Author Topic: Hemp Ethanol IS the answer to our energy needs  (Read 9964 times)

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Offline iskdude57

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Hemp Ethanol IS the answer to our energy needs
« on: July 02, 2014, 08:49:08 pm »
Hemp is a miracle product that the insane religious right has demonized and outlawed.  Hemp is a source of biodiesel and ethanol.  Ethanol in particular is the important product here, claims of up to 1800 gallons/acre have been claimed.  Hemp is supposed to be the fastest growing plant on the planet, and is able to grow in any climate. 

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5GyL2lq5h8k

Some strains of hemp can be grown in three months time, depending on the climate that means you can get up to four harvests in a year...

Ethanol doesn't pollute your oil, it has more potential for mpg given that you increase your compression in your engine.  And it can be combined with diesel for use in diesel engines.  Bio-diesel isn't very practical since nature doesn't make oil all that well but makes cellulose very abundantly.  Thus bio-diesel can be supplemented with ethanol to ease the burden of diesel renewable diesel fuel. 

Hempcrete is the best wall system for your home as well; it adds insulation, thermal mass, and controls humidity by absorbing/releasing moisture as needed.  However Hempcrete is not load-bearing and so needs timber frames or needs to be combined with another wall system.  Hemp-crete could be used to insulate modern crappy homes so that homes today have some thermal mass and would be more self-sufficient.

If we want to save this country we need a self-sufficient economy based on ethanol.  Estimates are that ethanol would cost only .50 a gallon!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

http://www.cannabisculture.com/blogs/2009/09/01/Hemp-ethanol-will-only-cost-15-cents-liter-or-50-cents-gallon





Offline fred.greek

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Re: Hemp Ethanol IS the answer to our energy needs
« Reply #1 on: July 03, 2014, 04:51:51 pm »
It is both the right and left who have made, and continue to keep products such as this "illegal".
Retired but still working in the garden...

Offline iskdude57

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Re: Hemp Ethanol IS the answer to our energy needs
« Reply #2 on: July 04, 2014, 08:53:59 am »
Quote
It is both the right and left who have made, and continue to keep products such as this "illegal".

Maybe, I don't know the full history of illegalization of marijuana..  The outlawing of ethanol was done with the help of Rockefeller (not surprisingly) funding a campaign by the Women's christian temperance movement which wiped out ethanol as a competing fuel source until it's slow return today in the form of e85 and e10... 


Offline fred.greek

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Re: Hemp Ethanol IS the answer to our energy needs
« Reply #3 on: July 04, 2014, 08:25:44 pm »
What is the EROI (Energy Return on Investment)?

How many gallons of biofuel, in the form of fuel burned on farm equipment, used to create fertilizer, pesticides, process into fuel, etc. are required, per how many gallons of fuel made available on the marketplace?

To produce a net sellable in the marketplace of 30 billion barrels (1,260,000,000,000 gallons) of fuel within the US, what is the required crop growing area?

Retired but still working in the garden...

Offline iskdude57

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Re: Hemp Ethanol IS the answer to our energy needs
« Reply #4 on: July 04, 2014, 09:02:36 pm »
Quote
What is the EROI (Energy Return on Investment)?

How many gallons of biofuel, in the form of fuel burned on farm equipment, used to create fertilizer, pesticides, process into fuel, etc. are required, per how many gallons of fuel made available on the marketplace?

To produce a net sellable in the marketplace of 30 billion barrels (1,260,000,000,000 gallons) of fuel within the US, what is the required crop growing area?

Not sure about specific numbers at the moment for EROI, it's my understanding that selling the seeds and oils and biomass for other uses is more profitable at the moment.  The cheap price of and availability of crude could have contributed to the demise of ethanol back in the day as well. 

The energy return for energy put in, in Brazil is somewhere around 8:1 ratio and brazil uses sugar cane which nets about equal or less than 1000 gallons/acre.  Generally speaking anywhere from 700 to 900 gallons/acre is typical.  I would assume that hemp is better considering it's fast growth and very high cellulose content up to 85% in some strains... 

Ethanol distillation is getting cheaper also.  This is probably one of the most energy intensive parts of the process.  Plants in brazil also use waste cellulose as fuel for generating electricity which nets an export of electricity as well as suiting all their electrical needs...   But anyways, companies use adsorber materials which collects ethanol so that the distillation process is more efficient and less energy intensive.  Cellulosic ethanol is more expensive than say sugar-sourced ethanol as you have to break down the cellulosic matter into sugars.   

A new miracle substance called Graphene could do wonders for lots and lots of things.  Amongst which, ethanol distillation would become vastly cheaper and more efficient as graphene allows h20 to pass through an nothing else.  I'm excited personally...  Of course it's also the hardest material in existence, a semi-conductor material, and solar panel potential with up to 60 percent theoretical efficiency.  Water filtration, ethanol distillation, I'm sure I missed something also...

Hemp ethanol is about the same yield as sugar cane at about 1000 gallons/acre per harvest estimated.  But due to it's high speed of growth in hot climates that could be a potential of 4000 gallons/acre.  But 2000 gallons/acre is considered very high.  Corn is a very poor choice and is only used because it's for free, since almost all corn goes to cattle's mouths and cattle eats cellulosic content not starch...  Corn yields about or less than 300 gallons/acre.

I've heard of an estimate of 6% farmland used for all our energy needs, sounds reasonable considering that Brazil uses about 1 to 2 percent of their farmland, I'll double-check my numbers later if I'm wrong I'll post them...

Sweet Sorghum would be a good crop choice as well, it's basically the cold weather version of sugar-cane and can be grown in most parts of the u.s. I believe.   Yields about the same as sugar cane and requires no special enzymatic process and is perfect for a diy shtf ethanol production at home type of situation. 



Offline iskdude57

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Re: Hemp Ethanol IS the answer to our energy needs
« Reply #5 on: July 04, 2014, 11:36:57 pm »
So I decided to research up those numbers and here's what I got

Not enough land?
According to the 3rd edition of “Environmental Chemistry” by Professor Stanley E. Manahan, “Meeting US demands for oil and gas would require that about 6% of the land area of the coterminous 48 states be cultivated intensively for energy production.” (40) According to one source, the US has 60 million idle acres of farmland (41) - about 3% of US land area – and another 130 million or so acres devoted to raising meat (42). According to another source, more than 302 million hectares of land are devoted to producing feed for the U.S. livestock population
-- about 272 million hectares in pasture and about 30 million hectares for cultivated feed grains. (43) Either way, it seems there's more than enough land to grow fuel with, if we each eat five or ten fewer steaks every year. As well, urban agriculture is another option to free land up for fuel crops – for example, 6% of Cuba's food supply is grown in the city of Havana. (44) Not only would urban agriculture increase the area available for food, it would conserve energy previously used to transport food.

Source: http://hemp-ethanol.blogspot.com/2008/01/economics-history-and-politics-of-hemp.html


Also major uses of land in 2002:
http://ers.usda.gov/publications/eib-economic-information-bulletin/eib14.aspx#.U7dd87G4_IU

Sugarcane is grown on a small amount of Brazil’s farmland occupying 9.5 million hectares. Of that amount, 4.6 million is used to grow cane to be processed into ethanol. Using just 1.4 percent of country’s arable land, Brazil has managed to replace almost 40 percent of its gasoline consumption with clean and renewable ethanol.

Source:  http://sugarcane.org/sustainability/preserving-biodiversity-and-precious-resources

EvadingGrid

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Re: Hemp Ethanol IS the answer to our energy needs
« Reply #6 on: July 05, 2014, 07:25:32 am »
Hemp is not the fastest growing plant, that would be a variety of bamboo. However, it is a little more complex than simply what grows the fastest.

As has been pointed out eloquently, hemp has many uses and other interesting useful properties.

What we do now, is just about one of the worst methods of getting ethanol in our gas tanks.

Different regions of the country, would prefer different crops. Say right down south it might make sense to use Sugar Cain and conversely in the North it might make sense to use Sugarbeet. It depends on quiet a few factors, but from one ton of sugar cane you could extract 70-80 gallons of fuel. Newspapers are basic cellulose with ink, again they can be fermented instead of costing us money to so called 'recycle' - this is done by using designer enzymes to break the ligin,  which is the stuff that makes wood and paper strong to get at sweet cellulose on the inside.

Not all biofuels are the same; there are "good" biofuels and "bad" biofuels.

Truthfully, we can ferment just about anything and absolutely stunning advances in bio technology mean we can do awesome jaw dropping things in industrial vats.

I participated in some of the very early ground breaking research into these fields. The use of farm land is not necessary as plants can be grown in industrial stainless steel vats, with the plant cells floating about in what looks like an algae mixture. The plant grows as separate cells instead of being organized into a structure with stuff like leaves and stems.

Mankind has also done an awful lot of groundbreaking research on organisms such as the many varieties of yeast that can produce things like ethanol as a waste product.

We have never been in a better position to get energy by using biotechnology.

Heck, we could turn just about any refined waste product into fuel with the power of biotechnology. We come a long way since hillbilly's knocking off moonshine in the woods.

They are lying to us through the sin of omission



Offline jerryweaver

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Re: Hemp Ethanol IS the answer to our energy needs
« Reply #7 on: July 05, 2014, 08:32:32 am »
Save the Hemp for after work.

weed whiskey - extremely potent! ;D

http://forum.grasscity.com/incredible-edible-herb/621883-weed-whiskey-extremely-potent.html

What EV was explaining.

Researchers use supercomputer to improve catalysts for biofuel

http://www.biomassmagazine.com/articles/10635/researchers-use-supercomputer-to-improve-catalysts-for-biofuel

ASU has the largest program on this. They are getting some grant money.

Photosynthetic Bacteria for Better Biofuels and Beyond

http://www.biodesign.asu.edu/research/projects/solar-powered-biofactory

This Joule Unlimited Inc. has a system to convert industrial CO2 emmissions into ethanol.

Joule announces EPA clearance for modified cyanobacteria

http://www.biomassmagazine.com/articles/10629/joule-announces-epa-clearance-for-modified-cyanobacteria

"Joule has developed a portfolio of catalysts that are engineered to continuously consume and convert industrial waste CO2 emissions directly to transportation fuels. The catalysts are derived from an environmentally benign cyanobacterium that exists naturally in the wild, and Joule has redirected the metabolism of multiple strains for the production of specific products, including ethanol and diesel-range alkanes – an industry first. This feat enables the continuous, single-step conversion of CO2 to fuels, negating the need for biomass feedstocks and complex downstream processing."

Offline jerryweaver

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Re: Hemp Ethanol IS the answer to our energy needs
« Reply #8 on: July 05, 2014, 08:57:51 am »
It would be cool to have this to power and clean the CO2 in my underground bunker.

Probably not too expensive to build.


Offline jerryweaver

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Syngenta funds GMO Ethanol-Cattle Feed operation
« Reply #9 on: July 05, 2014, 10:05:39 am »


Quote
The steers finished on the T-WDG had improved average daily gain, feed conversion, heavier final body weights, hot carcass weights and larger rib-eye areas compared to the steers fed the corn-based control diet.

Well the GMO corn is being fed to GMO yeast to extract the energy and the Distillers Grains are being resold to cattle feedlots.

What could go wrong?

DTN Weekly Distillers Grains Update
Thursday, July 3, 2014 3:28PM CDT

http://agnews.dtn.com/index.cfm?show=4&id=0702BF4F

By Cheryl Anderson
DTN Staff Reporter
DAVENPORT, Neb. (DTN) -- Distillers grains from a newly patented secondary fermentation process have proven to cause no significant loss in performance in beef steers, according to a recent Iowa State University feeding trial.

The new cellulosic ethanol technology was developed by Syngenta in an agreement with Cellulosic Ethanol Technologies, LLC and is being produced by Quad County Corn Processors (QCCP) bio-refinery in Galva, Iowa, Rick Heaton, co-product merchandiser for QQCP, told DTN. The QCCP bio-refinery is a farmer-owned, 35 million gallon ethanol that was the second plant to open in Iowa in 2003.

The licensed technology, called "Adding Cellulosic Ethanol" (ACE), involves a secondary fermentation process that allows the fiber, as well as the starch, in a corn kernel to be converted into ethanol. Pre-treatment with a combination of cellulosic enzymes, yeast and heat is used to break down starch and fiber, Heaton said.

The ACE technology increases ethanol production and corn oil production, as well as the protein content in the DDG. The process also reduces natural gas usage and improves the carbon footprint of ethanol plants, as the DDG is only exposed to additional heat for a few seconds.

The process leaves the resulting DDG 20%-25% higher in protein than regular DDG and about 20%-25% lower in oil. Heaton said the company is still fine-tuning the process and the exact fiber level is not known yet. Heaton added that the quantity of DDG mass will be reduced approximately 15% because of the fiber fermentation and oil removal.

The QCCP plant is the first ever to begin using the patented technology. The company has entered into an agreement with Syngenta to market the technology to other ethanol plants under licensing agreements in the future.

Heaton said the ACE DDG will be sold by the ton, but said that no pricing has been finalized. He added that the AVE DDG should have a higher value, especially to those looking for high-protein DDG, such as dairies and the export market.

Offline iskdude57

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Re: Hemp Ethanol IS the answer to our energy needs
« Reply #10 on: July 05, 2014, 11:17:12 pm »
Sweet sorghum could be used in most places in the u.s. sugar beets can be used as well but only intermittently as they would attract worms I guess.  Sugar beets can't be used year after year unless rotated.  Hemp is easier to grow and can grow in marginal soils supposedly.  I've heard of hemp being used to clean up radiation at Chernobyl as well. 

According to autho, David Blume, cat-tails are the highest yielding crop for ethanol.  Particularly when it's in sewage water as cat-tails have the ability to clean up sewage water whilst using up the nutrients.  Claims of a whopping 7,500 gallons/acre just from the starch, but 10,000 if you include the cellulose.  Probably feasible, I just wonder what kind of effect sewage water would have on the local ecology in terms of diseases...

I was wrong about the yields of 1800 gallons per acre, that's for sugar cane with the cellulose converted into ethanol...  I guess Hemp would be even more so that's an error on my part.

Here's another list of ethanol yields for liter...  There are 3.78 liters in a gallon

Ethanol yields per acre per annum from various feedstocks. Based on average yields per acre according to Bio Gas Company LTD of New Zealand.

Yields in litres per acre. Based on average yields per acre.

Apples 600-1000
Potatoes 1200-1500
Willow Tree (salix) 1300-1700
Corn 1300-1800
Sugar Beet 1700-2100
Sorghum Cane 2100-2400
Maize 1750-2500
Hemp (BGC) 6000-10000

Source: http://www.hemppermaculture.com/Hemp.html


Then there's also this: http://gas2.org/2012/02/23/company-claims-12x-more-biofuel-yield-per-acre-than-corn-ethanol/

Then there's algenol who claims that they can make 10k per acre of ethanol...

http://www.biofuelsdigest.com/bdigest/2013/03/11/algenol-hits-9k-gallonsacre-mark-for-algae-to-ethanol-process/

http://www.winknews.com/Call-for-Action/2013-07-01/Algenol-explains-why-its-looking-elsewhere-to-expand




Offline platinumpi4u

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Re: Hemp Ethanol IS the answer to our energy needs
« Reply #11 on: November 01, 2014, 10:19:55 am »
I did the math once on this, and you have to watch out because we are in the year 2014 - almost 2015, so there is data which is 10yrs old out there which seems accurate, but it is already old data.

The argument for hemp for bio production is overwhelming and imho is evergreen.