Author Topic: Ukraine Tension  (Read 13585 times)

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Offline Dig

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All eyes are opened, or opening, to the rights of man. The general spread of the light of science has already laid open to every view the palpable truth, that the mass of mankind has not been born with saddles on their backs, nor a favored few booted and spurred, ready to ride them legitimately

Offline UpsetBrit

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Re: Ukraine Tension
« Reply #1 on: February 19, 2008, 08:05:35 pm »
Another powderkeg! Maybe they'll 'pass through' on their way to Iran.  ::)
One mind at a time...

Offline Dig

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Re: Ukraine Tension
« Reply #2 on: February 19, 2008, 08:09:38 pm »
Another powderkeg! Maybe they'll 'pass through' on their way to Iran.  ::)

If the following picture does not worry you,

THEN YOU ARE NOT PAYING ATTENTION!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!


All eyes are opened, or opening, to the rights of man. The general spread of the light of science has already laid open to every view the palpable truth, that the mass of mankind has not been born with saddles on their backs, nor a favored few booted and spurred, ready to ride them legitimately

Offline MikiQuick123

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Re: Ukraine Tension
« Reply #3 on: February 19, 2008, 08:12:00 pm »
When was this meeting?
"All that is necessary for the triumph of evil is for good men to do nothing"-Edmund Burke

Offline Dig

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Re: Ukraine Tension
« Reply #4 on: February 19, 2008, 08:19:24 pm »
He reminds me of this movie which I did not think much of until I saw that the same plot is used in more movies now (smoking aces and Bond movie).  Does anyone think this technique is not available for the criminal elite?  John Woo would be the right one to expose it in cinema.

I mean look at that mug.


All eyes are opened, or opening, to the rights of man. The general spread of the light of science has already laid open to every view the palpable truth, that the mass of mankind has not been born with saddles on their backs, nor a favored few booted and spurred, ready to ride them legitimately

Offline Dig

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Re: Ukraine Tension
« Reply #5 on: February 19, 2008, 08:19:39 pm »
All eyes are opened, or opening, to the rights of man. The general spread of the light of science has already laid open to every view the palpable truth, that the mass of mankind has not been born with saddles on their backs, nor a favored few booted and spurred, ready to ride them legitimately

Offline Dig

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Re: Ukraine Tension
« Reply #6 on: February 19, 2008, 08:22:04 pm »
Here is the latest news:

Ukraine Digs Into EU Trade Talks


Tuesday, February 19, 2008
http://blog.kievukraine.info/

KIEV, Ukraine -- Ukraine kicked off trade talks with the European Union on Monday, a step likely to further alienate Russia, which has been fiercely resistant to the pro-Western policies adopted by governments in Kiev and Tbilisi.

President Viktor Yushchenko in a meeting of EU-Black Sea region countries Foreign Ministers.

President Viktor Yushchenko, who is locked in a tense power-sharing coalition with Prime Minister Yulia Tymoshenko, said the trade talks with Europe were a priority for the country.

"In September we may be able to sign this agreement and create an economic integration of Ukraine with the EU," he told a Kiev investment conference organized by Renaissance Capital. "This is part of the process of integrating with global economies."

While Yushchenko emphasized the importance of greater integration with the EU and other leading global economic players, he made no reference to Russia in his speech, an indicator of the cool relations between the two countries.

Yushchenko last week struck a deal in Moscow, where he agreed to pay off the country's gas debt to Russia, while allowing Gazprom to double its market share in Ukrainian gas distribution to 50 percent.

Gazprom had earlier threatened to reduce gas supplies to Ukraine, an important consumer of and transit point for Russian gas, if the government did not pay its bill.

In return, Ukraine secured Moscow's approval for the eventual removal of controversial gas trader RosUkrEnergo, a 50-50 joint venture between Gazprom and two Ukrainian businessmen, which acts as an intermediary for handling sales between Russia and Ukraine.

Yushchenko's deal with the Kremlin came ahead of a two-day visit to Moscow by Tymoshenko that starts Thursday.

Yushchenko's emphasis on bolstering trade relations with the West is unlikely to be welcomed in the Kremlin, which has reacted strongly to his stated wish to take Ukraine into NATO. President Vladimir Putin last week threatened to point nuclear missiles at Ukraine if NATO's missile-defense units were placed on its territory.

Speaking at Monday's conference, former British Prime Minister John Major acknowledged the growing importance of the European Union over Russiaas a trade partner to Ukraine.

"Ukraine will always have a political and commercial relationship with Russia, which will be important, but Ukraine can now look toward the gravitational pull of the West," he said, noting that an agreement with the EU would open up "large and important new markets."

"Permanent membership may lie ahead," Major added.

Shortly after he was swept to power in Ukraine's Orange Revolution in late 2004, Yushchenko identified a deepening of relations with the West as a priority direction for the government. Earlier this month, Ukraine obtained approval to join the World Trade Organization. Membership in the body could add as much as 1 percent to Ukraine's GDP, Yushchenko said at the signing ceremony in Geneva earlier this month.

Russia, which has been seeking to join the WTO for the past 15 years, hopes to complete talks on accession this year.

But ahead of holding talks in Kiev on Monday, EU Trade Commissioner Peter Mandelson said there was a tough road ahead.

"If it was as easy as turning on a light or turning on a switch then we could do it much more quickly, but then also the consequences and benefits would be far fewer," Mandelson said, Reuters reported. "If we want to make this as deep and comprehensive a trade agreement as both sides do, it will take time. It will take some tough negotiations, but I can promise you, it will not take a day longer than it needs to."

Some Ukrainian officials have said the trade talks could take up to five years.

Sergei Ivashnovsky, associate director at Moscow-based Prosperity Capital Management, said Ukraine should not rush into an agreement with the EU.

"Ukraine's integration with the EU will bring a lot of benefits but will also give access to its own consumer market, and the quality of [products] made in Ukraine is not as high, and [their] competitiveness doubtful," he said on the sidelines of the conference.

Moscow has fought efforts by former Soviet satellites to forge closer ties with Europe. Relations between Russia and the pro-Western government in Georgia are particularly frosty, and flights between Moscow and Tbilisi are still banned, as is the import of Georgian wine.

Yushchenko on Monday also promised a serious effort on the reform front, most notably in the areas of taxation and the stock market, key to promoting investment in the country. But some investors expressed doubt that Yushchenko could push through the reforms, given his public disagreements with Tymoshenko.

That view was reinforced by Ukrainian officials.

"We have imperfect legislation, and we are in permanent political conflict," said Anatoly Balyuk, head of the government's financial markets watchdog. "The infrastructure of the market is not perfect, and that's why transaction costs are higher."

But some investors insisted that the government would have no alternative but to cooperate if it is to attract greater foreign investment into the country.

"Yushchenko is not going to kick Tymoshenko out," said one Moscow-based investor. "They have to work together."

"It's definitely important that all branches of the government are in unison," said Alexander Pertsovsky, chief executive of Renaissance Capital. "There are quite a few problems to tackle, and it is obviously an issue."

He denied, though, that the difficulties among the differing parties in the government would derail the reform effort.

"There is an understanding among them," he said. "[But] it's difficult to expect that all [the reforms] will happen."

Ukraine reported impressive economic growth last year of 7.3 percent, but the country is also battling inflation, which at 16.6 percent in 2007 threatens to outpace income growth.

There are still powerful barriers to investment in the country, particularly in terms of public governance, and the country's stock market is highly illiquid.

But in an effort to stress Ukraine's emerging importance as a transparent partner, Yushchenko said privatizations slated for 2008 would be "fair."

"I guarantee that none of the assets offered for privatization is earmarked for a certain buyer," he said.

Source: The Moscow Times

posted by Nicholas @ 10:13 PM
All eyes are opened, or opening, to the rights of man. The general spread of the light of science has already laid open to every view the palpable truth, that the mass of mankind has not been born with saddles on their backs, nor a favored few booted and spurred, ready to ride them legitimately

Offline MikiQuick123

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Re: Ukraine Tension
« Reply #7 on: February 19, 2008, 08:25:43 pm »
The photo is disconcerting on many levels.
"All that is necessary for the triumph of evil is for good men to do nothing"-Edmund Burke

Offline Caasi

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Re: Ukraine Tension
« Reply #8 on: February 19, 2008, 08:27:49 pm »
You'll have to forgive my short time being awake to the movement.. who are those two guys and what's the problem?
"All the black is really white, if you believe it."

Offline Dig

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Re: Ukraine Tension
« Reply #9 on: February 19, 2008, 08:37:36 pm »
Ukraine President To Sign Off On Stock Exchange Development Plan

KIEV, Ukraine -- Ukraine President Viktor Yushchenko Monday said he will soon sign a decree providing incentives for faster development of the country's stock market.

The document will standardize practices and decrease investment risk, Yushchenko said at an investment conference organized by Renaissance Capital. "We understand that the stock market has to be improved," he said. "The scope of the market is still, unfortunately, not that great," noting that its total free float stands at around $5 billion. The Ukrainian equity market more than doubled in value in 2007, posting the second-fastest global growth rate after China. But volumes remain low as political turmoil inside the country as well as troubles on international markets keep investors at bay.
Source: NASDAQ posted by Nicholas @ 1:33 PM



EU, Ukraine In Free-Trade Talks

KIEV, Ukraine -- The European Union and Ukraine started talks over setting up a free trade area, a move that would push the former Soviet state closer to Europe.

EU Trade Commissioner Peter Mandelson "Today we officially started this marathon," President Viktor Yushchenko said in Kiev after meeting EU Trade Commissioner Peter Mandelson. "I hope it will not take us a long time and we will sign the free trade agreement in 10 to 11 months." Mr Yushchenko took office in the 2004 Orange Revolution on promises to move his country closer to the EU. Ukraine, a country of 46 million people, expects a free-trade deal with the EU to help sustain economic growth by expanding foreign trade. "This process is not just about economic opportunities," Mr Mandelson, who also met Prime Minister Yulia Timoshenko, said in an e-mailed statement. "It is a marker, a big step toward a closer partnership for the EU and Ukraine." The EU-Ukraine trade relationship was worth 26.6 billion euros ($39.2 billion) in 2006, according to the European Commission, the bloc's executive body. The EU replaced Russia as Ukraine's main trade commercial partner in 2006 and now accounts for about a third of its external trade.
Source: Bloomberg posted by Nicholas @ 8:54 AM



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Monday, February 18, 2008
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Ukraine, China, To Set Up Aerospace Design Centre

KIEV, Ukraine -- The Ukrainian aerospace manufacturer Antonov and the Chinese Aviation Industry Corporation are in the final stages of setting up a joint aircraft design bureau, the Interfax news agency reported on Monday.

Antonov An-225 Mriya cargo plane

The aviation-engineering centre will be located in Beijing, China. Once operational it will become Antonov's third major international cooperation programme, along with Russia and Iran. Antonov is a world leader in heavy cargo aircraft design and manufacture. The firm also produces medium and light aircraft, and during the Soviet era built the world's current largest cargo plane the An-225 Mriya. The branch of the Chinese Aviation Industry Corporation participating in the project, generally known as AVIC-II, produces the small passenger airliner Harbin Y-12, medium-range transport aircraft, and helicopters. The Chinese-Ukrainian centre's first priority will be continuing a modernization programme for China's 4-engine turboprop Y8F400, a licensed version of the venerable An-12 first produced by Antonov for the Soviet Union in the late 1950s, company spokesman said.
Source: The Earth Times posted by Nicholas @ 10:30 PM



Even Premiers Can Be Heroes

KIEV, Ukraine -- Even premiers can be heroes. Viktor Yushchenko, while heading the government, managed to clear pension arrears and stop mass blackouts. His deeds were not forgotten, and when he was running for president in 2004, he made the most of them.

PM Yulia Tymoshenko

During the same race, Viktor Yanukovych, the then prime minister, managed to raise pensions. That noble deed did not help him win, though. Almost all candidates in almost all races had promised the voters to reimburse them for their lost deposits [with the USSR Savings Bank], but none of them had said exactly when or how. When Yulia Tymoshenko promised to pay off the savings within two years and began to do so, she gave the political elite and ordinary citizens a hard time. Politicians racked their brains puzzling over the new electoral perspective, and ordinary people had a trying experience retrieving their money. Will this reimbursement make Tymoshenko a hero? Will it contribute to her political record and add votes in the presidential race? Will it trigger a new spiral of inflation?

Is Tymoshenko a Hero?
When Viktor Yanukovych headed the government, he said that in 2008 Ukraine would start moving toward NATO membership and that Ukrainians would start retrieving their lost bank deposits. It was supposed to take two years to draw up the register of depositors. When Tymoshenko said in August that the payoff would begin as soon as her government took office, her words were taken with a good deal of skepticism. All the previous governments had tried to solve the problem of lost savings, allocating each year an average of UAH 500M [$1 = UAH 5.05] for reimbursements. The Yanukovych government planned to spend UAH 650M in 2008. At such a pace it would take 260 years to pay off all reimbursable deposits, which totaled UAH 132 billion.

One of Tymoshenko’s indisputable merits is her ability to set new rules and get bureaucratic authorities to play by them. While the country was on the two-week New Year and Christmas holidays, her government managed to start the promised payout, accompanied by a clever information campaign. According to the Razumkov Center of Economic and Political Studies, 97 percent of Ukrainians know about the payout. 4,683,000 citizens already have their deposits reregistered and 2,206,000 already have their reimbursements back. The Yulia Tymoshenko Bloc collected more than seven million votes in the preterm parliamentary election [on September 30] largely thanks to the clever choice of the electoral target: she knew that 24 million Ukrainians had savings bank books. 57.2 percent of respondents polled by the Razumkov center (21 million people) said they had deposits with the USSR Savings Bank. Most of them belong to the senior age category (80% over 56 years; 64% between 36 and 55; 27% between 18 and 35). Tilling this vast electoral field, Tymoshenko can even win over a substantial number of elderly voters who have supported her opponent Yanukovych. Using her “point method,” she can certainly count on those 13.4 percent of respondents entitled to reimbursement who claim up to UAH 1,000. Her prime target, however, is 71 percent of depositors whose savings did not exceed 10,000 rubles [now equal to UAH 1,000]. Most of them would rather get one thousand instead of nothing or a meager UAH 50.

The opposition tried to organize a counter-campaign. It accused the Tymoshenko government of provoking inflation with “such bare populism” and gloated over long lines at Oshchadbank offices. It did not help much, though. In a fit of criticism the Regions Party went as far as to explain why this money should not be paid off. But the people did want their money back. President Yushchenko was skeptical at first about Tymoshenko’s pre-election promise. At the same time, he and his advisers understood how many political points she would score if she kept it. Soon Yushchenko decided that if he was unable to stop the process he should lead it. He changed his tactics and insistently advised the government to make the reimbursement process orderly and “take all possible measures to prevent an upsurge of inflation.” The opposition was sorry for millions of old people freezing in long lines at bank offices and demanded to improve the payout procedure. But even magic could not stop the people who rushed to get back their long-awaited money. Now, one month after the payout began, Tymoshenko enjoys electoral support of a relative majority. 46 percent of Ukrainians believe that it is right to mete out one thousand per person since the country cannot afford more. This opinion is shared by 54 percent of respondents in the west of the country and 34.5 percent in the east. Notably, even 39 percent of Yanukovych’s supporters are grateful to Tymoshenko for paying off at least UAH 1,000. This opinion is shared by 60 percent of those who support the Tymoshenko Bloc and 50 percent of those who support the pro-presidential Our Ukraine – People’s Self-Defense. 27 percent want the whole sum right away. 11 percent are more modest: seven percent are positive that the payout should be “not so fast and in smaller sums” and almost four percent believe that those deposits “should not be reimbursed at all.”

The latter, who must have kept nothing in the USSR Savings Bank, may be right in their own way, because the source of these reimbursements is the taxes of those who are working today. Amidst the disputes about this UAH 1,000 an important question remains in the background: will Tymoshenko be able to pay the whole sum – UAH 132 billion – in full? Will the 23 remaining months be enough? So far, the people answer this question with reserved optimism, preferring one bird in the hand to two in the bush. Every third respondent believes that Tymoshenko will fulfill her promise and pay off all savings. Every fourth is sure of the opposite, 16.7 percent believe that she will fail because of “spokes in her wheels,” and every fifth gave no definite answer. There is another open question: will all those 24 million depositors get their money this year? Drawing up the 2008 national budget, the government allocated UAH 6 billion for this payout while at least 21 billion is needed. It counts on proceeds from privatization, but that source has never been predictable. Besides, in some regions Oshchadbank offices are already short of cash. In Mykolayiv [a big south-Ukrainian seaport and shipbuilding center] the depositors are asked to wait for their money till October. So far, the general public opinion is on Tymoshenko’s side, but she failed to keep her pre-election promise to start shifting from conscription to contract military service on January 1. Besides, any irregularities or delays in the payout process are sure to turn the tide.

Presidential Race: Crouch Start
Returns of the poll show that since the government began to reimburse Ukrainians for their devalued deposits their attitude to Tymoshenko has changed (35 percent – for the positive, 6 percent – for the negative). Moreover, the attitude toward her has changed for the better even in the east and south of the country (19% and 33% respectively). Notably, almost 18 percent of supporters of the Regions Party led by Yanukovych did not hesitate to state their better attitude toward Tymoshenko. It may become far better if her government manages to keep another promise – to raise the coalminers’ wages and social security standards. Obviously, Tymoshenko is gaining over supporters of both allies (Our Ukraine – People’s Self-Defense) and opponents (Regions Party). 40 percent of pensioners whose attitude toward her has changed for the better are sure to add to the army of her devoted voters. Although 40 percent of respondents believe that the reimbursement campaign is a self-promotion move, 47 percent acknowledge that it is a very rare case of pre-election promises kept by a political leader. Tymoshenko should be glad that this fact is acknowledged by 22.5 percent of Yanukovych’s supporters. 10 percent of respondents are still undecided on that score, and their support is very likely to be decisive in the rivalry among Tymoshenko, Yanukovych, and Yushchenko. If they lean toward Tymoshenko, she will gather the critical mass of electoral support and thus become a politically sustainable leader with high chances of winning the presidential race, no matter whether she cooperates with Yushchenko as the head of government, leads the opposition, or steps aside to gear up for the race.

Tymoshenko is already calculating these three alternatives. According to sources with her headquarters, until recently she has been poised to work as prime minister for as long as possible. She even forbids everyone on her team to criticize Yushchenko in public, leaving this prerogative to herself and her right hand [first vice-premier] Olexandr Turchynov. The model of interactions between the president and the prime minister that was established during Yanukovych’s premiership has not changed: the head of state gives directives and instructions and the ministers must follow them. However, the previous government often ignored Yushchenko’s directives and even stood up in open confrontation. Tymoshenko does not permit herself to behave like that. Even when Yushchenko annulled the Cabinet’s resolution to sack State Property Fund Chairperson Valentyna Semenyuk, the Cabinet responded with a short caustic commentary but refrained from a massive counterattack. Nevertheless, by all appearances, this “peaceful coexistence” between Tymoshenko and Yushchenko cannot last long. Their different views on some issues of principle are increasingly expressed in controversies which are gradually but inevitably growing into conflicts. The latest and most exemplary fact is a checkup of the Cabinet’s activity in the gas sector, and nobody knows how this “gas conflict” will tell on their relations (this phrase doesn’t make sense…maybe “will affect their relations?) in the future.

One thing is for sure: Tymoshenko is set to run for president.
Considering the sliding popularity ratings of the Regions Party and the Our Ukraine – People’s Self-Defense, the Yulia Tymoshenko Bloc remains the only political force potentially interested in another preterm parliamentary election. At present, it is not strong enough (numerically) to form a majority in the parliament, but who knows what may happen in a few months… Tymoshenko started a lossless game and managed to convert payouts into a serious electoral backup. Now she is accumulating financial and organizational resources for the next stage of her political career. Her political game also has certain economic impacts. Representatives of the opposition and a number of experts warned that the massive payouts would inevitably lead to price hikes. 2.9% inflation in January partly proved their pessimistic forecasts. However, in the long run, this reimbursement campaign can hardly accelerate inflation much. Last year’s retail trade turnover totaled UAH 318 billion and this year is it is very likely to grow. A six-billion infusion (which is less than 2 percent of the total) is almost nothing compared to far more influential factors. Firstly, this year the country will have to live with the 16.6% inflation momentum created by the Yanukovych government. Economy is an inertial system, so we are going to feel the pressure from this factor until late summer, at least. Secondly, prices are going to grow mostly in the food market. Most of those who are queuing up for their reimbursements today will hardly put that money in the bank or buy new clothes, home appliances, or cell phones. They will buy essential foods and commodities. It is in this market segment where inflation will be the highest. Thirdly, the continuous talk of price hikes fans inflation expectations in society. This factor is psychological rather than economic, but it is strong all the same. Yulia Tymoshenko looks like a hero. She is gaining popularity with the elderly and the number of her supporters in the east and south of the country is growing. Very soon she may become the nation’s leader whose political weight will not depend on her formal position, a leader ready to set new rules and play by them. The question is whether other players are ready to be pawns in her game.
Source: Zerkalo Nedeli posted by Nicholas @ 6:00 PM



US Senate Urges NATO To Put Ukraine, Georgia, On Track For Alliance Membership

WASHINGTON, DC -- The US Senate urged NATO to put Ukraine and the Republic of Georgia on a track toward membership.

United States Senate

The support for the two countries came in a resolution passed without dissent on Thursday that backed their hopes to join NATO's membership action plan. The program helps countries prepare for eventual membership. The measure is not binding on US policy. NATO may consider Georgia and Ukraine for the membership track at its summit meeting in Bucharest, Romania, in April. It is unclear whether the two countries have the required unanimous support of NATO's 26 member countries. Russia has made clear that it opposes an expansion of NATO to include the two former Soviet republics. Last week Russia threatened to target Ukraine with nuclear missiles if it should join the alliance.
Source: Kyiv Post posted by Nicholas @ 12:52 PM



Ukraine Joins Nordic-Baltic "Friendship Circle" For First Time

BRUSSELS, Belgium -- Ukraine's Foreign Minister Volodymyr Ogryzko joined Nordic and Baltic counterparts in Brussels on Sunday to discuss how Ukraine could move closer to the EU and NATO.

Ukraine Foreign Minister Volodymyr Ohryzko

"This is the first time the ministers of the Nordic and Baltic countries and Poland have given the chance to Ukraine to be part of this new format of negotiations. It's very important because Ukraine is really doing its best to be closer to the EU," Ogryzko said. "This is something we've been planning for quite some time, to strengthen our support for Ukraine's European perspective, and look at the ways in which the Nordic and Baltic countries and Poland can help and assist," Swedish Foreign Minister Carl Bildt said.

On Monday, EU foreign ministers are set to gather in Brussels for a regular monthly meeting. Since the EU expanded to cover much of Central and Eastern Europe in 2004, it has become traditional for the foreign ministers of Sweden, Denmark, Finland, Latvia, Lithuania and Estonia to hold a regional mini-summit before the meeting. Sunday's meeting was the first time that the group - temporarily lacking Finland's minister - expanded to take both Poland and non-EU member Ukraine into the so-called "circle of friendship." "All of our countries are doing quite a lot in terms of bilateral support to Ukrainian aspirations to move closer to the European family. Tonight, we will discuss ways how we can join forces and perhaps develop some regional projects with the same objective," Latvian Foreign Minister Maris Riekstins said. Ukraine is currently working on a free-trade agreement with the EU and hopes for a visa-free agreement in the future, Ogryzko said. And he insisted that 90 per cent of Ukrainian citizens favour EU accession for their country, and that the nation's opposition to possible NATO membership should not be overestimated. "Thirty per cent of Ukrainians are for NATO membership, 30 per cent are against and the rest are in between. If we explain to the population that this would be another chance to make Ukraine more stable, secure and prosperous, in one to two years this percentage would be absolutely in favour of NATO enlargement," he said. Of the countries represented at Sunday's meeting, Poland, Denmark, Latvia, Lithuania and Estonia are both NATO and EU members. Sweden is an EU member but is neutral militarily, and therefore not in NATO. Ukraine's current government hopes to join both organizations.
Source: Trend News posted by Nicholas @ 12:51 AM


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Sunday, February 17, 2008
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Wladimir Klitschko, Sultan Ibragimov Want To Unify Heavyweight Division



WEST PALM BEACH, FL -- Wladimir Klitschko's training camp is buffeted by the plush villas and well-manicured golf courses of the PGA National Golf Resort. Ukraine's Wladimir Klitschko (L) and Sultan Ibragimov will go head-to-head Saturday night at Madison Square Garden. After the golfers finish a round they can bring their cool drinks inside the big white tent next to the registration desk and watch Klitschko, the IBF champion, spar. Thirty miles to the south, in a warehouse next door to an auto repair shop, Sultan Ibragimov sweats at his gym.

With the big overhead doors raised to allow for air flow, the mechanics from next door can watch Ibragimov's workouts - if they can pull their heads from underneath the hoods of the cars long enough. The training facilities aren't the only difference between Klitschko and the WBO champion, although it is their common goal to become the undisputed heavyweight champion of the world that will bring them together at Madison Square Garden on Saturday night on HBO. They are taking the first step by meeting in a title unification bout - perhaps the most significant heavyweight unification match since Evander Holyfield and Lennox Lewis met for the undisputed crown at the Garden in 1999. "I'm a fan of the sport," Klitschko says. "The pride of the heavyweight champion has to come back for the sport to succeed. This is the title. We lost it. Now we have to get it back." Says Ibragimov: "I can't wait for my chance to show everybody I'm the best. This is a very important fight for the unification of the title and for the fans." Klitschko and Ibragimov are sons of the former Soviet Union who come to this fight from different backgrounds and with different philosophical approaches. Klitschko, who wears clothes by Hugo Boss, is urbane. Ibragimov, who still identifies himself with a tribe (Avars), is rural.

Klitschko, 31, was born in Kazakhstan but raised in Kiev, Ukraine. His father was a colonel in the Soviet Air Force; his older brother, Vitali, is a former heavyweight world champion who ran for mayor of Kiev. Klitschko won a gold medal in the 1996 Olympics and has a doctorate in sports science from the University of Kiev. Ibragimov's mother died as she gave birth to him. His father gave him to an aunt to raise when he was 3 and then started another family. His remote village in Dagestan in the mountains of Caucasus had no electric lights until 1978. Children weren't allowed to walk around outside alone at night for fear that they would be attacked by wolves. Ibragimov's brother was killed in a car accident on the eve of his going to the 2000 Olympic Games. The 32-year-old Ibragimov is unfamiliar even to some hardcore boxing fans, while Klitschko is the known quantity in this boxing equation. He once held the same WBO title that Ibragimov now has, losing it on a second-round KO to Corrie Sanders. A year later he was KO'd by Lamon Brewster and his career hit bottom. "He had to get rid of a lot of emotional drama," says Emanuel Steward, Klitschko's trainer. "He had to get over those two losses. He had a couple of shaky fights after that. I think he really grew into his own when he got knocked down three times by Samuel Peter and kept getting back up and won that fight." Klitschko is now regarded as the premier heavyweight in the division. But until recently he didn't even enjoy the sport. "I was afraid of boxing," Klitschko says. "I was scared to death going into the ring. The bright lights, the people. I didn't feel comfortable." Part of his fear came from the fact that he never really had a strategy before stepping into the ring.

"It wasn't until I was 25 years old that I boxed with a plan or a strategy," he says. "Emanuel Steward explained more and more to me about boxing." As Klitschko's boxing IQ has increased, so has his ring dominance. His last four fights since the Peter match have ended in stoppages. He pounded Brewster so severely in the rematch that Brewster quit in his corner in the sixth round. This from a guy who backed into boxing at the age of 14. Klitschko ended up in one of the many Soviet Union sports academies because he was too young to be admitted to medical school. He found the sports academy system to be oppressive, but while some of his friends couldn't handle the physical and mental rigors, Klitschko survived. "You were forced to do things in training that you didn't want to do," he says. "If your mind wasn't clear it would affect your body. A lot of my friends were broken mentally and physically. I was one of those who passed the test. I survived because I was lazy and tricky." Sometimes he would feign sickness to get out of the strident training sessions. But he was a good enough athlete that he was selected for the Russian Olympic team in 1996 and won a gold medal at the Atlanta Games.

Klitschko is a multimillionaire now, thanks to boxing, although he says money is not his sole motivation. He says he wants to use his platform as heavyweight champion for social and economic change around the world. Through UNESCO, he has worked on projects to better the lives of children in Romania, Brazil and Africa. He is currently working with the Laureus Sport For Good Foundation, a global charity that promotes the use of sport as a tool for social change and counts athletes like Michael Jordan and Tiger Woods as benefactors. Klitschko plans to make a donation of at least $250,000 to the foundation and is earmarking a portion for an academy in the Bronx where boxing will be taught Ibragimov is not a wealthy man. He does not have such lofty social goals as Klitschko - he won the title against Shannon Briggs last June and defended it against Evander Holyfield in December, and the championship trappings are new to him. "What he wants now is visibility," says Jeff Mayweather, Ibragimov's trainer. "He fought Holyfield, but that was in Russia and not a lot of people saw that fight. More people will see him in this fight." Growing up in Tlyarata, Dagestan, Ibragimov could only dream of a time when he would have recognition beyond his remote village. He lived 200 miles from the nearest city and the village was accessible only by helicopter or car on a narrow, winding mountain road. Just twice has a helicopter landed in the village - once in 1978 when the president of Georgia visited and the other time was when he was brought back to town after winning the heavyweight title.

As when the president arrived, villagers crowded around Ibragimov's helicopter to see who the dignitary was: A few were disappointed when they discovered it was the kid who used to herd sheep in the nearby mountains. "We would go up into the mountains for two weeks with the sheep and you had to stay for the whole two weeks before someone came to relieve you," Ibragimov says. "The only heat or light we had came from the campfire." Ibragimov, whose Avars tribe were known as marauders, learned the value of staying focused and working hard. Most of the athletes from his village were wrestlers and that is what he wanted to do, too. But when he left his village at 16 and went to Rostov, he discovered that the gyms with the best wrestling coaches had closed. So, he took up boxing. Nikolay Khromov, his amateur coach in Russia, says Ibragimov was initially used only for sparring because he was tough and tenacious in the ring and he threw a lot of punches.  When asked what the southpaw Ibragimov's best trait as a boxer was, Khromov replies, "He is cold-blooded."

"I never thought I was a good boxer," says the 6-2, 220-pound Ibragimov. "I just wanted to stay in shape. But after six months the coach put me in the city championships and I won." Ibragimov won the 1998 Russian Nationals and was on his way to the 2000 Olympic Games. "His oldest brother died in a car crash a month before the Olympics," says Boris Grinberg, Ibragimov's manager. "He didn't even want to go because he was so upset. But his tribe told him that he had to go because it was what his brother wanted him to do." Ibragimov lost in the championship to Cuba's Felix Savon and earned the silver medal. For a year and a half after the Games he didn't know what to do with regard to boxing. "I told him that he needed to become a professional because that is what his style was best suited for," Khromov says. So Ibragimov came to the U.S. and settled in Florida in 2002 to begin his career. His first four fights ended in knockouts. Five years and 16 fights later he was an undefeated heavyweight champion. Now the shepherd boy from Dagestan is facing his first Goliath - the 6-6, 245-pound Klitschko. "I have a secret," Ibragimov says. "I know how to beat him. I know how it is going to go. Three or four weeks ago I played it out in my mind and I know how it will go." In the end, Klitschko, the other champion, will have something to say about that, from a totally different viewpoint
Source: Daily News posted by Nicholas @ 10:04 PM


Russian Missiles Aimed At Ukraine

MOSCOW, Russia -- Russia threatened that, if Ukraine joined NATO, and allowed parts of a U.S. missile defense system to be built in Ukraine, Russia would aim some of its ICBMs at Ukraine.

A Russian SS-27 Topol-M mobile ICBM

The Russians are serious about this. There are numerous reasons why. Many Russians are still upset about how they lost the Cold War, and are no longer a superpower. The current crop of Russian leaders have been playing the nationalism card heavily. This includes making a lot of noise about NATO, and Cold War archenemy the United States, plotting to surround Russia and destroy it. Westerners are perplexed at all this, but the nations of East Europe are not. These nations were tightly controlled by the Soviet Union from 1945 to 1989, and fear that the Russians are really serious about reestablishing that control, in order to provide a "buffer" against another invasion by some West European nation, or the Americans. East European nations want to join NATO in order to obtain more protection from Russia aggression. The Russians dismiss this as nonsense. Russia has been vague about exactly who they are aiming their ICBMs at these days. The U.S. missile defense system is to protect Europe from nuclear missiles launched from the Middle East, most likely Iran (in another 5-10 years.) The Russians believe that this is just a cover story, and that the U.S. has another agenda that is not entirely clear just yet.
Source: Strategic Weapons posted by Nicholas @ 11:57 AM
All eyes are opened, or opening, to the rights of man. The general spread of the light of science has already laid open to every view the palpable truth, that the mass of mankind has not been born with saddles on their backs, nor a favored few booted and spurred, ready to ride them legitimately

Offline Dig

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Re: Ukraine Tension
« Reply #10 on: February 19, 2008, 08:46:25 pm »
You'll have to forgive my short time being awake to the movement.. who are those two guys and what's the problem?

President of Ukraine meeting with Zbigniew Brzezinski (Also Clinton's former Secretary of State Madeline Albright is in the background).


Zbigniew Brzezinski is:
-Father of Mika Brzezinski (co-host of 5 hours of MSNBC morning programs)
-Former National Security Advisor to Carter during which time he created Osama Bin Laden and Islamic Fundamentalism in Afghanistan.
-Co-founder of the Trilateral Commission with David Rockefeller.  The Commission's goal was to trick asians into thinking they were equal to European Aristocracy in the eyes of Bilderberg and NWO.
-The current National Security Advisor to Barack Obama (I guess the "Trilateral Commission for African Americans").


The reason why it is concerning because it shows that our dictator (David Rockefeller) is continuing the US on a suicidal path of pissing off every other powerful entity in the world.  He send in his minions to negotiate deals with Ukraine for the sole purpose of causing tension with Putin.  So the US is going after Iran, Ukraine, Kosovo.

Who do you think the next target is?

Do you think they do not know?
All eyes are opened, or opening, to the rights of man. The general spread of the light of science has already laid open to every view the palpable truth, that the mass of mankind has not been born with saddles on their backs, nor a favored few booted and spurred, ready to ride them legitimately

Offline Caasi

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Re: Ukraine Tension
« Reply #11 on: February 19, 2008, 08:48:23 pm »
President of Ukraine meeting with Zbigniew Brzezinski (Also Clinton's former Secretary of State Madeline Albright is in the background).

Thanks for the short breakdown, I have some research to do!
"All the black is really white, if you believe it."

Offline Al Bundy

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Re: Ukraine Tension
« Reply #12 on: March 05, 2014, 06:40:10 am »
Stevan Seagal has a colf. But he is not sick in the brain:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EAb39HMVAGE#t=132http://

Offline Al Bundy

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Re: Ukraine Tension
« Reply #13 on: April 21, 2014, 04:50:56 pm »
Fascist throw a man from the bridge because he won`t to say "Glory to Ukraine ! " >:(


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-eB-Z-0mxmghttp://

Offline JohnBFTOR

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Re: Ukraine Tension
« Reply #14 on: April 21, 2014, 05:02:33 pm »
Not just in the Ukraine.  I see this in USA
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zRvPoCWElOc
Some say that I've been Delphied I'm not sure what it means.  They say that I'm a victim of some much bigger scheme. Do you believe it?
http://www.iror.org/delphied.asp

Have you been Delphied?

Mass Hopenosis
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Y32uFsgFmeQ

Offline Al Bundy

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Re: Ukraine Tension
« Reply #15 on: May 24, 2014, 12:40:19 pm »
Ukranian army fires warning shots at Russian military helicopters aprocaches from Crimea ( Reuters ).

http://www.haaretz.com/news/world/1.592545http://

Offline Al Bundy

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Re: Ukraine Tension
« Reply #16 on: May 24, 2014, 06:06:05 pm »
US army want to improve moral to Ukraine`s Army against federalist on Doneck-Lugansk county ??


http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2014/04/0 ... 21124.htmlhttp://

Offline Al Bundy

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Re: Ukraine Tension
« Reply #17 on: June 20, 2014, 05:05:02 pm »
President of selfclaimed Lugansk People Republic Bolotov refuse ultimatum of president of Ukraine Poroshenko.

http://en.itar-tass.com/world/737148http://

Offline regmeok

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Re: Ukraine Tension
« Reply #18 on: January 15, 2016, 12:29:41 pm »
https://youtu.be/dufxfFQmMHQ War in Donbass: Circles of hell

Partly translated to English
+ English Subtitles for inteview fragments

Offline regmeok

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Re: Ukraine Tension
« Reply #19 on: March 09, 2016, 06:55:33 am »
https://youtu.be/pPPHOCblBjg
 Russia-Ukraine War – examining evidence of Russian aggression (Episode 2) eng

(i really have troubles finding more fresh topics so had to use 2008 threads :)

Offline regmeok

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Re: Ukraine Tension
« Reply #20 on: March 29, 2016, 09:10:42 am »
tensions are everywhere in ukraine
 http://coub.com/view/blt8x
parliament. funny coub.

Offline regmeok

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Re: Ukraine Tension
« Reply #21 on: March 29, 2016, 12:33:29 pm »
demotivation video
 https://youtu.be/_bi3zU7PaPQ
it should demotivating dutch people voting on ukraine EU association

Offline Al Bundy

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Re: Ukraine Tension
« Reply #22 on: September 17, 2016, 04:50:52 am »

Offline Al Bundy

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Re: Ukraine Tension
« Reply #23 on: September 20, 2016, 08:30:25 am »
Meeting of Ukrainian President Poroshenko and Hitlery Clinton about "Russian invade"  :o

http://www.b92.net/eng/news/world.php?yyyy=2016&mm=09&dd=20&nav_id=99259http://

Offline Jackson Holly

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Re: Ukraine Tension
« Reply #24 on: September 20, 2016, 05:54:22 pm »
^^^


... that story is not making sense to me ...  :o

Besides, I believe such a meeting would have been
in our press, also ... the DEMs would play this up
as a big coup for Hillary.

What do you think, Al Bundy?

St. Augustine: -The truth is like a lion; you don't have to defend it.
Let it loose; it will defend itself.-

Offline Al Bundy

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Re: Ukraine Tension
« Reply #25 on: September 20, 2016, 07:40:23 pm »
^^^


... that story is not making sense to me ...  :o

Besides, I believe such a meeting would have been
in our press, also ... the DEMs would play this up
as a big coup for Hillary.

What do you think, Al Bundy?

This is news from Russian Agency Sputnik. I do not believe either that was a meeting but probably they are talking over phone. In news does not write WHERE Poroshenko and Hitlery met.

Offline Jackson Holly

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Re: Ukraine Tension
« Reply #26 on: September 20, 2016, 08:31:13 pm »


... oh well ... planning the next PROPAGANDA
barage, I guess. I would bet that those Anti-Putin
Ukrainian US lapdogs are quaking in their boots
now that a TRUMP presidency seems more
likely everyday.
St. Augustine: -The truth is like a lion; you don't have to defend it.
Let it loose; it will defend itself.-

Offline Al Bundy

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Re: Ukraine Tension
« Reply #27 on: September 20, 2016, 08:47:23 pm »

... oh well ... planning the next PROPAGANDA
barage, I guess. I would bet that those Anti-Putin
Ukrainian US lapdogs are quaking in their boots
now that a TRUMP presidency seems more
likely everyday.

Jackson, exactly. But not only Poroshenko is afraid pf Trump`s victory on Presidential elections. 2 days ago Albanian PM Rama said "we are screwed" if Trump beat Hillary. Saudis are for Hillary and probably pay her campaign. You probably that know better. Islamists and so-called refugees from Muslim countries cheering for Hillary. Here on Balkans, Bosnian Muslims surely not for Trump, although US Ambassadors
persuading politicians on Balkans that nothing won`t change in US policy.

Offline Al Bundy

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Re: Ukraine Tension
« Reply #28 on: September 21, 2016, 09:31:39 am »
Polish soldiers were sent to the area in front of the Donbas. Someone wants to Poland and NATO are involved in this conflict.
By order of Minister of Defense A. Macierevicz in Ukraine send the 18 Polish commandos. They were accompanied by officers of the military counter-intelligence service.
18 soldiers, even the best trained and equipped, will not change the fate of this conflict.

http://nie.com.pl/http://

Offline EvadingGrid

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Re: Ukraine Tension
« Reply #29 on: January 31, 2017, 04:23:47 am »
Ukraine trying to restart War

Just came up on RT live. 100 miners trapped underground following Artillery Fire.

Also reports of Paramilitary Units (Nazis) attacking the Rebels.

Ukrainian paramilitary supported by army attacked rebels in East – Peskov, citing Kremlin data


I expect advisors, experts and fake data are all ready to brief Trump its Russian Aggression
“Hey, I’m a nationalist and a globalist”
-- Donald Trump

Article : "A Limited Hangout Operation ?"

Offline EvadingGrid

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Re: Ukraine Tension
« Reply #30 on: January 31, 2017, 05:22:18 am »
100 miners trapped underground
A rescue operation is under way.

The cause was Artillery Shelling by Ukraine.

NO Calls from the West for Ukraine to observe the Minsk Agreement

Kiev denies everything, as per usual.
It coincides with a quote from Donald Trump on lifting sanctions against Stalin Putin.


“Hey, I’m a nationalist and a globalist”
-- Donald Trump

Article : "A Limited Hangout Operation ?"

Offline Al Bundy

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Re: Ukraine Tension
« Reply #31 on: January 31, 2017, 05:57:09 am »
100 miners trapped underground
A rescue operation is under way.

The cause was Artillery Shelling by Ukraine.

NO Calls from the West for Ukraine to observe the Minsk Agreement

Kiev denies everything, as per usual.
It coincides with a quote from Donald Trump on lifting sanctions against Stalin Putin.

Deja Vu.
The West treats Serbs for 22 years !
We have a name for such a policy of Washington and Brussels - "double standards".

Offline Al Bundy

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Re: Ukraine Tension
« Reply #32 on: February 05, 2017, 02:49:51 am »

Offline EvadingGrid

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Re: Ukraine Tension
« Reply #33 on: February 05, 2017, 10:35:07 am »
Poroshenko bet everything on Hillary getting elected.

He is like a rat, trapped...
“Hey, I’m a nationalist and a globalist”
-- Donald Trump

Article : "A Limited Hangout Operation ?"

Offline EvadingGrid

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Re: Ukraine Tension
« Reply #34 on: February 08, 2017, 08:51:37 am »
Wonder when Poroshenko will get fired .?
“Hey, I’m a nationalist and a globalist”
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Article : "A Limited Hangout Operation ?"

Offline Al Bundy

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Re: Ukraine Tension
« Reply #35 on: November 28, 2018, 05:51:17 pm »
Wonder when Poroshenko will get fired .?

The Fascist tyrant Poroshenko fought not to lose in the next elections, so he subscribed to the crisis with Russian NAVY and ordered a fake war situation.
However, the question is whether the President of Ukraine has done this with secret support with the West or whether he wants NATO to go to war against Russia?