Author Topic: Alternative energy and the Petrodollar status  (Read 9634 times)

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Offline iskdude57

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Alternative energy and the Petrodollar status
« on: August 23, 2013, 10:13:25 pm »
So from my very basic understanding, the world reserve currency is the dollar which is demanded by everyone in the world for exchange for oil.  Because for some reason every single last nation on the planet (except Brazil) has decided to jump on the gasoline bandwagon...  I have another post on here about Ethanol as fuel (see http://forum.prisonplanet.com/index.php?topic=230906.0)  This in turn gives the Federal Reserve basically an unlimited ability to print as much money as they want.  So basically anyone who's in on the game could become a multi-trillionaire or whatever denomination is above a trillionth (I think money becomes a moot issue once you're a trillionaire...)  So, wouldn't the logical conclusion come be to GTFO of oil and onto something better!

LIKE ETHANOL!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

I realize that people on the forum are saying that supposedly there's an unlimited supply of oil in the Earth, (never mind that oil might, just might serve some kind of function inside the Earth???  like lubricating tectonic plates??? IDK).  Ok, but here's another LOGICAL conclusion; not everyone has a few hundred million dollars to create their own oil rig in their backyard do they?  Of course who does...  Very Very few people do.  Whereas the creation of ethanol as a fuel source is something literally almost anyone can do...  So I don't understand this type of argument at all whatsoever.  

If the above was true that gasoline is in vast unlimited supply, then the only logical counterargument would be that gasoline prices would be lowered once ethanol cars started to gain traction.  Although if a car was made specifically for ethanol it'd have a higher compression ratio giving better performance with higher torque and hp and wouldn't be able to revert back to gasoline, unless you wanted to lower the performance for a dirty nasty ass carbon fouling fuel like gasoline...  Of course why would anyone want to do that?  


Offline jerryweaver

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Re: Alternative energy and the Petrodollar status
« Reply #1 on: August 23, 2013, 10:53:39 pm »
The US actually produces a huge portion of the worlds ethanol at around one dollar less per gallon than petrol. That isn't the problem. I don't really know but a guess as to what is the problem would be:


Offline iskdude57

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Re: Alternative energy and the Petrodollar status
« Reply #2 on: August 23, 2013, 11:31:07 pm »
Yeah nice pic lol...  Yes I realize that there's hoards of dumb sheep out there, I wrote this thread in particular to anyone who's against provable, traditional means of obtaining free energy, particularly ethanol of course.  Not really free either, you have to work to get it, which last I checked is how the universe works; but more accessible and off grid for sure. 


Offline iamc2

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Re: Alternative energy and the Petrodollar status
« Reply #3 on: August 24, 2013, 12:00:43 am »
The US actually produces a huge portion of the worlds ethanol at around one dollar less per gallon than petrol. That isn't the problem. I don't really know but a guess as to what is the problem would be:


  Bah Bah: We Get All Our energy From Grass and we make our own Gas  ???

 Tesla had the code cracked for FREE WIRELESS ENERGY--but the global cabal chose Edison\ the Theosophist  and Satanist--throw in BIG OIL and we have the combination of---PAY-PAY-PAY, for all this energy which according to Tesla is all FREE!
"When the Truth was murdered:
Common Sense ran away..."

Offline iskdude57

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Re: Alternative energy and the Petrodollar status
« Reply #4 on: August 24, 2013, 12:28:11 am »
Quote
Tesla had the code cracked for FREE WIRELESS ENERGY--but the global cabal chose Edison\ the Theosophist  and Satanist--throw in BIG OIL and we have the combination of---PAY-PAY-PAY, for all this energy which according to Tesla is all FREE!

OK so what's the code for FREE WIRELESS ENERGY?  Show me a real world application of it!  I've heard of free energy before but then I say ok let's do it, so let's do it!! But whereas I KNOW for sure I can make my own ethanol if I have my own land and can run my own car on it.

Tesla was going to collect energy from the atmosphere and spread it wirelessly correct?  This takes a society overhaul if it did work.  We'd have to have the funding to put them in place and people would have to have electric cars.  Most people have ICE's in their cars and I don't see society putting these up anytime soon.  Again you're dependent on society to give you energy it's a form of dependency.  Whereas ethanol if I wanted to I could make my own, and plan to in the future for my prepping operation.  You have to get off this idea that we have to be dependent on society to give you something and do things for yourself...

An ethanol economy would be self-sustainable and would change the world for the better.  It would lower gas prices, naturally making food prices cheaper around the world...  What's wrong with these results?  Then every country could start doing this or doing other things once people can get things like Food, Water, etc... 

Offline iamc2

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Re: Alternative energy and the Petrodollar status
« Reply #5 on: August 24, 2013, 01:07:49 am »
OK so what's the code for FREE WIRELESS ENERGY?  Show me a real world application of it!  I've heard of free energy before but then I say ok let's do it, so let's do it!! But whereas I KNOW for sure I can make my own ethanol if I have my own land and can run my own car on it.

Tesla was going to collect energy from the atmosphere and spread it wirelessly correct?  This takes a society overhaul if it did work.  We'd have to have the funding to put them in place and people would have to have electric cars.  Most people have ICE's in their cars and I don't see society putting these up anytime soon.  Again you're dependent on society to give you energy it's a form of dependency.  Whereas ethanol if I wanted to I could make my own, and plan to in the future for my prepping operation.  You have to get off this idea that we have to be dependent on society to give you something and do things for yourself...

An ethanol economy would be self-sustainable and would change the world for the better.  It would lower gas prices, naturally making food prices cheaper around the world...  What's wrong with these results?  Then every country could start doing this or doing other things once people can get things like Food, Water, etc... 
I not trying to show you anything---just the fact that your cell phone [one example]--- works on microwaves! Which is FREE Energy! The criminal clowns are having the last laugh at all the cell phone Payee's, as they just put up cell phone towers and that is their cost; plus charging up to $200 a month for FREE Microwaves and Billions of people pay this per month---that means Trillions of dollars!

 Tesla was on to more than history will release. The FBI stole all of his papers after his death in the 40's: WHY? Because Tesla was a Genius on par with Einstein; and he did create FREE ENERGY: But that doesn't pay big bucks to the NWO! Money-Power-Control--because in the NWO nothing is FREE!
"When the Truth was murdered:
Common Sense ran away..."

Offline jerryweaver

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Re: Alternative energy and the Petrodollar status
« Reply #6 on: August 24, 2013, 04:56:29 am »
 Here is a group of ethanol hobbyists ---- alcoholfuel@yahoogroups.com
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There is a plan in Arizona to use the desert spaces as biofuel algae farms. The algae grows in less than ideal water and actually cleans the water. Arizona has deep water reseviors but it isn't clean enough for most uses. ASU is experimenting with genetically modified algae that has a high oil content. Once the oil is extracted the remain biomass can also be used to make farm animal feed.

http://biomassmagazine.com/issues/browse/

http://biofuels.asu.edu/tubes.shtml  

Cyanobacterial Biodiesel: Tubes in the Desert
Corn-based ethanol or soy/palm oil–based biodiesel are inherently limited in terms of per-hectare yields and suitable land area for development. However, algae and photosynthetic bacteria overcome these constraints for biofuels by providing a roughly 100-fold advantage in yield (Table 1) and not requiring farmland for production (i.e., they do not compete with food crops). A major ongoing ASU effort, funded in its initial pilot stages by BP and Science Foundation Arizona, generates biodiesel from lipid produced by the photosynthetic cyanobacterium Synechocystis. Cyanobacteria are much more amenable to metabolic engineering to improve biofuel productivity than are eukaryotic algae. The genome of Synechocystis has been fully sequenced, and the microorganism provides a facile substrate for genetic modification of metabolic pathways to optimize yields of C-16 and C-18 lipids for biodiesel production. In fact, much progress has already been made at ASU in increasing the yields of these lipids through genetic engineering. The current projection is for a proof of concept demonstration of the industrial scale utility of this approach in Calendar Year 2008. Beyond this demonstration, a larger field test bed will be built to refine the approach and enable industrial pilot scale efforts in the 2010 timeframe.

This platform for renewable solar energy-to-biofuels conversion combines innovative metabolic engineering with state-of-the-art, large-scale bioprocess engineering, efficient cell harvesting, cost-effective conversion of lipid to biodiesel, and generation of other valuable byproducts. This is possible because Synechocystis is fast growing and robust in accommodating diverse environmental conditions. It can be cultivated over a wide range of salt and fixed-nitrogen concentrations and at CO2 levels up to 5 percent. The system also requires minimal water consumption. These traits make the microorganism well suited for growth using flue gas effluent from power plants as a carbon source (recapturing the carbon dioxide from the plant before release into the atmosphere) and using agricultural run-off water contaminated with nitrogenous fertilizer as a fixed-nitrogen source when it is available. When N-contaminated water is not used, fixed nitrogen can be recycled so little new nitrogen will need to be added.

This renewable solar energy-to-biofuels approach is very well suited to arid regions with high levels of sunlight, and Central Arizona is ideal for this purpose. Biofuel production from cyanobacterial photobioreactors should be scalable to a point where it represents a major source of carbon-neutral fuel for the United States, as well as high-quality employment and overall economic growth in the State.
In order to demonstrate the feasibility of biofuel production, our current project involves the production of laboratory–scale photobioreactors, while simultaneously designing and implementing a rooftop photobioreactor, where we will then apply mathematical modeling tools for systems analysis. We plan to address issues associated with bioreactor scale-up prior to introducing the improved strains and equipment into the large-scale field test bed bioreactor for final validation. The current plan involves scaling to a point where, in two years time, we will have designed and fabricated a field-scale bioreactor. This will allow our laboratory-scale organism optimization to be evaluated for suitability in larger scale bioprocess production under "real-world conditions." The test-bed photobioreactor will be located at an APS power plant close to the ASU-Tempe Campus. This location will provide a secure site and will enable engineering assessment of operating the photobioreactor system using flue gas and water recycling from the power plant for biomass production. The proposed research—with its coordination of genetic improvement, testing at the pilot scale, and industry partners—will create a unique setting in which dramatic advances can be realized in a relatively short time.

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US capacity for Ethanol is 15 billion gallons annually.

http://www.neo.ne.gov/statshtml/122.htm  

 Ethanol Facilities
Capacity by State and Plant


http://www.pinalenergyllc.com/            Pinal Energy LLC. was funded by the local feed grain producers at a cost of 75 million I am guessing. If memory serves they had a return on investment in six months.

Because of the location the grain makes a short trip to the distillery the starches are extracted in the distillation process with the ethanol going into energy use and the stillage gets the water recycled and vegetable proteins are sent on to the feed lots for the cows. The cows are fed a high protein partially digested grain which is much better than raw grain. Cows natural food is grass and grain is hard for their digestive tract.

This economic model slowly is being repeated around the country.

 


Offline jerryweaver

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Re: Alternative energy and the Petrodollar status
« Reply #7 on: August 24, 2013, 05:20:12 am »
As I was investigating this stuff I found out the US ethanol is mostly exported and only one gas station in Pinal County had ethanol on tap. The consumer demand isn't there. The problem is :  




Offline iskdude57

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Re: Alternative energy and the Petrodollar status
« Reply #8 on: August 24, 2013, 07:59:02 am »
Quote
US capacity for Ethanol is 15 billion gallons annually.

This sounds low, the reason corn-based ethanol is good because almost all corn goes to animal feed.  Namely cattle, but cattle aren't designed to eat starches they eat the cellulose.  So using corn is really a free source of ethanol for the time being.  Algae is definitely the best source at about around 20,000 gallons per acre using a traditional pond set up.  Corn only makes about 340 gallons/acre whereas sugar cane used in Brazil makes about 740 -1000 gallons per acre sustainably and reliably with an energy output of 8x.  Those numbers alone are good enough for u.s. production of ethanol.  Of course we don't have the climate to grow sugar cane all year long.  There are other crops that can be utilized, add in other forms of algae like kelp that could be used to grow in coastal areas and we could really take off.  If people ate healthier and went vegan of course much could change for the better in every way.  People would be healthier and a less of a burden on the land but that's never gonna happen of course. 

All things being the same, I definitely agree though that the demand isn't there and thus it's basically the populations fault.  Also look into vaporized fuel or the pogue carbuerator which let's cars get much higher mpg.  This alone if supposed numbers of around 100 mpg are true would definitely change the perspectives on things.  The wikispeed car already gets 100 mpg at a weight of only 1500 lbs http://wikispeed.org/  The thing about ethanol, is that it's tremendously easier to vaporize than gasoline at a boiling point of around 174  Whereas gasoline, which is a mix of hydrocarbons have varying boiling points, but to boil all substances it needs around 600 degrees F to boil.