Author Topic: Question  (Read 3428 times)

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Offline sentinelscout

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Question
« on: February 14, 2013, 01:52:20 am »
It is said that the moon is kept in orbit around the earth because its centripetal force matches or nullifies the gravitational pull of the earth, the moon is leaving the earth at a rate of one and a half centimeters a year (give or take).

For some reason this just doesn't add up to me for a few reasons.
1) The moon has been hit by tons and tons and tons of asteroids for billions of years, all that new mass (minus any mass that was blasted off the moon from impacts) should of caused the moon to flee the earth already.
If A represented earths gravity, and B represented the moons centripetal force, and A = B means that the moon orbits the earth, than simply adding any mass to the moon (lunar lander) should cause the moon to flee off at a faster rate.

This pushes me to believe that the moon is actually held there by a combination of forces and not just A and B.
A earth and moons gravity (keeps it from going off into space)
B Centripetal Force (keeps it from hitting earth)
C Magnetism (Magnetic fields locking the moon in its place)(keeping it close and keeping it away at the same time).

Both the moon and the earth have magnetic fields, it may be that the actual force holding the moon in place is magnetism, just as if you had two round wheel shaped magnets, (one large and one small) the small magnet would lock onto the side of the larger magnet and be allowed to rotate around the magnet (just like the moon and earth).

2) The size of the moon relative to earth makes it look to me that given the actual weakness of gravity (especially at those distances from earth) the earth should not have enough gravity to actually hold a moon of its size.

Also another thing, if the moon and earth were equalized by gravity and centripetal force alone, I would actually expect to see a larger deviation in the rotation of the earth (the earth and moon should actually orbit eachother and the distance from the earth to the sun should deviate a lot more based on the lunar cycle alone)

And another thing, how is pluto or any of the outer gas giants actually held in orbit, it doesn't make any sense, they are sooo far from the sun, yet they still orbit the sun, gravity at those distances from the should be almost meaningless, even gravity from something as massive as our sun.
If you were floating in space at the distance of pluto, and you pushed yourself with a rocket (one pulse forward) chances are you would probably just go out into space almost perfectly straight, yet planets seem to defy that trajectory.


This leads me to the conclusion that:

Magnetism is the leading force keeping the planets in motion and orbit.
or
Gravity obeys exactly like magnetism, and gravity itself has polarity.

Polarity itself might not even be a difference in charge (+ or -) its more likely that polarity is more or less a direction of movement (direction in which gravitons or magnetons flow through objects in uniformity).


If gravity acts like magnetism, and has polarity.
Than it should be plausible that a drive or generator could be designed to operate using gravity instead of magnetism.

Also, I would like to note, that I think pretty much anywhere you see gravity, you also see magnetic fields, which leads me to believe that magnetons and gravitons mimic eachother or flow through a fluid (either of space) in roughly the same channels (paths of least resistance).


If that is the case, gravity, and magnetism actually push against the either of space which could provide the basis for a reaction-less drive.



Where is my logic flawed?

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Offline ekimdrachir

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Re: Question
« Reply #1 on: February 14, 2013, 06:03:15 am »
Thats not a moon... thats a space station!

worcesteradam

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Re: Question
« Reply #2 on: February 17, 2013, 06:00:33 am »
It is said that the moon is kept in orbit around the earth because its centripetal force matches or nullifies the gravitational pull of the earth, the moon is leaving the earth at a rate of one and a half centimeters a year (give or take).

This doesnt sound right.
The centripetal force is the acceleration on the body, so, as its used here, thats the earths gravity.
The moon does not hit the earth because it is in orbit, not because of any nullification of gravity.

look up orbits for a better explanation of how this works