Author Topic: House group agrees on immigration reform  (Read 2254 times)

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Offline America2

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House group agrees on immigration reform
« on: May 16, 2013, 08:41:25 pm »
http://politicalticker.blogs.cnn.com/2013/05/16/breaking-house-reaches-immigration-agreement/?hpt=hp_t2
5/16/13

House group agrees on immigration reform

Washington (CNN) -  After months of intense negotiations, a bipartisan U.S. House group has reached an "agreement in principle" on immigration reform, according to Rep. Mario Diaz-Balart of Florida, one of the GOP members of the group.

A Democratic aide familiar with the discussions confirmed that all the members signed on and told CNN both Democrats and Republicans "will now run the whole package past their respective leadership and colleagues" and aim to formally introduce legislation at the beginning of June.

 Diaz-Balart declined to get into the details of the deal, but said, "there's going to be a lot of differences in a lot of areas," from a bipartisan measure working its way through the Senate.

"Filing a real bipartisan bill – a serious, enforceable commonsense bill is, I think, a huge step. But it's the first step of the process … a very important step," Diaz-Balart told reporters outside the House floor Thursday.

The four Republican members of the House group include Diaz-Balart, Rep. Raul Labrador of Idaho, and Rep. John Carter and Rep. Sam Johnson, both of Texas.

The four Democrats are Reps. Xavier Becerra and Zoe Lofgren, both of California, Rep. Luis Gutierrez of Illinois, and Rep. John Yarmuth of Kentucky.

Carter told reporters earlier on Thursday that the last sticking point involved whether the 11 million undocumented immigrants in the United States would get access to government health care benefits. It's unclear how the group resolved that issue.

Carter also said that because Republican and Democratic negotiators were unable to come to an agreement on a program overseeing guest workers, the group decided to leave that issue out of the bill. But both planned to offer their proposals separately, likely as amendments to the main legislation.

Both sides differed on how many worker visas should be allowed for construction companies and other industries relying on low skilled labor workers.

House Speaker John Boehner pledged that any immigration bill would move through the appropriate committees in the House before any vote by the full chamber.

A key test for the bipartisan deal will come when the House Judiciary Committee takes it up, because that panel includes a significant number of conservatives, who have pledged to block any measure that allows a path to citizenship for undocumented workers.

Boehner signaled he wanted the House to have its own version to negotiate a final immigration bill with the Democratic-led Senate.

"I continue to believe that the House needs to deal with this and the House needs to work its will," Boehner said on Thursday.

The Senate plan is now being considered by the Judiciary Committee.

Offline RollyPolly

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Re: House group agrees on immigration reform
« Reply #1 on: May 16, 2013, 08:51:19 pm »
I think the house should legalize them so they can demand fair wages and back pay without fear of being deported.













Yeah, that'll never happen.

Offline Monkeypox

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Re: House group agrees on immigration reform
« Reply #2 on: May 16, 2013, 09:43:49 pm »
f**king traitors.
War Is Peace - Freedom Is Slavery - Ignorance Is Strength


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Offline America2

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Re: House group agrees on immigration reform
« Reply #3 on: May 21, 2013, 03:33:29 pm »
http://news.yahoo.com/u-panel-votes-speed-airport-fingerprinting-immigrants-002336866.html
5/21/13
Senate panel nears completion of immigration bill

By Richard Cowan and Rachelle Younglai

WASHINGTON (Reuters) - Senate negotiators on Tuesday reached a tentative deal to ease restrictions on U.S. technology firms hiring highly skilled workers from abroad, potentially a big win for industry as efforts to pass comprehensive immigration reform this year accelerated.

Under the deal struck by Utah Republican Senator Orrin Hatch and New York Democratic Senator Charles Schumer, the Senate would back a looser formula for issuing H-1B visas that technology companies say they need to hire qualified employees.

That formula would replace the one specified in the sweeping bill the committee has been considering since May 9.

In an important boost for the measure, Senate Republican Leader Mitch McConnell said he will not stand in the way of the measure coming to the floor for a full debate.

"There is a possibility that we can be done today," Senate Judiciary Committee Chairman Patrick Leahy said Tuesday as he kicked off a fifth day of debate on the nearly 900-page bill.

The measure would create a pathway to legal status for millions of undocumented immigrants, create a new system for determining the future flow of workers long desired by agriculture as well as industry, and revamp the law governing immigration to the United States for the first time in a generation.

The panel was hurrying to finish debating and amending the bill for two reasons: Senators are hoping to begin a Memorial Day holiday recess this week, and backers of the legislation want it to be ready for debate by the full Senate in early June.

For weeks now, senators on the panel have been in negotiations with each other and with labor union groups and high-tech industry officials over limits imposed for hiring skilled workers from abroad.

Hatch of Utah has fought against some of the constraints that Democratic Senator Dick Durbin of Illinois had included on behalf of organized labor, which wants to protect American jobs.

Supporters of the immigration bill want Hatch's vote and were working to accommodate him. With Hatch's support - in the Judiciary Committee and on the Senate floor - the measure stands a much better chance of success, according to several congressional aides and immigration reform advocates.

HIGH-TECH NEGOTIATIONS

The immigration bill currently requires all companies that hire H-1B employees, not just those that are defined as dependent on the high-skill visas, to advertise job openings on a government website and offer them first to any qualified Americans.

Schumer accepted one of Hatch's most contentious proposals, strongly opposed by the AFL-CIO labor organization, that requires only "H-1B dependent" companies to give Americans the first shot at jobs.

A dependent company is defined as one with more than 15 percent of its workforce on H-1B visas.

The Hatch-Schumer deal needs approval from the Judiciary Committee, and the entire immigration bill needs to pass the Senate and House of Representatives before President Barack Obama can sign it into law.

Throughout the Judiciary Committee's debate of the bill, Republicans and Democrats have been striving to show they have overcome the partisan bickering that has bogged down lawmakers for the past two years.

But there was still plenty of time for fights to break out.

Leahy has made clear he wants to amend the bill to give people the right to sponsor same-sex partners who are foreigners for permanent legal status.

Conservatives in Congress, including Florida Republican Senator Marco Rubio, have warned that the Vermont lawmaker's amendment would kill the measure.

On Tuesday some gay rights groups feared that Democrats might shy away from the fight.

Rachel Tiven, executive director of Immigration Equality, a gay rights group, feared Democrats "are giving in to bullying."

(Additional reporting by Caren Bohan and Sarah McBride.; Editing by Xavier Briand)

Offline America2

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McConnell won't block immigration bill from hitting Senate floor
« Reply #4 on: May 21, 2013, 08:27:49 pm »
http://thehill.com/homenews/senate/301047-mcconnell-hopefully-of-passing-senate-immigration-reform-bill

McConnell won't block immigration bill from hitting Senate floor

   By Alexander Bolton  -    05/21/13 05:13 PM ET

Senate Republican Leader Mitch McConnell (Ky.) on Tuesday said he would not try to block immigration reform from reaching the floor despite the opposition of some conservative leaders.
 
The green light from McConnell is a promising development for the 800-plus-page bill from the Gang of Eight that was unveiled at the beginning of the month.
 
While McConnell stopped short of pledging his support for the legislation, he praised the Gang of Eight’s work and said he is “hopeful” of passing a comprehensive immigration fix through the Senate.
 
“The status quo is not good, the current situation is not good,” McConnell said of the nation’s immigration system, which his colleagues frequently describe as broken.
 
“With regard to getting started on the bill, it’s my intention — if there is a motion to proceed required — to vote for the motion to proceed so we can get on the bill and see if it we’re able to pass a bill that actually moves the ball in the right direction,” he said.

Read more: http://thehill.com/homenews/senate/301047-mcconnell-hopefully-of-passing-senate-immigration-reform-bill#ixzz2TyqyW9j9

Offline larsonstdoc

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Re: House group agrees on immigration reform
« Reply #5 on: May 21, 2013, 08:41:47 pm »


  THE SENATORS THAT ARE FOR THIS ARE UNAMERICAN NWO SCUM.

  These guys are so old that they won't feel the effects of immigration reform like the rest of us that will have to live through it. 

 
I'M A DEPLORABLE KNUCKLEHEAD THAT SUPPORTS PRESIDENT TRUMP.  MAY GOD BLESS HIM AND KEEP HIM SAFE.

Offline chris jones

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Re: House group agrees on immigration reform
« Reply #6 on: May 21, 2013, 08:59:35 pm »
 I may have the wrong slant on this, seems to me GWB started this and the NWO crew is following through.
 I can understand in full why decent folks would want to enter the USA, I got it.
 Also understood is the wave of drug running, cartell manipulations the open door, red carpet for criminal elements and the free ride they are giving illegals.
 Chaos.
 
 
 

Offline America2

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Re: House group agrees on immigration reform
« Reply #7 on: May 21, 2013, 10:19:14 pm »
I may have the wrong slant on this, seems to me GWB started this and the NWO crew is following through.
 I can understand in full why decent folks would want to enter the USA, I got it.
 Also understood is the wave of drug running, cartell manipulations the open door, red carpet for criminal elements and the free ride they are giving illegals.
 Chaos.
 
 
 

Yes, GWB tried to push immigration reform when he was in office, but failed. He also pushed through the RealID Act in 2005.

They're all on the same team - no surprise that Obama is having more success trying to push this through.

Offline America2

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http://news.yahoo.com/senate-panel-passes-immigration-reform-bill-republicans-helped-151929396.html
Senate panel passes immigration reform bill: how Republicans helped shape it

The immigration reform bill, which passed the Senate Judiciary Committee by a 13-to-5 vote Tuesday night, received some tweaks aimed at attracting more GOP support during its next key vote on the Senate floor.

5/22/13

The Senate’s comprehensive immigration-reform legislation marches on.

A bill that would be the most sweeping rewrite of America’s immigration laws in two decades not only passed the Senate Judiciary Committee on a 13-to-5 vote Tuesday night, but also sustained no dramatic alterations to the bipartisan framework fashioned by the bill’s authors, the “Gang of Eight.”

The bill did receive, however, a slew of tweaks and adjustments aimed at attracting more GOP support during its next key vote on the floor of the US Senate. Tuesday’s vote brought commentary from several key Republicans that augur well for the bill’s prospects.

“I appreciate the work of the Senate Judiciary Committee in taking the bill my colleagues and I introduced in April as a starting point for debate and making improvements to it over the past few weeks,” said Sen. Marco Rubio (R) of Florida in a statement after the bill’s passage. “Through an extensive, open and transparent process, they have made real improvements to the bill.”

The four “Gang” members on the Judiciary committee – Charles Schumer (D) of New York, Richard Durbin (D) of Illinois, Jeff Flake (R) of Arizona, and Lindsey Graham (R) of South Carolina – were joined by the eight other Democrats on the panel and Sen. Orrin Hatch (R) of Utah in voting affirmatively.

Senator Hatch’s support of the bill in committee came after he and Senator Schumer hashed out a deal on a handful of amendments that Hatch wanted regarding high-skilled workers, long of interest to the veteran Utahn. These measures would make it easier for technology companies and others to hire the talented but temporary workers that come through the H-1B program.

Hatch also secured a compromise amendment requiring a test of a biometric entry-exit system at America’s 10 largest airports in the next two years, followed by an expanded test at the 30 largest US airports four years later. A biometric system, which could capture a foreign traveler’s fingerprints or scan his or her iris, was a frequently cited desire of Republican members of the panel.

While Hatch’s final support of the bill will be contingent on another series of amendments he’ll offer on the Senate floor, the committee adopted other conservative changes to the bill that may accentuate its appeal to Republicans on the Senate floor. These changes include the stipulation that the Department of Homeland Security must turn back or apprehend 90 percent of would-be border crossers along the entire Southern border – not just in high-risk sectors as the bill originally required – before the nation’s millions of illegal immigrants can become citizens.

The changes were only a handful of the more than 200 amendments that the committee considered over five days and more than 30 hours of debate and votes. About a third of the 141 changes that were approved came from the panel’s conservative senators.

The process drew acclaim from even the most deep-seated opponents of the legislation, with several Republican senators thanking Judiciary chairman Patrick Leahy (D) of Vermont in their closing comments for organizing what the panel’s ranking Republican, Charles Grassley (R) of Iowa, called a “productive debate.”

However, senators agreed that not everything was up for amendment, for fear that the delicate balance struck by the Gang of Eight could be undone. That group’s two Republican members on the panel hung with Democrats to defeat a slew of amendments regarding amped-up border security and forced widespread implementation of a biometric entry-exit system.

In one of the committee’s most emotional moments, a handful of Democrats said they would vote with all the panel’s Republicans to defeat Senator Leahy’s amendment allowing same-sex couples to be recognized by the federal government for immigration purposes – because that measure would all but guarantee GOP opposition to the bill on the Senate floor. Leahy withdrew the amendment.

“You’ve got me on immigration,” Senator Graham said. “You don’t have me on marriage.”

Several key Republicans indicated they would not attempt to block the measure from entering debate.

Senate minority leader Mitch McConnell (R) of Kentucky, who as his party’s leader in the Senate is often the frontman for holding back bills the GOP conference doesn’t like, told reporters he would vote to break an initial filibuster “so we can get on the bill and see ... if we're able to pass a bill that actually moves the ball in the right direction.”

“I think the Gang of Eight has made a substantial contribution to moving the issue forward,” Senator McConnell said Tuesday
.

Two of the bill’s critics in the Judiciary Committee, Sen. John Cornyn (R) of Texas and Senator Grassley, both said they would vote affirmatively to move to debate on the bill. Such support makes it all but guaranteed that the measure has a quick route to further amendments on the Senate floor when Senate majority leader Harry Reid (D) of Nevada takes the measure up after the Memorial Day recess.

The fact that senators on both sides see a pressing need to move legislation forward even if they don’t agree with all of it was embodied best by Grassley, who said he would have voted for the bill if it meant the difference between it dying in committee or being sent to the full Senate.

With a broken immigration system, Grassley said, it’s incumbent on Congress to give the issue the fullest hearing possible – passing bills in both chambers and then untangling the differences in a conference committee.

“I believe we have to move this bill along, and I believe that nobody has their mind made up exactly what this bill is going to look like when this bill comes out of conference,” he said in his closing statement Tuesday. “In the final analysis, I won’t know if I’m for this bill or not [until] it gets to that final product.”

He added, “If this system is broken, we all ought to take every opportunity we can ... to make sure it is fixed and fixed right.”

Offline JT Coyoté

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http://news.yahoo.com/senate-panel-passes-immigration-reform-bill-republicans-helped-151929396.html
Senate panel passes immigration reform bill: how Republicans helped shape it

The immigration reform bill, which passed the Senate Judiciary Committee by a 13-to-5 vote Tuesday night, received some tweaks aimed at attracting more GOP support during its next key vote on the Senate floor.

5/22/13

The Senate’s comprehensive immigration-reform legislation marches on.

A bill that would be the most sweeping rewrite of America’s immigration laws in two decades not only passed the Senate Judiciary Committee on a 13-to-5 vote Tuesday night, but also sustained no dramatic alterations to the bipartisan framework fashioned by the bill’s authors, the “Gang of Eight.”

[...]

“I appreciate the work of the Senate Judiciary Committee in taking the bill my colleagues and I introduced in April as a starting point for debate and making improvements to it over the past few weeks,” said Sen. Marco Rubio (R) of Florida in a statement after the bill’s passage. “Through an extensive, open and transparent process, they have made real improvements to the bill.”

The four “Gang” members on the Judiciary committee – Charles Schumer (D) of New York, Richard Durbin (D) of Illinois, Jeff Flake (R) of Arizona, and Lindsey Graham (R) of South Carolina – were joined by the eight other Democrats on the panel and Sen. Orrin Hatch (R) of Utah in voting affirmatively.

[...]

“I believe we have to move this bill along, and I believe that nobody has their mind made up exactly what this bill is going to look like when this bill comes out of conference,” he said in his closing statement Tuesday. “In the final analysis, I won’t know if I’m for this bill or not [until] it gets to that final product.”

He added, “If this system is broken, we all ought to take every opportunity we can ... to make sure it is fixed and fixed right.”


IF THIS SYSTEM IS BROKEN???....

This is like saying the best way to fix your new car with a flat tire... is by beating it to scrap with a sledge hammer!!

The Fools!

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