Author Topic: Declaration of Independence & US Constitution  (Read 62255 times)

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Offline Dig

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Declaration of Independence & US Constitution
« on: August 07, 2007, 10:55:42 pm »
When in the Course of human events it becomes necessary for one people to dissolve the political bands which have connected them with another and to assume among the powers of the earth, the separate and equal station to which the Laws of Nature and of Nature's God entitle them, a decent respect to the opinions of mankind requires that they should declare the causes which impel them to the separation. We hold these truths to be self-evident, that all men are created equal, that they are endowed by their Creator with certain unalienable Rights, that among these are Life, Liberty and the pursuit of Happiness.

— That to secure these rights, Governments are instituted among Men, deriving their just powers from the consent of the governed,

— That whenever any Form of Government becomes destructive of these ends, it is the Right of the People to alter or to abolish it, and to (REINSTATE THE PROPER) Government, laying its foundation on such principles and organizing its powers in such form, as to them shall seem most likely to effect their Safety and Happiness. Prudence, indeed, will dictate that Governments long established should not be changed for light and transient causes; and accordingly all experience hath shewn that mankind are more disposed to suffer, while evils are sufferable than to right themselves by abolishing the forms to which they are accustomed. But when a long train of abuses and usurpations, pursuing invariably the same Object evinces a design to reduce them under absolute Despotism, it is their right, it is their duty, to throw off such Government, and to provide new Guards for their future security.

— Such has been the patient sufferance of these Colonies; and such is now the necessity which constrains them to alter their former Systems of Government.

The history of the present King of Great Britain is a history of repeated injuries and usurpations, all having in direct object the establishment of an absolute Tyranny over these States. To prove this, let Facts be submitted to a candid world.

He has refused his Assent to Laws, the most wholesome and necessary for the public good.

He has forbidden his Governors to pass Laws of immediate and pressing importance, unless suspended in their operation till his Assent should be obtained; and when so suspended, he has utterly neglected to attend to them.

He has refused to pass other Laws for the accommodation of large districts of people, unless those people would relinquish the right of Representation in the Legislature, a right inestimable to them and formidable to tyrants only.

He has called together legislative bodies at places unusual, uncomfortable, and distant from the depository of their Public Records, for the sole purpose of fatiguing them into compliance with his measures.

He has dissolved Representative Houses repeatedly, for opposing with manly firmness his invasions on the rights of the people.

He has refused for a long time, after such dissolutions, to cause others to be elected, whereby the Legislative Powers, incapable of Annihilation, have returned to the People at large for their exercise; the State remaining in the mean time exposed to all the dangers of invasion from without, and convulsions within.

He has endeavoured to prevent the population of these States; for that purpose obstructing the Laws for Naturalization of Foreigners; refusing to pass others to encourage their migrations hither, and raising the conditions of new Appropriations of Lands.

He has obstructed the Administration of Justice by refusing his Assent to Laws for establishing Judiciary Powers.

He has made Judges dependent on his Will alone for the tenure of their offices, and the amount and payment of their salaries.

He has erected a multitude of New Offices, and sent hither swarms of Officers to harass our people and eat out their substance.

He has kept among us, in times of peace, Standing Armies without the Consent of our legislatures.

He has affected to render the Military independent of and superior to the Civil Power.

He has combined with others to subject us to a jurisdiction foreign to our constitution, and unacknowledged by our laws; giving his Assent to their Acts of pretended Legislation:

For quartering large bodies of armed troops among us:

For protecting them, by a mock Trial from punishment for any Murders which they should commit on the Inhabitants of these States:

For cutting off our Trade with all parts of the world:

For imposing Taxes on us without our Consent:

For depriving us in many cases, of the benefit of Trial by Jury:

For transporting us beyond Seas to be tried for pretended offences:

For abolishing the free System of English Laws in a neighbouring Province, establishing therein an Arbitrary government, and enlarging its Boundaries so as to render it at once an example and fit instrument for introducing the same absolute rule into these Colonies

For taking away our Charters, abolishing our most valuable Laws and altering fundamentally the Forms of our Governments:

For suspending our own Legislatures, and declaring themselves invested with power to legislate for us in all cases whatsoever.

He has abdicated Government here, by declaring us out of his Protection and waging War against us.

He has plundered our seas, ravaged our coasts, burnt our towns, and destroyed the lives of our people.

He is at this time transporting large Armies of foreign Mercenaries to compleat the works of death, desolation, and tyranny, already begun with circumstances of Cruelty & Perfidy scarcely paralleled in the most barbarous ages, and totally unworthy the Head of a civilized nation.

He has constrained our fellow Citizens taken Captive on the high Seas to bear Arms against their Country, to become the executioners of their friends and Brethren, or to fall themselves by their Hands.

He has excited domestic insurrections amongst us, and has endeavoured to bring on the inhabitants of our frontiers, the merciless Indian Savages whose known rule of warfare, is an undistinguished destruction of all ages, sexes and conditions.

In every stage of these Oppressions We have Petitioned for Redress in the most humble terms:

Our repeated Petitions have been answered only by repeated injury.

A Prince, whose character is thus marked by every act which may define a Tyrant, is unfit to be the ruler of a free people.

Nor have We been wanting in attentions to our British brethren.

We have warned them from time to time of attempts by their legislature to extend an unwarrantable jurisdiction over us.

We have reminded them of the circumstances of our emigration and settlement here.

We have appealed to their native justice and magnanimity, and we have conjured them by the ties of our common kindred to disavow these usurpations, which would inevitably interrupt our connections and correspondence.

They too have been deaf to the voice of justice and of consanguinity. We must, therefore, acquiesce in the necessity, which denounces our Separation, and hold them, as we hold the rest of mankind, Enemies in War, in Peace Friends.

We, therefore, the Representatives of the united States of America, in General Congress, Assembled, appealing to the Supreme Judge of the world for the rectitude of our intentions, do, in the Name, and by Authority of the good People of these Colonies, solemnly publish and declare, That these united Colonies are, and of Right ought to be Free and Independent States, that they are Absolved from all Allegiance to the British Crown, and that all political connection between them and the State of Great Britain, is and ought to be totally dissolved; and that as Free and Independent States, they have full Power to levy War, conclude Peace contract Alliances, establish Commerce, and to do all other Acts and Things which Independent States may of right do.

— And for the support of this Declaration, with a firm reliance on the protection of Divine Providence, we mutually pledge to each other our Lives, our Fortunes and our sacred Honor.

— John Hancock
All eyes are opened, or opening, to the rights of man. The general spread of the light of science has already laid open to every view the palpable truth, that the mass of mankind has not been born with saddles on their backs, nor a favored few booted and spurred, ready to ride them legitimately

Offline jbrid1138

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Re: Declaration of Independence
« Reply #1 on: August 08, 2007, 06:21:38 am »
SANE -- Nice finding you here.  Why is it that your post (above) sounds so much like John Hancock?  Smile.

“There, I guess King George will be able to read that. [Remark on signing American Declaration of Independence]”
-- John Hancock quotes
 
We refuse to let our knowlege, however limited, be informed by your ignorance, however vast.
-- David Ray Griffin

If Tyranny and Oppression come to this land, it will be in the guise of fighting a foreign enemy.
 -- James Madison (Fourth President USA 1809-1817)

Offline jamesfrancis

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Re: Declaration of Independence
« Reply #2 on: August 10, 2007, 07:37:39 pm »
This is not our war against the Iraqi people.  Before 9/11 there was no mention of war with Iraq.  We knew Saddam was bad, we knew what he had done... but we didn't fear him... because we had that sense of security which comes along with living in a free democracy.  We knew that Saddam wouldn't touch us because we were simply out of his moral, intellectual, and technological domain.  We were the light.  Just like Anchient Rome was... at one point. 

... and just like Anchient Rome, that light eventually goes out.   With Rome, it was the spoiled son of a roman ruler who drove the society into the ground... a son who did not know the first thing about God or what Rome stood for.  Sound familiar?

The truth is that America is the worlds superpower.  Not only technologically and economically, but also morally and spiritually.  We live in a free democracy.  In MOST places on Earth people do not enjoy such a luxery.

American status as an economic, technological, moral, and spiritual superpower is currently being challenged.  It is being challenged from within.  Each year hundreds of Billions of American taxpayers money are going into bombing people while our social services such as education and health care need serious improvement.  Technologically we are behind we are starting to fall behind in emerging alternative fuel technology while other countries are starting to incorporate alternative fuel technology into their transportation infrastructure.  We are starting to loose our Christian morals, but equally as important we are loosing/forgetting what democratic morals are.  Spiritually we are loosing our relationship with God. 

Saddam could never so much have dented our status as supwerpower.  It was pointless for Saddam to ever attack us.  Why would he attack an all-mighty entity when he can pick on his neighbors, or his own people.  Doesn't make sense.

Well, i've said my peice


Offline Dig

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US Constitution
« Reply #3 on: August 10, 2007, 09:50:53 pm »
Preamble

We the People of the United States, in order to form a more perfect union, establish justice, insure domestic tranquility, provide for the common defence, promote the general welfare, and secure the blessing of liberty to ourselves and our posterity, do ordain and establish the Constitution of the United States of America.
Index for the U.S. Constitution and its Amendments

Article I

Sect. 1. All legislative powers herein granted shall be vested in a Congress of the United States, which shall consist of a Senate and a House of Representatives.


Sect. 2. The House of Representatives shall be composed of members chosen every second year by the people of the several states, and the electors in each state shall have the qualifications requisite for electors of the most numerous branch of the state legislature.

No person shall be a representative who shall not have attained to the age of twenty-five years, and been seven years a citizen of the United States, and who shall not, when elected, be an inhabitant of that state in which he shall be chosen.

Representative and direct taxes shall be apportioned among the several states which may be included within this Union, according to their respective numbers, which shall be determined by adding to the whole number of free persons, including those bound to service for a term of years, and excluding Indians not taxed, three-fifths of all other persons. The actual enumeration shall be made within three years after the first meeting of the Congress of the United States, and within every subsequent term of ten years in such manner as they shall be law direct. The number of representative shall not exceed one for every thirty thousand, but each state shall have at least one representative; and until such enumeration shall be made, the state of New Hampshire shall be entitled to choose three, Massachusetts eight, Rhode Island and Providence Plantations one, Connecticut five, New-York six, New-Jersey four, Pennsylvania eight, Delaware one, Maryland six, Virginia ten, North-Carolina five, South-Carolina five, and Georgia three.

When vacancies happen in the representation from any state, the Executive authority thereof shall issue writs of election to fill such vacancies.

The House of Representatives shall choose the Speaker and other officers; and shall have the sole power of impeachment.


Sect. 3. The Senate of the United States shall be composed of two senators from each state chosen by the legislature thereof, for six years and each senator shall have one vote.

Immediately after they shall be assembled in consequence of the first election, they hall be divided as equally as may be into three classes. The seats of the senators of the first class shall be vacated at the expiration of the second year, of the second class at the expiration of the fourth year, and of the third class at the expiration of the sixth year, so that one-third may be chosen every second year; and if vacancies happen by resignation, or otherwise during the recess of the legislature of any state, the Executive thereof may make temporary appointments until the next meeting of the Legislature, which shall then fill such vacancies.

No person shall be a senator who shall not have attained to the age of thirty years, and been nine years a citizen of the United States, who shall not, when elected, be an inhabitant of that state for which he shall be chosen.

The Vice-President of the United States shall be President of the Senate, but shall have no vote unless they be equally divided.

The Senate shall choose their other officers, and also a President pro tempore, in the absence of the Vice-President, or when he shall exercise the office of President of the United States.

The Senate shall have the sole power to try all impeachments. When sitting for that purpose, they shall be on oath or affirmation. When the President of the United States is tried, the Chief Justice shall preside: And no person shall be convicted without the concurrence of two-thirds of the members present.

Judgement in cases of impeachment shall not extend further than to removal from office and disqualification to hold and enjoy any office of honor, trust or profit under the United States; but the party convicted shall nevertheless be liable and subject to indictment, trial, judgment and punishment, according to law.


Sect. 4. The times, places and manner of holding elections for senators and representatives, shall be prescribed in each state by the legislature thereof: but the Congress may at any time by law make or alter such regulations, except as to the places of choosing Senators.

The Congress shall assemble at least once in every year, and such meeting shall be on the first Monday in December, unless they shall be law appoint a different day.


Sect. 5. Each house shall be the judge of the elections, returns and qualifications of its own members, and a majority of each shall constitute a quorum to do business; but a smaller number may adjourn from day to day, and may be authorized to compel the attendance of absent members, in such manner, and under such penalties as each house may provide.

Each house may determine the rules of its proceedings, punish its members for disorderly behaviour, and with the concurrence of two- thirds, expel a member.

Each house shall keep a journal of its proceedings, and from time to time publish the same, excepting such parts as may in their judgment require secrecy; and the yeas and nays of the members either house on any question shall, at the desire of one-fifth of those present be entered on the journal.

Neither house, during the session of Congress shall, without the consent of the other, adjourn for more than three days, nor to any other place than that in which the two houses shall be sitting.


Sect. 6. The senators and representatives shall receive a compensation for their services, to be ascertained by law, and paid out of the treasury of the United States. They shall in all cases, except treason, felony and breach of the peace, be privileged from arrest during their attendance at the session of their respective houses, and in going to and returning from the same; and for any speech or debate in either house, they shall not be questioned in any other place.

No senator or representative shall, during the time for which he was elected, be appointed to any civil office under the authority of the United States, which shall have been created, or the emoluments whereof shall have been increased during such time; and no person holding any office under the United States, shall be a member of either house during his continuance in office.


Sect. 7. All bill for raising revenue shall originate in the house of representatives; but the senate may propose or concur with amendments as on other bills.

Every bill which shall have passed the house of representatives and the senate, shall, before it become a law, be presented to the president of the United States; if he approve he shall sign it, but if not he shall return it, with his objections to that house in which it shall have originated, who shall enter the objections at large on their journal, and proceed to reconsider it. If after such reconsideration two-thirds of that house shall agree to pass the bill, it shall be sent, together with the objections, to the other house, by which is shall likewise be reconsidered, and if approved by two-thirds of that house, it shall become a law. But in all such cases the votes of both houses shall be determined by yeas and nays, and the names of the persons voting for and against the bill shall be entered on the journal of each house respectively. If any bill shall not be returned by the President within ten days (Sundays excepted) after it shall have been presented to him, the same shall be a law, in like manner as if he had signed it, unless the Congress by their adjournment prevent its return, in which case it shall not be a law.

Every order, resolution, or vote to which the concurrence of the Senate and House of Representative may be necessary (except on a question of adjournment) shall be presented to the President of the United States; and before the same shall take effect, shall be approved by him, or being disapproved by him, shall be repassed by two-thirds of the Senate and House of Representatives, according to the rules and limitations prescribed in the case of a bill.


Sect. 8. The Congress shall have power

To lay and collect taxes, duties, imposts and excises, to pay the debts and provide for the common defence and general welfare of the United States; but all duties, imposts and excises shall be uniform throughout the United States.

To borrow money on the credit of the United States;
To regulate commerce with foreign nations, and among the several states, and with the Indian tribes;
To establish an uniform rule of naturalization, and uniform laws on the subject of bankruptcies throughout the United States;
To coin money, regulate the value thereof, and of foreign coin, and fix the standard of weights and measures;
To provide for the punishment of counterfeiting the securities and current coin of the United States;
To establish post offices and post roads;
To promote the progress of science and useful arts, by securing for limited times to authors and inventors the exclusive right to their respective writings and discoveries;
To constitute tribunals inferior to the supreme court;
To define and punish piracies and felonies committed on the high seas, and offences against the law of nations;
To declare war, grant letters of marque and reprisal, and make rules concerning captures on land and water;
To raise and support armies, but no appropriation of money to that use shall be for a longer term than two years;
To provide and maintain a navy;
To make rules for the government and regulation of the land and naval forces;
To provide for calling forth the militia to execute the laws of the union, suppress insurrections and repel invasions.;
To provide for organizing, arming, and disciplining, the militia, and for governing such part of them as may be employed in the service of the United States, reserving to the States respectively, the appointment of the officers, and the authority of training the militia according to the discipline prescribed by Congress;
To exercise exclusive legislation in all cases whatsoever, over such district (not exceeding ten miles square) as may, by cession of particular States, and the acceptance of Congress, become the seat of the government of the United States, and to exercise like authority over all places purchased by the consent of the legislature of the states in which the same shall be, for the erection of forts, magazines, arsenals, dockyards, and other needful buildings;
-And
To make all laws which shall be necessary and proper for carrying into execution the foregoing powers, and all other powers vested by the Constitution in the government of the United States, or in any department or officer thereof.


Sect. 9. The migration or importation of such persons as any of the states now existing shall think proper to admit, shall not be prohibited by the Congress prior to the year one thousand eight hundred and eight, but a tax or duty may be imposed on such importation, not exceeding ten dollars for each person.

The privilege of the writ of habeas corpus shall not be suspended, unless when in cases of rebellion or invasion the public safety require it.
No bill of attainder or ex post facto law shall be passed.
No capitation, or other direct, tax shall be laid, unless in proportion to the census or enumeration herein before directed to be taken.
No tax or duty shall be laid on articles exported from any state.
No preference shall be given by any regulation of commerce or revenue to the ports of one state over those of another: nor shall vessels bound to, or from, one state, be obliged to enter, clear, or pay duties in another.
No money shall be drawn from the treasury, but in consequence of appropriations made by law; and a regular statement and account of the receipts and expenditures of all public money shall be published from time to time.
No title of nobility shall be granted by the United States:--And no person holding any office of profit or trust under them, shall, without the consent of the Congress, accept of any present, emolument, office, or title, of any kind whatever, from any king, prince, or foreign state.


Sect. 10. No state shall enter into any treaty, alliance, or confederation; grant letters of marque and reprisal; coin money; emit bills of credit; make any thing but gold and silver coin a tender in payment of debts; pass any bill of attainder, ex post facto law, or law impairing the obligation of contracts, or grant any title of nobility.

No state shall, without the consent of the Congress, lay any imposts or duties on imports or exports, except what may be absolutely necessary for executing its inspection laws; and the net produce of all duties and imposts, laid by any state on imports or exports, shall be for the use of the Treasury of the United States; all such laws shall be subject to the revision and control of the Congress.
No state shall, without the consent of Congress, lay any duty of tonnage, keep troops, or ships of war in time of peace, enter into any agreement or compact with another state, or with a foreign power, or engage in war, unless actually invaded, or in such imminent danger as will not admit of delay.
All eyes are opened, or opening, to the rights of man. The general spread of the light of science has already laid open to every view the palpable truth, that the mass of mankind has not been born with saddles on their backs, nor a favored few booted and spurred, ready to ride them legitimately

Offline Dig

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Re: US Constitution
« Reply #4 on: August 10, 2007, 09:51:18 pm »
Article II

Sect. 1. The executive power shall be vested in a president of the United States of America. He shall hold his office during the term of four years, and, together with the vice-president, chosen for the same term, be elected as follows.

Each state shall appoint, in such manner as the legislature thereof may direct, a number of electors, equal to the whole number of senators and representatives to which the state may be entitled in the Congress: but no senator or representative, or person holding an office of trust or profit under the United States, shall be appointed an elector.

The electors shall meet in their respective states, and vote by ballot for two persons, of whom one at least shall not be an inhabitant of the same state with themselves. And they shall make a list of all the persons voted for, and of the number of votes for each; which list they shall sign and certify, and transmit sealed to the seat of the government of the United States, directed to the president of the senate. The president of the senate shall, in the presence of the senate and house of representatives, open all the certificates, and the votes shall then be counted. The person having the greatest number of votes shall be the president, if such number be a majority of the whole number of electors appointed; and if there be more than one who have such majority, and have am equal number of electors appointed; and if there be more than one who have such majority, and have an equal number of votes, then the house of representatives shall immediately choose by ballot one of them for president; and if no person have a majority, then from the five highest on the list the said house shall in like manner choose the president. But in choosing the president, the votes shall be taken by states, the representation from each state having one vote; a quorum for this purpose shall consist of a member or members from two-thirds of the states, and a majority of all the states shall be necessary to a choice. In every case, after the choice of the president, the person having the greatest number of votes of the electors shall be the vice- president. But if there should remain two or more who have equal votes, the senate shall choose from them by ballot the vice-president.

The Congress may determine the time of the choosing the electors, and the day on which they shall give their votes; which day shall be the same throughout the United States.

No person except a natural born citizen, or a citizen of the United States, at the time of the adoption of this constitution, shall be eligible to the office of president; neither shall any person be eligible to that office who shall not have attained to the age of thirty-five years, and been fourteen years a resident within the United States.

In case of the removal of the president from office, or his death, resignation, or inability to discharge the powers and duties of the said office, the same shall devolve on the vice-president, and the Congress may by law provide for the case of removal, death, resignation or inability, both of the president and vice-president, declaring what officer shall then act as president, and such officer shall act accordingly, until the disability be removed, or a president be elected.

The president shall, at stated times, receive for his services, a compensation, which shall neither be encreased nor diminished during the period for which he shall have been elected, and he shall not receive within that period any other emolument from the United States, or any of them.

Before he enter on the execution of his office, he shall take the following oath or affirmation:


"I do solemnly swear (or affirm) that I will faithfully execute the office of president of the United States, and will to the best of my ability, preserve, protect and defend the constitution of the United States."


Sect. 2. The president shall be commander in chief of the army and navy of the United States, and of the militia of the several States, when called into the actual service of the United States; he may require the opinion, in writing of the principal officer in each of the executive departments, upon any subject relating to the duties of their respective offices, and he shall have power to grant reprieves and pardons for offences against the United States, except in cases of impeachment.

He shall have power, by and with the advice and consent of the senate, to make treaties, provided two-thirds of the senators present concur; and he shall nominate, and by and with the advice and consent of the senate, shall appoint ambassadors, other public ministers and consuls, judges of the supreme court, and all other officers of the United States, whose appointments are not herein otherwise provided for, and which shall be established by law. But the Congress may by law vest the appointment of such inferior officers, as they think proper, in the president alone, in the courts of law, or in the heads of departments.

The president shall have power to fill up all vacancies that may happen during the recess of the senate, by granting commissions which shall expire at the end of their session.


Sect. 3. He shall from time to time give to the Congress information of the state of the union, and recommend to their consideration such measures as he shall judge necessary and expedient; he may, on extraordinary occasions, convene both houses, or either of them, and in case of disagreement between them, with respect to the time of adjournment, he may adjourn them to such time as he shall think proper; he shall receive ambassadors and other public ministers; he shall take care that the laws be faithfully executed, and shall commission all the officers of the United States.


Sect. 4. The president, vice-president and all civil officers of the United States, shall be removed from office on impeachment for, and conviction of, treason, bribery, or other high crimes and misdemeanors.

Article III

Sect. 1. The judicial power of the United States shall be vested in one Supreme Court, and in such inferior courts as the Congress may from time to time ordain and establish. The judges, both of the Supreme and inferior courts, shall hold their offices during good behavior, and shall, at stated time, receive for their services a compensation which shall not be diminished during their continuance in office.


Sect. 2.

1. The judicial power shall extend to all cases, in law and equity, arising under this Constitution, the laws of the United States, and treaties made, or which shall be made, under their authority; to all cases affecting ambassadors, other public ministers, and consuls; to all cases of admiralty and maritime jurisdiction; to controversies to which the United States shall be a party; to controversies between two or more States, between a State and citizens of another State, between citizens of different States, between citizens of the same State claiming lands under grants of different States, and between a State or the citizens thereof, and foreign states, citizens, or subjects.

2. In all cases affecting ambassadors, other public ministers and consuls, and those in which a State shall be a party, the Supreme Court shall have original jurisdiction. In all the other cases before mentioned, the Supreme Court shall have appellate jurisdiction, both as to law and fact, with such exceptions and under such regulations as the Congress shall make.

3. The trial of all crimes, except in cases of impeachment, shall be by jury; and such trial shall be held in the State where the said crimes shall have been committed; but when not committed within any State the trial shall be at such place or places as the Congress may by law have directed.


Sect. 3.

1. Treason against the United States shall consist only in levying war against them, or in adhering to their enemies, giving them aid and comfort. No person shall be convicted of treason unless on the testimony of two witnesses to the same overt act, or on confession in open court.

2. The Congress shall have power to declare the punishment of treason, but no attainder of treason shall work corruption of blood, or forfeiture except during the life of the person attained.

Article IV

Sect. 1. Full faith and credit shall be given in each State to the public act, records, and judicial proceedings of every other State. And the Congress may, by general laws, prescribe the manner in which such acts, records, and proceedings shall be proved, and the effect thereof.


Sect. 2.

1. The citizens of each State shall be entitled to all privileges and immunities of citizens in the several States.

2. A person charged in any State with treason, felony, or other crime, who shall flee from justice, and be found in another State, shall, on demand of the executive authority of the State from which he fled, be delivered up, to be removed to the State having jurisdiction of the crime.

3. No person held to service or labor in one State, under the laws thereof, escaping into another, shall, in consequence of any law or regulation therein, be discharged from such service or labor, but shall be delivered up on claim of the party to whom such service or labor may be due.


Sect. 3.

1. New States may be admitted by the Congress into this Union; but no new State shall be formed or erected within the jurisdiction of any other State, nor any State be formed by the junction of two or more States, or parts of States, without the consent of the legislatures of the States concerned as well as of the Congress.

2. The Congress shall have power to dispose of and make all needful rules and regulations respecting the territory or other property belonging to the United States; and nothing in this Constitution shall be so construed as to prejudice any claims of the United States, or of any particular State.


Sect. 4. The United States shall guarantee to every State in this Union a republican form of government, and shall protect each of them against invasion; and on application of the legislature, or of the executive (when the legislature cannot be convened), against domestic violence.

Article V

The Congress, whenever two-thirds of both House shall deem it necessary, shall propose amendments to this Constitution, or, on the application of the legislatures of two-thirds of the several States, shall call a convention for proposing amendments, which, in either case, shall be valid, to all intents and purposes, as part of this Constitution, when ratified by the legislatures of three-fourths of the several States, or by conventions in three-fourths thereof, as the one or the other mode of ratification may be proposed by the Congress; provided [that no amendment which may be made prior to the year one thousand eight hundred and eight shall in any manner affect the first and fourth clauses in the ninth section of the first Article;] and that no State, without its consent, shall be deprived of its equal suffrage in the Senate.

Article VI

Sect. 1. All debts contracted and engagements entered into, before the adoption of this Constitution, shall be as valid against the United States under this Constitution, as under the Confederation.


Sect. 2. This Constitution, and the laws of the United States which shall be made in pursuance thereof, and all treaties made, or which shall be made, under the authority of the United States, shall be the supreme law of the land; and the judges in every State shall be bound thereby, anything in the constitution or laws of any State to the contrary notwithstanding.


Sect. 3. The Senators and Representatives before mentioned, and the members of the several State legislatures, and all executive and judicial officers, both of the United States and of the several States, shall be bound, by oath or affirmation, to support this Constitution; but no religious test shall ever be required as a qualification to any office or public trust under the United States.

Article VII


The ratification of the conventions of nine States shall be sufficient for the establishment of this Constitution between the States so ratifying the same.


Done in Convention, by the unanimous consent of the States present, the seventeenth day of September, in the year of our Lord one thousand seven hundred and eighty-seven, and of the Independence of the United States of America the twelfth. In Witness whereof, we have hereunto subscribed our names.


Attest:
William Jackson, Secretary
George Washington
PRESIDENT AND DEPUTY FROM VIRGINIA

NEW HAMPSHIRE
John Langdon
Nicholas Gilman

MASSACHUSETTS
Nathaniel Gorham
Rufus King

NEW YORK
Alexander Hamilton

NEW JERSEY
William Livingston
David Brearley
William Paterson
Jonathan Dayton

PENNSYLVANIA
Benjamin Franklin
Thomas Mifflin
Robert Morris
George Clymer
Thomas Fitzsimons
Jared Ingersoll
James Wilson
Gouverneur Morris

DELAWARE
George Read
Gunning Bedford, Jr.
John Dickinson
Richard Bassett
Jacob Broom

MARYLAND
James McHenry
Dan of St. Thomas Jennifer
Daniel Carroll

VIRGINIA
John Blair
James Madison, Jr.

NORTH CAROLINA
William Blount
Richard Dobbs Spaight
Hugh Williamson

SOUTH CAROLINA
John Rutledge
Charles Cotesworth Pinckney
Charles Pinckney
Pierce Butler

GEORGIA
William Few
Abraham Baldwin

Note: The following text is a direct transcription of the amendments. Out of the twelve articles that were proposed these Ten Articles were ratified in there original form and together with the 1787 Constitution as part and parcel were fully ratified by 3/4 of the States on December 15, 1791. These 10 Declaratory Articles form what is known as the "Bill of Rights."

THE BILL OF RIGHTS

The Preamble to The Bill of Rights

" Congress of the United States
begun and held at the City of New-York, on
Wednesday the fourth of March, one thousand seven hundred and eighty nine.

THE Conventions of a number of the States, having at the time of their adopting the Constitution, expressed a desire, in order to prevent misconstruction or abuse of its powers, that further declaratory and restrictive clauses should be added: And as extending the ground of public confidence in the Government, will best ensure the beneficent ends of its institution.


RESOLVED by the Senate and House of Representatives of the United States of America, in Congress assembled, two thirds of both Houses concurring, that the following Articles be proposed to the Legislatures of the several States, as amendments to the Constitution of the United States, all, or any of which Articles, when ratified by three fourths of the said Legislatures, to be valid to all intents and purposes, as part of the said Constitution; viz.

ARTICLES in addition to, and Amendment of the Constitution of the United States of America, proposed by Congress, and ratified by the Legislatures of the several States, pursuant to the fifth Article of the original Constitution.

Amendment I

Congress shall make no law respecting an establishment of religion, or prohibiting the free exercise thereof; or abridging the freedom of speech, or of the press; or the right of the people peaceably to assemble, and to petition the Government for a redress of grievances.

Amendment II

A well regulated Militia being necessary to the security of a free State, the right of the people to keep and bear Arms shall not be infringed.

Amendment III

No Soldier shall, in time of peace be quartered in any house, without the consent of the Owner, nor in time of war, but in a manner to be prescribed by law.

Amendment IV

The right of the people to be secure in their persons, houses, papers, and effects, against unreasonable searches and seizures, shall not be violated, and no Warrants shall issue, but upon probable cause, supported by Oath or affirmation, and particularly describing the place to be searched, and the persons or things to be seized.

Amendment V

No person shall be held to answer for a capital, or otherwise infamous crime, unless on a presentment or indictment of a Grand Jury, except in cases arising in the land or naval forces, or in the Militia, when in actual service in time of War or public danger; nor shall any person be subject for the same offence to be twice put in jeopardy of life or limb; nor shall be compelled in any criminal case to be a witness against himself, nor be deprived of life, liberty, or property, without due process of law; nor shall private property be taken for public use, without just compensation.

Amendment VI

In all criminal prosecutions, the accused shall enjoy the right to a speedy and public trial, by an impartial jury of the State and district wherein the crime shall have been committed, which district shall have been previously ascertained by law, and to be informed of the nature and cause of the accusation; to be confronted with the witnesses against him; to have compulsory process for obtaining witnesses in his favor, and to have the Assistance of Counsel for his defence.

Amendment VII

In Suits at common law, where the value in controversy shall exceed twenty dollars, the right of trial by jury shall be preserved, and no fact tried by a jury, shall be otherwise re-examined in any Court of the United States, than according to the rules of the common law.

Amendment VIII

Excessive bail shall not be required, nor excessive fines imposed, nor cruel and unusual punishments inflicted.

Amendment IX

The enumeration in the Constitution, of certain rights, shall not be construed to deny or disparage others retained by the people.

Amendment X

The powers not delegated to the United States by the Constitution, nor prohibited by it to the States, are reserved to the States respectively, or to the people.

Attest,          Frederick Augustus Mechlenberg   Speaker of the House of Representatives.
                                  John Adams,  Vice President of the United States, and President of the Senate


John Beckley,  Clerk of the House of Representatives.
Sam. A. Otis  Secretary of the Senate
"
All eyes are opened, or opening, to the rights of man. The general spread of the light of science has already laid open to every view the palpable truth, that the mass of mankind has not been born with saddles on their backs, nor a favored few booted and spurred, ready to ride them legitimately

Offline Dig

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Re: US Constitution
« Reply #5 on: August 10, 2007, 09:52:21 pm »
Article XI: 1798 - Sovereign Immunity.

11th Amendment

The judicial power of the United States shall not be construed to extend to any suit in law or equity, commenced or prosecuted against one of the United States by citizens of another State or by citizens or subjects of any foreign state.

Article XII: 1804 - Electoral College.

12th Amendment

The Electors shall meet in their respective States, and vote by ballot for President and Vice President, one of whom, at least, shall not be an inhabitant of the same State with themselves; they shall name in their ballots the person voted for as President, and in distinct ballots the person voted for as Vice President; and they shall make distinct lists of all persons voted for as President, and of all persons voted for as Vice President, and of the number of votes for each, which lists they shall sign, and certify, and transmit, sealed, to the seat of the Government of the United States, directed to the President of the Senate; the President of the Senate shall, in the presence of the Senate and the House of Representatives, open all the certificates, and the votes shall then be counted; the person having the greatest number of votes for President shall be the President, if such number be a majority of the whole number of Electors appointed; and if no person have such a majority, then, from the persons having the highest numbers, not exceeding three, on the list of those voted for a President, the House of Representative shall choose immediately, by ballot, the President. But in choosing the President, the votes shall be taken by States, the representation from each State having one vote; a quorum for this purpose shall consist of a member or members from two-thirds of the States, and a majority of all the States shall be necessary to a choice. And if the House of Representatives shall not choose a President, whenever the right of choice shall devolve upon them, [before the fourth day of March next following] the Vice President shall act as President, as in case of death, or other constitutional disability of the President. The person having the greatest number of votes as Vice President, shall be the Vice President, if such number be a majority of the whole number of Electors appointed; and if no person have a majority, then, form the two highest numbers on the list, the Senate shall choose the Vice President; a quorum for the purpose shall consist of two-thirds of the whole number of Senators; a majority of the whole number shall be necessary to a choice. But no person constitutionally ineligible to the office of President shall be eligible to that of Vice-President of the United States.

Article XIII: 1865 - Abolishment of Slavery.

13th Amendment

Sect. 1. Neither slavery nor involuntary servitude, except as a punishment for crime, whereof the party shall have been duly convicted, shall exist within the United States, or any place subject to their jurisdiction.

Sect. 2. Congress shall have power to enforce this article by appropriate legislation.

Article XIV - Due Process and Equal Protection / Basis of Representation.

14th Amendment

Sect. 1. All persons born or naturalized in the United States, and subject to the jurisdiction thereof, are citizens of the United States and of the State wherein they reside. No State shall make or enforce any law which shall abridge the privileges or immunities of citizens of the United States; nor shall any State deprive any person of life, liberty, or property, without due process of law, nor deny any person within its jurisdiction the equal protection of the laws.

Sect. 2. Representatives shall be apportioned among the several States according to their respective numbers, counting the whole number of persons in each State, excluding Indians not taxed. But when the right to vote at any election for the choice of electors for President and Vice President of the United States, Representatives in Congress, the executive and judicial officers of a State, or the members of the legislature thereof, is denied to any of the male inhabitants of such State, being twenty-one years of age, and citizens of the United States, or in any way abridged, except for participation in rebellion or other crime, the basis of representation therein shall be reduced in the proportion which the number of such male citizens shall bear to the whole number of male citizens twenty-one years of age in such State.

Sect. 3. No person shall be a Senator or Representative in Congress, or elector of President and Vice President, or hold any office, civil or military, under the United States, or under any State, who, having previously taken an oath, as a member of Congress, or as an officer of the United States, or as a member of any State legislature, or as an executive or judicial officer of any State, to support the Constitution of the United States, shall have engaged in insurrection or rebellion against the same, or given aid or comfort to the enemies thereof. But Congress may, by a vote of two-thirds of each House, remove such disability.

Sect. 4. The validity of the public debt of the United States, authorized by law, including debts incurred for payment of pensions and bounties for services in suppressing insurrection or rebellion, shall not be questioned. But neither the United States nor any State shall assume or pay any debt or obligation incurred in aid of insurrection or rebellion against the United States, or any claim for the loss or emancipation of any slave; but all such debts, obligations, and claims shall be held illegal and void.

Sect. 5. The Congress shall have power to enforce, by appropriate legislation, the provisions of this article.

Article XV: 1870 - Voting Rights.

15th Amendment

Sect. 1. The right of citizens of the United States to vote shall not be denied or abridged by the United States or by any State on account of race, color, or previous condition of servitude.

Sect. 2. The Congress shall have power to enforce this article by appropriate legislation.

Article XVI: 1913 - Income Tax.

16th Amendment

The Congress shall have power to lay and collect taxes on incomes, from whatever source derived, without apportionment among the several States and without regard to any census or enumeration.

Article XVII: 1913 - Office of Senator.

17th Amendment

The Senate of the United States shall be composed of two Senators from each State, elected by the people thereof, for six years; and each Senator shall have one vote. The electors in each State shall have the qualifications requisite for electors of the most numerous branch of the State legislatures.

When vacancies happen in the representation of any State in the Senate, the executive authority of such State shall issue writs of election to fill such vacancies: Provided, That the legislature of any State may empower the executive thereof to make temporary appointment until the people fill the vacancies by election as the legislature may direct.

This amendment shall not be so construed as to affect the election or term of any Senator chosen before it becomes valid as part of the Constitution.

Article XVIII: 1919 - Prohibition.

18th Amendment

Sect. 1. After one year from the ratification of this article the manufacture, sale or transportation of intoxicating liquors within, the importation thereof into, or the exportation thereof from the United States and all territory subject to the jurisdiction thereof for beverage purposes is hereby prohibited.

Sect. 2. The Congress and the several States shall have concurrent power to enforce this article by appropriate legislation.

Sect. 3. This article shall be inoperative unless it shall have been ratified as an amendment to the Constitution by the legislatures of the several States, as provided in the Constitution, within seven years of the date of the submission hereof to the States by Congress.

Article XIX: 1919 - Woman's Voting Rights.

19th Amendment

The right of citizens of the United States to vote shall not be denied or abridged by the United States or by any State on account of sex.

Congress shall have power to enforce this article by appropriate legislation.

Article XX: 1933 - Terms of Office.

20th Amendment

Sect. 1. The terms of the President and Vice President shall end at noon on the 20th day of January, and the terms of Senators and Representatives at noon on the 3d day of January, of the years in which such terms would have ended if this article had not been ratified; and the terms of their successors shall then begin.

Sect. 2. The Congress shall assemble at least once in every years, and such meeting shall begin at noon on the 3d day of January, unless they shall by law appoint a different day.

Sect. 3. If, at the time fixed for the beginning of the term of the President, the President-elect shall have died, the Vice President-elect shall become President. If a President shall not have been chosen before the time fixed for the beginning of his term, or if the President-elect shall have failed to qualify, then the Vice President-elect shall act as President until a President shall have qualified; and the Congress may by law provide for the case wherein neither a President-elect nor a Vice President-elect shall have qualified, declaring who shall then act as President, or the manner in which one who is to act shall be selected, and such person shall act accordingly until a President or Vice President shall have qualified.

Sect. 4. The Congress may by law provide for the case of the death of any of the persons from whom the House of Representatives may choose a President whenever the right of choice shall have devolved upon them, and for the case of the death of any of the persons from whom the Senate may choose a Vice President whenever the right of choice shall have devolved upon them.

Sect. 5. Sections 1 and 2 shall take effect on the 15th day of October following the ratification of this article.

Sect. 6. This article shall be inoperative unless it shall have been ratified as an amendment to the Constitution by three-fourths of the several States within seven years from the date of its submission.

Article XXI: 1933 - Repeal of Prohibition.

21st Amendment

Sect. 1. The eighteenth article of amendment to the Constitution of the United States is hereby repealed.

Sect. 2. The transportation or importation into any State, Territory, or possession of the United States for delivery or use therein of intoxicating liquors, in violation of the laws thereof, is hereby prohibited.

Sect. 3. This article shall be inoperative unless it shall have been ratified as an amendment to the Constitution by conventions in the several States, as provided in the Constitution, within seven years from the date of the submission hereof to the States by the Congress.

Article XXII: 1951 - Term Limits.

22nd Amendment

Sect. 1. No person shall be elected to the office of the President more than twice, and no person who has held the office of President, or acted as President, for more than two years of a term to which some other person was elected President shall be elected to the office of the President more than once. But this Article shall not apply to any person holding the office of President when this Article was proposed by the Congress, and shall not prevent any person who may be holding the office of President, or acting as President, during the term within which his Article becomes operative from holding the office of President or acting as President during the remainder of such term.

Sect. 2. This article shall be inoperative unless it shall have been ratified as an amendment to the Constitution by the legislatures of three- fourths of the several states within seven years from the date of its submission to the States by the Congress.

Article XXIII: 1961 - Appointment of Electors.

23rd Amendment

Sect. 1. The District constituting the seat of Government of the United States shall appoint in such manner as the Congress may direct:

A number of electors of President and Vice President equal to the whole number of Senators and Representative in Congress to which the District would be entitled if it were a State, but in no event more than the least populous State; they shall be considered, for the purposes of the election of President and Vice President, to be electors appointed by a State; and they shall meet in the District and perform such duties as provided by the twelfth article of amendment.

Sect. 2. The Congress shall have power to enforce this article by appropriate legislation.

Article XXIV: 1964 - Abolishment of Poll Tax.

24th Amendment

Sect. 1. The right of citizens of the United States to vote in any primary or other election for President or Vice President, for electors for President or Vice President, or for Senator or Representative in Congress, shall not be denied or abridged by the United States or any State by reason of failure to pay any poll tax or other tax.

Sect. 2. The Congress shall have power to enforce this article by appropriate legislation.

Article XXV: 1967 - Succession to Office.

25th Amendment

Sect. 1. In case of the removal of the President from office or of his death or resignation, the Vice President shall become President.

Sect. 2. Whenever there is a vacancy in the office of the Vice President, the President shall nominate a Vice President who shall take office upon confirmation by a majority vote of both Houses of Congress.

Sect. 3. Whenever the President transmits to the President pro tempore of the Senate and the Speakers of the House of Representatives his written declaration that he is unable to discharge the powers and duties of his office, and until he transmits to them a written declaration to the contrary, such powers and duties shall be discharged by the Vice President as Acting President.

Sect. 4. Whenever the Vice President and a majority of either the principal officers of the executive departments or of such other body as Congress may by law provide, transmit to the President pro tempore of the Senate and the Speaker of the House of Representatives their written declaration that the President is unable to discharge the powers and duties of his office, the Vice President shall immediately assume the powers and duties of the office as Acting President.

Thereafter, when the President transmits to the President pro tempore of the Senate and the Speaker of the House of Representatives his written declaration that no inability exists, he shall resume the powers and duties of his office unless the Vice President and a majority of either the principal officers of the executive department or of such other body as Congress may by law provide, transmit within four days to the President pro tempore of the Senate and the Speaker of the House of Representatives their written declaration that the President is unable to discharge the powers and duties of his office. Thereupon Congress shall decide the issue, assembling within forty-eight hours for that purpose if not in session. If the Congress, within twenty-one days after Congress is required to assemble, determines by two-thirds vote of both Houses that the President is unable to discharge the powers and duties of his office, the Vice President shall continue to discharge the same as Acting President; otherwise, the President shall resume the powers and duties of his office.

Article XXVI: 1971 - Age Related Voting Rights.

26th Amendment

Sect. 1. The right of citizens of the United States, who are eighteen years of age or older, to vote shall not be denied or abridged by the United States or by any State on account of age.

Sect. 2. The Congress shall have the power to enforce this article by appropriate legislation.

Article XXVII: 1992 - Compensation.

27th Amendment

No law, varying the compensation for the services of the Senators and Representatives, shall take effect, until an election of Representatives shall have intervened.

NCOIC
Civil Intelligence Association
Defense Oversight Group
[email protected]
http://www.ncoic.com
All eyes are opened, or opening, to the rights of man. The general spread of the light of science has already laid open to every view the palpable truth, that the mass of mankind has not been born with saddles on their backs, nor a favored few booted and spurred, ready to ride them legitimately

Offline Strive4Liberty

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Re: US Constitution
« Reply #6 on: August 12, 2007, 06:13:49 pm »
Michael Badnarik's Constitution Class (8 hours of class all on a free video download): http://www.missouriconservative.com/multimedia/constitutionclass.shtml

General Welfare Clause explained: http://www.lawandliberty.org/genwel.htm

CATO'S LETTERS
OR
Essays on Liberty, Civil and Religious, and Other Important Subjects
By John Trenchard and Thomas Gordon

http://www.constitution.org/cl/

Offline Dig

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BILL OF RIGHTS
« Reply #7 on: August 12, 2007, 09:41:28 pm »
Note: The following text is a direct transcription of the amendments. Out of the twelve articles that were proposed these Ten Articles were ratified in there original form and together with the 1787 Constitution as part and parcel, were fully ratified by 3/4 of the States on December 15, 1791. These 10 Declaratory Articles form what is known as the "Bill of Rights."

THE BILL OF RIGHTS

The Preamble to The Bill of Rights

*************

" Congress of the United States
begun and held at the City of New-York, on
Wednesday the fourth of March, one thousand seven hundred and eighty nine.

THE Conventions of a number of the States, having at the time of their adopting the Constitution, expressed a desire, in order to prevent misconstruction or abuse of its powers, that further declaratory and restrictive clauses should be added: And as extending the ground of public confidence in the Government, will best ensure the beneficent ends of its institution.


RESOLVED by the Senate and House of Representatives of the United States of America, in Congress assembled, two thirds of both Houses concurring, that the following Articles be proposed to the Legislatures of the several States, as amendments to the Constitution of the United States, all, or any of which Articles, when ratified by three fourths of the said Legislatures, to be valid to all intents and purposes, as part of the said Constitution; viz.

ARTICLES in addition to, and Amendment of the Constitution of the United States of America, proposed by Congress, and ratified by the Legislatures of the several States, pursuant to the fifth Article of the original Constitution.

Amendment I

Congress shall make no law respecting an establishment of religion, or prohibiting the free exercise thereof; or abridging the freedom of speech, or of the press; or the right of the people peaceably to assemble, and to petition the Government for a redress of grievances.

Amendment II

A well regulated Militia being necessary to the security of a free State, the right of the people to keep and bear Arms shall not be infringed.

Amendment III

No Soldier shall, in time of peace be quartered in any house, without the consent of the Owner, nor in time of war, but in a manner to be prescribed by law.

Amendment IV

The right of the people to be secure in their persons, houses, papers, and effects, against unreasonable searches and seizures, shall not be violated, and no Warrants shall issue, but upon probable cause, supported by Oath or affirmation, and particularly describing the place to be searched, and the persons or things to be seized.

Amendment V

No person shall be held to answer for a capital, or otherwise infamous crime, unless on a presentment or indictment of a Grand Jury, except in cases arising in the land or naval forces, or in the Militia, when in actual service in time of War or public danger; nor shall any person be subject for the same offence to be twice put in jeopardy of life or limb; nor shall be compelled in any criminal case to be a witness against himself, nor be deprived of life, liberty, or property, without due process of law; nor shall private property be taken for public use, without just compensation.

Amendment VI

In all criminal prosecutions, the accused shall enjoy the right to a speedy and public trial, by an impartial jury of the State and district wherein the crime shall have been committed, which district shall have been previously ascertained by law, and to be informed of the nature and cause of the accusation; to be confronted with the witnesses against him; to have compulsory process for obtaining witnesses in his favor, and to have the Assistance of Counsel for his defence.

Amendment VII

In Suits at common law, where the value in controversy shall exceed twenty dollars, the right of trial by jury shall be preserved, and no fact tried by a jury, shall be otherwise re-examined in any Court of the United States, than according to the rules of the common law.

Amendment VIII

Excessive bail shall not be required, nor excessive fines imposed, nor cruel and unusual punishments inflicted.

Amendment IX

The enumeration in the Constitution, of certain rights, shall not be construed to deny or disparage others retained by the people.

Amendment X

The powers not delegated to the United States by the Constitution, nor prohibited by it to the States, are reserved to the States respectively, or to the people.

Attest,          Frederick Augustus Mechlenberg   Speaker of the House of Representatives.
                                  John Adams,  Vice President of the United States, and President of the Senate


John Beckley,  Clerk of the House of Representatives.
Sam. A. Otis  Secretary of the Senate
"
All eyes are opened, or opening, to the rights of man. The general spread of the light of science has already laid open to every view the palpable truth, that the mass of mankind has not been born with saddles on their backs, nor a favored few booted and spurred, ready to ride them legitimately

Offline cruzin

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Re: Declaration of Independence & US Constitution
« Reply #8 on: March 21, 2008, 01:08:06 am »
The information war is about to end. Those that would hear have heard or found out. Now it is time for the rest of the story. Do you agree? I see idiots who have bumper sticker that say "Git er done" I assume they they are mistakenly  talking about 9/11. But are clueless about reality.

Offline bmcedm

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Re: Declaration of Independence & US Constitution
« Reply #9 on: April 16, 2008, 07:31:10 pm »
Time to frame a new Declaration:

Something like:

Declaration of an illegal government

Be it known unto the citizens of our countries that the enemy has once again slithered into the corridors of power.  It has seized the reigns of our constitution that was to steer us into the path of peace and has steered it off course onto a path of destruction.  It has overthrown democractic processes and the freedoms of our christian institutions from within through its criminal ideology which it calls freedom.  It has infected every branch of governance with the fallen nature of man and made money its god.  It has removed the laws of God as the foundation of our courts that were to measure out Justice according to Truth.  It has ceased to be legitimate in the eyes of the people and must be dissolved forthwith.  It has overthrown the monetary system by indebting the Nation to foreign bankers without consultation to the foundation of our countries that was built upon freedom and therefore we declare a year of Jubilee against this fraudulent debt that has been burdened to the people through deceit.

One problem with doing this is that we will need an alternative to the current illegal tender system?  Something that is backed up with something tangible like silver and goal or labour in the bank.  A monetary system that could only be used for nationals and national comapnies and could only be used to buy products, goods and services within the country of origin.  Its the only way to reclaim the soveignty thats been lost to the NWO.  This national currency could also be used interchangeably with the global currency that we have that is about to colapase.  Then when it colapses we would still have a currency to work with that would be backed up with something real.

After the global currency colapses we would be able to lock up many of the treasonous traitors that engineered and prosituted our countries out to the multinational corporate criminals that have centralized all the markets and industries through their craftiness and deceit.

Sounds like a legitimate plan....I hate to think what the alternative might be.
There are two enemies of the People: criminals and the government. Let us bind the second with the chains of the Constitution, so that it does not become the legalized version of the first.

--Thomas Jefferson

Offline ryanwv

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Re: Declaration of Independence & US Constitution
« Reply #10 on: May 07, 2008, 02:29:54 am »
I think that it is coming to a point in which the American people need to again to write a declaration of independence. The central government is has become oppressive and does not work in the interest of the people.
It was so brave for the founding fathers to declare America separate from British Empire. We have the right to throw away any government this becomes oppressive. We may have to use that right before too long. 
The gentlemen from Tokyo MR. Ryan D. Smith

Offline doublethink

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Re: Declaration of Independence & US Constitution
« Reply #11 on: June 11, 2008, 03:08:53 pm »
ask anyone you know if they have actually READ the Constitution, or even the Declaration, 90% havent,  if we merely followed our own Constitution we wouldnt be in this mess, we do not need a new one.
Dependence begets subservience and venality, suffocates the germ of virtue, and prepares fit tools for the designs of ambition.

Thomas Jefferson - 1787

Offline GeorgeWashingtonJohnson

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Re: BILL OF RIGHTS
« Reply #12 on: June 12, 2008, 04:11:52 pm »
AMENDMENTS

The first ten amendments are commonly called the Bill of Rights

1st Amendment

Congress shall make no law respecting an establishment of religion, or prohibiting the free exercise thereof; or abridging the freedom of speech, or of the press; or the right of the people peaceably to assemble, and to petition the government for a redress of grievances.

2nd Amendment

A well-regulated militia being necessary to the security of a free state, the right of the people to keep and bear arms shall not be infringed.

3rd Amendment

No soldier shall, in time of peace, be quarters in any house, without the consent of the owner; nor in time of war, but in a manner to be prescribed by law.

4th Amendment

The right of the people to be secure in their persons, houses, papers, and effects, against unreasonable searches and seizures, shall not be violated; and no warrants shall issue, but upon probable cause, supported by oath or affirmation, and particularly describing the place to be searched and the persons or things to be seized.

5th Amendment

No person shall be held to answer for a capital, or otherwise infamous, crime, unless on a presentment or indictment of a grand jury, except in cases arising in the land or naval forces, or in the militia, when in actual service, in time of war, or public danger; nor shall any person be subject, for the same offence, to be twice put in jeopardy of life or limb; nor shall be compelled, in any criminal case, to be a witness against himself; nor be deprived of life, liberty, or property, without due process of law; nor shall private property be taken for public use, without just compensation.

6th Amendment

In all criminal prosecutions, the accused shall enjoy the right to a speedy and public trial, by an impartial jury of the state and district wherein the crime shall have been committed, which district shall have been previously ascertained by law; and to be informed of the nature and cause of the accusation; to be confronted with the witnesses against him; to have compulsory process for obtaining witnesses in his favor; and to have the assistance of counsel for his defence.

7th Amendment

In suits at common law, where the value in controversy shall exceed twenty dollars, the right of trial by jury shall be preserved; and no fact, tried by a jury, shall be otherwise re-examined in any court of the United States than according to the rules of the common law.

8th Amendment

Excessive bail shall not be required, nor excessive fines imposed, nor cruel and unusual punishment inflicted.

9th Amendment

The enumeration in the Constitution of certain rights shall not be construed to deny or disparage others retained by the people.

10th Amendment

The powers not delegated to the United States shall not be construed to extend to any suit in law or equity, commenced or prosecuted against one of the United States by citizens of another State or by citizens or subjects of any foreign state.


The 10th Amendment actually says this:

The powers not delegated to the United States by the Constitution, nor prohibited by it to the States, are reserved to the States respectively, or to the people.

http://www.foundingfathers.info/documents/billrights.html

I also have the printed version given out by the American Center For Law and Justice, a conservative Constitution upholding group who represents people who's Constitutionally protected rights are being trampled on.

JTCoyoté

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Re: Declaration of Independence & US Constitution
« Reply #13 on: June 13, 2008, 01:40:27 pm »
SANE...

GWJ is absolutely correct here... could you link to whatever it was that gave you that despotic atrocity, masquerading as the 10th amendment?

I know from the 10th amendment... and I can't believe someone is pushing what you've posted here as the 10th amendment.

http://forum.prisonplanet.com/index.php?topic=4199.0

The above thread will shed some light...

--Oldyoti

"Government is not reason; it is not eloquence;
it is force! Like fire, it is a dangerous servant
and a fearful master... Firearms are second
only to the Constitution in importance;
they are the Peoples' Liberty's Teeth."

~George Washington

Offline GeorgeWashingtonJohnson

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Re: Declaration of Independence & US Constitution
« Reply #14 on: June 17, 2008, 12:05:41 am »
SANE...

GWJ is absolutely correct here... could you link to whatever it was that gave you that despotic atrocity, masquerading as the 10th amendment?

I know from the 10th amendment... and I can't believe someone is pushing what you've posted here as the 10th amendment.

http://forum.prisonplanet.com/index.php?topic=4199.0

The above thread will shed some light...

--Oldyoti

"Government is not reason; it is not eloquence;
it is force! Like fire, it is a dangerous servant
and a fearful master... Firearms are second
only to the Constitution in importance;
they are the Peoples' Liberty's Teeth."

~George Washington


We could mail a million copies of the Constitution to both houses of Congress and tell them if they don't learn it we will work to remove them from office.

It is hard to believe, well no it's not, that so many people, including elected officials have little or no understanding of our Constitution.

The only one of the Bill of Rights they seem concerned with is the First, and they are busy butchering that to allow pornographers to peddle anything they want while seeking to silence the Conservatives and Conservative Christians.

Offline Kilika

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Re: Declaration of Independence & US Constitution
« Reply #15 on: August 01, 2008, 04:46:21 pm »
http://www.archives.gov/exhibits/charters/bill_of_rights_transcript.html

The Bill of Rights...

Quote
Amendment I

Congress shall make no law respecting an establishment of religion, or prohibiting the free exercise thereof; or abridging the freedom of speech, or of the press; or the right of the people peaceably to assemble, and to petition the Government for a redress of grievances.


--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Amendment II

A well regulated Militia, being necessary to the security of a free State, the right of the people to keep and bear Arms, shall not be infringed.


--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Amendment III

No Soldier shall, in time of peace be quartered in any house, without the consent of the Owner, nor in time of war, but in a manner to be prescribed by law.


--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Amendment IV

The right of the people to be secure in their persons, houses, papers, and effects, against unreasonable searches and seizures, shall not be violated, and no Warrants shall issue, but upon probable cause, supported by Oath or affirmation, and particularly describing the place to be searched, and the persons or things to be seized.


--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Amendment V

No person shall be held to answer for a capital, or otherwise infamous crime, unless on a presentment or indictment of a Grand Jury, except in cases arising in the land or naval forces, or in the Militia, when in actual service in time of War or public danger; nor shall any person be subject for the same offence to be twice put in jeopardy of life or limb; nor shall be compelled in any criminal case to be a witness against himself, nor be deprived of life, liberty, or property, without due process of law; nor shall private property be taken for public use, without just compensation.


--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Amendment VI

In all criminal prosecutions, the accused shall enjoy the right to a speedy and public trial, by an impartial jury of the State and district wherein the crime shall have been committed, which district shall have been previously ascertained by law, and to be informed of the nature and cause of the accusation; to be confronted with the witnesses against him; to have compulsory process for obtaining witnesses in his favor, and to have the Assistance of Counsel for his defence.


--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Amendment VII

In Suits at common law, where the value in controversy shall exceed twenty dollars, the right of trial by jury shall be preserved, and no fact tried by a jury, shall be otherwise re-examined in any Court of the United States, than according to the rules of the common law.


--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Amendment VIII

Excessive bail shall not be required, nor excessive fines imposed, nor cruel and unusual punishments inflicted.


--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Amendment IX

The enumeration in the Constitution, of certain rights, shall not be construed to deny or disparage others retained by the people.


--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Amendment X

The powers not delegated to the United States by the Constitution, nor prohibited by it to the States, are reserved to the States respectively, or to the people.


Learn it. Know it. Thats' the only way to know the truth.
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Offline Dan

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Re: Declaration of Independence & US Constitution
« Reply #16 on: August 15, 2008, 05:56:45 am »
We could mail a million copies of the Constitution to both houses of Congress and tell them if they don't learn it we will work to remove them from office.

It is hard to believe, well no it's not, that so many people, including elected officials have little or no understanding of our Constitution.

The only one of the Bill of Rights they seem concerned with is the First, and they are busy butchering that to allow pornographers to peddle anything they want while seeking to silence the Conservatives and Conservative Christians.

I like this idea.  If every "truther" sent 10 copies of the constitution to all of the elected officials (Federal) of their state, and threatened to campaign for removal on the grounds of noncompliance, it would send a real big message.

It would be a massive mail overload (don't want to say bomb there), that if sent to their DC offices, is sure to get talked about amongst themeselves.  And the media should be alerted to the mailings about the time the letters were to arrive.

It would have to be timed just right in order for all of the letters to arrive at the same time for the most impact, but individually would work as well.

And it wouldn't cost that much.

Dan

PS, Anyone know how much the lobbyists cost to work their magic?  Maybe that is worth looking into also.  Pay a lobbyist group to send the message.  They seem to be the only people that the politicians listen to.
My freedom is more important than your good idea.

When only cops have guns, it's called a "police state". - Claire Wolfe

You know why there's a Second Amendment? In case the government fails to follow the first one. -Rush Limbaugh

The militia is the dread of tyrants and the guard of freeme

Offline Triadtropz

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Re: Declaration of Independence & US Constitution
« Reply #17 on: August 15, 2008, 06:12:53 am »
If we were enforcing the constitution ..you could show up in washington DC with about 1000 arrest warrants..and get all of them..congress, senate, the administration , all of them..
one man with courage makes a majority..TJ

Offline life0repeats

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Re: Declaration of Independence & US Constitution
« Reply #18 on: August 15, 2008, 08:00:13 am »
i prefer the articles of confederation.

Offline Dig

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Re: Declaration of Independence & US Constitution
« Reply #19 on: August 15, 2008, 10:55:54 pm »
SANE...

GWJ is absolutely correct here... could you link to whatever it was that gave you that despotic atrocity, masquerading as the 10th amendment?

I know from the 10th amendment... and I can't believe someone is pushing what you've posted here as the 10th amendment.

http://forum.prisonplanet.com/index.php?topic=4199.0

The above thread will shed some light...

--Oldyoti

"Government is not reason; it is not eloquence;
it is force! Like fire, it is a dangerous servant
and a fearful master... Firearms are second
only to the Constitution in importance;
they are the Peoples' Liberty's Teeth."

~George Washington


I can only find it now on BS sites.

Thanks for the correction guys!
All eyes are opened, or opening, to the rights of man. The general spread of the light of science has already laid open to every view the palpable truth, that the mass of mankind has not been born with saddles on their backs, nor a favored few booted and spurred, ready to ride them legitimately

Offline Nailer

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Re: Declaration of Independence & US Constitution
« Reply #20 on: October 22, 2008, 06:15:55 am »
arguing with the OP who started a thread on GLP about wanting to abolish the original Constitution and make a new one..
 here is a reply by one of the members.

http://www.godlikeproductions.com/forum1/message643385/pg1

How do you think we got here in the first place? Our Republic has been replaced by a democracy by traitors in our government. Democracy is what Karl Marx advocated to bring down a free Republic so it could be rebuilt to further world communism.

As far as 'the Constitution should be scrapped because it can't defend itself', just shows you're an even bigger idiot! The Constitution of the united States is a piece of paper, on which great men wrote down TIMELESS principles of liberty gleaned from the history of governments going back centuries. These principles must be defended by just men. Unjust men tear down our Republic for power, campaign contributions and the ever popular "socialist revolution".

If you want to know what kind of government we have now. Take a copy of the Constitution and a copy of the communist manifesto and read them.

Find out which one has...

1. a central bank controlling all credit (Fed Reserve bank).
2. government control of education (dept of Ed).
3. government control of agriculture (dept of Ag).
4. a progressive income tax (IRS).
5. centralization of communication (FCC)
and transportation (DOT).


Google - ten planks of the communist manifesto

to find out the answer.
I am a realist that is slightly conservative yet I have some republican demeanor that can turn democrat when I feel the urge to flip independant.
 
The truth shall set you free, if not a 45ACP round will do the trick.. HEHE

Offline Nailer

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Re: Declaration of Independence & US Constitution
« Reply #21 on: October 22, 2008, 06:18:35 am »
haha the last post I made here gave the year of the 200th anniversary of the USA 1976.

                                              .Subject Started by Replies Views Last post  .
     Declaration of Independence & US Constitution  Sane  21  1976   Today at 06:15:55 AM
by Nailer 
I am a realist that is slightly conservative yet I have some republican demeanor that can turn democrat when I feel the urge to flip independant.
 
The truth shall set you free, if not a 45ACP round will do the trick.. HEHE

Offline DireWolf

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Re: Declaration of Independence & US Constitution
« Reply #22 on: October 31, 2008, 09:10:00 am »
ask anyone you know if they have actually READ the Constitution, or even the Declaration, 90% haven't,  if we merely followed our own Constitution we wouldn't be in this mess, we do not need a new one.

How true. I would surmise it has been the conditioning of most minds that has led us to the precipice where we now find ourselves. We have as a society, become obsessed with self indulgence, focusing on our next good time or the next bauble we wish to purchase. It has been through careful, deliberate, manipulation of body and mind (mostly mind) that they have led the majority like sheep to slaughter.

So much of what has been passed into law has no Constitutional basis or actual authority. Our own complacency and blind trust in others ( those we elect to represent / serve us ) to the point where we allow them to do our thinking for us has now come to a head placing the greatest Republic ever assembled, at extinction`s door.

It will take herculean effort on our part , to restore this nation to its former greatness and glory, to be sure it will not be without great sacrifice and bloodshed if we are indeed able to accomplish our goal. I say this not advocating violence, but rather merely reflecting back to a time when our nation was birthed and noting how unwilling tyrants relinquish their power however unjust it may be.
Freedom and Liberty, or slavery and death, your choice, choose wisely.

Offline donnay

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Re: Declaration of Independence & US Constitution
« Reply #23 on: October 31, 2008, 09:55:26 am »
Make copies of the DOI and the Constitution and send them out in Christmas cards this year.  Along with Alex Jones End Games and Jason Bermas' Fabled Enimies.

Make up a short introduction to all and say this should be EVERYONE'S New Years Resolution!!
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Offline donnay

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Re: Declaration of Independence & US Constitution
« Reply #24 on: October 31, 2008, 10:32:41 am »
Ah, Houston, we have a problem.  Someone added a comma where there
wasn't one before.  With the comma the sentence makes no sense.
The comma is not there in the genuine copy in D.C.
---------------------------------
US Constitution:

Sect. 9. The migration or importation of such persons as any of the states now existing shall think proper to admit, shall not be prohibited by the Congress prior to the year one thousand eight hundred and eight, but a tax or duty may be imposed on such importation, not exceeding ten dollars for each person.

The privilege of the writ of habeas corpus shall not be suspended, unless when in cases of rebellion or invasion the public safety require it.
No bill of attainder or ex post facto law shall be passed.

                               ---->?<-------
No capitation, or other direct, tax shall be laid, unless in proportion to the

census or enumeration herein before directed to be taken.
No tax or duty shall be laid on articles exported from any state.
No preference shall be given by any regulation of commerce or revenue to the ports of one state over those of another: nor shall vessels bound to, or from, one state, be obliged to enter, clear, or pay duties in another.
No money shall be drawn from the treasury, but in consequence of appropriations made by law; and a regular statement and account of the receipts and expenditures of all public money shall be published from time to time.
No title of nobility shall be granted by the United States:--And no person holding any office of profit or trust under them, shall, without the consent of the Congress, accept of any present, emolument, office, or title, of any kind whatever, from any king, prince, or foreign state.


Hmm, good catch...

http://avalon.law.yale.edu/18th_century/art1.asp

Section 9 - Provision as to migration or importation of certain persons. Habeas Corpus , Bills of attainder, etc. Taxes, how apportioned. No export duty. No commercial preference. Money, how drawn from Treasury, etc. No titular nobility. Officers not to receive presents, etc.

1. The migration or importation of such persons as any of the states now existing shall think proper to admit, shall not be prohibited by the Congress prior to the year 1808, but a tax or duty may be imposed on such importations, not exceeding 10 dollars for each person.

2. The privilege of the writ of habeas corpus shall not be suspended, unless when in cases of rebellion or invasion the public safety may require it.

3. No bill of attainder or ex post facto law shall be passed.

4. No capitation, or other direct tax shall be laid unless in proportion to the census or enumeration herein before directed to be taken. (Modified by Amendement XVI)

5. No tax or duty shall be laid on articles exported from any state.

6. No preference shall be given by any regulation of commerce or revenue to the ports of one state over those of another: nor shall vessels bound to, or from one state, be obliged to enter, clear, or pay duties in another.

7. No money shall be drawn from the treasury but in consequence of appropriations made by law; and a regular statement and account of the receipts and expenditures of all public money shall be published from time to time.

8. No title of nobility shall be granted by the United States: And no person holding any office or profit or trust under them, shall, without the consent of the Congress, accept of any present, emolument, office, or title, of any kind whatever, from any king, prince, or foreign state.
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Offline lord edward coke

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Re: Declaration of Independence & US Constitution
« Reply #25 on: January 04, 2009, 11:31:21 pm »
The War on the Bill of Rights



he rush to push aside the Bill of Rights began on September 13, two days after the terrorist attacks. That night, the Senate swiftly attached to a previously written appropriations bill an amendment to make it much easier for the government to wiretap computers without having to go to court to get multiple search warrants. The Internet has been enlisted against the Evil Empire, and your privacy is the first casualty.

Passed by voice vote, with only brief debate, this incursion into the Fourth Amendment was heralded by a sponsoring senator as "the first legislative strike against terrorists."

In this immediate aftermath, Attorney General John Ashcroft has appeared often on television to assure the public that to protect its security, the government will demand new legislation for "roving wiretaps." Rather than target a suspect's primary phone, the judicial warrant would extend the wiretap to any and all telephones—regular, cell, or any other—that he or she used. If the suspect talks on a relative's phone, or a phone in an office unrelated to his alleged terrorist activities, or a phone in your home, the owners of those phones would also become part of the investigative record of purported terrorism.   

The public was not told by Ashcroft that roving wiretaps had already become law in 1998, during the Clinton administration. The Bush team wants credit for this strike against Osama bin Laden. Only Georgia congressman Bob Barr, a fierce conservative advocate of privacy, tried to stop the 1998 roving-wiretaps law, and the press paid hardly any attention.

What is new is Ashcroft's pressing for a radical extension of present government wiretapping powers. The law now says that a warrant for a wiretap is valid only in the jurisdiction in which it is issued. But the Bush administration demands a national wiretap warrant that will save its agents from repeated trips to court.

The president and his enforcement team correctly anticipate that the public will offer little opposition to the evisceration of its Fourth Amendment rights—and other Bill of Rights "guarantees" of protection of individual liberties against the government.

A CBS-New York Times survey released on Sunday, September 16, showed that 74 percent of Americans thought they would have to give up some of their personal freedoms to get Osama bin Laden "dead or alive," as George W. Bush put it, recalling wanted posters in the Old West.

The explanation for this eagerness to relinquish our supposedly cherished freedoms is not only the rage and fear at the shocking numbers of civilians murdered on our own land by foreign fanatics for the first time in our history.

The more frightening reason why the government can have confidence in our support is that most Americans have only the dimmest notion of what their constitutional freedoms are—and what it took to get them. So there is little concern that they and other Americans can be caught in dragnets of suspicion by a government that has suspended much of the Bill of Rights.

This willingness to surrender what we're supposed to be fighting for is a recurring part of our history. During the Civil War, Abra-ham Lincoln imprisoned newspaper editors and other dissenters against his policies. In addition, he suspended the oldest right of English-speaking peoples, habeas corpus. "The Constitution," Lincoln explained, "is not a suicide pact."

How many Americans, right now, would disagree with that conclusion?

While the media has been focusing on Osama bin Laden, the president, Secretary of State Colin Powell, and Secretary of Defense Donald Rumsfeld have been pledging to root out terrorism in all countries harboring terrorists, not only Afghanistan.

When Colin Powell named the countries implicated in the murderous conspiracy soon after the catastrophic attacks on September 11, it was not noted in the press that the harboring nations had already been cited as official "state sponsors of terrorism" in a report last April by the State Department's Office of the Coordinator for Counterterrorism. That report was largely ignored in the media.

The deadly seven are Iran, Iraq, Syria, Libya, Cuba, North Korea, and Sudan. The State Department counterterrorism report emphasizes that Sudan is a leading harborer of international terrorists—but that nation has been overlooked in the recent media furor about this malevolent network.

From the report: "Sudan . . . continued to be used as a safe haven by members of various groups, including associates of Osama bin Laden's al-Qaida ["the Base"] organization . . . Egyptian Islamic Jihad, the Palestine Islamic Jihad, and Hamas. Most groups used Sudan primarily as a secure base for assisting compatriots elsewhere." (Emphasis added.)

Osama bin Laden, the State Department continues, has a "working agreement" with the government of Sudan.

Are we going to bomb or invade Sudan?

This will indeed be a war without a clear end, because we are dealing with an extensive network of terrorists. Bin Laden's organization, the State Department reports, "has a worldwide reach" through its connections to this network. Even if Bin Laden is taken, dead or alive, there will remain hidden cells, hidden "sleepers" around the world—some of them right here.

Civil libertarians—and there aren't many—have to be careful not to believe that the huge popular support for the Bush war effort will make significant resistance nearly impossible. But opposition to a coup d'état against the Bill of Rights is our only alternative to yielding to the beginnings of a police state for an indefinite period.

There is still time to save the freedoms our government says we're fighting for. And that requires doing—and planning—with the confidence that most Americans will applaud.

The Alien and Sedition Acts of 1798, which nearly destroyed the First Amendment, ignited enough opposition to elect Thomas Jefferson in 1800, and he released all those imprisoned by that law. The "Red Scare" of 1919 and the early 1920s—with its mass arrests of "subversives" in 33 cities, without a semblance of due process—was eventually seen by the citizenry as a disgrace. And in the 1950s, Joe McCarthy was finally overcome.

If we do not spread the word of this bipartisan attack on the Bill of Rights—and insist on our First Amendment rights to protest—we will become accomplices in this war against the Constitution. American flags are everywhere. I bought one at a vigil for the dead at Union Square. But what do those flags stand for?

In the September 17 Daily News, Richard Sisk did the kind of reporting that will continually be needed to awaken enough of the populace to rescue the Constitution.

Sisk noted that New York is now the headquarters for the multi-agency Joint Terrorism Task Force. He quoted Justice Department spokeswoman Mindy Tucker as saying, as Sisk summarized it, that "U.S. Attorney Mary Jo White, top federal prosecutor for the Southern District of New York, has been given extraordinary powers to proceed in secrecy against anyone implicated 'in the entire attack against the four airliners.' " (Emphasis added.)

What does "implicated" mean? Reasonable suspicion? Probable cause? And how will we know whether basic due process has been afforded those "implicated" when, as Sisk continued, the Justice Department says, "Search warrants and records will be sealed. Law enforcement also no longer will disclose when arrests are made or when material witnesses are taken into custody."

And we're supposed to be telling China how to reform its justice system, which functions in secrecy as it crunches human rights?

In the September 24 National Law Journal, David C. Vladeck, director of the Public Citizen Litigation Group, says that the public demand for security will support "virtually everything the government does in terms of intelligence gathering and assessment, immigration, and telecommunications."

He could have added: the rapid increase in checkpoints in public places; the profiling of suspects by how they look and dress; and the eventual, sooner rather than later, creation of a national ID card. That card, with its relentless computer chip, will enable the authorities to keep pervasive track of what we do and where we go.

"These are very sobering times," Vladeck says, "and I think the temperament of the country will tolerate the kind of measures we might at one point have thought intolerable."

It's up to us as to whether he's right.

"Liberty has never come from government.  Liberty has always come from the subjects of government. The history of liberty is a history  of resistance. The history of liberty is a history of limitations of government power, not the increase of it." http://sedm.org/

perplexed1

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Re: Declaration of Independence & US Constitution
« Reply #26 on: May 13, 2009, 12:09:48 am »
 How about riding the coat tails of States 10th Ammendment claim of sovereignty by finding true 10th
Ammendment standing People in every county in all 50 states to vote to reserve new rights of People? This creates foundation to all the original writs and remedies and squarely attacks the oaths and affirmations of all govt. when they proceed  in disobedience. It also lays the framework to  wield the Declaration's disbandment clause whereby voting to reclaim all the original powers vested unto govt. High
Court already recognizes States rights in New York vs. United States. If States are recognized so to must
people as they are a seperate party within the 10th Ammendment. Its self evident people can reserve
rights . Only problem is we're all seen thru lens of law and court as being a 14th Ammendment class of people. Cease being the federal citizen of the United States in whatever state one reside's, one ceases to be the foreigner made subject to the jurisdiction thereof. Didn't Supreme Court state in other cases that Washington,D.C./District of Columbia is a foreign nation in respect to the States?  We're dumbed  down into being extensions of the federal govt.,thats how federal democracy overlays the States. What
we're all presumed to being foreign to is the 10th Ammendment position of law and authority the Founding
Fathers occupied. They never existed under the 14th Ammendment,nor would ever be identified as a U.S.
citizen. If govt theory of only one citizenship exists why did they create a Diversity of Citizenship Doctrine ?  True answer is obvious read the 10th Ammendment and thats where people were intended to be.

JTCoyoté

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Re: BILL OF RIGHTS
« Reply #27 on: May 28, 2009, 07:08:30 pm »
AMENDMENTS

The first ten amendments are commonly called the Bill of Rights

1st Amendment

Congress shall make no law respecting an establishment of religion, or prohibiting the free exercise thereof; or abridging the freedom of speech, or of the press; or the right of the people peaceably to assemble, and to petition the government for a redress of grievances.

2nd Amendment

A well-regulated militia being necessary to the security of a free state, the right of the people to keep and bear arms shall not be infringed.

3rd Amendment

No soldier shall, in time of peace, be quarters in any house, without the consent of the owner; nor in time of war, but in a manner to be prescribed by law.

4th Amendment

The right of the people to be secure in their persons, houses, papers, and effects, against unreasonable searches and seizures, shall not be violated; and no warrants shall issue, but upon probable cause, supported by oath or affirmation, and particularly describing the place to be searched and the persons or things to be seized.

5th Amendment

No person shall be held to answer for a capital, or otherwise infamous, crime, unless on a presentment or indictment of a grand jury, except in cases arising in the land or naval forces, or in the militia, when in actual service, in time of war, or public danger; nor shall any person be subject, for the same offence, to be twice put in jeopardy of life or limb; nor shall be compelled, in any criminal case, to be a witness against himself; nor be deprived of life, liberty, or property, without due process of law; nor shall private property be taken for public use, without just compensation.

6th Amendment

In all criminal prosecutions, the accused shall enjoy the right to a speedy and public trial, by an impartial jury of the state and district wherein the crime shall have been committed, which district shall have been previously ascertained by law; and to be informed of the nature and cause of the accusation; to be confronted with the witnesses against him; to have compulsory process for obtaining witnesses in his favor; and to have the assistance of counsel for his defence.

7th Amendment

In suits at common law, where the value in controversy shall exceed twenty dollars, the right of trial by jury shall be preserved; and no fact, tried by a jury, shall be otherwise re-examined in any court of the United States than according to the rules of the common law.

8th Amendment

Excessive bail shall not be required, nor excessive fines imposed, nor cruel and unusual punishment inflicted.

9th Amendment

The enumeration in the Constitution of certain rights shall not be construed to deny or disparage others retained by the people.

10th Amendment

The powers not delegated to the United States shall not be construed to extend to any suit in law or equity, commenced or prosecuted against one of the United States by citizens of another State or by citizens or subjects of any foreign state.



Hey Bud...

Look at the 10th amendment bolded above... that is not the 10th Amendment...  :o :o   This is the 10th Amendment:

“The powers not delegated to the United States by the Constitution,
nor prohibited by it to the States, are reserved to the States respectively,
or to the people.”

Where did you find this...?

JTCoyoté

"...the State of Colorado hereby claims sovereignty, under the 10th
Amendment to the Constitution of the United States, over all powers
not otherwise enumerated and granted to the federal government by
the United States Constitution."
~From HJR-94-1035, The First
10th Amendment State Sovereignty Resolution, 1994



Offline Elvis

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Re: Declaration of Independence & US Constitution
« Reply #28 on: May 28, 2009, 07:20:09 pm »
"A great civilization is not conquered from without until it has destroyed itself from within." - Will Durant

JTCoyoté

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Re: Declaration of Independence & US Constitution
« Reply #29 on: May 29, 2009, 05:08:50 pm »
11th amendment:

http://www.usconstitution.net/const.html#Am11

Yes, a very destructive combination of the 10th and 11th Amendments that horribly alters the meaning of both... this is the kind of thing that starts slow, a word here, a phrase there, and over time it becomes the lie that is believed to be true, that is if it isn't nipped in the bud NOW... This needs to be corrected on whichever website it was that is displaying it, since I believe it was cut and pasted here as the 10th Amendment from a College website...  :o

Amendment X: The powers not delegated to the United States by the Constitution,
nor prohibited by it to the States, are reserved to the States respectively,
or to the people.

Amendment XI: The Judicial power of the United States shall not be construed to extend to any suit in law or equity, commenced or prosecuted against one of the United States by Citizens of another State, or by Citizens or Subjects of any Foreign State.

When you combine the blue letters from the two amendments..."voila"... you get the new "Anti-10th, false Amendment" shown below that was cut and pasted from the yet to be named COLLEGE website...

The powers not delegated to the United States shall not be construed to extend to any suit in law or equity, commenced or prosecuted against one of the United States by citizens of another State or by citizens or subjects of any foreign state.

JTCoyoté

''...on every question of construction [of the Constitution], let us carry
ourselves back to the time when the Constitution was adopted, recollect the
spirit manifested in the Debates, & instead of trying what meaning may be
squeezed out of the text, or invented against it, conform to the probable one
in which it was passed.''
~Thomas Jefferson

Offline Elvis

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Re: Declaration of Independence & US Constitution
« Reply #30 on: May 29, 2009, 05:13:00 pm »
Yes, a very destructive combination of the 10th and 11th Amendments that horribly alters the meaning of both... this is the kind of thing that starts slow, a word here, a phrase there, and over time it becomes the lie that is believed to be true, if it isn't nipped in the bud NOW... This needs to be corrected on whichever website it was that is displaying it, that was cut and pasted here as the 10th...  :o

JTCoyoté

''...on every question of construction [of the Constitution], let us carry
ourselves back to the time when the Constitution was adopted, recollect the
spirit manifested in the Debates, & instead of trying what meaning may be
squeezed out of the text, or invented against it, conform to the probable one
in which it was passed.''
~Thomas Jefferson


Agreed. How you feelin'?
"A great civilization is not conquered from without until it has destroyed itself from within." - Will Durant

JTCoyoté

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Re: Declaration of Independence & US Constitution
« Reply #31 on: May 29, 2009, 05:49:01 pm »
I feel okay... had a wild 48 hours though... film at 5 so to speak... actually an article to appear on the blogs in the next 2 days or so...

--Oldyoti

"Fear can only prevail when victims
are ignorant of the facts."

~Thomas Jefferson

Offline Elvis

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Re: Declaration of Independence & US Constitution
« Reply #32 on: May 29, 2009, 05:51:53 pm »
I'll be watching for it. Hang in there man. :)
"A great civilization is not conquered from without until it has destroyed itself from within." - Will Durant

Offline Ghost in the Machine

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Re: Declaration of Independence & US Constitution
« Reply #33 on: June 29, 2009, 08:13:14 pm »
lol I bet 90% of congress didn't even read the constitution its like toilet paper to them... and what pisses me off obama says all the time hes a expert in the constitution, hes a constitution lawyer. man its a sad America is disappearing right in front of my eyes  :'(
101010

Offline lord edward coke

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Re: Declaration of Independence & US Constitution
« Reply #34 on: June 29, 2009, 08:41:19 pm »
http://www.criminalgovernment.com/docs/emer.html

Congressman Beck is saying that, of all the damnable heresies that ever existed, this doctrine of emergency has got to be the worst, because once Congress declares an emergency, there is no Constitution. He goes on to say,

"But the Constitution of the United States, as a restraining influence in keeping the federal government within the carefully prescribed channels of power, is moribund, if not dead. We are witnessing its death-agonies, for when this bill becomes a law, if unhappily it becomes a law, there is no longer any workable Constitution to keep the Congress within the limits of its Constitutional powers."

What bill is Congressman Beck talking about? In 1933, "the House passed the Farm Bill by a vote of more than three to one." Again, we see the doctrine of emergency. Once an emergency is declared, there is no Constitution.

http://52.thelastoutpost.com/video-5/war-powers/dr-gene-schroeder-war-powers-act.html
"Liberty has never come from government.  Liberty has always come from the subjects of government. The history of liberty is a history  of resistance. The history of liberty is a history of limitations of government power, not the increase of it." http://sedm.org/

Offline lord edward coke

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Re: Declaration of Independence & US Constitution
« Reply #35 on: August 24, 2009, 10:53:56 am »


              George Bancroft knew the intent of the framers, expounders, and executors of the United States Constitution better, perhaps, than any of his contemporaries. Born in 1800, he had personally talked with James Madison, John Adams, and LaFayette; had known Andrew Jackson, and Polk, and every president since Monroe.

Too, he was well qualified to discuss our Constitution as it applied to foreign nations, having been Secretary of the Navy and founder of the Naval Academy at Annapolis, Ambassador to The Court of St James's and Minister to Germany (Bancroft knew Lord Byron, Baron Rothschild, von Bismarck, and Goethe; Percy Bysshe Shelley dashed off flattering verse in his honor).

No American is a finer historian than Bancroft: although rarely seen in our educational system today, his life's work, the ten-volume HISTORY OF THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA FROM THE DISCOVERY OF THE CONTINENT, is still the most accurate of our national chronicles.

George Bancroft was 84 years old when the supreme Court, without having listened to any public argument on a case both sides of which were presented by one man, issued its opinion in Juilliard vs Greenman, saying:


"The power to make the notes of the government a legal tender in payment of private debts being one of the powers belonging to sovereignty in other civilized nations, and not expressly withheld from congress by the constitution; we are irresistibly impelled to the conclusion that the impressing upon the treasury notes of the United States the quality of being a legal tender in payment of private debts is an appropriate means, conducive and plainly adapted to the execution of the undoubted powers of congress."
Bancroft was shocked at what he called this "language of revolution." These men were not "expounding a Constitution," as Chief justice Marshall had described the Court's duty, they were legislating powers the Constitution was intended to prohibit! Greatly alarmed, Bancroft chose to dedicate his remaining years (he died at 91) to advising the Court and the world of its monumental error. Painstakingly, he assembled "facts which are beyond the reach of change," called upon "clouds of witnesses" to whom the Court "must feel willing to pay respect, if not deference," and put them all into a last great memorandum of law entitled A PLEA FOR THE CONSTITUTION, published by Harpers in 1886.

The only private citizen to have been accorded full floor privileges by the United States Senate by virtue of his name and not his office predicted that the Juilliard opinion, "if accepted as law," would be the end of both the Constitution and of "the honor and hope of republicanism throughout the world." His predictions have come true in the most horrifying ways. It is a fact that Juilliard provided the raw legal materials for a series of financial panics calculated to result in the establishment of the Federal Reserve System, whose owners are unknown and probably un-American; and that the Federal Reserve used legal tender promissory notes to attract the people's saved gold and silver which funded the machinery making possible the wholesale slaughter of the Bolshevik Revolution, World Wars I and II, Korea, Cuba, Viet Nam, and countless other genocidal adventures past and yet to come.

Bancroft's PLEA was treated by his publisher like an ugly duckling. It flopped. As one of his biographers politely wrote: "His protest attracted little serious attention."

We can speculate why.

While the Constitution declares nothing but gold and silver can be money, "legal tender" laws, such as the one found constitutional by the Juilliard Court, declare words and numbers on paper to be money, too. These laws enable the writers of these words and numbers to pay debts with their paper. Since this means that anyone permitted to write the words and numbers can acquire someone else's hard-won property with the mere stroke of a pen, comparisons of paper money to euphoric drugs are not exaggerations.

Overnight, a nobility arises, consisting of those privileged to write the words and numbers first-the bankers. The bankers in turn lavish unquestioned credit upon certain persons without whose help the whole nobility would collapse: the "opinion-makers," among whom today are the prominent newspapers, magazines, publishing houses, fictionists, columnists, broadcasters, politicians, entertainers, executives, merchants, religious figures, labor leaders, taste makers, lawyers, educators economists, industrialists and their advertising agents, and supreme Court justices (just to name a few) who make paper money seem desirable while blaming paper money's tragic side effects on other phenomena entirely. Maintaining what Bancroft termed the people's "honest illusions" about paper money and the law, the opinion makers keep us ignorant of the hard facts, and for this service they enjoy a comfortable line of paper money credit down at the bank even in hard times.

But the money high isn't limited to the privileged. Indeed, the under-privileged and middle class feel rich and commanding, too, when bank credit enables them to write words and numbers for goods that yesterday were only wished for. Embracing the "honest illusion" that little labor justly brings big reward, they do not see the dangers in collateralizing their borrowed words and numbers with real property until the day comes when the rising sea of bankers' generosity has so heightened prices that to repay the loan is now impossible. Thus begins the crunch.

The unprincipled victim of legal tender turns to crime in order to keep what he feels is his; the honorable victim, suffering immense emotional and physical pressure, humbly surrenders to the law of foreclosure. And the opinion makers, rather than holding up paper money as the cause of the honorable man's misery, point to Crime as a Growing Problem, calling for More Police and Larger Prisons.

The probable reason Bancroft's PLEA FOR THE CONSTITUTION went unheeded in its day is that it fell not so much on deaf ears as on drugged minds, minds hallucinating on generous doses of legal tender.

The errors in Juilliard, regardless of how little "serious attention" they drew, are still proved errors, flagrant errors guarded now by a new generation of opinion makers whose personal investment portfolios will surely reveal, as of old, that they are blessed with credit privileges from the money source. Our files bulge with letters from official attorneys and recent court opinions insisting that it is "well settled" that Congress has power to impress legal tender qualities on paper.

But the incontrovertible evidence in Bancroft's little book exposes a deliberate criminal trespass on our rights that spoils all aspects of human relationships down to this day, and soon not even the most compelling illusions of the opinion makers will have power to convince the people otherwise.

Juilliard is founded on fictions, fictions are unreal, and to nature, unreal substances are poisons to be systemically rejected if the organism is to live. It's not surprising, then, that a massive natural movement to purify our poisoned sense of the value of things has begun, so that our great societal organism can stay alive.

The pages of THE MAIN STREET JOURNAL document mounting numbers of the victims of paper money in all 50 states who are demanding that their state governments show authority for paying debts (and requiring payments of assessed taxes) in paper money when the Constitution mandates that "no State shall make any Thing but gold and silver Coin a tender in Payment of Debts."

A Federal Grand Jury in Salt Lake City in 1982 twice indicted the Federal Reserve system, but the opinion making beneficiaries of paper money-the United States Attorney and the District Judge quashed the indictment and covered over the whole experience with denials and "honest illusion."

Embattled farmers, businessmen, and laborers, discovering that their sinking fortunes are the fault not of themselves but of the legal-tender con, are beginning to sue banks for fraud, usury (any interest charged on money created out of nothing is pure usury), and breach of contract. Predictably, these perfectly real events are treated by the opinion-makers as though they're not happening.

Meanwhile, the violence in our entertainment escalates with the rising tide of blood in our homes and streets, and community leaders call for more police, more controls, more money. Workers cast into unemployment lines by a swerving standard of monetary value which a misinformed tribunal made "constitutional" a century ago, pray for another war to make them busy again, even if it means risking a son or a daughter, and ...

Because George Bancroft believed that all difficulties in the Union could be resolved by love, the great historian prayed that the supreme Court would read his PLEA and reverse itself. He also urged the people to take the knowledge contained in A PLEA FOR THE CONSTITUTION and ransom their minds from error, discern the truth, and not accept the Court's opinion as law.

A hundred years and a trillion broken dreams later, the people are just weary enough to listen to him.

-Frederick Tupper Saussy 1982 

http://www.geocities.com/Heartland/7006/plea.html
"Liberty has never come from government.  Liberty has always come from the subjects of government. The history of liberty is a history  of resistance. The history of liberty is a history of limitations of government power, not the increase of it." http://sedm.org/

Offline phosphene

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Re: US Constitution
« Reply #36 on: September 17, 2009, 06:17:37 am »
Preamble

We the People of the United States, in order to form a more perfect union, establish justice, insure domestic tranquility, provide for the common defence, promote the general welfare, and secure the blessing of liberty to ourselves and our posterity, do ordain and establish the Constitution of the United States of America.

Actually, I think it's....

We the People of the United States......establish the Constitution FOR the United States of America.

and Posterity should be capitalized.
"A strange game. The only winning move is not to play."--Joshua

Offline lord edward coke

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Re: US Constitution
« Reply #37 on: November 18, 2009, 10:16:11 am »
Actually, I think it's....

We the People of the United States......establish the Constitution FOR the United States of America.

and Posterity should be capitalized.
Two hundred and thirty-three years ago, in Philadelphia, a bunch of guys got together and wrote a letter to their king. The letter was very eloquent, and well thought out, but it basically boiled down to this:

"Dear King George,

You're not the boss of us!

Sincerely,

A Bunch of Troublemakers"


That's essentially what the Declaration of Independence was: abunch of radicals declaring that they would no longer recognize the right of their king to rule them, at all, ever again. They went on to create a new boss, which turned into a new oppressor, but we'll get to that in a moment. First, let's consider the essence of that attitude: "You're not the boss of me!"

This July 4th, like every year, millions of Americans are celebrating Independence Day with various parades, picnics, fireworks, and so on. But how many of those people celebrating have ever actually considered what the Declaration was actually about, and what the colonists actually did? The colonists did not merely beg the king to change his ways. In fact, the Declaration explains how they had tried that, to no avail. Instead, the colonists were doing something far more drastic.

In short, they committed treason. They broke the law. They disobeyed their government. They were traitors, criminals and tax cheats. The Boston Tea Party was not merely a tax protest, but open lawlessness. Furthermore, truth be told, some of the colonists were even cop-killers. At Lexington, when King George's "law enforcers" told the colonists to lay down their guns, the colonists responded with, "No, you're not the boss of us!" (Well, that was the meaning, if not the exact verbiage.) And so we had "The Shot Heard 'Round the World," widely regarded as the beginning of the American Revolution.

Looking back now, we know the outcome. We know who eventually won, and we don't mind cheering for the rebels. But make no mistake: when you cheer for the founders of this country, you are cheering for law-breakers and traitors. As well you should. But, for all the flag-waving and celebrating that goes on every July 4th, do Americans actually believe in what the colonists did? Do they really believe in the attitude expressed in the Declaration of Independence? Are they really still capable of supporting a mantra of "You're not the boss of me!"?

In, short, no. Imagine the equivalent of what the colonists did so many years ago, being done today. Imagine a group of people writing a letter to the United States government, sending a letter to Congress and to the President, saying that they would no longer pay federal taxes, they would no longer obey federal laws, and that they would resist--by force, if necessary--any attempt by federal agents to enforce those laws. How would a group which did such things be viewed today, by most Americans?

They would be viewed as nut-cases, scofflaws and terrorists, despicable criminals and malcontents. They would be scorned as the scum of the earth, despised by just about everyone who today celebrates Independence Day.

How ironic.

So why the double standard? Why would the American public today condemn the exact same attitudes and behaviors which they glorify and praise in the context of the American Revolution? Quite simply, it's because, for all the proud talk of "land of the free and home of the brave," the spirit of resistance--the courage to say "You're not the boss of us!"--has been trained out of the American people.

We have become a nation of wimps.

For years and years, in the churches and schools, on the news, in the media, and from everywhere around us, we have been taught one thing above all else: that obedience to authority is the highest virtue, and that disobedience is the worst sin. As a result, even most of those who now claim to be zealous advocates for individual rights and personal liberty will almost always couch their "demands" with disclaimers that, of course, their efforts for justice will be done "within the system," and that they would never advocate anything "illegal." They claim to be devout proponents of freedom, and yet all they ever do is seek a political solution, whether through lobbying of politicians, elections, or other government-approved means.

Of course, government never approves of anything which might actually endanger government power. As the bumper-sticker says, "If voting made a difference, it would be illegal." And why should civilized people assume that change must be done "legally" and "within the system"? That is obviously NOT what the Declaration of Independence was about. In fact, the Declaration states quite plainly that when a government ceases to be a protector of individual liberty, it is not only the right, but the DUTY of the people to ALTER or ABOLISH that form of government. In other words, when the government becomes an oppressor, instead of a protector-- as is obviously the case today--the people are morally obligated to adopt an attitude of, "You're not the boss of us!"

So how many Americans are doing that? Almost none. Instead, even the most vocal critics of corruption and injustice usually do little more than banging their heads against a brick wall, begging, in half a dozen different ways, for the tyrants to please be nicer to us. (Meanwhile, they go to great lengths to distance themselves from people like me, for fear of what the general public might think of them. As a result, I believe the general public, and those in government, view them pretty much as I view them: as harmless and irrelevant conformists, destined to forever beg for freedom, and never achieve it.)

Make no mistake, begging and whining is not what the Declaration of Independence was about. It was about breaking the law, when the law is unjust. It was about committing treason, when the rulers became oppressive. It was about disobedience--civil disobedience, when effective, and not-so-civil disobedience when necessary. It was about open resistance, including violent resistance when called for.

So where is that attitude today? Where is the candidate advocating such a thing? Patrick Henry, Thomas Paine, Samuel Adams--where are the modern equivalents? For all the whining about extremists, where are those willing to openly resist injustice? Not only don't most Americans believe in resisting tyranny, they feel extremely uncomfortable just hearing others talk about it, even in abstract terms (like this).

Maybe it's just that we're not quite at the level of oppression to justify resistance. Is that it? Hardly.. If two or three percent taxation justified rebellion in 1776, why doesn't fifty percent taxation justify it now? If a few puny excise taxes on tea and pieces of paper justified it then, why don't the myriad of unavoidable, crushing taxes at all levels, and the hordes of callous, vindictive tax collectors justify it now? If the relatively unusual cases of Redcoats abusing colonists justified it then, why doesn't it justify it when American police see no problem with randomly stopping, detaining, interrogating and searching anyone they want, whenever they want, for any reason or no reason at all?

Does anyone think Thomas Jefferson, if he were alive today, would quietly allow himself to be strip-searched, and allow his belongings to be rummaged through, by some brain-dead TSA thug? Read the Fourth Amendment. They had a revolution over that sort of thing. Does anyone think that Patrick Henry would take kindly to being robbed blind to pay for whatever war-mongering the politicians wanted to engage in this week? Read what the Founders said about standing armies. They had a revolution over that sort of thing. Think James Madison would go along with being disarmed, by the various state and federal control freaks? Read the Second Amendment. They had a revolution over that sort of thing. Think George Washington would be happy to have both his earnings and savings constantly looted by a parasite class, to pay for all manner of wealth redistribution, political handouts and other socialist garbage? Think Thomas Paine would gladly be extorted to give all his money to some giant, failed corporation or some huge international bank? Think the founders would have quietly gone along with what this country has become today? Think they would have done nothing more than vote, or whine? Well, the founders are dead. And, unfortunately, so is their spirit of resistance. In short, just about all of the flag-waving and celebrating that happens every July 4th is nothing but empty hypocrisy. How many Americans today can say, loudly and proudly, like they mean it, "Give me liberty or give me death!"? Or, at least, in the modern vernacular, "You're not the boss of me!"? Anyone? In this nation that imagines itself to be the land of the free and the home of the brave, where are those who dare to resist, or even dare to talk about it? And I don't mean voting, or whining to your congressman, or begging your masters to not whip you so hard. I'm talking about resisting, refusing to obey.

America, where is your Independence Day pride now? Exactly what are you proud of? I have a message for you, from a guy named Sam. Samuel Adams, that is. Yeah, the beer guy. But he did a little more for this country than make beer. Here is his message:

"If ye love wealth better than liberty, the tranquility of servitude better than the animating contest of freedom, go home from us in peace. We ask not your counsels or arms. Crouch down and lick the hands which feed you. May your chains set lightly upon you, and may posterity forget that ye were our countrymen."

When's the last time you heard a modern so-called "statesman" say something like that?

So what happened? When did Americans lose their ability to say, "You're not the boss of me," and why? Yes, most people are scared, and for good reason. With the capacity for violence of the current police state, and the willingness of the politicians and their thugs to crush anyone who threatens their power, everyone has to choose his battles carefully, and decide for himself what he's willing to risk, what is worth fighting for and what isn't. That makes sense, but there is more to it than just fear. Because not only won't most Americans resist, but they will condemn anyone who does. If you do what the founders did, most people in this country would call you a tax cheat, a malcontent, a criminal, a traitor, even a terrorist. Why? Why do Americans now vehemently condemn those who say and do exactly what the Founders did a couple hundred years ago? When did our priorities and view of the world change so drastically, and why?

I'll tell you why. Gradually, and very systematically, we have been trained to measure our own worth, not by what we produce, not by how we treat other people, but by how well we obey authority. Consider the term, "law abiding taxpayer." How many people wear that label as a badge of honor? "I am a law-abiding taxpayer!" When they say that, they mean, "I'm a good person." But is that what it really means?

Well, "law-abiding" just means that you do whatever the politicians tell you to do. We speak with great reverence of this thing called "the law," as if it is the decree of the gods, which no decent human being would dare to disobey. But what is it really? It's whatever the politicians decide to command you to do. Why on earth would anyone think that obedience to a bunch of liars and crooks is some profound moral obligation? Is there any reason for us to treat with reverence such commands and demands? No rational reason, no. The only reason we do it is because we have been trained to do it. Some might point out that obeying the laws against theft and murder is a good thing to do. Well, yes and no. It is good to refrain from committing theft and murder, but it is NOT because "the law" says so. It is because theft and murder are inherently wrong, as they infringe upon the rights of others. And that was true before any politician passed a "law" about it, and will be true even if they "legalize" theft and murder (as every government has done, in the name of "taxation" and "war"). What is right and wrong does not at all depend upon what is "legal" or "illegal." And if you need POLITICIANS to tell you what is right and what is wrong, you need your head examined. Instead, you should judge the validity of so-called "laws" by whether they match what is inherently right and wrong. Thomas Jefferson put it this way:

"Rightful liberty is unobstructed action according to our will within limits drawn around us by the equal rights of others. I do not add 'within the limits of the law,' because the law is often but the tyrant's will, and always so when it violates the rights of the individual."

So why should anyone be proud of being "law-abiding," when all it means is blindly obeying whatever arbitrary commands the parasite class spews out this week? And pride in being a "taxpayer" is no better, since all that phrase means is that you give the politicians lots of money. When, exactly, did obeying politicians and giving them money become the measure of whether you're a good person?

Consider Nazi Germany. Were the law-abiding taxpayers in Nazi Germany the good guys? No. By obeying the so-called "laws" of that time, the majority allowed, or even assisted in, a nearly incomprehensible level of evil. And by being "taxpayers," they provided the funding for it. No, the good people in Germany were the criminals and tax cheats, who refused to assist, even passively, in the oppressions done in the name of "government."

The same is true under the regimes of Stalin, Lenin, Mao, Pol Pot, Castro--you can go right down the list (and it's a very long list). Under every nasty regime in history, the obedient subjects, who quietly did as they were told, the law-abiding taxpayers, were not the good guys. The law-breakers and rebels, the so-called traitors and terrorists, those were the good guys. How about in this country, when slavery was legal? The cowards were the ones obeying the law, while the good guys broke it.

How about here, today? Is it good to fund what the government is doing? Do you have some moral obligation to give your "fair share" of however many thousands of dollars, so Obama can give it to his banker buddies? Is it noble to fund whatever war the politicians decide to engage in this week? Do you like paying for the detention and torture of people who haven't been convicted, or even charged with any crime? (By the way, instead of doing away with that, Obama just gave it a new name: preventative detention.) Is it some great virtue to have helped to finance the police state growing up all around you, on both the federal and state levels? In short, is being a "law-abiding taxpayer" really something you should be proud of, or is it something you should be ashamed of?

Over time we have forgotten a very important secret--a secret the control freaks don't want you to know; a secret some of the Founders hinted at, though even most of them didn't seem to fully grasp it. Ready for it?

You own yourself.

You are not the property of the politicians, or anyone else. I own me, and you own you. Each of you owns himself. Sounds simple enough, right? And most people respond with, "Well duh, of course. That's no secret. We knew that." But in reality most people don't know that.

If you own yourself, would anyone have the right to take, without your consent, the fruits of your labor? What you earn, with your time and effort, does anyone have the right to take that from you by force? Of course not, most will answer. Really? And what if they call it "taxation"? "Oh, well, that's different." No, it isn't.

If you own yourself, would anyone have the right to force you to pay rent for a house you already paid for, under threat of taking your house away? Of course not. What if they call it "property taxes"? Oh, that's different. No, it isn't. And you can go right down the list: if you truly own yourself, the vast majority of so- called "laws," at all levels, are absolutely illegitimate. As Jefferson put it, ANY so-called "law" that infringes upon individual liberty--which is dang near all of them--is inherently
bogus.

But let's take it one step further. If you own yourself--your life, liberty and property--doesn't that imply that you have the right to defend those things from any and all aggressors? Yes. What if the aggressors call themselves "government" and call their attacks and robberies "law" and "taxes"? You still have the right. Changing the name of an act cannot make something bad into something good. And if you have the right to defend your life, liberty and property from all aggressors, it stands to reason that you have the right to equip yourself to do so. In other words, you have the right to be armed--the right to possess the equipment to exert whatever force is necessary to repel any attempts to infringe upon your rights to life, liberty and property.

I know it makes people uncomfortable (especially people who work for the government) when I say the following: I want every sane, adult American to have the ability to use force, including deadly force, against government agents. I don't want people randomly gunning down cops, but I do want the people to retain the ability to forcibly resist their own government. The very concept bothers a lot of people, but what is the alternative? The alternative is something a lot scarier: that the people should NOT have the means to resist their own government. But, once again, even most people who claim to be vehemently pro-freedom, don't like to talk about what that really means. Many "gun rights" organizations, for example, go to great lengths to beg the politicians to LET them remain armed. Why? At Lexington, when the British troops told the colonists to lay down their weapons, what was the response? Did the colonists say, "Awe, can't we keep them, pretty please?"? No, they had a very different attitude, something alone the lines of, "You're not the boss of us!"

If you own yourself--and this is a big one--it is not only your right, but your most profound obligation as a human being, to judge for yourself what is right and wrong, and to act accordingly. But what if people claiming to be "authority" want to force you to do something contrary to what you deem to be right? Do you have an obligation to obey them, and ignore your own conscience? No. What if their threats are called "legislation"? It makes no difference.

You are always, at all times, in every situation, obligated to do what you deem right, no matter what so-called "government" and "authority" and "law" have to say about it. And when the tyrants and control freaks, authoritarian thugs and megalomaniacs, try to tell you that are an evil, nasty, despicable criminal and traitor for daring to think for yourself, you have a right and duty to stand firm, and say, with confidence, "You are not the boss of me!"

"Liberty has never come from government.  Liberty has always come from the subjects of government. The history of liberty is a history  of resistance. The history of liberty is a history of limitations of government power, not the increase of it." http://sedm.org/

Offline Dan

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Re: Declaration of Independence & US Constitution
« Reply #38 on: November 18, 2009, 10:46:09 am »
Nice speech Lord, I am going to borrow it if you do not mind.

Dan
My freedom is more important than your good idea.

When only cops have guns, it's called a "police state". - Claire Wolfe

You know why there's a Second Amendment? In case the government fails to follow the first one. -Rush Limbaugh

The militia is the dread of tyrants and the guard of freeme

Offline Cywar

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Re: Declaration of Independence & US Constitution
« Reply #39 on: November 18, 2009, 11:22:20 am »
Lord Edward Coke, that, Sir, is beautiful.
"Condemnation without investigation is the height of ignorance."

—Albert Einstein