Author Topic: Drought Reaches Record 56% of Continental US  (Read 3032 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Offline larsonstdoc

  • Moderator
  • Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 28,341
Drought Reaches Record 56% of Continental US
« on: July 06, 2012, 01:35:44 pm »
http://news.yahoo.com/drought-reaches-record-56-continental-us-235924965.html

  USA Drought Map

        http://news.yahoo.com/photos/world-events-slideshow/noaa-handout-image-u-drought-monitor-map-photo-125310623.html



The United States is parched, with more than half of the lower 48 states experiencing moderate to extreme drought, according to a report released today (July 5).
Just under 56 percent of the contiguous United States is in drought conditions, the most extensive area in the 12-year history of the U.S. Drought Monitor. The previous drought records occurred on Aug. 26, 2003, when 54.79 percent of the lower 48 were in drought and on Sept 10, 2002, when drought extended across 54.63 percent of this area.
When including the entire nation, the monitor found 46.84 percent of the land area meets criteria for various stages of drought, up from 42.8 percent last week. Previous records: 45.87 percent in drought on Aug. 26, 2003, and 45.64 percent on Sept. 10, 2002.
"The recent heat and dryness is catching up with us on a national scale," Michael Hayes, director of the National Drought Mitigation Center at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln, said in a statement. "Now, we have a larger section of the country in these lesser categories of drought than we've previously experienced" in the past 12 years.
I'M A DEPLORABLE KNUCKLEHEAD THAT SUPPORTS PRESIDENT TRUMP.  MAY GOD BLESS HIM AND KEEP HIM SAFE.

Offline Brocke

  • Eleutherophiliac & Drapetomaniac
  • Global Moderator
  • Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 9,790
  • I am not a number, I am a free man!
    • Vimeo page
Re: Drought Reaches Record 56% of Continental US
« Reply #1 on: July 06, 2012, 04:56:56 pm »


Of course the Global Warming acolytes will cry that we have brought this on ourselves and are being punished by Gaia.

A closer look at long term historical and paleoclimatic records show us that for thousands of years the continental United States has regularly experienced periods of drought.

I live in Australia and over the last 3 years we suffered a substantial drought. The climate fanatics pulled their hair and wrung their hands. During this drought water restrictions were enacted and legislated to the point where there are many regions that now have PERMANENT water restrictions! The drought broke last year and we are now experiencing record rains, floods and land slides. Yet the water restrictions remain in place.

Water will be the CO2 of the near future. Controlled and commodified and traded to "protect" us. Once again a natural resource, that every human being shoud have a natural right to, will be restricted.




The impact of droughts over the last few decades have shown that some regions and sectors of the population are becoming increasingly vulnerable to drought. Compounding these vulnerabilities is the uncertainty of the effects of human activities and global warming on climate in general and on drought in particular. A number of climate model simulations for doubled CO2 conditions suggest an increased frequency of drought in midcontinental regions (e.g. Gregory et al, 1997 , Mearns et al, 2000) whereas other model simulations and recent decadal trends in the instrumental record suggest wetter conditions, at least in the short term, due to an intensification of the hydrologic cycle associated with warmer sea surface temperatures. Better constrained answers to the question of the severity of future droughts requires improved understanding and modeling of the processes underlying the drought behavior exhibited in both the instrumental and the paleoclimate records.




The graphic [above] illustrates four regional droughts. Each graph shows the variations in the instrumental Palmer Drought Severity Index (PDSI) from 1895-1995 for each of the four regions; northern California, eastern New York, northwestern Texas, and north-central Nebraska (graphs are based on a grid point within each region). The accompanying maps show the spatial pattern of drought for key drought years.

Each drought in the 20th century has a unique signature. The timing and evolution of droughts, and the areas impacted are variable, making it difficult to understand just what causes drought onset and persistence. Although the central High Plains appears to be the region most often affected by the most persistent droughts, the southern Plains, and parts of Texas in particular, appear to suffer from the highest frequency of drought. However, evidence from the instrumental record indicates that drought can affect any region of the U.S.

http://www.ncdc.noaa.gov/paleo/drought/drght_temporal.html

1934 - 1940
The Dust Bowl drought was a natural disaster that severely affected much of the United States during the 1930s. The drought came in three waves, 1934, 1936, and 1939-40, but some regions of the High Plains experienced drought conditions for as many as eight years. The "dust bowl" effect was caused by sustained drought conditions compounded by years of landPhotos from Library of Congress and U.S. National Archives management practices that left topsoil susceptible to the forces of the wind. The soil, depleted of moisture, was lifted by the wind into great clouds of dust and sand which were so thick they concealed the sun for several days at a time. They were referred to as" black blizzards".


1950 - 1957
During the 1950s, the Great Plains and the southwestern U.S. withstood a five-year drought, and in three of these years, drought conditions stretched coast to coast. The drought was first felt in the southwestern U.S. in 1950 and spread to Oklahoma, Kansas and Nebraska by 1953. By 1954, the drought encompassed a ten-state area reaching from the mid-west to the Great Plains, and southward into New Mexico. The area from the Texas panhandle to central and eastern Colorado, western Kansas and central Nebraska experienced severe drought conditions. The drought maintained a stronghold in the Great Plains, reaching a peak in 1956. The drought subsided in most areas with the spring rains of 1957.


1987 - 1989
The three-year drought of the late 1980s (1987-1989) covered 36% of the United States at its peak. Compared to the Dust Bowl drought, which covered 70% during its worst year, this does not seem significant. However, the 1980s drought was not only the costliest in U.S. history, but also the most expensive natural disaster of any kind to affect the U.S.




The Last 500 Years
A gridded network of tree-ring reconstructions of Palmer Drought Severity Index (PDSI) for the last 300 years has been used to create a set of maps of the spatial pattern of PDSI for each year, back to AD 1700. This set of maps enables an assessment of the droughts of the 20th century compared to droughts for the past 300 years. An inspection of the maps shows that droughts similar to the 1950s, in terms of duration and spatial extent, occurred once or twice a century for the past three centuries (for example, during the 1860s, 1820s, 1730s). However, there has not been another drought as extensive and prolonged as the 1930s drought in the past 300 years.

Longer records show strong evidence for a drought that appears to have been more severe in some areas of central North America than anything we have experienced in the 20th century, including the 1930s drought. Tree-ring records from around North America document episodes of severe drought during the last half of the 16th century. Drought is reconstructed as far east as Jamestown, Virginia, where tree rings reflect several extended periods of drought that coincided with the disappearance of the Roanoke Colonists, and difficult times for the Jamestown colony. These droughts were extremely severe and lasted for three to six years, a long time for such severe drought conditions to persist in this region of North America.

Coincident droughts, or the same droughts, are apparent in tree-ring records from Mexico to British Columbia, and from California to the East Coast (See examples in the graph to the right). Winter and spring drought conditions appear to have been particularly severe in the Southwestern U.S. and northwestern Mexico, where this drought appears to have lasted several decades. In other areas, drought conditions were milder, suggesting drought impacts may have been tempered by seasonal variations.

http://www.ncdc.noaa.gov/paleo/drought/drght_500years.html


Possible Role of Climate in the Collapse of the Classic Maya Civilization
http://www.ncdc.noaa.gov/paleo/drought/drght_mayan.html


That men do not learn very much from the lessons of history is the most important of all the lessons of history.
~Aldous Huxley

He who has a why to live can bear almost any how. - ~Friedrich Nietzsche

Offline Brocke

  • Eleutherophiliac & Drapetomaniac
  • Global Moderator
  • Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 9,790
  • I am not a number, I am a free man!
    • Vimeo page
Re: Drought Reaches Record 56% of Continental US
« Reply #2 on: September 21, 2012, 05:02:57 am »

An interesting fact:

There is enough water in Lake Superior to cover the entire continent of North and South America with 12 inches of water.



Drought is not about how much water there is. It's about where it is.


That men do not learn very much from the lessons of history is the most important of all the lessons of history.
~Aldous Huxley

He who has a why to live can bear almost any how. - ~Friedrich Nietzsche

Offline jerryweaver

  • Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 5,430
Re: Drought Reaches Record 56% of Continental US
« Reply #3 on: September 21, 2012, 10:54:34 am »
NAWAPA

A solution to todays water shortage problem in western US.   This project has been on the shelf for almost  50 years.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ORRUJyt7AIo



http://www.robertlautenforussenate2012.com/Start-1960's-NAWAPA-Project/construct-nawapa-infrastructure-project.html

Offline jerryweaver

  • Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 5,430
Re: Drought Reaches Record 56% of Continental US
« Reply #4 on: September 21, 2012, 01:30:26 pm »
NAWAPA

A solution to todays water shortage problem in western US.   This project has been on the shelf for almost  50 years.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ORRUJyt7AIo



http://www.robertlautenforussenate2012.com/Start-1960's-NAWAPA-Project/construct-nawapa-infrastructure-project.html



Currency or Bonds backed by clean water?

Offline empire

  • Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 404
Re: Drought Reaches Record 56% of Continental US
« Reply #5 on: September 22, 2012, 03:59:48 am »
Chemtrails anybody?