Author Topic: Coco Chanel the Nazi spy  (Read 3519 times)

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EvadingGrid

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Coco Chanel the Nazi spy
« on: December 02, 2014, 05:31:34 am »
Coco Chanel the Nazi spy
Fashion designer's role in Second World War under scrutiny as new document proves that she worked for Hitler's military intelligence

Read more: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2857133/Coco-Chanel-Nazi-spy-Fashion-designer-s-role-Second-World-War-scrutiny-new-document-proves-worked-Hitler-s-military-intelligence.html

Offline TahoeBlue

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Re: Coco Chanel the Nazi spy
« Reply #1 on: December 02, 2014, 12:33:32 pm »
Well something I've wondered about .... ( Also how the French Rothschild's survived .... )

"The documentary claimed that officials in post-War France scrubbed the celebrities' records of Nazi links and invented ties to the Resistance movement in order to help rebuild the country's reputation"



http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/%C3%89douard_Alphonse_James_de_Rothschild
Édouard Alphonse James de Rothschild (24 February 1868 – 30 June 1949) was an aristocrat, French financier and a member of the prominent Rothschild banking family of France.
...
He was raised in a Paris mansion at 2 rue Saint-Florentin that is now home to the United States Embassy as well as at Château de Ferrières in the country.
...
Effects of the German occupation, 1940-1944

The rise to power of the Adolf Hitler National Socalist party in Germany and the subsequent Anschluss of Austria to Germany saw a wave of Jews, and others the Nazis labeled as "undesirables," seek refuge in France. Most of these people escaped with little more than a suitcase of clothes. In March 1939, Édouard's wife Germaine converted an old house near the Château de Ferrières into a hostel for some 150 of these displaced persons. However, with the onset of World War II and the subsequent German occupation of France in 1940, Édouard de Rothschild and his family themselves chose to flee the country. In 1939, Édouard's son Guy joined the French Army and daughter Jacqueline escaped with her husband Gregor Piatigorsky to the United States. Before leaving, Édouard de Rothschild tried to hide as much of his valuable art collection as possible, on the grounds of the Haras de Meautry farm and at his Château de Reux. The Nazis confiscated his collection.[1]

With his wife and second daughter Bethsabée, he safely left France and they made their way to Lisbon, Portugal from where they were able to go by plane to New York City.


With the Allied liberation of France in 1944, Édouard de Rothschild and his wife returned home where he died in Paris in 1949 at the age of eighty-one. His son Guy took over as head of the family bank

...

http://americancenterfrance.org/front/index.php?&lvlid=22&dsgtypid=10&a=1&title=Architectures-_-Monuments&pos=0&lang=en



The George C. Marshall Center

The George C. Marshall Center
will exceptionally open on Sunday, September 21, 2014 from 10 am to 5 pm (last entry at 4.30 pm) for European Heritage Days.
 Address: 2, rue Saint Florentin, 75001 Paris, France

 The “hôtel particulier” (meaning “private residence”) known today as Hôtel de Talleyrand was built between 1767 and 1769 for Louis Phélypeaux, Comte de Saint-Florentin, Marquis then Duc de la Vrillière (1705-1777). As State Minister, Minister in Charge of the King’s House, then Minister of Foreign Affairs, and personal friend of the King, Saint-Florentin was one of the most influential figures of the reign of Louis XV.

...

In 1838, baron James-Mayer de Rothschild bought the mansion from Talleyrand’s niece, the duchesse de Dino, who had just inherited it. The Hôtel de Talleyrand remained the property of the Rothschild family for over a hundred years, until 1950. The Rothschild family lived here until the invasion of Paris by the German occupying army forced them to leave France. During this long period of time, major construction and decoration works were undertaken, particularly with the extension of the central part of the mansion, between 1868 and 1871, under the supervision of architect Léon Ohnet (1813-1874).

 During World War II, the hôtel particulier was requisitioned by the Ministry of the Navy of the Vichy Government and, during the Nazi Occupation, it housed the headquarters of the German Naval Forces (Kriegsmarine).
A footbridge was constructed above the Rue Saint-Florentin to facilitate crossings between the mansion and the main building of the Ministry of the Navy located on the other side of the street. It is also here that, on August 25, 1944, the troops of General Leclerc arrested the staff officers of the German Navy. After the Liberation, the mansion was used by the Vice-Premier of the Provisional Government, thus housing the offices of Maurice Thorez.

[ Birth of the EU was here: ]


 After World War II, the U.S. Department of State rented, from 1947 until 1950, then bought, in 1950, the Hôtel de Talleyrand from the Rothschild family, to serve as the home of the American Administration of the European Recovery Program, better known as the Marshall Plan (1947-1952).
It is in this mansion that Ambassador W. Averell Harriman, the US Representative of the President at the head of the American Administration of the Marshall Plan in Europe, gathered representatives of the 17 participating European countries.

 From 1981 until 1984, under the supervision of the Office of Foreign Buildings Operations of the U.S. Department of State and of expert Robert Carlhian, architects Hugh Newell Jacobsen and J. Bruce Smith conducted major renovation works . Then, and until 2007, the hôtel particulier was home to several offices of the American Embassy to France, including Consular Services.

 From 2000 until 2010, the Hôtel de Talleyrand again underwent major restoration work, managed by the U.S. Department of State in collaboration with the World Monuments Fund. French experts of 18th and 19th century historic decors Robert Carlhian and Fabrice Ouziel undertook extensive historical research. The restoration, accomplished by over 150 French artisans, was financed by private funds from both sides of the Atlantic. The Hôtel de Talleyrand was inaugurated again in 2010.

http://www.bibliotecapleyades.net/sociopolitica/esp_sociopol_skullbones11e.htm



The name William Averell Harriman turns up behind world political scenes more frequently than any other member of The Order. Possibly as because Harriman is a remarkably active man. Born in 1891, graduated Yale 1913, Harriman is still newsworthy in the 1980s. In June 1983 Harriman had a private meeting with Yuri Andropov in Moscow and in December 1983, at 92, broke his right leg while swimming in the sea off Barbados. Whatever else we say here about Averell, we must record his truly remarkable energy and longevity.

In official Harriman biographies, however, there is no mention of The Order, Skull & Bones, or the Russell Trust. Like other initiates Harriman has carefully expunged membership from the public record. We have not yet determined if this membership was ever made known to the FBI for use in background checks needed for government positions, or maybe no one ever bothered to ask for a background check on Averell Harriman.
Behold, happy is the man whom God correcteth: therefore despise not thou the chastening of the Almighty: For he maketh sore, and bindeth up: he woundeth, and his hands make whole ; He shall deliver thee in six troubles: yea, in seven there shall no evil touch thee. - Job 5

Offline iamc2

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Re: Coco Chanel the Nazi spy
« Reply #2 on: December 02, 2014, 01:37:50 pm »
 Most who know me on this Forum, understand that I believe The Nazis' are behind all the destruction going on today as it was yesterday.

 Nazis' are from the ancient Babylonian Mystery Religion!

...and they are still here...

Nice info mate!
"When the Truth was murdered:
Common Sense ran away..."

Offline TahoeBlue

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Re: Coco Chanel the Nazi spy
« Reply #3 on: December 02, 2014, 03:14:37 pm »
see its a tangled web we weave - ( when we practice to deceive) ...

Coco Chanel - Rothschild family and Wertheimers


http://www.nytimes.com/2002/02/24/magazine/the-power-behind-the-cologne.html
The Power Behind The Cologne
By Dana Thomas
Published: February 24, 2002

Chanel may be the most famous French brand in the world. Coco Chanel, its founder, is one of France's most recognizable icons -- its perfume, No. 5, the world's best-selling scent ever. And Karl Lagerfeld, its designer of 19 years, is perhaps the most quoted personality in the fashion business.

Yet nothing -- nothing -- is known about the company's owners, the Wertheimers, who have held the majority stake in Les Parfums Chanel since its incorporation in 1924. ''We're a very discreet family, we never talk,'' Gérard Wertheimer, one of the two brothers who run the business, whispered to me before the Chanel couture show in Paris last year. ''It's about Coco Chanel. It's about Karl. It's about everyone who works and creates at Chanel. It's not about the Wertheimers.''

...

What the Wertheimers do instead is live like Old World aristocrats -- that is, in quiet luxury. Their friends are a small, tight-lipped circle of Rothschilds, Wildensteins, Gutfreunds and Bichs (of Bic-ballpoint-pen wealth). Their passions are shooting (years back, doves in Mexico; these days, game at their chateau in the Loire Valley), horse racing (their stables are among the greatest in the world), fine wines (two more chateaus, in Bordeaux), art collecting and skiing at their chalet in the Swiss Alps.
...
The Wertheimers refused a formal interview with The Times for this article, although Alain did say: ''I spoke to the Wine Spectator because that's PR, that's how you sell wine. I will gladly speak to you, about the wine and the horses, because we sell the brand value. Horses are the brand value of 'Wertheimer Frères.' But I don't give interviews on Chanel because it is not useful for the Chanel business.''

Dozens of others did speak to The Times about this reclusive family, and this is probably one of the first glimpses of their lifestyle. For example, the Wertheimers have an impressive art collection -- Picasso, Matisse, Rousseau and many fine Asian pieces -- that graces their eight homes as well as the company's executive offices on 57th Street, yet they never allow any of the works to be loaned or photographed. Alain, slim, bearded, the more cynical of the two brothers, lives with his wife, Brigitte, and their three children in a grand apartment on Fifth Avenue, has a country home in Connecticut and is steeped in money -- Forbes estimates the family's combined wealth to be $5 billion -- but he doesn't hesitate to use his Metrocard to get around Manhattan. Similarly, he and Brigitte shun the charity ball and Park Avenue dinner circuit. As Nan Kempner, the New York socialite, puts it, ''I've known them for years to say, 'How do you do,' but I've never been in their house, and they have never been to mine.''
...

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pierre_Wertheimer
...
In 1924, Coco Chanel made an agreement with the Wertheimers creating a corporate entity, "Parfums Chanel."

Chanel believed that the time was opportune to extend the sale of her fragrance Chanel No. 5. to a wider customer base. Since its introduction it had been available only as an exclusive offering to an elite clientele in her boutique. Cognizant of the Wertheimer’s proven expertise in commerce, their familiarity with the American marketplace, and resources of capital, Chanel felt a business alliance with them would be fortuitous

...

World War II brought with it the Nazi seizure of all Jewish owned property and business enterprises, providing Chanel with the opportunity to gain the full monetary fortune generated by "Parfums Chanel" and its most profitable product, Chanel No. 5.

The Wertheimers, were Jewish, and in May 1941, Chanel used her position as an "Aryan" to petition German officials to legalize her right to sole ownership. Chanel was unaware that the Wertheimers, anticipating the forthcoming Nazi mandates against Jews had taken steps to protect their interests.

Prior to fleeing France for New York in 1940, they had legally turned control of “Parfums Chanel” over to a Christian, French business man and industrialist, Felix Amiot. At war's end, Amiot turned "Parfums Chanel" back over to the Wertheimers.[6][7]
...


http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/F%C3%A9lix_Amiot
...
Amiot was a Nazi collaborator, his businesses supplying the occupiers with armaments for warfare. In 1940 Amiot made a business arrangement with Paul and Pierre Wertheimer. The Wertheimers were Jews who presciently predicated the forthcoming mandates against Jewish business interests, and put control of their prestigious fragrance house, “Parfums Chanel” under his directorship. The Wertheimers had sweetened the deal for Amiot by purchasing a fifty percent share in the Amiot airplane propeller industry. At the end of World War II, Amiot turned “Parfums Chanel" back into the hands of the Wertheimers. It was said that his alliance with the Wertheimers “saved his [Amiot’s] little neck” from prosecution by the Allies

...

http://www.bloomberg.com/news/2013-09-23/chanel-s-wertheimer-family-seen-with-19-billion-fortune.html
Chanel’s Wertheimer Family Seen With $19 Billion Fortune


Gerard Wertheimer, left, and his brother Alain Wertheimer attend the Prix de Diane

...
The brothers have guided the family business for 39 years and are the third generation to run the more-than-a-century-old company, which was almost lost to the Nazis in World War II, and has grown into one of the most recognized luxury goods companies in the world.

The calculation gives each brother a net worth of $9.6 billion, and ranks them 120th and 121st on the Bloomberg Billionaires Index.

They don’t publish their numbers, they don’t publish their figures and they don’t talk about it,” Thomas said. “It’s smart business. They can have lean seasons, even lean years and nobody knows. They play the long game, which they do very well.”
...

The scent’s success soured relations between Chanel and the Wertheimers, and when the Jewish brothers fled Paris in 1940 as German troops advanced on the city, Chanel attempted to take control of the business.

Nazi Occupiers

She wrote to the Nazi occupiers in 1941, according to Mazzeo, arguing that Les Parfums Chanel was Jewish property and so should be redistributed, namely to her. She was foiled by the Wertheimers, who before leaving Paris had passed their stake to industrialist Felix Amiot, who’d agreed to hold it for them during the occupation to prevent it from being seized.

Relations slowly improved following the war, and after Paul’s death, Pierre bought out Bader and then Chanel, agreeing to fund her couture house and pay all her bills -- including her taxes -- for the rest of her life.

In return he took full control of Chanel’s fashion and business operations in 1954, according to Mazzeo, passing the company to Jacques on his death in 1965. The business passed to Alain and Gerard in 1996.

“They’ve done the best job of any company at preserving the integrity of the brand,” said Financo’s Harrison. “The Wertheimer family, which is extremely private, has protected the brand like no other.”
Behold, happy is the man whom God correcteth: therefore despise not thou the chastening of the Almighty: For he maketh sore, and bindeth up: he woundeth, and his hands make whole ; He shall deliver thee in six troubles: yea, in seven there shall no evil touch thee. - Job 5