Author Topic: Large-scale motion detected near San Andreas Fault System  (Read 1917 times)

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Offline windyacres

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Large-scale motion detected near San Andreas Fault System
« on: June 21, 2016, 04:07:42 pm »
  Large-scale motion detected near San Andreas Fault System 


Brooks Hays
UPI
June 21, 2016

Analysis of GPS data has revealed new areas of motion around the San Andreas Fault System.

Using data collected by the EarthScope Plate Boundary Observatory’s GPS array, researchers identified 125-mile-wide “lobes” of uplift and subsidence. Over the last several years, the lobes, which straddle the fault line, have hosted a few millimeters of annual movement.

Computer models simulating the San Andreas Fault System have predicted such crustal movement, but the areas of motion hadn’t been physically identified until now.

Researchers used advanced statistical modeling to identify the movement among the inevitable statistical noise that comes with monitoring minute movements in the Earth’s crust.

Read more -

http://www.prisonplanet.com/large-scale-motion-detected-near-san-andreas-fault-system.html
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Offline donnay

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Re: Large-scale motion detected near San Andreas Fault System
« Reply #1 on: June 21, 2016, 10:07:41 pm »
If I lived in California I would be packing my stuff and heading east.
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Offline windyacres

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Re: Large-scale motion detected near San Andreas Fault System
« Reply #2 on: June 21, 2016, 10:15:16 pm »
I lived in the fault area there and that's when preps
can really pay off.  Especially  stored water.  The last
big earthquake I went through in California, the city
sewer line and the water line breached and in 20 minutes
the water was contaminated for 5 days.   Power was out
also for 5 days and interestingly, all the neighbors hid in
their houses and nobody checked on anyone. 

A good broom and dust pan is also a good idea in an
earthquake zone, I had broken glass and broken mirrors
all over the floor and had to hand pick up all the glass.
Though the mirrors were put up with molly-bolts in the
walls, fixed into the studs (2x4's)  I watched during a big
after-shock, the walls twisting inside as this big heavy
mirror in the hallway wrenched itself off the wall.

We always had a pipe wrench sitting on top of the hot water
heater with the gap in it pre-set to instantly wrench the hot water
gas valve off and then to also turn the gas valve off at the meter
outside. 

Though I'm not in earthquake country anymore, I still do things
here like I did in California, no heavy objects over the bed is one of them.
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Offline donnay

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Re: Large-scale motion detected near San Andreas Fault System
« Reply #3 on: June 21, 2016, 10:24:18 pm »
I lived in the fault area there and that's when preps
can really pay off.  Especially  stored water.  The last
big earthquake I went through in California, the city
sewer line and the water line breached and in 20 minutes
the water was contaminated for 5 days.   Power was out
also for 5 days and interestingly, all the neighbors hid in
their houses and nobody checked on anyone. 

A good broom and dust pan is also a good idea in an
earthquake zone, I had broken glass and broken mirrors
all over the floor and had to hand pick up all the glass.
Though the mirrors were put up with molly-bolts in the
walls, fixed into the studs (2x4's)  I watched during a big
after-shock, the walls twisting inside as this big heavy
mirror in the hallway wrenched itself off the wall.

We always had a pipe wrench sitting on top of the hot water
heater with the gap in it pre-set to instantly wrench the hot water
gas valve off and then to also turn the gas valve off at the meter
outside. 

Though I'm not in earthquake country anymore, I still do things
here like I did in California, no heavy objects over the bed is one of them.

The problem is there is earthquakes in places that never had them before.   :o

I know lots of people that live in California and their attitudes are, "Meh it's no big deal."  I was visiting a few years back and was in Semi Valley at a Black Angus eating when there was a tremor (3.5) that sent my water glass dancing across the table.  I was literally panicked and ready to take the first flight out, and the folks I was visiting, didn't even flinch.

I am afraid that attitude is going to get lots of people killed.   :(
Please visit my website: https://www.theherbsofthefield.com/

Offline windyacres

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Re: Large-scale motion detected near San Andreas Fault System
« Reply #4 on: June 21, 2016, 10:42:48 pm »
Yeah, I don't get that donnay, the complacency towards
earthquakes.  Reading for years now about all the other
states not prone to earthquakes now having them like Oklahoma,
one never knows when a big earthquake could happen in their area.

There's different types too and the ones that shake up and down
are real damaging.  What's odd is before you can feel one sometimes
you hear a noise up on your roof, as if someone is up there crunching
on the roof shingles, then you feel it.  The roof noise is your 1st indication.

In the future if you're visiting California and you feel one and visibly
you see signs of it like your water glass dancing around, get out of the
building and make sure no over-head wires are near you.   Also if you
run outside, make sure the house doesn't have a brick chimney, I've seen
bricks break loose from way up high on a 2-story house and hurl bricks
downward. 

Multi-level parking garages still creep me out incase of earthquakes
and all the cement decks above me with cars on them come crashing
down and pancake as the saying goes (flatten everything)  and I also
don't like getting stopped in traffic under big freeway under-passes
for the same reason. 

The water inside your hot water heater is safe to drink, most people
don't realize they have 40-55 gallons of drinking water depending on
the size of their tank.

I also would  find myself in the Financial District of San Francisco
(downtown) staring up at the glass front high rise buildings and
telling myself, this would not be a good place to be in an earthquake.

Plus I always thought you could drive in an earthquake, you can't when
the roads are heaving upwards, twisting, moving, etc.  your tires can't
go straight when the roads are moving and I had front wheel drive in that
car trying to get home. 

The complacent attitudes about earthquakes and being ready for one
those people will find out that's not a good mind-set.   
Be Prepared

Offline donnay

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Re: Large-scale motion detected near San Andreas Fault System
« Reply #5 on: June 22, 2016, 05:54:05 pm »
'Seismic strain': Land around the San Andreas fault is rising and sinking, new earthquake research shows




Rong-Gong Lin II

For the first time, scientists have produced a computer image showing huge sections of California rising and sinking around the San Andreas fault.

The vertical movement is the result of seismic strain that will be ultimately released in a large earthquake.

The San Andreas fault is California’s longest earthquake fault, and one of the state’s most dangerous. Scientists have long expected that parts of California are rising — and other parts sinking — around the fault in a way that is ongoing, very subtle and extremely slow.

Such vertical movement makes a lot of sense. California sits on the border of two gigantic tectonic plates — the Pacific and North American — that are constantly grinding past each other.

Once there is a major event, all of that energy gets released. — Sam Howell

But actually observing how California’s landscape is rising and falling from seismic strain has been an elusive goal, until now.

In a study published in the journal Nature Geoscience on Monday, scientists found that much of the Los Angeles Basin, Orange County, San Diego County and the Bakersfield area are sinking 2 to 3 millimeters a year — a couple of penny-widths annually. By contrast, Santa Barbara and San Luis Obispo counties, and a large portion of San Bernardino County, are rising at the same rate.

Take a look at the image below. The areas in red are rising, while the areas in blue are sinking.

Read more:  http://www.latimes.com/local/lanow/la-me-ln-san-andreas-fault-20160622-snap-story.html
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Offline donnay

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Re: Large-scale motion detected near San Andreas Fault System
« Reply #6 on: June 22, 2016, 06:02:25 pm »
Yeah, I don't get that donnay, the complacency towards
earthquakes.  Reading for years now about all the other
states not prone to earthquakes now having them like Oklahoma,
one never knows when a big earthquake could happen in their area.

There's different types too and the ones that shake up and down
are real damaging.  What's odd is before you can feel one sometimes
you hear a noise up on your roof, as if someone is up there crunching
on the roof shingles, then you feel it.  The roof noise is your 1st indication.

In the future if you're visiting California and you feel one and visibly
you see signs of it like your water glass dancing around, get out of the
building and make sure no over-head wires are near you.   Also if you
run outside, make sure the house doesn't have a brick chimney, I've seen
bricks break loose from way up high on a 2-story house and hurl bricks
downward. 

Multi-level parking garages still creep me out incase of earthquakes
and all the cement decks above me with cars on them come crashing
down and pancake as the saying goes (flatten everything)  and I also
don't like getting stopped in traffic under big freeway under-passes
for the same reason. 

The water inside your hot water heater is safe to drink, most people
don't realize they have 40-55 gallons of drinking water depending on
the size of their tank.

I also would  find myself in the Financial District of San Francisco
(downtown) staring up at the glass front high rise buildings and
telling myself, this would not be a good place to be in an earthquake.

Plus I always thought you could drive in an earthquake, you can't when
the roads are heaving upwards, twisting, moving, etc.  your tires can't
go straight when the roads are moving and I had front wheel drive in that
car trying to get home. 

The complacent attitudes about earthquakes and being ready for one
those people will find out that's not a good mind-set.   

Too scary for me.  I lived through tornadoes, hurricanes and blizzards so bad I couldn't get out of my house unless I dug my way out.  But earthquakes scares the bejesus out of me.  A couple of years ago (in NE) we had a relatively big one and it made more noise than shaking.  I thought my furnace was getting ready to blow!   :o
Please visit my website: https://www.theherbsofthefield.com/