannews.net/story/391319
Thursday 7th August, 2008 (ANI)

Kabul, Aug 7 : Afghanistan's spy agency - the National Directorate of Security has reportedly accused a member of the Pakistan consulate in Kabul that he was proving aid to the Taliban to weaken the Afghan government.

Without disclosing the name of the Pakistan consulate staffer, the spy agency maintained that he gave "orders and money" to Mullah Rahmatullah, a Taliban militant in the region who was captured earlier this week.

The spy agency added that this information was gathered during the interrogation of a Taliban militant captured by Afghan intelligence agents on Tuesday.

Rahmatullah was captured by Afghan intelligence agents on Tuesday in Kandahar city, and the information linking the official with the militants was gleaned during the questioning, the Dawn quoted an NDS statement as saying.

The Taliban militant was responsible for kidnappings of influential elders in the province, extortion, "guerilla attacks and some other terrorist activities," the statement said.

"Mullah Rahmatullah tried to show that the (Afghan) government is weak in Kandahar," the statement said, and added: "After the arrest, Mullah Rahmatullah confessed to his crimes and said he received orders and money for all terrorist activities and for the kidnappings from one of the members of Pakistan's consulate in Kandahar."

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Re: Coming War With Pakistan??? - Post News About Pakistan Here
« Reply #97 on: August 08, 2008, 12:09:24 pm »
US weighs stepped-up military forays into Pakistan
http://ap.google.com/article/ALeqM5jaHgiDiFx7JI-5aMTNSVadA2AZdAD92DVN800
By PAMELA HESS and MATTHEW LEE – August 8, 2008

WASHINGTON (AP) — Top Bush administration officials are urging the president to direct U.S. troops in Afghanistan to be more aggressive in pursuing militants into Pakistan on foot as part of a proposed radical shift in its regional counterterrorism strategy, The Associated Press has learned.

Senior intelligence and military aides want President Bush to give American soldiers greater flexibility to operate against al-Qaida and Taliban fighters who cross the border from Pakistan's lawless tribal border area to conduct attacks inside Afghanistan, officials say.

The plan could include sending U.S. special forces teams, temporarily assigned to the CIA, into the tribal areas to hit high-value targets, according to an intelligence official with direct knowledge of the plan.

Such a move would be controversial, in part because of Pakistani opposition to U.S. incursions into its territory, and the proposal is not universally supported in Washington. It comes amid growing political instability in Pakistan and concerns that elements of Pakistan's security forces are collaborating with extremists.

Senior members of Bush's national security team met last week at the White House to discuss the recommendations and are now weighing how to proceed, the officials said.

The top agenda item at the meeting of the so-called deputies committee — usually the No. 2 officials at the departments of Defense, and State, plus the intelligence agencies and the National Security Council — was to "review and potentially revise cross-border strategy," a person familiar with the session told the AP.

"What the deputies committee has raised is, given the possibility that political fragmentation in Pakistan is going to continue, do we need to change our strategy?" the official said. He and other current and former officials spoke on condition of anonymity because sensitive foreign policy matters are in play.

The deputies committee is two levels down from the president, so its recommendations would not immediately affect policy.

White House spokesman Tony Fratto declined to comment.

The current strategy — relying on Pakistan to keep a lid on the tribal areas along the border with Afghanistan — was meant to support Pakistani President Pervez Musharraf, a strong ally of the U.S. who took control of Pakistan in 1999 in a bloodless coup. Musharraf was sidelined this spring when a coalition government trounced Musharraf's allies in parliamentary elections. He remains president but with vastly diminished influence.

Pakistan's governing coalition announced Thursday it will seek to impeach Musharraf, cranking up pressure on the U.S.-backed former general to resign.

In Washington, the State Department and some Pentagon officials are leery of the new proposal, warning of repercussions from the Pakistani government, which they fear could be further destabilized, while some officials in the CIA are pushing the plan.

Officials closer to the front lines in Afghanistan also are pushing for a newly aggressive stance. The rules currently limiting U.S. incursions into Pakistan when in hot pursuit of enemy fighters or targets would not be stretched under the plan. But U.S. forces would be encouraged to use that authority liberally.

The Associated Press reported last year that U.S. rules of engagement allowed ground forces to go a little over 6 miles into Pakistan when in hot pursuit, and when forces were targeted or fired on by the enemy. U.S. rules allow aircraft to go 10 miles into Pakistan air space.

Afghanistan's ambassador to the U.S. supports the plan.

"The argument that we may destabilize Pakistan has taken us to where we are right now," Ambassador Said T. Jawad told the AP. "Pursuing the policy of public praise and private pressure on Pakistan doesn't work."

But defense officials say they are cautioning against stepping up military operations in Pakistan without specific approval from Islamabad. They say violating Pakistani sovereignty would anger the Pakistani people and could affect U.S. use of the country as a base from which to resupply U.S. forces in Afghanistan.

Jawad said U.S. and Afghan forces know the location of training camps, places Taliban extremists live and where there have been large gatherings of al-Qaida members, but the current rules of engagement have hampered attacking those targets.

"We need to enhance the capacity of hitting these targets," he said.

The recommendations also call for developing direct relationships with Pashtun tribes on the Pakistani side of the border. That engagement has largely been left to Pakistan's security service, which U.S. officials increasingly fear is riddled with extremists and militant sympathizers.

Pakistan and the United States have somewhat contrary short-term interests in the Federally Administered Tribal Area, a Maryland-sized swath of ungoverned territory bordering Afghanistan.

It is home to about 2 million Pakistanis, representing between 20 and 30 fiercely independent tribes, several with well-armed, militant branches. The region also is increasingly home to al-Qaida terrorists and a growing network of foreign fighters, according to Defense Department officials.

Bowing to U.S. pressure, Musharraf three years ago directed a military crack down on the tribal area to root out al-Qaida fighters. The tribes resisted the intrusion into their affairs. Prior to 2007 there were around a dozen tribal attacks a year in Pakistan. Last year there were nearly 100, according to U.S. defense officials.

Many tribes have decades-long associations with al-Qaida leaders, dating back to the Soviet occupation of Afghanistan that they fought against. Al-Qaida leaders have intermarried with the tribes and are a source of arms and weapons.

Now, the defense officials said, Pakistani officials are primarily concerned with negotiating an end to the attacks outside the tribal areas. But the U.S. concern is primarily al-Qaida in the tribal areas, and the negotiations are unlikely to affect al-Qaida's increasingly free rein throughout the region.
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Re: Coming War With Pakistan??? - Post News About Pakistan Here
« Reply #98 on: August 10, 2008, 11:13:37 am »
Afghan president urges military action in Pakistan
http://ap.google.com/article/ALeqM5i8dGftYb0s4XWdUMRdIVs3vh1CKAD92FGV9G1
By RAHIM FAIEZ – 18 minutes ago

KABUL, Afghanistan (AP) — President Hamid Karzai said Sunday that airstrikes carried out in Afghan villages by U.S. and NATO troops are only killing civilians and that the international community should instead go after terror centers in Pakistan.

International forces serving under NATO and the separate U.S.-led coalition insist that the vast majority of those killed in air raids are militants. However, they also acknowledge that civilians are sometimes killed in bombing runs, though they accuse militants of firing on international troops from civilian homes they have commandeered.

Speaking under a tree on the grounds of the presidential palace, Karzai said the international community should take its fight across the border into Pakistan, where militants find safe havens in Pakistan's tribal region.

"The struggle against terrorism is not in the villages of Afghanistan," Karzai said. "The only result of the use of airstrikes is the killing of civilians. This is not the way to wage the fight against terrorism."

Afghan officials say U.S. or NATO airstrikes killed dozens of civilians in two incidents last month, including 47 people who were killed while walking to a wedding in the eastern province of Nangarhar on July 6.

Karzai's comments come the same day as Afghan officials announced that airstrikes and clashes in Kapisa province, north of the capital, killed more than 10 people Saturday. A defence ministry spokesman, Gen. Mohammad Zahir Azimi, said those killed were militants.

However, provincial deputy governor, Rahimullah Safi, said 11 people were killed and all were civilians.

The NATO spokesman, Mark Laity, said there was no record of airstrikes in the Kapisa clash but that helicopters fired cannons at militants. Laity said NATO was still investigating but that "at present we do not believe" civilians were killed.

Karzai's criticism of U.S. and NATO airstrikes comes at a time when he appears to be making an increasing number of nationalistic appeals ahead of next year's presidential election. Karzai has indicated he plans to run.

However, Karzai's call for military action in Pakistan echoes the views of top NATO military leaders, who say that militants train, recruit and rearm in Pakistan's tribal areas.

Senior U.S. military officials say it will be extremely difficult to defeat the resurgent Taliban as long as militant sanctuaries exist on Pakistan's side of the border. U.S. and NATO troops have limited latitude to fight or pursue militants into Pakistan.

Karzai and his government have stepped up criticism in recent months of Pakistan's military-run intelligence service accusing it of directly supporting militants and of being behind the deadly July bombing of the Indian Embassy in Kabul.

Karzai said the Inter-Services Intelligence agency should "abandon the idea that the Afghan government will be under its control."

"We do not want to be the slaves or puppets of other countries," he said.

Top Bush administration officials are pressing the president to direct U.S. troops in Afghanistan to be more aggressive in pursuing militants into Pakistan on foot as part of a proposed radical shift in regional counterterrorism strategy.

Senior intelligence and military aides want President Bush to give American soldiers greater flexibility to operate against al-Qaida and Taliban fighters who cross the border from Pakistan to conduct attacks inside Afghanistan.

But any such move would be controversial, in part because of Pakistani opposition to U.S. incursions into its territory, and the proposal is not universally supported in Washington. It comes amid growing political instability in Pakistan.
“The Constitution is not an instrument for the government to restrain the people,
it's an instrument for the people to restrain the government.” – Patrick Henry

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Re: Coming War With Pakistan??? - Post News About Pakistan Here
« Reply #99 on: August 10, 2008, 11:20:27 am »
CIA Mission -Tarnishing the Image of ISI
http://www.kashmirwatch.com/showexclusives.php?subaction=showfull&id=1218394690&archive=&start_from=&ucat=15&var1news=value1news
KashmirWatch, August 10

By Zaheerul Hassan

Since couple of months, some of Western electronic and print particularly Americans media jumped into the support of self-generated cold war of notorious Central Intelligence Agency (CIA) against Pakistani Intelligence Agency (ISI). As usually its allied agencies, RAW, Khad and Mossad are assisting the US intelligence agency covertly in the completion of their agenda of destabilizing this region. The malicious operating roles of the revealed agencies against Pakistan, China, Russia, Bangladesh, Iran, Middle East countries and Sri Lanka are totally now an open secret game because of their common interests of containing the emerging super power like Russia and China to get hold of the future markets. Washington-led block believes that their political economic goals can only be achieved through targeting the opponents’ intelligence agencies, launching puppet governments of their own choice, destroying important institutions, assassinating popular political leadership and creating unrest and destabilization in the developing countries particularly in Asia .

The psychological war between KGB and CIA was remained on the top till disintegration of the former Russia after the World War II. Similarly, US in collaboration with Raw and Mossad are engaged in disturbance creation plan in like China and Arab countries. In the recent past, Raw with the help of her master agency CIA staged a plot of sabotaging Beijing Olympic Games through of Dalai Lama movement which was a simplest example of nefarious activities in this region being undertaking by her.

The European intelligence agencies led by CIA now-a-days have started tarnishing the image of ISI just to cover their failure in Iraq and Afghanistan. The responsibility of every unsuccessful action like deteriorating law and order situation in Afghanistan are being put on the shoulder of ISI so as to conceal their own clandestine activities. On, July 31 and August 1, The New York Times levelled the series of allegations while quoting CIA Deputy Director Stephen Kappes visit of Pakistan, in which he confronted to Pakistani officials on the evidence of ties between ISI and the militants in the tribal areas—aiding in bombing of Indian embassy in Kabul on July 7. Instead of taking confidence building measures, President Bush too contended with Prime Minister Gilani about the "divided loyalties of ISI." Next day, Washington Times and American electronic media too repeated these baseless allegations. PM Gilani rejected these accusations as "unbelievable" in relation to any links between Pakistan’s ISI and the militants. Pakistan Army spokesman and foreign minister also declared these allegations as rubbish. Basically all this have been done intentionally by American officials just to pressurize Pakistani Prime Minister during his talk with Bush.

Basically, Washington, New Delhi and Tel Aviv are launching covert and overt operations through their secret agencies in China, Russia and other countries of the region. In the 1980s, Larry Wu-Tai Chin (Jin Wudai), a translator for the CIA's Foreign Broadcast Information Service, was arrested and charged with espionage in China. He had been recruited as US officer in 1944 while stationed in China, who remained invisible for four decades. In 2003, Chinese-American Federal Bureau of Investigation employee and Republican Party fund raiser Katrina Leung was arrested and accused of being a double agent for both the FBI and the Chinese government, although she was acquitted of charges of copying classified information, and convicted only of tax charges and of lying to the FBI. The charging of Katrina is also revealing one more fact, which is causing harassment for the completion of unlawful tasks of CIA.

The missions of ISI and Chinese Security agencies since their inception are very common and simple, the security of their respective states through effective measures against enemy agents, spies, and counter-revolutionary activities designed to sabotage or overthrow. But on the other hand, the missions of CIA and its allied agencies include achieving their aims of protecting their interests through destruction, destabilization and over throwing undesired rulers of other countries. According to the available information’s on websites, The Central Intelligence Agency was created in 1947 with the signing of the National Security Act of 1947[1][2] (PL 235 - 61 Stat. 496; U.S.C. 402) by President Harry S. Truman. The Act was amended by the National Security Act Amendments of 1949 (63 Stat. 579; 50 U.S.C. 401 et seq.). Somehow this agency in general masses is known as a powerful central state of America.

The National Security Act charged the Director of Central Intelligence (DCI) with coordinating the nation's intelligence activities and correlating, evaluating and disseminating intelligence which affects national security ... The CIA is an independent agency, responsible to the President through the DCI, and accountable to the American people through the intelligence oversight committees of the U.S. Congress but working of this agency is quite different from that which a layman thinks or know that CIA even doesn’t spare her own political leadership. Actually, it is on record that CIA itself promoted terrorism in the world because Bin Laden, Amil Kancy and many others even some of main activists operating in FATA are her products . In this context, Ramzi Yousaf who was well-aware of the activities of the American secret agencies had stated in the US court in 1997, "You are butchers, liars, and hypocrites. You keep on talking about terrorism to the media, but behind closed doors you support terrorism." His statement about the CIA activities is absolutely right by which world came to know their dealing with prisoner of war.

In the recent past, an officially declassified document of the CIA had revealed that during the Cold War era, the agency had tried to kill the Cuban President Fidel Castro. US journalist Ron Suskind unfolded some of CIA actions in his book, "The Way of the World" regarding taping of Benazir Bhutoo conversation with Musharraf. These tapes may be wrong or right but fact is there that it’s a very normal activity and condemnable action in the part of American agency. In fact, assassination of Edi Ameen of Uganda, murder of Kennedy , efforts of toppling over of present Iran government , hanging Sadam , execution of Bhutto in Zia’s regime and killing Shah Faisal through his nephew somehow suspected to be undertaken or launched by CIA. The inhuman acts with prisoners in Guananamo Bay are being condemnd world over. The current case of Dr. Aafia Siddique by so called civilized country (US) is again a big question mark for sleeping NGO dealing with Human Rights. Reportedly, she along with her innocent kids have been picked by CIA in 2003, taken to Afghanistan and transported to America. Print and electronic media of Pakistan and western countries have reported that she have been fired, tortured physically and mentally. Government must provide her legal support to rescue from the case. Similarly, Raw in Kashmir, Mossad in Palestine and Khad are playing with the innocent individuals, women and children by to pressurizing—creating harassment through rape and killing to fulfill there own interests .

Unfortunately some of leaders unintentionally, play in the hands of anti -Pakistan agencies and start doing those actions which directly give the benefits to our opponents. The latest example of issuance of a notification on July 26 last month by some officials to bring ISI under the control of the interior ministry and later on withdrawing the same in no time on the occasion of the recent trip of Pakistan’s PM Gilani to the US exposes an international plot against the ISI .The role of ISI in relation to country’s security is undoubtedly very important. The agency works in and outside the boundary to guard and protect the interests of our own nation which can never be taken as positive by the anti- Pakistan elements. While, US and its allied agenda is to compromise ISI, degrade the image of Pakistan Army in the masses, destabilize Pakistan, and then go for nuclear assets of the lonely Islamic state. Thus issuing of notification regarding ISI might be unsuccessful move of creating rifts amongst newly elected government and ISI.

Concluding the discussion, I must say that CIA and its allied agencies are on the mission to fulfill their agenda by tarnishing the image of ISI but indirectly they are causing damage to the war against terror. Pakistan’s political leadership must take step to guard against the potent threat to the country’s security. US think-tanks must ask their leadership to curtail the activities of CIA if they want to go for real peace in the world.
 
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it's an instrument for the people to restrain the government.” – Patrick Henry

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Re: Coming War With Pakistan??? - Post News About Pakistan Here
« Reply #100 on: August 10, 2008, 08:30:49 pm »
First we had a training exercise off the east coast, then the naval armada heads for Iran.

Now we have this exercise starting tomorrow.

US and India training for attack on Pakistan? ???


Air Force hosting training exercises with allies
http://www.ktvn.com/Global/story.asp?S=8818672&nav=menu549_2
Associated Press - August 10, 2008 8:35 PM ET

LAS VEGAS (AP) - The Air Force is expected to begin military training exercises above the Nevada desert tomorrow with pilots from India, marking another step in relations between the two countries that have steadily improved since the terrorist attacks of September 11th.

Air Force officials say South Korean and French pilots will also take part in the realistic combat exercises that will put about 65 airplanes in the skies over two weeks. It brings India's pilots to the United States for training for the first time.

The Indian and U.S. militaries had little interaction during the Cold War, when India was closer to the Soviet Union and the United States was seen to be allied with India's neighbor and rival, Pakistan.

But relations have steadily improved, with increasing political, economic and military ties.

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it's an instrument for the people to restrain the government.” – Patrick Henry

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Re: Coming War With Pakistan??? - Post News About Pakistan Here
« Reply #101 on: August 10, 2008, 08:37:23 pm »
Air Force hosting training exercises with allies
http://www.tmcnet.com/usubmit/-air-force-hosting-training-exercises-with-allies-/2008/08/10/3593692.htm

(Associated Press WorldStream Via Acquire Media NewsEdge) LAS VEGAS_The Air Force was expected to begin military training exercises above the Nevada desert with pilots from India on Monday, marking another step in steadily improving relations between the two countries since the terrorist attacks of Sept. 11, 2001.

Air Force officials said South Korean and French pilots would also take part in the realistic combat exercises that will put about 65 airplanes in the skies over two weeks. It brings India's pilots to the United States for training for the first time.

"This particular Air Force exercise is important because India is included among some very important allies," said Christine Fair, a South Asia specialist at the RAND Corp. "This is definitely an extension of an arc that has been mapped out since 2000, and it really signifies that what India and the United States have is a strategic relationship."

The Indian and U.S. militaries had little interaction during the Cold War, when India was closer to the Soviet Union and the United States was seen as allied with India's neighbor and rival, Pakistan.

But relations have steadily grown better, with increasing political, economic and military ties. The Sept. 11, 2001, attacks in the United States and the subsequent fight against terrorism brought the two sides even closer.

Ties have expanded rapidly since then, with a series of joint exercises in the air, on land and at sea. Analysts believe that the U.S. is eager to use India as a counter to China in the region.

"The United States is very keen that India become important," Fair said. "India's going to be doing what it wants to do in the area that China thinks is important and a more capable, strong India will be able to prevent Chinese hegemony more so than a weak India."

India is also extremely worried about China's growing military and political influence in the region and has upped its military spending.

Capt. Marcus Wilson, team chief for the exercises, said it was not designed to combat any specific country or threat, but are designed to test how the forces would work together during large scale missions.

"We will learn how our allies operate in response to similar threats," Wilson said in a statement. "It will allow us to build observations to eventually learn those lessons about what it takes to integrate, talk, fly with, employ, deploy and sustain air power with places like India, Korea and France."

Wilson said more than 1,000 people would participate in the simulations of various exercises, from bomb-dropping to hostage rescue.

Dr. Jing-dong Yuan, a nonproliferation expert at the Monterey Institute of International Studies, said North Korea would most likely have the strongest negative reaction to the joint exercises.

"Pyongyang, through its state-run news agency, the Korean Central News Agency, has consistently and passionately criticized such ventures accusing the United States of harboring hostile intentions toward North Korea," Yuan said. "Beijing would likely remain reticent (about) such training since it does not see itself as directly and imminently affected by such activities."

U.S. firms are also eager to get a share of the arms market in India, where Russia has long been the prime supplier. India has already agreed to buy six of Lockheed's C-130J Hercules airlift aircraft for roughly $1 billion.

American companies are eagerly eyeing a lucrative $10 billion deal to supply 126 fighters _ which features bids from major U.S. defense contractors Boeing Corp. and Lockheed Martin.

Relations between the two countries have been further strengthened by the India-U.S. nuclear deal.

The accord would reverse three decades of U.S. policy by shipping atomic fuel and technology to India in return for international inspections on India's civilian, but not its military, reactors.

India recently managed to push ahead with the deal despite widespread local opposition, particularly from the strong communist parties that oppose closer ties with the U.S.
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Re: Coming War With Pakistan??? - Post News About Pakistan Here
« Reply #102 on: August 11, 2008, 07:17:11 am »
Afghan president urges military action in Pakistan
 

Afghan President Hamid Karzai speaks during a press conference at the presidential palace in Kabul, Afghanistan, Sunday, Aug. 10, 2008. Karzai says that the bombing of Afghan villages is only killing civilians and that the international community should be going after terror centers in Pakistan instead.

By RAHIM FAIEZ, The Associated Press
2008-08-10 15:52:46.0
 http://www.examiner.com/a-1530052~Afghan_president_urges_military_action_in_Pakistan.html?cid=temp-popular

KABUL, Afghanistan -
President Hamid Karzai said Sunday that airstrikes carried out in Afghan villages by U.S. and NATO troops are only killing civilians and that the international community should instead go after terror centers in Pakistan.

International forces serving under NATO and the separate U.S.-led coalition insist that the vast majority of those killed in air raids are militants. However, they also acknowledge that civilians are sometimes killed in bombing runs, though they accuse militants of firing on international troops from civilian homes they have commandeered.

Speaking under a tree on the grounds of the presidential palace, Karzai said the international community should take its fight across the border into Pakistan, where militants find safe havens in Pakistan's tribal region.

"The struggle against terrorism is not in the villages of Afghanistan," Karzai said. "The only result of the use of airstrikes is the killing of civilians. This is not the way to wage the fight against terrorism."

Afghan officials say U.S. or NATO airstrikes killed dozens of civilians in two incidents last month, including 47 people who were killed while walking to a wedding in the eastern province of Nangarhar on July 6.

Karzai's comments come the same day as Afghan officials announced that airstrikes and clashes in Kapisa province, north of the capital, killed more than 10 people Saturday. A defence ministry spokesman, Gen. Mohammad Zahir Azimi, said those killed were militants.

However, provincial deputy governor, Rahimullah Safi, said 11 people were killed and all were civilians.

The NATO spokesman, Mark Laity, said there was no record of airstrikes in the Kapisa clash but that helicopters fired cannons at militants. Laity said NATO was still investigating but that "at present we do not believe" civilians were killed.

Karzai's criticism of U.S. and NATO airstrikes comes at a time when he appears to be making an increasing number of nationalistic appeals ahead of next year's presidential election. Karzai has indicated he plans to run.

However, Karzai's call for military action in Pakistan echoes the views of top NATO military leaders, who say that militants train, recruit and rearm in Pakistan's tribal areas.

Senior U.S. military officials say it will be extremely difficult to defeat the resurgent Taliban as long as militant sanctuaries exist on Pakistan's side of the border. U.S. and NATO troops have limited latitude to fight or pursue militants into Pakistan.

Karzai and his government have stepped up criticism in recent months of Pakistan's military-run intelligence service accusing it of directly supporting militants and of being behind the deadly July bombing of the Indian Embassy in Kabul.

Karzai said the Inter-Services Intelligence agency should "abandon the idea that the Afghan government will be under its control."

"We do not want to be the slaves or puppets of other countries," he said.

Top Bush administration officials are pressing the president to direct U.S. troops in Afghanistan to be more aggressive in pursuing militants into Pakistan on foot as part of a proposed radical shift in regional counterterrorism strategy.

Senior intelligence and military aides want President Bush to give American soldiers greater flexibility to operate against al-Qaida and Taliban fighters who cross the border from Pakistan to conduct attacks inside Afghanistan.

But any such move would be controversial, in part because of Pakistani opposition to U.S. incursions into its territory, and the proposal is not universally supported in Washington. It comes amid growing political instability in Pakistan.

---

Associated Press writers Amir Shah in Kabul and Noor Khan in Kandahar contributed to this report.


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Re: Coming War With Pakistan??? - Post News About Pakistan Here
« Reply #103 on: August 13, 2008, 06:34:31 am »
Wednesday, August 13, 2008
13:34 Mecca time, 10:34 GMT   
News CENTRAL/S. ASIA 
http://english.aljazeera.net/news/asia/2008/08/200881362554173554.html


 
Attack 'destroys Pakistan bases' 
 
At least 24 people were killed in northwestern Pakistan when four missiles or bombs hit two compounds used by armed groups operating along the Afghanistan border, local sources have told Al Jazeera.

Pakistani, Arabs and Turkmen fighters were said to be among the casualties in the attack in South Waziristan late on Tuesday.

It was not immeditaely clear who carried out the attack, but several unconfirmed reports blamed US or Nato-led forces deployed in Afghanistan.

"This is their work," a senior security official told the AFP news agency, referring to those foreign forces operating across the border.

However, US military officials in the Afghan capital Kabul denied that the missiles were fired by either Nato's International Security Assistance Force (Isaf) or the US-led coalition.

"This is not true. We have no reports of missiles being fired into Pakistan," US Lieutenant Nathan Perry told AFP.

Residents told the Reuters news agency that the mud-and-brick compound had been destroyed and at least eight bodies recovered from the rubble.

Hezb-e-Islami commanders

The Associated Press news agency reported that at least one base hit on Wednesday was linked to Gulbuddin Hekmatyar, the Afghan leader of the Hezb-e-Islami group which has been fighting Nato and US forces in his country.

While a Pakistani security official told AFP that the two compounds were run by Zanjir Wazir, a local Hezb-e-Islami commander.

"It is not clear whether Wazir survived the attack or not, but his brother Abdur Rehman and one of their close relatives, Abdul Salam, were killed in the strike," the official said.

The US has been accused of carrying out several attacks on targets across the border in Pakistan in recent months.

Abu Khabab al-Masri, an Egyptian purported to be al-Qaeda's chemical weapons expert, was reportedly killed in a similar air raid in July.

During talks with George Bush, the US president, last month, Yusuf Raza Gilani, Pakistan's prime minister, called on the Washington not to act "unilaterally" against targets in Pakistan.

Leader shot dead

Meanwhile, Haji Namdar, the leader of the Vice and Virtue Movement, a group promoting Taliban-style rule in northwestern Pakistan, was shot dead during a meeting at his office.

"They were three men who suddenly stood up during the meeting and one of them opened fire on him," Zahir Shah, a close ally of Namdar, said.

The attacker was captured while the other two men escaped, Shah said.

Namdar escaped another attempt on his life in May when a suicide bomber blew himself up outside the office.

The Vice and Virtue Movement was among three groups banned in June when security forces launched an operation to curb the growing influence of such in the Khyber region.
   
The Pakistani government had opened negotiations with pro-Taliban groups in the tribal areas earlier this year, but has since launched several military operations, including an ongoing offensive in the Bajaur tribal region which has left more than 160 people dead in a week.
 
 Source: Al Jazeera and agencies 
 
 

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Re: Coming War With Pakistan??? - Post News About Pakistan Here
« Reply #104 on: August 13, 2008, 08:00:25 am »
Taliban: 'Open war' in Pakistan as bomb kills 14

Taliban declares 'open war' in Pakistan as bomb wrecks military truck and kills up to 14

RIAZ KHAN
AP News

Aug 12, 2008 15:13 EST
http://wiredispatch.com/news/?id=292891


The Pakistani Taliban declared "open war" Tuesday in response to military offensives in the northwest, saying it staged a bombing that destroyed an air force truck and killed up to 14 people, including a child.

Authorities, meanwhile, investigated whether an insurgent reported killed in one of the military operations was a senior al-Qaida commander. The offensive in the Bajur tribal area reportedly has killed 160 people and caused tens of thousands to flee to camps farther north.

The blast in Peshawar, main city of the restive frontier with Afghanistan, escalated the conflict in a region where the new government is struggling to contain increasingly brazen militants. It dealt another blow to efforts to strike peace deals with hard-liners in the Swat Valley and other areas, pacts that U.S. officials contend would strengthen extremists.

"It is an open war between us and them," Pakistani Taliban spokesman Maulvi Umar told The Associated Press. "If these kinds of operations continue against us in Swat and in the tribal areas, we will continue this."

Pakistani officials could not be reached for comment or declined to react to the Taliban's statement, but earlier in the day Interior Ministry chief Rehman Malik said the country would not yield in its attempts to end militancy in its frontier areas.

"It is our firm resolve that we will root out terrorism from Pakistan, and all of our security agencies are working together to achieve this goal," he told the AP.

The bomb hit the air force truck as it crossed a bridge on the outskirts of Peshawar. The blast tore a big hole in the bridge deck and reduced the Mazda truck to a smoldering wreck. The site was littered with debris, blood and a mangled motorcycle.

A provincial government spokesman, Mian Iftikhar Hussain, said the explosion killed 14 people, most of them air force personnel, and wounded more than a dozen.

An air force statement put its death toll at five airmen, two lower-ranking personnel and two civilian employees. Five air force personnel also were wounded, it said.

A 5-year-old girl in a nearby vehicle was among those killed, said Nisar Khan, a Peshawar police officer. He said police were trying to trace her relatives.

A bomb disposal officer, who requested anonymity because he was not authorized to speak to journalists, said the bomb had been attached under the bridge and contained between 66 and 88 pounds of explosives.

President Pervez Musharraf condemned the blast in a statement that said he "reiterated the resolve of the nation to remain determined and not yield to pressures created by such heinous crimes."

The increasingly unpopular Musharraf faces possible impeachment by the governing coalition that came to power after February elections. Many Pakistanis blame his alliance with Washington after the Sept. 11 attack on the U.S. for rising militancy in the country.

U.S. officials have anxiously watched the new government's effort to grapple with militant movements by using both sticks and carrots. Of particular concern to the West is the government's weak hold on the tribal regions, which are considered Taliban and al-Qaida strongholds.

NATO contends cease-fire deals have allowed militants based in the frontier areas to step up attacks across the border in Afghanistan, while U.S. officials warn that al-Qaida leaders hiding along the border could be plotting attacks on the West.

On Tuesday, a senior Interior Ministry official confirmed that authorities were probing the identity of a suspected militant reported killed this week during the fighting in Bajur.

A senior intelligence official identified the militant as an Egyptian known as Abu Saeed and said he was believed to be a close aide of al-Qaida No. 2 leader Ayman al-Zawahri. He said authorities had intelligence that the militant was killed but had not found the body.

A top al-Qaida commander in Afghanistan, Mustafa Abu al-Yazeed, who had appeared in videos issued by the terrorist network, is also known as Abu Saeed al-Masri. The ministry official said authorities were trying to determine whether the Abu Saeed reported killed was the same man.

Both Pakistani officials spoke on condition of anonymity because they were not authorized to release the information.

Contacted by the AP, two spokesmen for Afghanistan's Taliban, Qari Yousef Ahmadi and Zabiullah Mujahid, said they had no information about the reported death.

In late July, an al-Qaida explosives and poison expert, Abu Khabab al-Masri, was killed by a suspected U.S. missile strike in the Pakistani border region of South Waziristan.

On Tuesday, Pakistani army helicopter gunships fired on suspected militant positions in Bajur, which is north of Peshawar along the rugged Afghan-Pakistan frontier.

The army spokesman, Maj. Gen. Athar Abbas, said the fighting in Bajur had killed at least 150 militants in the past week. Officials have reported at least nine paramilitary troops dead.

Independent confirmation of casualties has not been possible, but the fighting caused thousands to flee their homes in Bajur to take refuge in the nearby Lower Dir area.

Kamran Rehman Khan, a top aide to the chief minister of North West Frontier Province, said three government camps were serving some 17,500 people and a fourth was being set up. Leaders of political parties in the region said their own camps held some 45,000 people.

___

Associated Press writers Habib Khan in Khar and Nahal Toosi, Zarar Khan and Munir Ahmad in Islamabad contributed to this report.

Source: AP News


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Re: Coming War With Pakistan??? - Post News About Pakistan Here
« Reply #105 on: August 13, 2008, 09:17:09 am »
US blamed again for missile attack in Pakistan
http://story.albuquerqueexpress.com/index.php/ct/9/cid/c08dd24cec417021/id/393928/cs/1/
Albuquerque Express
Wednesday 13th August, 2008 



A missile strike on a training camp in Waziristan in a Pakistani tribal area bordering Afghanistan has left at least ten people dead.

The dead include a number of foreigners.

Pakistan has claimed United States forces carried out the strike, but a spokesperson for the US army says the missiles were not fired by any member of NATO's international force or the US-led coalition.

Both al-Qaeda and the Taliban are active in the region, as is the American CIA, which is also known to operate pilotless aircraft armed with missiles.
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Re: Coming War With Pakistan??? - Post News About Pakistan Here
« Reply #106 on: August 14, 2008, 09:37:17 am »
as ever they appear to be playing down Pakistani government casualties, they generally do and then a few months later the real figure turns out to be many times what was claimed at the time

Pakistan Kills 150 Rebels in Six-Day Battle in Tribal Region

By Khaleeq Ahmed

http://www.bloomberg.com/apps/news?pid=20601091&sid=aKpbjU3t7E1o&refer=india

Aug. 12 (Bloomberg)
-- Pakistan's security forces killed more than 150 militants in six days of fighting in the northwestern region of Bajaur, near the Afghanistan border, which the U.S. describes as a haven for Taliban and al-Qaeda fighters.

``The security forces are attacking the strongholds of the militants in their mountain hideouts,'' Major Murad Khan, a spokesman for the military, said by telephone today from the garrison town of Rawalpindi. ``The political administration and the security forces are in control of the situation.''

The battle left 13 security force members dead, he said.

Pakistan's government, led by Prime Minister Yousuf Raza Gilani, says it is trying to combat extremism by using a combination of negotiation, economic and political development and the selective use of military force. Terrorist attacks killed more than 2,000 people in Pakistan last year.

Pakistani Taliban leaders held a news conference this month in Bajaur and threatened to carry out suicide attacks in Pakistan's major cities, including Karachi, Lahore and Islamabad, unless the military halts its offensive in the northwestern Swat Valley, the News newspaper has reported.

The army has been fighting since last year against supporters of Maulana Fazlullah, a pro-Taliban cleric, who wants to impose Islamic law in Swat, a once popular tourist destination about 250 kilometers (150 miles) from the capital, Islamabad.

Troops have killed 103 militants in Swat Valley since a two-month cease-fire broke down and fresh clashes began last month, the military said last week.

The North Atlantic Treaty Organization and U.S. intelligence agencies say Islamic militants use bases in Pakistan's northwestern tribal areas to train, arm themselves and plan attacks against troops across the border and beyond.

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Offline bigron

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Re: Coming War With Pakistan??? - Post News About Pakistan Here
« Reply #107 on: August 15, 2008, 06:47:18 am »
West’s Diplomats Rush To Save Musharraf From Impeachment as Resignation Rumors Grow

by Saeed Shah

http://www.commondreams.org/archive/2008/08/14/10982/

ISLAMABAD - British and American diplomats are attempting to find an exit for Pakistan’s President Pervez Musharraf, a staunch western ally, before he is dragged through a humiliating impeachment process.

Rumours that Musharraf is set to quit have been circulating in Pakistan for several days. He has suffered a collapse in support as three of Pakistan’s four provincial parliaments have passed resolutions, with overwhelming backing, declaring him unfit for office. The fourth province is expected to follow soon.

The provincial votes were symbolic, but the formal process will begin early next week with an impeachment motion in the national parliament. It is clear that the ruling coalition now has the two-thirds majority needed to impeach him.

Government insiders said that if Musharraf wants to quit, he must do so before the impeachment proceedings begin, leaving him with only a few days.

His spokesman has rebutted any suggestion that he will step down.

Western diplomats have sought to convince the coalition government that impeachment would further undermine the security and political situation in crisis-racked Pakistan, and that he should instead be offered a “graceful exit”.

“We’re being told [by western envoys] that it’s not going to bring more stability to have a long trial. And that it is in the interests of stability for him to exit,” said one senior coalition politician.

Sir Mark Lyall Grant, director of political affairs at the British Foreign Office, currently in Pakistan, is said to spearheading the message of caution. Lyall Grant met Asif Zardari, leader of the Pakistan People’s Party, one of the two big parties in the coalition, on Tuesday night at the British high commission. He held a separate meeting with Sherry Rehman, a senior minister, and he also saw Musharraf, the FCO confirmed.

Lyall Grant, a former British high commissioner to Pakistan, was intimately involved in western-mediated negotiations last year between Musharraf and former prime minister Benazir Bhutto, which presaged her return to Pakistan and the holding of elections.

American diplomats are also engaged in an intensive round of meetings. The deputy US ambassador, Peter Bodde, is understood to have met Zardari in the last couple of days. American ambassador Anne Patterson saw Nisar Ali Khan, a senior member of Nawaz Sharif’s party, the Pakistan Muslim League-N, the other main group in the coalition. Sources in Sharif’s party said her message was: “Give Musharraf safe passage.”

However, spokesmen for both the British and US missions denied that they were seeking to interfere. Aidan Liddle, a spokesman for the British embassy, said: “We are very clear that we have no role to play in this impeachment process. Britain has no interest in talking about the fate of individuals.”

Musharraf has been a crucial partner in the so-called “war on terror”. US officials in particular are anxious that he is not disgraced now.

They are also concerned that impeachment of Musharraf, a former army chief, will poison relations between the government and Pakistan’s powerful military.

“There is a link between Musharraf and the army, so humiliating him is like humiliating the army,” said Daniel Markey, a former US state department official who is now at the Council on Foreign Relations in Washington. “The [US] administration would have much preferred to see a workable political arrangement, between Musharraf and the government, not another looming transition.”

The attack on Musharraf has been inflamed in recent days by Zardari’s accusations that the president siphoned off hundreds of millions of dollars in American aid. The accusation, backed up by no evidence, is said to have made Musharraf more determined to fight on. The PPP is willing to allow the president to resign and retreat from public life.

However, the party of Nawaz Sharif, who was ousted as prime minister in 1999 by Musharraf’s military coup, seems determined to prosecute the president. “We’ve had enough of dictators,” said Ahsan Iqbal, one of the leaders of the Pakistan Muslim League-N. “Whoever abrogates the constitution must be punished or we will never stop these dictators usurping power here.”

Sheikh Waqas Akram, a pro-Musharraf member of the national parliament, warned: “This is a man who stood up against al-Qaida. Who will face al-Qaida after Musharraf? Certainly not this coalition.” Akram, who is close to the president, said that Musharraf wanted to stay in Pakistan after he leaves office.

However, there have been at least three assassination attempts on the president by extremist groups, and it is considered highly dangerous for him to remain in the country. Al-Qaida recently issued a video denouncing Musharraf’s rule.

Where could he go?
United States

Musharraf has been one of the Bush administration’s closest allies. While Washington would prefer not to host his exile, as it would look bad politically, it would if he has nowhere else to go. His son lives in the US.

Pakistan

The president has a small farm just outside Islamabad but the house is still being constructed and security would be a challenge. Another option would be Karachi but it is a volatile city with a huge population of Pushtuns, the ethnic group most angered by his rule.

Turkey

This has long been the favoured destination for Musharraf in exile. He spent his childhood in Turkey, speaks the language and loves the country. He is rumoured to own property there. But Turkey is a Muslim-majority country and he may become a target.

Saudi Arabia

Saudi Arabia has a rich tradition of taking in former dictators and, as a firm ally of Pakistan, would be willing to accommodate Musharraf as part of an exit deal. Nawaz Sharif was given refuge there in 2000, after Musharraf ousted him from power.

© 2008 The Guardian


Offline Optimus

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Re: Coming War With Pakistan??? - Post News About Pakistan Here
« Reply #108 on: August 15, 2008, 09:02:08 am »
August 15th, 2008 National
UP Police Arrest ISI Agent in Lucknow
http://www.newspostonline.com/national/up-police-arrest-isi-agent-in-lucknow-200808151869

Uttar Pradesh Police have arrested an agent of Pakistan’s Inter-Services Intelligence (ISI) and recovered sensitive documents related to an India’s ordnance factory and other defence establishments.

Brij Lal, additional director general of police (law and order), said that they had proof that the arrested person belonged to Pakistan.

“The Anti Terrorist Squad of Uttar Pradesh has arrested one ISI agent of Pakistan from Rupaideeha in Bahraich district. We have come to know that his name is Mohamad Masrur alias Manzoor Ansari who is son of Noor Muhammad. He is native of 154/4, Garden west, Adul Jabbar compound, near Nazeer Hotel, Karachi,” Lal said.

Lal also told that the police have recovered sensitive documents including secret documents pertaining to the Indian army, photographs of Kanpur ordnance factory, cartographic details of Lucknow cantonment and other areas.

India accuses Pakistan’s ISI of supporting a revolt in its Kashmir. Pakistan denies the charges. (ANI)

“The Constitution is not an instrument for the government to restrain the people,
it's an instrument for the people to restrain the government.” – Patrick Henry

>>> Global Gulag Media & Forum <<<

Offline Biggs

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Re: Coming War With Pakistan??? - Post News About Pakistan Here
« Reply #109 on: August 17, 2008, 11:39:30 am »
SEVERAL HUNDRED KILLED IN PAKISTAN FIGHTING - it is worth noting that the figure of 22 pakistani troops killed is likely tobe a severe underestimate, typically in such engagements they have lost 50% of what the rebels have lost, but only admitted it a few months later, notice also that civilian casualties are ignored, even though 200,000 civilians have fled the fighting - typically civilian casualties have been about one third of the total in these types of clashes in NWFP

460 militants, 22 troops killed near Afghan border: Pakistan

15 Aug 2008, 2052 hrs IST,AFP

http://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/World/Pakistan/460_militants_22_troops_killed_near_Afghan_border_Pakistan/rssarticleshow/3369079.cms

PESHAWAR:
Pakistan's interior ministry chief said on Friday that over 460 Islamic militants and 22 soldiers have been killed in more than a week of fighting in a tribal area bordering Afghanistan.

More than 3,000 armed militants, most of them foreigners, are taking part in the clashes in the troubled Bajaur tribal region, said Rehman Malik, the prime minister's advisor on interior matters.

Pakistan sent security forces backed by helicopter gunships and fighter jets into Bajaur last week amid intense pressure from the United States to curb militants launching attacks in Afghanistan.

"Extremists wanted to establish their hold in Bajaur and the government had to take action," Malik told a news conference in the northwestern city of Peshawar.

"Until today 462 militants have been killed in Bajaur and a similar number have been injured. Twenty-two troops have been killed and some are missing in action," Malik said.

The "major portion" of the militants were foreigners, Malik said, adding that they included "Afghans, Chechens, Yemenis and Afro-Asians."

There has been no independent corroboration of the figures.

Provincial governor Owais Ghani said that around 219,000 people have been displaced from Bajaur, adding that the provincial government had set up nine camps to provide them shelter, food and medicines.

Pakistan's newly elected government has drawn criticism from western allies for earlier negotiations with Taliban militants based near the rugged Afghan frontier.

There has been further alarm abroad over the government's plans to impeach President Pervez Musharraf, a key ally in the US-led "war on terror
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Re: Coming War With Pakistan??? - Post News About Pakistan Here
« Reply #110 on: August 17, 2008, 11:50:57 am »
confirmation that indeed Pakistani government casualties are far higher than reported, and indeed also that civilian casualties are far higher than reported.(see bolded section below)

Taliban win a fight - and settle scores

By Syed Saleem Shahzad

http://www.atimes.com/atimes/South_Asia/JH14Df01.html

KARACHI -
When several hundred Pakistani troops backed by paramilitary forces on Friday launched an operation against militants in Bajaur Agency in the Federally Administered Tribal Areas of Pakistan on the border with Afghanistan, they received a most unwelcome surprise.

News of the offensive, which proved to be the most bloody this year in Pakistan, had been leaked to the Pakistani Taliban and al-Qaeda militants by sympathizers in the security forces, and the army walked into a literal hail of bullets.

Contacts familiar with the militants told Asia Times Online that every hill had observers as the first military convoys entered Bajaur - the main corridor leading to the Afghan provinces of Kunar, Nooristan, Kapisa and the capital Kabul - and they were quickly under attack.

In just a few hours, 65 soldiers were killed, 25 were taken prisoner and scores more were wounded. Under air cover, the soldiers retreated, leaving behind five vehicles and a tank, which are now part of the arsenal of the Taliban and al-Qaeda.

On Tuesday, the Pakistan Air Force, whose air power played a central role in the Bajaur operation, was on the receiving end. Once again on the basis of precise information, eight airmen were killed in a suicide attack near Peshawar, the capital of North-West Frontier Province (NWFP).


Limited fighting continued on Wednesday. The government said that 200 militants had been killed, but a Taliban spokesman confirmed only seven dead. The remainder, he said, were civilians killed during aerial bombardments.

Unconfirmed reports said leading al-Qaeda military commander Abu Saeed al-Masri had been killed. He is said to be number three in the group behind Ayman al-Zawahiri and Osama bin Laden, and if indeed he is dead it would be a major setback for al-Qaeda.

The fierce militant response against the army, which is under heavy pressure from the United States to be more proactive, was under the unified command of Pakistani Taliban leader Baitullah Mehsud, whose base is in the South Waziristan tribal area. The hardline Baitullah does not believe in "limited war" - his goal is full-scale war across the country. Bajaur could be the beginning of this.

Pakistani Taliban spokesman Moulvi Omar issued a statement claiming responsibility for the Peshawar attack and warned of more across the country in reaction to the Bajaur offensive.

However, the militants' current tactics are different from those of previous years when they reacted within a few hours or days. Now, the militants spend more time waiting for information on their "daunting foe", the Pakistani security forces and the government, so they can decide on their targets and cause maximum damage. Much of this information comes from informants in the security forces.

In the broader picture, al-Qaeda decides when to switch on the attacks or switch them off in their own version of war and peace. This is the new face of the neo-Taliban - more radical and more strategic - raised on al-Qaeda ideology.

These neo-Taliban don't forget, either.

On Wednesday morning, Haji Namdar, the chief of the "Vice and Virtue" organization in Khyber Agency, a tribal region on the Afghan border, was gunned down in his office by Baitullah's men.

Although Namdar supported the Taliban-led insurgency in Afghanistan, he was a strategic asset for the Pakistani security agencies trying to wipe out al-Qaeda-influenced radicals and the neo-Taliban.

In April, he sold out the Taliban after initially agreeing to help them target the North Atlantic Treaty Organization supply lines passing through Khyber Agency. (See Taliban bitten by a snake in the grass Asia Times Online, April 26, 2008.) Namdar had survived an earlier suicide attack in which about 30 people died.

Namdar's death leaves the Pakistani security agencies and the government with only one "precious asset" - Haji Nazeer in South Waziristan. Other than him, they have no choice but to deal with Baitullah's radical face.

Economic and political chaos

Apart from the Peshawar Valley, the whole Pashtun-dominated region of NWFP is effectively under the control of the Taliban and their al-Qaeda allies. The chaotic state of the economy plays into their hands as people become increasing disgruntled.

Inflation is running at 25% a year, the Karachi stock exchange has lost 35% of its value since April, there are frequent electricity shutdowns and foreign exchange reserves have fallen from US$17 billion last year to $9 billion, barely enough to cover imports for three months.

These economic woes are compounded by an ongoing political crisis which al-Qaeda is already exploiting.

Zawahiri has issued an audio message critical of President Pervez Musharraf, who is under pressure to resign or else face impeachment. A leading militant from the Swat area, Muslim Khan, has issued a statement that anyone who supports Musharraf during an impeachment process would become the Taliban's enemy. Musharraf is the United States' point man in the South Asian theater of the "war on terror".

In a similar manner, when a military junta recently ousted Mauritania's president Sidi Mohamed Ould Cheikh Abdallahi, al-Qaeda immediately called for a jihad in the North African country to establish Islamic rule. As with Pakistan, this is a bid by al-Qaeda to pitch itself as the only viable choice in Muslim countries.

The Bajaur showdown plays into this scenario. The Pakistani military, as it has every time in other operations in the tribal areas over the past few years, will pull back. Prisoners will be swapped and a hollow ceasefire will be agreed on, backed by cash inducements for the militants and more military aid for Pakistan from the United States.

Battle will break out again. In the meanwhile, the Taliban will increase their strength and boundaries, and al-Qaeda's ideology will draw in new recruits.

Syed Saleem Shahzad is Asia Times Online's Pakistan Bureau Chief. He can be reached at [email protected]
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Offline bigron

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Re: Coming War With Pakistan??? - Post News About Pakistan Here
« Reply #111 on: August 18, 2008, 07:01:16 am »
August 19, 2008

President Musharraf of Pakistan Resigns

By JANE PERLEZ

http://www.nytimes.com/2008/08/19/world/asia/19pstan.html?_r=1&hp=&oref=slogin&pagewanted=print


ISLAMABAD, Pakistan — Under pressure over impending impeachment charges, President Pervez Musharraf announced he would resign Monday, ending nearly nine years as one of the United States’ most important allies in the campaign against terrorism.

Speaking on television from his presidential office here at 1 p.m., Mr. Musharraf, dressed in a gray suit and tie, said that after consulting with his aides, “I have decided to resign today.” He said he was putting national interest above “personal bravado.”

“Whether I win or lose the impeachment, the nation will lose,” he said, adding that he was not prepared to put the office of the presidency through the impeachment process.

Mr. Musharraf said the governing coalition, which has pushed for impeachment, had tried to “turn lies into truths.”

“They don’t realize they can succeed against me but the country will undergo irreparable damage.”

In an emotional ending to a speech lasting more than an hour, Mr. Musharraf raised his clenched fists to chest height, and said, “Long live Pakistan!”

His resignation came after 10 days of intense political maneuvering in Pakistan, and cleared the way for the four-month-old coalition government to choose a new president by a vote of the Parliament and provincial assemblies. But there were intense concerns in Washington that Mr. Musharraf’s departure would open a new era of instability in the nuclear-armed country of 165 million people, as the fragile coalition jockeys for his share of power.

Mr. Musharraf, 65, will stay in Pakistan in the immediate future, a request he had insisted on, according to Nasir Ali Khan, a senior member of the Pakistan Muslim League-N, a partner in the coalition. The coalition, led by Asif Ali Zardari, the leader of the Pakistan Peoples Party, and Nawaz Sharif, the chairman of the Pakistan Muslim League-N, were scheduled to meet here in the capital Monday afternoon to discuss the way forward, Mr. Khan said.

There were few indications of who the next president would be. According to the Constitution, a new president must be chosen within 30 days. American officials have said that Mr. Zardari, the widower of Benazir Bhutto, the former prime minister who was assassinated in December, would like the post. But Mr. Sharif, who maintains a barely civil relationship with Mr. Zardari, is strongly opposed to the elevation of Mr. Zardari.

Mr. Musharraf has been under strong pressure in the past few days, as the coalition said it had completed a charge sheet to take to Parliament for his impeachment. The charges were centered on “gross violations” of the Constitution, according to the minister of information, Sherry Rehman.

The rhetoric from the coalition mounted over the weekend, but the leading politicians wavered on an exact date for bringing the charges, thus leaving a window for Mr. Musharraf to leave.

In his speech, Mr. Musharraf tore into the coalition for what he called their failed economic policies. He said Pakistan’s critical economic situation — a declining currency, capital flight, soaring inflation — was their responsibility. In contrast, he said, his policies had brought prosperity out of near economic collapse when he took charge in 1999.

He then gave a laundry list of his achievements, ranging from expanded road networks to a national art gallery in the capital. Although Pakistan’s literacy rate hovers around 50 percent, and is much lower among women, he took credit for new schools.

The army, the most powerful institution in Pakistan, stayed publicly above the fray in the past 10 days. But in remaining studiously neutral and declining to come to Mr. Musharraf’s rescue, the new leader of the army, Gen. Ashfaq Parvaz Kayani, tipped the scales against the president, politicians said.

Mr. Musharraf grabbed power in a bloodless coup in October 1999, ousting Prime Minister Nawaz Sharif, the man who had picked Mr. Musharraf as army chief. For eight years, he ruled as head of the army and president, positions that gave him almost unfettered power and allowed the Bush administration to rely on Mr. Musharraf in the campaign on terrorism.

Lou Fintor, the spokesman at the United States Embassy in Islamabad, declined to comment on the announced resignation.

Across the border in Afghanistan, government officials expressed satisfaction that Mr. Musharraf was leaving. The relationship between the neighboring countries has long been tense, with Afghan officials blaming increasing violence there on Pakistan’s failure to crack down on militants in the border region.

An Afghan Interior Ministry spokesman, Zemeri Bashary, said on Monday that Mr. Musharraf had been an ally of the United States “in words only, not by actions” and argued that his rule had not been good for Afghanistan, The Associated Press reported. Also, a Foreign Ministry spokesman, Sultan Ahmed Baheen, said Afghanistan hoped the resignation would strengthen democracy in both countries, the A.P. said.

As Mr. Musharraf began to lose popularity last year, Washington tried to forge a power-sharing relationship between him and Ms. Bhutto, who had been in exile since the late 1990s and returned to Pakistan last fall. She was assassinated Dec. 27.

The Musharraf government accused the Taliban leader Baitullah Mehsud of her murder. By then Mr. Sharif had also returned from exile to run in elections. The Pakistan Peoples Party of Ms. Bhutto, under the stewardship of her husband, Mr. Zardari, and the Pakistan Muslim League-N, under Mr. Sharif, swept into power in elections in February.

Mr. Musharraf leaves office as the Taliban insurgency in the tribal areas has taken on renewed vigor in the past week, prompting civilians to leave their homes there, and pitting the paramilitary Frontier Corps, directed by the army, directly against the insurgents.

Salman Masood contributed reporting in Islamabad, Pakistan, and Tom Rachman contributed in Paris.



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Re: Coming War With Pakistan??? - Post News About Pakistan Here
« Reply #112 on: August 18, 2008, 07:20:35 am »
Opinion: Long walk into oblivion 
 
 By Kamran Rehmat in Islamabad

http://english.aljazeera.net/focus/pakistanpowerandpolitics/2008/08/2008818954736825.html
 
 
Musharraf, who today resigned, will join the ranks of Pakistani leaders who have played a role in the country's history.

 
In the end, the Pakistani ruling coalition only needed to summon the courage — something they found in short supply for nearly five months — to go for the kill.
 
Pervez Musharraf, the Pakistani president, threw in the towel by announcing his "resignation" despite promising a defiant "fight to the finish".

The die was cast after all four provincial assemblies making up the federation voted in numbers to demand he seek a vote of confidence or quit.

The beleaguered leader was also ditched by his loyalists in all these federating units.

Alone and with no power base, Musharraf now found that tremendous political and moral pressure had been brought to bear on him to resign.

The decision seemed inevitable though skeptics continued to suspect he might use presidential powers to dismiss the government and parliament in a last ditch effort to save himself from impeachment.

But this was always dependent on two critical factors: support from the army, his real power base, which he quit last year, and Washington.

Depending on the army became unlikely after his successor General Ashfaq Pervez Kayani made a paradigm shift to move the army out of politics and support democracy.

His fate was also sealed when Washington finally came around to view Musharraf as a liability.

Difficult decision

In the murky world of Pakistani politics, things do not always follow a straight and narrow path. This explains why political pundits were not betting on a cornered Musharraf simply walking into oblivion.

Musharraf twice sacked the chief justice (the judge was reinstated briefly following a popular movement) and deposed a number of independent-minded judges in a sweeping emergency measure only last year.

He feared they would overrule his controversial re-election as president.

But more than the fear of becoming the first Pakistani leader to be impeached, Musharraf's paramount concern was his fate after resigning.

In the last few days, even as the coalition hammered out the impeachment knell, interlocutors from Saudi Arabia and Britain converged on Islamabad to resolve the impasse after the retired general announced through his allies that he would fight to stay on.

The US employed less-visible means but pushed through with the same message: encourage Musharraf to call it a day and ask the coalition not impeach or try the embattled leader.

Quid pro quo

The military did not support Musharraf as he faced off with political opponents .

Pakistani media recently reported that Musharraf was seeking indemnity for his acts as president and army chief in return for his resignation.

He was also said to seek guarantees of presidential level security if he stayed in Pakistan.

However, apart from agreeing to "adequate" security, the coalition refused to offer him immunity from prosecution for his controversial decisions, such as the extra-constitutional step of imposing emergency law and deposing judges last year.

Musharraf has survived at least three known attempts on his life. He faces threat from extremists, predominantly al-Qaeda, and other militant groups because of his support for the US war on terror.

The continuing terror war has led to great upheaval within Pakistan, making Musharraf intensely unpopular.

In an opinion poll conducted last month by the International Republican Institute (IRI), a non-profit group based in Washington, 83 per cent of Pakistanis said they wanted Musharraf to resign immediately. His job approval rating also slipped to an all-time low of 11 per cent.

Next residence

Though he continues to swear he will remain in Pakistan — he has a farm house on the outskirts of Islamabad - three foreign destinations have been mentioned as a possible future home for Musharraf.

These include Boston in the US, where his son resides; Jeddah in Saudi Arabia, which hosted former premier Nawaz Sharif (deposed by Musharraf in 1999); and Turkey, where Musharraf spent his childhood.

However, Condoleezza Rice, the US secretary of state, recently denied that the option of asylum was on the table. News reports suggest Turkey, too, has declined to host the former president, fearing an unstable situation in the event al-Qaeda chooses to pursue Musharraf there.

This leaves Saudi Arabia, which has given conflicting signals about whether to host yet another high-profile exiled leader from the South Asian nation.

But The News, Pakistan's leading English daily, quoted sources on Monday saying that Riyadh had told Islamabad it was no longer interested in becoming a permanent residence for exiled Pakistani leaders.

As throughout his nine-year reign, Musharraf will once again be challenged to live up to his word: this time on where he wants to live out of power.

In his last public pledge on the issue in June, he said: "I will live and die in Pakistan, there is no other way".

Easier said than done

Meanwhile, the election of a new president and reinstatement of deposed judges is expected to test the uneasy ruling alliance of the Pakistan People's Party (PPP) and Pakistan Muslim League-Nawaz (PML-N).

The dominant view is that the desire to remove the former president was the glue - and part of an understanding - that held them together following a spectacular showing at the February 18 national elections, which saw Musharraf allies drubbed.

For starters, the PPP will be under tremendous pressure to restore the judges Musharraf deposed.

Pakistanis are not likely to quickly forget that the PPP has twice failed to restore them despite public assurances.

The PPP fears the deposed judiciary will revoke the indemnity granted to Asif Zardari, its leader, under a so-called National Reconciliation Ordinance.

Musharraf had decreed the ordinance last year, removing decade-old corruption cases against Zardari and his wife Benazir Bhutto, the slain former premier.

However, PML-N chief Nawaz Sharif, who pushed Zardari into making a pitch for Musharraf's ouster early this month, will unlikely settle for anything less than the reinstatement of judges and a consensus president.

In that, the end of Musharraf's rule may signal the beginning of real political drama.

The writer is News Editor at Dawn News, an independent Pakistani TV channel.

 
 
 

Offline Triadtropz

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Re: Coming War With Pakistan??? - Post News About Pakistan Here
« Reply #113 on: August 18, 2008, 07:31:50 am »
looks like bush lost a 12 billion dollar , sock puppet..pakistans a dangerous place...
one man with courage makes a majority..TJ

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Re: Coming War With Pakistan??? - Post News About Pakistan Here
« Reply #114 on: August 18, 2008, 03:23:25 pm »
Musharraf leaves behind a mixed legacy 

18/08/2008 07:35:00 PM GMT
http://aljazeera.com/news/newsfull.php?newid=152040

 
 "Historians will not forgive Musharraf. He manipulated elections, he hounded his opponents, and he became a dictator. It's not much of a legacy."


By Philippe Khan

Pakistani President Pervez Musharraf announced his resignation on Monday, ending nine years in power in a country that is now facing huge economic and security challenges. 

The former army chief, who seized power in a bloodless coup in 1999, had been under immense pressure to step down before the coalition government launches the first impeachment proceedings in Pakistan's 61-year history.

(Watch video: Musharraf resigning to avoid impeachment)

According to an article on the BBC, Musharraf will be remembered for many things. He sacked an elected government in a military coup. He took Pakistan to the brink of war with India only to start a peace process with the nuclear-armed Asian rival a few years later. He also became a vital ally of the United States after the September 11 attacks in 2001.

Musharraf could also be credited for modernising many sections of Pakistan’s society but his critics argue that he weakened important state institutions, leaving Pakistan a more fragile country than it was when he came to power.

"There will be a more balanced view of him in the future than there is now," argues Mushahid Hussein, a leading political supporter. "A lot of things happened in Pakistan for the good under his watch, and I think that is something the history books will recall after some time."

But Musharraf’s critics insist that he had to leave.

"As far as democracy in Pakistan is concerned, historians will not forgive him,” says Senator Enver Beg of the Pakistan People's Party. "He manipulated elections, he hounded his opponents, and he became a dictator. It's not much of a legacy."

“War on terror”
One of Musharraf’s most significant decisions was his complete support for the U.S.’s war on terror following the 9/11 attacks. In exchange, the U.S. gave Pakistan more than $10bn in aid, mostly to the military, since 2001.

But many of the benefits from Musharraf’s alliance with the U.S. seem to be fading. Pakistan’s borders with Afghanistan remain lawless, the Taliban is gaining strength inside Pakistan and many Pakistanis criticise military cooperation with the Americans, accusing the government of fighting someone else’s war.
 
"He never tried to create an impression in Pakistan that we were fighting for our own country and our own good," says military analyst Talat Masood, a retired lieutenant-general. 

"And because of that the Pakistan army became a client army and Pakistan became a client state in the eyes of the people. It was a major failing on his part."

Relations with India
In 1999, General Musharraf launched a military adventure in Kargil, shortly before his military coup. Pakistani soldiers and Kashmiri fighters infiltrated Indian territory, before pressure from the United States forced them to leave.

Both countries were drawn closer to war in 2001 when an armed attack on the Indian parliament in New Delhi prompted a military build-up on both sides of the Indo-Pakistani border.

But a peace process launched in 2004 led to a ceasefire and several goodwill gestures.

Despite the seemingly calm atmosphere, Pakistan’s current relations with India are tense following last month’s bomb attack on the Indian embassy in Kabul, which Delhi alleges was organised under the auspices of Pakistani intelligence agents.

“Time to move on”
Domestically, Musharraf's first few years in power were promising. He liberalised the economy and the electronic media. He supported the empowerment of women and made efforts to improve standards in education.

Most importantly, he is leaving office with no serious changes of corruption against him, a rare event in Pakistan.

Despite these positive achievements, Musharraf’s last 18 months in office brought his presidential term to an end. He thought he could take on the judiciary, the parliament and anyone else who disagreed with him. He fired the chief justice, imposed a state of emergency and engineered his own re-election as president.

“He didn't understand that a country of 160 million people couldn't be ruled by just one man,” said Talat Masood.

The political crisis triggered by Musharraf’s bad decisions tarnished the economic accomplishments he could claim. In July 2008 annual inflation was over 24%, while the value of the rupee fell dramatically as the long political stalemate dragged on.

"He overstayed his welcome," says Enver Beg of the PPP. "It's time for life without Musharraf, it's time to move on."



-- AJP

 

Offline Biggs

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Re: Coming War With Pakistan??? - Post News About Pakistan Here
« Reply #115 on: August 19, 2008, 05:23:50 am »
Bomb attack on Pakistan hospital
 
http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/world/south_asia/7569786.stm

At least 25 people have been killed in a suicide bomb attack on a hospital in Pakistan's North West Frontier Province, police say.


The attack happened at midday while local Shia Muslims gathered at the hospital in Dera Ismail Khan district, after their leader had been shot dead.

Meanwhile, there has been more fighting between militants and soldiers in the Bajaur district on the Afghan border.

The violence comes one day after Pervez Musharraf resigned as president.

Coalition parties are expected to meet to discuss later on Tuesday to discuss who will succeed Mr Musharraf.

Security will be a key concern for whoever succeeds the outgoing president.

Mourners struck

Salahuddin Khan, the head of the local police station in Dera Ismail Khan told the BBC the explosion was "definitely a suicide attack".

"At the moment I can say that 25 people have died in the attack", he said. He added that the motive was almost certainly sectarian.

At least 24 other people are believed to have been injured, police said.

The attack took place outside the hospital's emergency centre, where mourners had gathered after the body of Zaffar Jajjee, a local Shia killed in a drive-by shooting, was brought in.

Police officials say the suicide bomber blew himself up in a dense crowd. The dead included children, officials said.

Afterwards, an emergency was declared at the hospital and a tight security cordon thrown around the compound.

Meanwhile at least 11 militants and a number of soldiers are reported to have been killed in the latest violence in Bajaur district.

Last week the army said more than 150 militants and 13 soldiers had been killed in a week of fighting in Bajaur. Militants put their dead much lower, at about a dozen.

The latest violence comes the day after Pervez Musharraf resigned as president of Pakistan.
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Offline Optimus

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Re: Coming War With Pakistan??? - Post News About Pakistan Here
« Reply #116 on: August 20, 2008, 09:19:58 am »
Pakistan violence flares after Musharraf resigns
http://ap.google.com/article/ALeqM5jIE0IUn4WIiaMBpjG8SI_6H5RXzgD92LEQIO0
By MUNIR AHMAD – 22 hours ago

ISLAMABAD, Pakistan (AP) — Leaders of Pakistan's ruling coalition discussed Tuesday how to replace former President Pervez Musharraf and what to do with the man who ruled for nine years, while militant violence underscored the challenges facing the country.

Another potentially divisive issue on the agenda is how to restore judges Musharraf fired in a desperate attempt to cling to power. The meeting ended abruptly and no progress was announced.

The retired army general resigned Monday in the face of impeachment threats from the fragile ruling coalition, which is packed with his foes. He is believed to be in his army-guarded residence near the capital, Islamabad.

How the government deals with his succession — and whether it leads to a power struggle — is a looming question at a critical time.

The militant threat is spreading in Pakistan's northwest — with clashes between the army and insurgents killing at least 29 people since Musharraf's exit — adding to uncertainty about the new government's approach to tackling extremist violence. Unlike Musharraf, who took a hard line against the insurgents, the coalition has sought to negotiate peace treaties with tribal leaders in the restive northwest to curb the violence.

The country is also facing soaring inflation, chronic power shortages and a host of other economic problems.

Law Minister Farooq Naek said Tuesday that the government had not struck an immunity deal with Musharraf, though supporters and foes suggested he had sought guarantees that he would not face criminal prosecution or be forced into exile.

"There is no deal with the president, and he had himself resigned," Naek told reporters.

Musharraf did not specify his plans during his emotional farewell speech on Monday, saying only that his future was in the hands of the people. But local media reports have suggested he might leave the country for security reasons — he is despised by Islamist militants and is widely unpopular among ordinary Pakistanis.

Turkey, Saudi Arabia and the United States were being discussed as potential havens.

"He should not be allowed to leave," said Sadiqul Farooq, spokesman for the coalition's second-largest party, which has accused the former president of treason. "He should be tried for his crimes."

Pakistan's president is elected by lawmakers, a process that is supposed to be completed within 30 days.

Musharraf seized control of the government in a 1999 coup and dominated Pakistan for years, supporting the U.S. in the war on terror. Pakistanis blamed rising violence in the country on his alliance with Washington.

For many, the final straw came last year when Musharraf imposed emergency rule and sacked dozens of judges who could challenge his rule — one of the key topics facing ruling coalition leaders on Tuesday.

The two sides have differed over the how to restore the judges, especially the deposed Supreme Court chief justice, Iftikhar Muhammad Chaudhry.

The Pakistan Peoples Party, headed by Asif Ali Zardari has so far refused to say that all should be reinstated immediately.

But Former Prime Minister Nawaz Sharif's party, Pakistan Muslim League-N, demanded Tuesday that Chaudhry and all others be "restored within the next 48 hours," said Farooq, the spokesman.

Musharraf's rivals won February parliamentary elections, largely sidelining him while clamoring for him to quit. They announced an impeachment campaign earlier this month, leading Musharraf to ultimately calculate that he could not remain in power.

Analysts said earlier infighting over Musharraf's future and the mechanics of bringing back the judges he fired late last year had distracted the government from tackling important issues.

"The coalition will now have to apply themselves because they will have no excuse," said Talat Masood, a prominent political commentator.

One of the biggest challenges ahead is how to deal with an al-Qaida and Taliban-backed insurgency in Pakistan's volatile northwest as well as in neighboring Afghanistan.

A military operation against insurgents in the Bajur tribal region has reportedly killed hundreds and displaced more than 200,000 in recent weeks.

On Tuesday, police said security forces backed by helicopter gunships and artillery pounded targeted insurgents in Bajur, killing 11 suspected militants and five civilians over a 24-hour period.

Separately, government official Jamil Khan said 13 militants and five troops died Tuesday in a clash at a fort in the Nawagai area of Bajur.

Another 27 people were killed and 35 wounded in a suicide blast outside the emergency gate of a hospital crowded with Shiite Muslim mourners, according to area police chief Nasir Mahmood.

A spokesman for the Pakistani Taliban claimed responsibility for the explosion at Dera Ismail Khan District Hospital, saying it was targeting security forces. But Mohsin Shah, a top district official, said the motive appeared to be sectarian, noting the area has seen much friction between the country's Sunni Muslim majority and Shiites.
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Offline jaro

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Re: Coming War With Pakistan??? - Post News About Pakistan Here
« Reply #117 on: August 20, 2008, 10:58:05 pm »
Please watch this video I made and email 10 people.

http://posmedprod.webs.com/alexjonescensored.htm

Offline Biggs

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Re: Coming War With Pakistan??? - Post News About Pakistan Here
« Reply #118 on: August 22, 2008, 11:35:12 am »
here the author who isd generally the best writer on pakistan, states that the new government of pakistan under PM Giliani will do more of US/NATo's bidding and will furtehr attack mili9tants in NWFP. No surpise there then, there will be a lot mroe bloodshed in Pakistan. HOWEVER, the real cruncher is that the new administration may be ordered by US?NATO to go after groups it has previously left alone, those such as Jalaluddin's Haqqani's network which is very powerful and in full support of the Afghan Taliban's campaign. If so this will essentially result in a vast broadening of the scale of violence in Pakistan and runs a very real and serious risk of full scale civil war.

It is now quite clear that the neocons and NWO forces have financed the lawyers groups and others so as to unseat Musharraf in the expectation fo causing a wider and more bloody war in Pakistan, this really is very serious indeed but will likely take some time to play out. If the new Pakistani government and eventual new president do not stand up to and resist US/NATO pressure to act against these other groups such as Haqqani's network and the Afghan Taliban groups in Quetta, Baluchistan, then we will without doubt see a full scale civil war in Pakistan.

Let us hope that prime minster Giliani's PPP government show some nerve and refuse unreasonable requests from the subverters and maniacs governing US & NATO policy.


Militants ready for Pakistan's war

By Syed Saleem Shahzad

http://www.atimes.com/atimes/South_Asia/JH23Df01.html

KARACHI
- Pakistan has two options. The country can give in to militancy or it can conduct military operations against it, influential advisor to the Interior Ministry, Rahman Malik, said on Thursday. And the government is not going to negotiate with militants, he added.

His remarks follow a suicide bomb attack outside the country's main defense industry complex at Wah, 30 kilometers northwest of the capital Islamabad, which killed as many as 100 people. The Pakistani Taliban immediately claimed responsibility, saying the attack was in response to the military's recent air bombardment of Bajaur Agency, which led to the displacement of 250,000 people.

Rahman's comments amount to a declaration of war on growing

   

Islamic militancy, but it could be that the new civilian Pakistani leadership is steering the "war on terror" in the wrong direction.

Rahman's remarks cannot be dismissed as a knee-jerk reaction in the heat of the moment. Only a few hours before the suicide attack, the chief minister of North-West Frontier Province (NWFP), Amir Haider Khan Hoti, announced in a policy statement that even if militants shunned violence and laid down their weapons, they would not be pardoned.

Similarly, Prime Minister Syed Yousuf Raza Gillani, who spoke to US President George W Bush by telephone on Thursday morning, rejected any possibility of dialogue with militants.

In the wake of Pervez Musharraf, who retired as president on Monday after flip-flopping on the country's approach to militancy for many years, the American-sponsored coalition of the willing in Islamabad appears ready for all-out war at any cost.

Ironically, this uncharacteristically clear Pakistani policy emerges as the political quagmire in the capital deepens. Former premier Nawaz Sharif has threatened to pull his Pakistan Muslim League out of the ruling coalition if judges sacked by Musharraf last year are not reinstated. He set a deadline for next Wednesday. The other main coalition partners, the Pakistan People's Party, the Awami National Party and the Jamiat-i-Ulema-i-Islam, said they would put the matter to parliament for debate, a proposal Sharif is not keen on.

Who do they intend to fight?
The government's approach will be different from that adopted by Musharraf when he signed onto the "war on terror" in 2001, officials in Pakistan's top strategic circles tell Asia Times Online.

Then, Musharraf, who was also chief of army staff, acted as he saw fit, often not to the liking of Washington, which often accused Islamabad of dragging its feet in the fight against Taliban and al-Qaeda militancy.

The new elected government is expected to be an active partner in the South Asian war theater and its military will help the North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO). The coordination will be similar to that between Afghan President Hamid Karzai's government and NATO.

NATO command will identify problem areas and Pakistan will hit those targets. A plan, drawn up between the Americans and Pakistan in 2007, will be implemented under which Peshawar, capital of NWFP, will serve as a base camp from where, under American guidance, the Taliban's bases will be targeted. The Taliban use these bases to launch operations into Afghanistan.

Channels have also been established for the US Embassy in Islamabad to coordinate with the Pakistani government. As a sign of the renewed goodwill, the US Embassy has announced US$50,000 as immediate aid relief for the people displaced from Bajaur. Other financial packages are expected to follow.

Up until 2007, under Musharraf, Pakistan made a clear distinction between the Taliban, al-Qaeda, the Takfiris (those who believe non-practicing Muslims are infidels) among al-Qaeda and criminal gangs who became a part of the Taliban and al-Qaeda.

The Taliban were viewed as a phenomenon spanning the southwestern Pashtun lands from Pakistan's Balochistan province to Afghanistan's provinces of Kandahar, Helmand, Urzgan and Zabul. This is the heartland of the Taliban in which leader Mullah Omar and majority of his shura (council) live.

They have never troubled Pakistan and have not tried to impose sharia law or interfere in Shi'ite-Sunni feuds or meddle with the thousands of Hindus living in the border town of Chaman. These are the "real" Taliban and the core of the resistance fighting against the foreign occupation of Afghanistan.

Pakistan has never conducted any military operations against the Taliban in Balochistan - one NATO's main complaints.

In NWFP, the problem was more complex. There are Taliban such as Jalaluddin Haqqani steering the insurgency in Afghanistan, and Pakistan has never tried to target his outfit, despite repeated NATO requests.

Top al-Qaeda leaders also live here and in the tribal regions on the border with Afghanistan. They are not specifically anti-Pakistan and there was until 2007 a tacit agreement with the Pakistani security forces that they would be left alone. American intelligence was given a free hand to arrest them - al-Qaeda members had to look after themselves, with Pakistan acting more like a referee.

However, the Takfiris, who include aging Egyptian Sheikh Essa's group, are a different story. Pakistan has made a clear distinction with them, including Uzbeks under the command of Qari Tahir Farooq (Tahir Yaldeshiv) and has gone after them with its proxies in the tribal areas. The same went for Pakistani criminal groups such as the Lashkar-i-Jhangvi, who joined the Takfiri camp, or camps under Pakistani Taliban Baitullah Mehsud, who is very close to the Takfiris.

Pakistan's relations with the Pakistani Taliban have depended on which leader they followed. If they were part of Mullah Omar's or Jalaluddin Haqqani's groups, they were left alone; if they were part of the Takfiri groups, the treatment was different.

In essence, this was Pakistan's war, and it fought it on its own terms, which was only partially beneficial to NATO. Under the new leadership, Pakistan's participation in the "war on terror" will be more for the benefit of NATO.

This could come at a very high cost. Those militants who were previously left alone will now be targets. In turn, they will conduct operations against Pakistan.

Osama bin Laden does not have the resources he had in 1989, when he tried to finance Nawaz Sharif to dethrone Benazir Bhutto's government (See The pawns who pay as powers play Asia Times Online, June 2, 2005). But his people certainly have ties within the security forces to allow them to launch operations like the failed one in the mid-1990s against Bhutto's government.

Last year, Bin Laden appointed an Amir of Khuruj (Revolt) for Pakistan, but he died of illness early this year. He has been replaced by Khalid Habib, a Moroccan, and he is now on standby for orders.

Thursday's attack at Wah is a portend of what lies in store for the country. That attack, although claimed by the Pakistan Taliban, was carried out by Pakistani criminal gangs with religious orientations and allied with the Takfiris.

Al-Qaeda has executed high-profile attacks, such as the assassination of Benazir Bhutto last December and the one on Bagram base in Kabul during US Vice President Dick Cheney's 2007 visit.

Should the Pakistani government really commit to its all-out war on militants, it will feel more of such wrath.

Syed Saleem Shahzad is Asia Times Online's Pakistan Bureau Chief. He can be reached at [email protected]
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Offline David Rothscum

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Re: Coming War With Pakistan??? - Post News About Pakistan Here
« Reply #119 on: August 22, 2008, 12:42:44 pm »
Gilani is another globalist puppet, judging from the fact that he spoke at the council of foreign relations, where he was introduced by Haas:
http://www.cfr.org/publication/16877/
It really seems to me they want to cause a civil war in Pakistan. There's no way they start funding Jundullah if they don't want to strengthen the radicals in Pakistan as well.