Author Topic: CDC - National Hepatitis Testing Day - Proposes Boomers Be Tested for Hep-C  (Read 3319 times)

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Online TahoeBlue

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http://www.cdc.gov/nchhstp/newsroom/HepTestingRecsPressRelease2012.html
For immediate release: May 18, 2012

CDC Announces First Ever National Hepatitis Testing Day and Proposes that All Baby Boomers Be Tested Once for Hepatitis C

 On the eve of the first ever National Hepatitis Testing Day (May 19), the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention is issuing draft guidelines proposing that all U.S. baby boomers get a one-time test for the hepatitis C virus.

One in 30 baby boomers – the generation born from 1945 through 1965 – has been infected with hepatitis C, and most don’t know it. Hepatitis C causes serious liver diseases including liver cancer, which is the fastest-rising cause of cancer-related deaths, and the leading cause of liver transplants in the United States.

CDC believes this approach will address the largely preventable consequences of this disease, especially in light of newly available therapies that can cure up to 75 percent of infections.

 “With increasingly effective treatments now available, we can prevent tens of thousands of deaths from hepatitis C,” said CDC Director Thomas R. Frieden, M.D., M.P.H.
 
More than 2 million U.S. baby boomers are infected with hepatitis C, accounting for more than 75 percent of all American adults living with the virus. Baby boomers are five times more likely to be infected than other adults. Yet most infected baby boomers do not know they have the virus because hepatitis C can damage the liver for many years with few noticeable symptoms. More than 15,000 Americans, most of them baby boomers, die each year from hepatitis C-related illness, such as cirrhosis and liver cancer, and deaths have been increasing steadily for over a decade and are projected to grow significantly in coming years.

 “Identifying these hidden infections early will allow more baby boomers to receive care and treatment, before they develop life-threatening liver disease,” said Kevin Fenton, M.D., director of CDC’s National Center for HIV/AIDS, Viral Hepatitis, STD and Tuberculosis Prevention.
 
Current CDC guidelines call for testing only individuals with certain known risk factors for hepatitis C infection. But studies find that many baby boomers do not perceive themselves to be at risk and are not being tested.
 
CDC estimates one-time hepatitis C testing of baby boomers could identify more than 800,000 additional people with hepatitis C, prevent the costly consequences of liver cancer and other chronic liver diseases and save more than 120,000 lives.
 
CDC’s draft recommendations will be available for a public comment period from May 22 – June 8, 2012.
 

http://www.bloomberg.com/news/2012-05-18/test-all-baby-boomers-for-hepatitis-c-cdc-urges.html

...

Testing may help prevent cirrhosis and liver cancer, both of which result from infection, public health officials said.
Baby boomers were infected in their teens and 20s, either through blood transfusions before HIV concerns
 prompted widespread screening in 1992,

or with experimental injection drug use.

Hepatitis C is often asymptomatic while it damages the liver, the CDC said in a statement.
...

Standard Treatment

The standard treatment for hepatitis C for the past decade has been a combination of the antiviral drug ribavirin with interferon, an immune-boosting protein. Patients receive weekly shots of Interferon for as long as a year, which can cause side effects such as fatigue and flu-like symptoms.

Other important announcements tied to the first National Hepatitis Testing Day include:
 •The release of a $6.5 million funding opportunity announcement to expand testing of hepatitis B and hepatitis C, increase earlier diagnosis of individuals with infections, and enhance linkage to care, treatment and preventive services for people living with these infections.


Funded efforts will focus on groups that are disproportionately affected by the disease, including Asian-American Pacific Islander communities who have the highest rates of hepatitis B, and injection drug users and individuals born from 1945 – 1965 who are most affected by hepatitis C. These efforts align with the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services’ Action Plan for the Prevention, Care and Treatment of Viral Hepatitis, which was released in May 2011.
•Adding additional tools and resources to the CDC Know More Hepatitis website, including a new online Hepatitis Risk Assessment tool. This tool is designed to help people determine their risk for viral hepatitis.
•Collaborating with HHS to produce PSAs featuring HHS’ assistant secretary for health, Howard Koh, M.D., and Surgeon General Regina Benjamin, M.D., with specific outreach to high-risk communities on the importance of testing.

For additional information about hepatitis, visit www.cdc.gov/hepatitis.

related see:  Climate change could boost U.S. dengue fever - HCV BioWeapon  

Related: BioWeapon Hepatitis-C 5x times more deadly then Hep-B - no vaccine
Behold, happy is the man whom God correcteth: therefore despise not thou the chastening of the Almighty: For he maketh sore, and bindeth up: he woundeth, and his hands make whole ; He shall deliver thee in six troubles: yea, in seven there shall no evil touch thee. - Job 5

Online TahoeBlue

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http://www.hcvets.com/

HCVets.com Educational Website & Support Forums are provided by past and presents members of the United States Military with Hepatitis C (HCV) to assist fellow Retirees/Veterans / Active Military and Dependents with awareness to the Hep C virus exposure methods during military service.
 
The VA Testimony before the Subcommittee on Benefits Committee on Veterans’ Affairs, U.S. House of Representatives, April 13, 2000, Gary A. Roselle, M. D., Program Director for Infectious Diseases, Veterans Health Administration, Department of Veterans Affairs, state,

"One in 10 US Veterans are infected with HCV", a rate 5 times greater than the 1.8% infection rate of the general population."

One in 5 of these Veterans are from the Vietnam era.

A study conducted in 1999, by the Veterans Health Administration (VHA), and involving 26,000 veterans shows that up to 10% of all veterans in the VHA system tested positive for hepatitis C.

Of the total number of persons who were hepatitis C antibody positive, and reported an era of service, 62.7% were noted to be from the Vietnam. The second most frequent group is listed as post-Vietnam at 18.2%, followed by 4.8% Korean conflict, 4.3% post-Korean conflict, 4.2% from WWII, and 2.7% Persian Gulf era veterans.
Behold, happy is the man whom God correcteth: therefore despise not thou the chastening of the Almighty: For he maketh sore, and bindeth up: he woundeth, and his hands make whole ; He shall deliver thee in six troubles: yea, in seven there shall no evil touch thee. - Job 5

Online TahoeBlue

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http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/preview/mmwrhtml/00055154.htm
Recommendations for Prevention and Control of Hepatitis C Virus (HCV) Infection and HCV-Related Chronic Disease
October 16, 1998 / 47(RR19);1-39
...
INTRODUCTION

Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is the most common chronic bloodborne infection in the United States.

CDC staff estimate that during the 1980s, an average of 230,000 new infections occurred each year (CDC, unpublished data). Although since 1989 the annual number of new infections has declined by greater than 80% to 36,000 by 1996 (1,2), data from

the Third National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES III), conducted during 1988-1994, have indicated that an estimated 3.9 million (1.8%) Americans have been infected with HCV (3).

Most of these persons are chronically infected and might not be aware of their infection because they are not clinically ill. Infected persons serve as a source of transmission to others and are at risk for chronic liver disease or other HCV-related chronic diseases during the first two or more decades following initial infection.

Chronic liver disease is the tenth leading cause of death among adults in the United States, and accounts for approximately 25,000 deaths annually, or approximately 1% of all deaths (4). Population-based studies indicate that 40% of chronic liver disease is HCV-related, resulting in an estimated 8,000-10,000 deaths each year (CDC, unpublished data). Current estimates of medical and work-loss costs of HCV-related acute and chronic liver disease are greater than $600 million annually (CDC, unpublished data), and HCV-associated end-stage liver disease is the most frequent indication for liver transplantation among adults. Because
most HCV-infected persons are aged 30-49 years

 (3), the number of deaths attributable to HCV-related chronic liver disease could increase substantially during the next 10-20 years as this group of infected persons reaches ages at which complications from chronic liver disease typically occur.

HCV is transmitted primarily through large or repeated direct percutaneous exposures to blood. In the United States, the relative importance of the two most common exposures associated with transmission of HCV, blood transfusion and injecting-drug use, has changed over time (Figure_1) (2,5). Blood transfusion, which accounted for a substantial proportion of HCV infections acquired greater than 10 years ago, rarely accounts for recently acquired infections.

Since 1994, risk for transfusion-transmitted HCV infection has been so low that CDC's sentinel counties viral hepatitis surveillance system* has been unable to detect any transfusion-associated cases of acute hepatitis C, although the risk is not zero. In contrast, injecting-drug use consistently has accounted for a substantial proportion of HCV infections and currently accounts for 60% of HCV transmission in the United States. A high proportion of infections continues to be associated with injecting-drug use, but for reasons that are unclear, the dramatic decline in incidence of acute hepatitis C since 1989 correlates with a decrease in cases among injecting-drug users.

Reducing the burden of HCV infection and HCV-related disease in the United States requires implementation of primary prevention activities to reduce the risk for contracting HCV infection and secondary prevention activities to reduce the risk for liver and other chronic diseases in HCV-infected persons. The recommendations contained in this report were developed by reviewing currently available data and are based on the opinions of experts.

These recommendations provide broad guidelines for
a) the prevention of transmission of HCV;
b) the identification, counseling, and testing of persons at risk for HCV infection; and
c) the appropriate medical evaluation and management of HCV-infected persons.

Behold, happy is the man whom God correcteth: therefore despise not thou the chastening of the Almighty: For he maketh sore, and bindeth up: he woundeth, and his hands make whole ; He shall deliver thee in six troubles: yea, in seven there shall no evil touch thee. - Job 5

Online TahoeBlue

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We need to look at the HCV "test", One problem I see is that the test shows positives for exposure to HCV.
If sometime in the past you were exposed to an infected person, you may have anti-bodies for HCV but never had the disease... hmmm


See the related threads that show treatment with interferon causes some people to be suicidal.


http://labtestsonline.org/understanding/analytes/hepatitis-c/tab/test
Hepatitis C

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Also known as: Hepatitis C antibody; anti-HCV; HCV recombinant immunoblot assay; HCV RIBA; HCV-RNA; Hepatitis C viral load
Formal name: Viral Hepatitis C
Related tests: Hepatitis A; Hepatitis B; Acute Viral Hepatitis Panel; Liver Panel; ALT; AST; GGT, Bilirubin


Anti-HCV test detects the presence of antibodies to the virus, indicating exposure to HCV.

This test cannot distinguish between someone with an active or a previous HCV infection. Usually, the test is reported as "positive" or "negative." There is some evidence that if the test is "weakly positive," it may be a false positive.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) suggests that weakly positive tests be confirmed with the HCV RIBA test before being reported.

HCV recombinant immunoblot assay (RIBA) test is an additional test ordered to confirm the presence of HCV antibodies. In most cases, it can tell if the positive anti-HCV test was due to exposure to HCV (positive RIBA) or represents a false signal (negative RIBA).

In a few cases, the results cannot answer this question (indeterminate RIBA). Like the anti-HCV test, the RIBA test cannot distinguish between a current or past infection.


HCV Viral Load (HCV RNA test, Quantitative) detects and measures the number of viral RNA particles in the blood. Viral load tests are often used before and during treatment to help determine response to treatment by comparing the amount of virus before and during treatment (usually at several time points in the first three months of treatment). Successful treatment causes a decrease of 99% or more (2 logs) in viral load soon after starting treatment (as early as 4-12 weeks) and usually leads to viral load being not detected even after treatment is completed. Some newer viral load tests can detect very low amounts of viral RNA.

Viral genotyping is used to determine the kind, or genotype, of the HCV virus present. There are 6 major types of HCV; the most common (genotype 1) is less likely to respond to treatment than genotypes 2 or 3 and usually requires longer therapy (48 weeks versus 24 weeks for genotype 2 or 3). Genotyping is often ordered before treatment is started to give an idea of the likelihood of success and how long treatment may be needed.
Behold, happy is the man whom God correcteth: therefore despise not thou the chastening of the Almighty: For he maketh sore, and bindeth up: he woundeth, and his hands make whole ; He shall deliver thee in six troubles: yea, in seven there shall no evil touch thee. - Job 5

Online TahoeBlue

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bump for article on HIV screening
Behold, happy is the man whom God correcteth: therefore despise not thou the chastening of the Almighty: For he maketh sore, and bindeth up: he woundeth, and his hands make whole ; He shall deliver thee in six troubles: yea, in seven there shall no evil touch thee. - Job 5

Offline larsonstdoc

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  I'm not going to get tested.  My BP--110/68, pulse 52, 20-20 vision in both eyes.  I eat mostly vegan. 

  My philosophy---if you don't have symptoms, don't go to the doctor.  THEY WANT MORE BUSINESS.
I'M A DEPLORABLE KNUCKLEHEAD THAT SUPPORTS PRESIDENT TRUMP.  MAY GOD BLESS HIM AND KEEP HIM SAFE.

Online TahoeBlue

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bump for memorial day
Behold, happy is the man whom God correcteth: therefore despise not thou the chastening of the Almighty: For he maketh sore, and bindeth up: he woundeth, and his hands make whole ; He shall deliver thee in six troubles: yea, in seven there shall no evil touch thee. - Job 5

Online TahoeBlue

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http://www.hcvets.com/data/occupational/munji/toc.htm

2015- According to Veterans Affairs interview with  NewsWeek, 50,000 veterans  that have hepatitis C remain unidentified in the Health Administration. Jetgun devices are not listed as a risk factor for screening.  Read more

Jetgun (Airgun) Injections
 (AKA MUNJI or   PCNFI)


| - - - -
http://www.va.gov/vetapp05/files5/0531165.txt
On appeal from the Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) Regional Office (RO) in Reno, Nevada

THE ISSUE

Entitlement to service connection for Hepatitis C.


INTRODUCTION

The veteran had active service from July 1978 to May 1980.

This matter comes before the Board of Veterans' Appeals
(Board) from a November 2004 RO rating decision which denied
service connection for Hepatitis C.  Pursuant to an October
2005 motion and the Board's granting thereof, this case has
been advanced on the Board's docket under 38 U.S.C.A. § 7107
(West 2002) and 38 C.F.R. § 20.900(c) (2005).


FINDING OF FACT

Hepatitis C is a result of receiving immunizations in service
by means of a multi-use jet gun injector.



CONCLUSION OF LAW

Hepatitis C was incurred in service.  38 U.S.C.A. § 1131
(West 2002); 38 C.F.R. § 3.102, 3.303 (2005).

...

B.  Service Connection for Peripheral Neuropathy

Service connection may be granted for a disability resulting
from injury or disease incurred in or aggravated by active
service.  38 U.S.C.A. § 1131; 38 C.F.R. § 3.303.

In this case, the veteran contends that he received
vaccinations in July 1978, upon entry into active duty, and
that these injections were given by a type of air injector
and were not sanitized between injections on recruits.
 

The pertinent evidence of record will be briefly summarized. 
Service medical records show that the veteran received
several vaccinations and immunizations upon his entry into
service in July 1978.  Service medical records show no high
risk activities other than on the veteran's entrance (and
separation) examinations it was noted that he had two tattoos
on his arms. 

Post-service private treatment records show that Hepatitis C
was diagnosed in 2002
, and that the veteran had elevated
liver function tests in the years prior to that.

Behold, happy is the man whom God correcteth: therefore despise not thou the chastening of the Almighty: For he maketh sore, and bindeth up: he woundeth, and his hands make whole ; He shall deliver thee in six troubles: yea, in seven there shall no evil touch thee. - Job 5