Author Topic: Comic Book Conspiracy- Symbols and Messages in Comic Books  (Read 318747 times)

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Offline Suriel

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Re: Comic Book Conspiracy- Symbols and Messages in Comic Books
« Reply #320 on: January 29, 2009, 10:39:37 am »
If you are interested in Project Bluebeam and the elite controlling the problem, reaction and solution then Watchmen is a must read.   

Here is the plot summary:

Story
Watchmen is set in an alternate reality which closely mirrors the contemporary world of the 1980s. The primary point of divergence is the presence of superheroes. Their existence in this iteration of America is shown to have dramatically affected and altered the outcomes of real-world events such as the Vietnam War and the presidency of Richard Nixon.[16] In keeping with the realism of the series, although the costumed crime fighters of Watchmen are commonly called "superheroes", the only character who possesses obvious superhuman powers is Doctor Manhattan.[17] The existence of Doctor Manhattan has given the U.S. a strategic advantage over the Soviet Union, which has increased tensions between the two nations. Additionally, superheroes have become unpopular among the public, which has led to the passage of legislation in 1977 to outlaw them. While many of the heroes retired, Doctor Manhattan and the Comedian operate as government-sanctioned agents, and Rorschach continues to operate outside the law.[18]

Plot summary
In October 1985, New York City police are investigating the murder of Edward Blake. With the police having no leads, costumed vigilante Rorschach, who keeps a personal journal, decides to probe further. Discovering Blake to be the face behind The Comedian, a costumed hero employed by the United States government, Rorschach believes he has discovered a plot to eliminate costumed adventurers and sets about warning four of his retired comrades, Dan Dreiberg (formerly the second Nite Owl), the super-powered and emotionally detached Doctor Manhattan and his lover Laurie Juspeczyk (the second Silk Spectre), and Adrian Veidt (once the hero Ozymandias, and now a successful businessman).

After Blake's funeral, Doctor Manhattan is accused on national television of causing cancer in friends and former colleagues. When the U.S. government takes the accusations seriously, Manhattan exiles himself to Mars. In doing so he throws humanity into political turmoil, with the Soviet Union invading Afghanistan to capitalize on the perceived American weakness. Rorschach's paranoid beliefs appear vindicated when Adrian Veidt narrowly survives an assassination attempt, and Rorschach himself is framed for murder and arrested.

Jaded in her relationship, and no longer kept on retainer by the government, Juspeczyk stays with Dreiberg; they don their costumes as they grow closer together. With Dreiberg starting to believe some aspects of Rorschach's conspiracy theory, the pair take it upon themselves to free him from prison. Doctor Manhattan, after analyzing his own personal history, places the fate of his involvement with human affairs in Juspeczyk's hands. He teleports her to Mars to make the case for emotional investment. During the course of the argument, Juspeczyk is forced to come to terms with the fact that Blake was her biological father, the discovery of which re-engages Doctor Manhattan's interest in humanity.

On Earth, Nite Owl and Rorschach continue to uncover the conspiracy surrounding the death of The Comedian and the accusations that drove Doctor Manhattan into exile. They discover evidence that Adrian Veidt may be behind the plan. After adding a last entry, before leaving to confront Veidt, Rorschach mails his journal to a small right wing magazine. The pair then fly to Veidt's Antarctic retreat. Veidt explains his underlying plan is to save humanity from impending nuclear war between the United States and Soviet Union by faking an alien invasion in New York City, which he hopes will unite the nations against a perceived common enemy. He also reveals that he had killed The Comedian, arranged for Dr. Manhattan's past associates to contract cancer, and staged the attempt on his own life in order to place himself above suspicion. Finding his logic callous and abhorrent, Dreiberg and Rorschach attempt to stop him but discover that Veidt has already enacted his plan.

When Doctor Manhattan and Juspeczyk arrive back to Earth, they are confronted by mass destruction and wide scale death in New York City. Doctor Manhattan notices his abilities are limited by tachyons emanating from the Antarctic, and the pair teleport there. They discover Veidt's involvement and confront him. Veidt shows everyone news broadcasts confirming the cessation of global hostilities, leading almost all present to agree that concealing the truth from the public is in the best interests of the world. Rorschach refuses to compromise and leaves, intent on revealing the truth. As he is making his way back, he is confronted by Manhattan. Rorschach tells Manhattan he'll have to kill him to stop him from exposing Veidt and his actions, and Manhattan responds by vaporizing him. Manhattan then wanders through the base and finds Veidt, who asks Manhattan if he did the right thing in the end. Manhattan's response is that "Nothing ever ends", then leaves Earth for a different galaxy without answering Veidt's question. Dreiberg and Juspeczyk go into hiding under new identities and continue their romance.

In New York City, the editor of the magazine which received Rorschach's journal had placed it in a "Crank" pile after having heard only one sentence read. Some time later (after Veidt's attack) and in need of filler material, the editor sends his assistant to grab something from the "Crank" pile. The series ends with a shot of the assistant reaching for the pile, near the top of which is Rorschach's journal.

References
Reynolds, Richard. Super Heroes: A Modern Mythology. B. T. Batsford Ltd, 1992. ISBN 0-7134-6560-3
Wright, Bradford W. Comic Book Nation: The Transformation of Youth Culture in America. Johns Hopkins, 2001. ISBN 0-8018-7450-5
16.Wright, p. 271
17.Wright, p. 272
18.Reynolds, p. 106
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Watchmen
"We have reached a stage at which we have surrounded ourselves with more things, but have less joy." - The Brothers Karamazov by Fyodor Dostoevsky translated by Ignat Avsey

Offline Brocke

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Re: Comic Book Conspiracy- Symbols and Messages in Comic Books
« Reply #321 on: January 29, 2009, 01:31:00 pm »
Re. Watchmen
Yet another of Alan Moore's brilliant creations.

I love Moore's work in spite of the fact he is high level OTO and probably A∴A∴ as well as a Mason at some level. He admittedly worships a "Snake God" [Lucifer?] and is as dark a character as H.R.Giger.



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Offline Ford

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Re: Comic Book Conspiracy- Symbols and Messages in Comic Books
« Reply #322 on: January 29, 2009, 01:42:17 pm »
After reading Freeman's post about V for Vendetta, I checked out the comic book version to see if he was correct on it being based on Crowly's occult magic. While I didn't see any rituals, V frequently quotes Crowly, and Crowly is even mentioned on one page.

I've studied the works of Moore for a long time, and I still don't know whose side he's on. I don't think being an occultist or a Mason automatically makes a person pro NWO. I've spoken to some Masons who appeared to be hugely anti NWO. (Of course they could have been scamming me.)

I don't pretend to know all the ins and outs of the Mason/NWO connection, but In the end, it's the actions of the individual that count. Moore has warned about project Blue Beam, and written about how fascism can come to a western society. Andrew Jackson was a high level Mason, and he fought the banks tooth and nail until his dying day.

Offline GoingEtheric

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Re: Comic Book Conspiracy- Symbols and Messages in Comic Books
« Reply #323 on: January 29, 2009, 01:50:10 pm »
After reading Freeman's post about V for Vendetta, I checked out the comic book version to see if he was correct on it being based on Crowly's occult magic. While I didn't see any rituals, V frequently quotes Crowly, and Crowly is even mentioned on one page....
ford, no research needed. look up "hollywoods war on god". they did excellent research on crowley in V.

Offline Suriel

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Re: Comic Book Conspiracy- Symbols and Messages in Comic Books
« Reply #324 on: January 29, 2009, 01:52:21 pm »
Oh yeah I love his work to.  The  Rorschach origin story is probably one of my favorite comic book book moments.  I saw an interview where he talked about the "snake God" he worships and that he calls it "Sweetie".  It's true name is Glycon.



Glycon was a snake god, according to the satirist Lucian, who provides the only literary reference to the deity. Lucian claimed Glycon was created in the mid-second century by the Greek prophet Alexander of Abonutichus. Lucian was ill-disposed toward the cult, calling Alexander the "oracle-monger" and accusing the whole enterprise of being a hoax — Glycon himself was supposedly a glove puppet.

Macedonian cultural roots
The cult possibly originated in Macedonia, where similar snake cults had existed for centuries. The Macedonians believed snakes had magical powers relating to fertility and had a rich mythology on this subject, for example the story of Olympias' impregnation by Zeus disguised as a serpent.

Early years
At least initially, the cult did not worship an abstraction or a spirit of a snake but an actual, physical serpent that was said to embody the god. According to the cult's mythology, the snake appeared after Alexander had foretold the coming of a new incarnation of Asclepius. When the people gathered in the marketplace of Abonutichus at noon, when the incarnation was supposed to occur, Alexander produced a serpent egg and sliced it open, revealing the god within. Within a week it grew to the size of a man with the features of a man on its face, including long blond hair. At this point the figure resembling this description was apparently a puppet that appeared in the temple. In some references Glycon was a trained snake with a puppet head.

As with previous Macedonian snake cults, the focus of worship at the temple was on fertility. Barren women would bring offerings to Glycon in hopes of becoming pregnant. According to Lucian, Alexander had less magical ways of causing pregnancy among his flock as well. The god was also believed to offer protection against the plague.

Spread and influence
By 160, the worship of Glycon had undoubtedly spread beyond the Aegean. An inscription from Antioch of that date records a slogan, "Glycon protect us from the plague-cloud" that is consistent with the description we have from Lucian. Also in that year the governor of Asia, Publius Mummius Sisenna Rutilianus, declared himself protector of Glycon's oracle. The governor later married Alexander's daughter. According to Lucian, another Roman governor, of Cappadocia, was led by Glycon's oracle to his death in Armenia, and even the Emperor himself was not immune to the cult: Marcus Aurelius sought prophesies from Alexander and his snake god.

Meanwhile, Abonutichus, a small fishing village before the arrival of the cult, became an important town and accepted another name, Ionopolis. It is uncertain what role the popularity of Glycon played in the rise of the city.

In short order Glycon worship was found throughout the vast area between the Danube and Euphrates. Beginning late in the reign of Antoninus Pius and continuing into the third century, official Roman coins were struck in honor of Glycon, attesting his popularity. While the cult gradually lost followers after the death of its leader in c.170, it survived for at least a hundred years thereafter, with Alexander being incorporated into its mythology as a grandson of Asclepius. Some evidence indicates the cult survived into the fourth century.

Modern times
Residual superstitions originating with Glycon were reported by some researchers to continue even into modern times. A Turkish friend of Jona Lendering once told him that in the early 1970s, when he was hunting in the hills near Inebolu, the modern name of Ionopolis, people warned him about a magical snake.

Following his (as he put it) "coming out" as a magician in 1993, the English graphic novelist and occultist Alan Moore has declared himself a devotee of Glycon, and has cheerfully admitted in interviews the absurdity of worshiping a probable fraud. Moore has declared he considers all ideas (including fictions) in some sense, "real". He has performed spoken word under the name the Moon and Serpent Grand Egyptian Theatre of Marvels. With Steve Moore, Alan Moore is preparing a book — entitled The Moon and Serpent Bumper Book of Magic, which will detail the history of magic, and particularly the histories of both Alexander and Glycon.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Glycon
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Offline akston

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Re: Comic Book Conspiracy- Symbols and Messages in Comic Books
« Reply #325 on: January 29, 2009, 02:24:52 pm »
I don't particularly care that the snake symbol is a part of the human subconscious - it is what it is, it sheds it's skin, etc.

But aren't there some communities in the hill country (Ozarks?), real hillbilly types, that worship and play with venemous snakes in an echo of shamanism? For anyone to be taking psychological symbols literally in this day and age is pretty... well, infantile.

Oh, yeah, here it is: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Snake_handling

It's a Pentecostal sect. Parse that one if you will.
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Offline piratenews

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Re: Comic Book Conspiracy- Symbols and Messages in Comic Books
« Reply #326 on: February 04, 2009, 09:58:32 am »
Batman The Dark Knight Founded 9.11 Truth

Comic graphic novel The Dark Knight Strikes Again (DK2) published 12 Sept 2001, where Batman assassinated the president of the United States (Lex Luthor = Bush/Cheney) by ramming his robot Batjet into the president's skyscraper (as seen on History Channel), in retaliation of the president's false-flag robot attack to bomb Metropolis (NY City).

The Joker was Robin, a mindcontrol slave working as a false-flag suicide bomber for the president of USA.

Batgirl and Batman used THERMITE and EXPLOSIVE CONTROLLED DEMOLITION to kill Robin/Joker.



TDK movie did not contain a scene of the Batjet crashing into a skyscraper, but used this image on movie posters and the WB website, WHICH IS A BIG DAMN HINT TO GO READ THE BOOK! Too bad the sheeple are lazy, illiterate and stupid.

Offline BlackFeather

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Re: Comic Book Conspiracy- Symbols and Messages in Comic Books
« Reply #327 on: February 07, 2009, 10:08:15 am »
The images are there because the stuff sells.  Period.   People like shock.  Look at reality.  It was a huge shock for the towers to get hit.   It doesn't mean comic book artists are part of a conspiracy.  It means they went after shock value.  That is why a lot of stories involve the possibility of destroying the world.  People want to know there is a super hero who can save it.   This is a classic story archetype.  It is nothing more than that.

Offline 37

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Re: Comic Book Conspiracy- Symbols and Messages in Comic Books
« Reply #328 on: February 07, 2009, 11:41:49 am »
The images are there because the stuff sells.  Period.   People like shock.  Look at reality.  It was a huge shock for the towers to get hit.   It doesn't mean comic book artists are part of a conspiracy.  It means they went after shock value.  That is why a lot of stories involve the possibility of destroying the world.  People want to know there is a super hero who can save it.   This is a classic story archetype.  It is nothing more than that.

Pretty specific details within this example of your archetype...

http://i401.photobucket.com/albums/pp94/JJZero2/X-Men189Page2.jpg



It's from Uncanny X men #189, 1984. A time traveller from the 21rst century reflects on seeing the WTC burn.
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Offline BlackFeather

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Re: Comic Book Conspiracy- Symbols and Messages in Comic Books
« Reply #329 on: February 08, 2009, 08:56:43 am »
Pretty specific details within this example of your archetype...


And that same shocking style imagery was in "Planet of the Apes" and heralded as one of the most dramatic movie moments--liberty's head and hand sticking up from the sand.

It sells.

I think now the trend is to push more what the comic book publishers will buy, but at the beginning it was shock and just good story writing.   If you go to those writers book clubs online and start perusing titles you see books on creating archetypes, plot lines, etc.  Even plots fall into certain categories.  Plots with shock value would sell more--hence end of the world stuff in the early years of comic books.

Now what is the main driving force is money.  I can't deny that there may be government intentions behind them now.  Certainly there are publisher intentions.   It's money.  It sells because it's what the people want (or what they think they want).   They are new versions of old tales even back to Heracles.    It's a desire for a real hero.

Offline 37

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Re: Comic Book Conspiracy- Symbols and Messages in Comic Books
« Reply #330 on: February 11, 2009, 01:29:00 am »
I don't really see how your example compares to what we have been discussing?

Do apes run the planet?

Is the head of the Statue of Liberty on a beach somewhere?


Hard to believe you can't see the difference.

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Offline akston

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Offline White Rose Sophie

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Re: Comic Book Conspiracy- Symbols and Messages in Comic Books
« Reply #332 on: February 20, 2009, 07:31:00 pm »
"Six more beautiful".......Are they nuts?

THat is one of the most horrific things I've ever seen.  UGH.  >:(

They are NOT even being subtle about it anymore, are they?

Offline akston

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Re: Comic Book Conspiracy- Symbols and Messages in Comic Books
« Reply #333 on: February 21, 2009, 02:21:09 am »
Literature is tricky, of course, because you have to parse who's being portrayed as the hero, and who's the villain. When you get into morally ambiguous types and anti-heroes - such as Moore and much of modernist literature fills its pages with - it gets even trickier to discern intent when themes like this are played with, and the issue of irony complicates things further. Warning? Conditioning? A lot of people here have strong opinions on Moore's work based on the entirety of his output, and there have been a lot of good points made on the subject in this thread. There's a quote this brings to mind, though...

Quote
The obvious question, to which the heirs of statistical Naturalism have no answer, is: if heroes and geniuses are not to be regarded as representative of mankind, by reason of their numerical rarity, why are freaks and monsters to be regarded as representative? Why are the problems of a bearded lady of greater universal significance than the problems of a genius? Why is the soul of a murderer worth studying, but not the soul of a hero?

The answer lies in the basic metaphysical premise of Naturalism, whether its practitioners ever chose it consciously or not: as an outgrowth of modern philosophy, that basic premise is anti-man, anti-mind, anti-life; and, as an outgrowth of the altruist morality, Naturalism is a frantic escape from moral judgment—a long, wailing plea for pity, for tolerance, for the forgiveness of anything.

Ayn Rand, “The Esthetic Vacuum of Our Age,”
The Romantic Manifesto, 125

Obviously Alan Moore's a brilliant man, his writing is well executed, intricate, and troubling on many levels. Is he saying Ozymandias is right? From my admittedly fuzzy memory of the graphic novel, Ozymandias is portrayed as misguided, a dark genius with his own notion of the good for mankind. (The Egyptology angle is interesting, not only because that symbolism is shared by occultists and secret societies, but because of the way that society operated. And the Shelley poem of the same name, of course.) What about Rorschach? Is his vigilantism justified? Well, it gets the job done, even if the man is little more than a cipher, a representation of the operation of chaos in the world. Everything is shades of grey and black. Dr. Manhattan, the omniscient observer, is, in the end, disgusted with the affair.

The Watchmen seems to be a meditation on human nature, and if I'm right, this is what makes it so timeless and compelling. What is the sense of life Moore projects, and how does this view of humanity influence what one should do about humanity? Are we heroes, capable of rational, independent thought, efficacious, capable of navigating through the world and fulfilling our potential? Are we a Hobbesian rabble, lost, fouling our nest, in need of a ruler or the Leviathan of the state to keep us from self-destructing? Who is the fool, living in the past, who is ascendant? That's what the Watchmen asks, and anyone walking into that theatre looking for an escapist adventure and spectacle without something of a critical attitude towards these issues is going to get schooled in a viewpoint that lies at some point along the axis between these two views.







(Oh, incidentally, online sources have the number '3' as being associated with Jupiter, for those that think numerology means anything. Look at the release date for the film. Very funny, guys. Get a grip.)

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Offline 37

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Re: Comic Book Conspiracy- Symbols and Messages in Comic Books
« Reply #334 on: February 21, 2009, 11:53:37 am »


See the Stargate?

Sacrifice for the New Era...

Familiar theme.  Even the new President is calling for a New Era of sacrifice and service for the good of the world.
"Whatever it is, I am against it."  -Groucho Marx

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Offline White Rose Sophie

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Re: Comic Book Conspiracy- Symbols and Messages in Comic Books
« Reply #335 on: February 21, 2009, 11:55:54 am »
3+6+9 = 18   (18 divided by 3=6, or 6+6+6)

Interesting, isn't it?   :D

Offline akston

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Re: Comic Book Conspiracy- Symbols and Messages in Comic Books
« Reply #336 on: February 21, 2009, 08:18:14 pm »
See the Stargate?

Sacrifice for the New Era...

Familiar theme.  Even the new President is calling for a New Era of sacrifice and service for the good of the world.

The kitty/sphinx is a genetic hybrid, as well.
stat·ism /ˈsteɪtɪzəm/
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Offline akston

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Re: Comic Book Conspiracy- Symbols and Messages in Comic Books
« Reply #337 on: February 21, 2009, 08:26:03 pm »
3+6+9 = 18   (18 divided by 3=6, or 6+6+6)

Interesting, isn't it?   :D

Somehow I ended up having the 333rd response to this thread. Lol. Just goes to show you that coincidence does rear its head on occasion. But the film date is evidently chosen to have some sort of impact.

stat·ism /ˈsteɪtɪzəm/
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Offline Ford

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Re: Comic Book Conspiracy- Symbols and Messages in Comic Books
« Reply #338 on: February 23, 2009, 05:28:57 pm »
From a new post at Mercury's Garden

http://mercurysgarden.blogspot.com/2009/02/wonder-woman-attacks-nyc.html

(Please visit and support my blog, and feel free to post as many links as you want.)

Wonder Woman Attacks NYC!


 
I've displayed this cover before. I found it while I was browsing through comic book covers. The cover date is January 1982, and it is issue #287.



While the building on the cover is obviously not the twin towers, (it does look a little like building 7 though)I found it intriguing . A runaway plane is about to wreck New York. Inside the plane is the goddess Diana (Wonder Woman), and the Titans of Myth (Teen Titans) are trying to get things under control. All this and the huntress too! But wait a minute, I thought Diana was the Huntress? Oh well.

I thought there might be more to this issue than meets the eye, so I sought one out and bought it.

It starts out with Donna Troy and Starfire checking out the waterfront. They are attacked by green hooded thugs, and Donna is kidnapped. It turns out it was all a plot by Doctor Cyber to get Wonder Woman to fly her invisible plane to New York. (To those of you giggling at her name, Doctor Cyber first appeared in the sixties, long before the internet was common and "Cyber" became the term we are familiar with.)




It appears Doctor Cyber's base of operations is the Pentagon, (lol) where she is performing some sort of ritual in order to take over the "invisible" plane. Cyber baby, the purple jumpsuit has got to go, but the gold mask is bitchin!







There you have it. You have just witnessed a black magick ritual designed to take remote control of an invisible plane with a goddess inside of it, and crash it into the twin towers, depicted in a comic book twenty years before 911.

If you are wondering, the Titans were able to save the people from the falling debris, and with Wonder Woman they were able to rescue Donna.

When I think I have uncovered all there is, something like this comes in and floors me. And Condi said no one envisioned terrorists using airplanes as a weapon.

Offline Biggs

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Re: Comic Book Conspiracy- Symbols and Messages in Comic Books
« Reply #339 on: February 24, 2009, 04:14:05 am »
more amazing finds Ford, many thanks for enlightening us
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Offline Suriel

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Re: Comic Book Conspiracy- Symbols and Messages in Comic Books
« Reply #340 on: February 24, 2009, 03:32:44 pm »
I find it interesting all of the Illuminati symbols that are in Watchmen.  There is this one part when a character named Moloch is killed.  It is one shot to the head with two lines of blood coming down.  It looks like the Illuminati pyramid with the gunshot bing the eye.  I tried to find a picture of it on-line but it was not there.  Also I find it interesting that on Ozymandias is a pyramid with an eye in the middle rather then on the top.  Could it be a reference to the folowing picture of Alister Crowley?  I think that is an eye in the middle but I am not for sure.

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Offline White Rose Sophie

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Re: Comic Book Conspiracy- Symbols and Messages in Comic Books
« Reply #341 on: February 24, 2009, 10:27:48 pm »
more amazing finds Ford, many thanks for enlightening us

That is indeed unbelievable.  Just wondering - was it foreshadowing, or conditioning?

Offline Brocke

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Re: Comic Book Conspiracy- Symbols and Messages in Comic Books
« Reply #342 on: February 24, 2009, 10:28:42 pm »
Slightly off topic but interesting...

Lesbian Batwoman takes over Gotham City

By staff writers

Herald Sun

February 13, 2009 07:52am


Back in town ... a new look Batwoman is taking over from where Batman left off. Picture: DC Comics

    * Batwoman replaces Batman in comic series
    * Character is now a red-headed lesbian
    * Batman star Bale sorry for tantrum

SHE first swung into action 50 years ago, helping her boyfriend Batman rid Gotham City of villains until she was killed off in 1979.

Now Batwoman is making a comeback, replacing Batman - who is missing, presumed dead - in the popular DC Comics series.

And this time around the superheroine's alter ego, Kathy Kane, is a red-headed lesbian.

Billed as a "lesbian socialite by night and a crime-fighter by later in the night", the new Batwoman is clad in a figure-hugging black outfit with knee-high red stiletto boots.

She is set to appear in at leasty 12 issues of the Detective Comics, the first of which will appear in June, the BBC reports.

"We've been waiting to unlock her - it's long overdue," DC Comics writer Greg Rucka said.

"Yes, she's a lesbian. She's also a redhead.

"If people are going to have problems with it, that's their issue."

Batwoman was first outed in 2006 and has made a number of cameo appearances in the series.

Batman was killed by a fireball last November, though fans suspect he'll be back.

http://www.news.com.au/entertainment/story/0,28383,25048288-7485,00.html


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Offline Ford

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Re: Wonder Woman crashes plane into WTC 20 years before 911
« Reply #343 on: February 25, 2009, 10:12:24 am »
That is indeed unbelievable.  Just wondering - was it foreshadowing, or conditioning?

I am leaning towards psychic phenomena and synchronicity, but after seeing a super villian sitting in the middle of a pentagram in order to take over a plane and crash it into the WTC, and it was written 20 years before 911, I am starting to have doubts.

Brocke, I think diversity in comics is great, but replacing Batman will lead to plummeting sales and he will be back. There is no way Warner brothers are going to let their multi million dollar baby stay absent for long.

Suriel, I found the Moloch thing interesting as well.

Offline 37

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Re: Comic Book Conspiracy- Symbols and Messages in Comic Books
« Reply #344 on: February 25, 2009, 10:41:30 am »
This is NOT off topic!!
IMO...It's just HOT!

The new Batwoman is clad in a figure-hugging black outfit with knee-high red stiletto boots.  :o


"Yes, she's a lesbian. She's also a redhead.
"If people are going to have problems with it, that's their issue."



I have no problem with any of that...I'm hoping they turn it into a cinematic three-way trilogy!
  ;)


Seriously, though, how decadent can we get?
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Offline Jackson Holly

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Re: Comic Book Conspiracy- Symbols and Messages in Comic Books
« Reply #345 on: February 25, 2009, 01:10:08 pm »
FORD:

Your last post about the WONDER WOMAN 911 connections is AMAZING! I thought I would post a bit more about the Amazon PRINCESS DIANA and her creator William Moulton Marston.

There is no doubt that the so-called "sexual revolution" and the horrific degradation of society which we have witnessed was a big part of the Predictive Programming spoonfed the youth of our country throughout the 20th Century. Of course at this point in time, the sado~masochistic titilation is WAY beyond description. It IS the culture!


«« W O N D E R  W O M A N »»



~~~ O ~~~

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wonder_Woman

EXCERPT:
Wonder Woman is a fictional character, a DC Comics superheroine created by William Moulton Marston. First appearing in All Star Comics #8 (December 1941), she is one of three characters to have been continuously published by DC Comics since the company's 1944 inception (except for a brief hiatus in 1984).[1]

Wonder Woman is a member of a fictional, all-female tribe of Amazons (based on the Amazons of Greek mythology) who is sent to "man's world" as an ambassador of peace, charged with the mission of imparting the Amazonian ideals of peace and harmony to "Patriarch's World." Among the Amazons she is known as Princess Diana (being the daughter of Amazon queen Hippolyta); in "man's world" she takes the secret identity of Diana Prince. Her powers include super strength, enhanced speed and stamina, and flight. She is highly proficient in hand-to-hand combat and in the art of tactical warfare. She also possesses an animal-like cunning and a natural rapport with animals, which has in the past been presented as an actual ability to communicate with the animal kingdom. She also makes use of her Lasso of Truth (which forces those bound by it to tell the truth), a pair of indestructible bracelets, and an invisible plane.


WONDER WOMAN debut.

~~~~~~~ O ~~~~~~~

Psychologist and inventor


William Moulton Marston

Marston is credited as the creator of the systolic blood-pressure test used in an attempt to detect deception, which became one component of the modern polygraph. According to their son, Marston's wife, Elizabeth Holloway Marston, was also involved in the development of the systolic blood-pressure test: "According to Marston’s son, it was his mother Elizabeth, Marston’s wife, who suggested to him that 'When she got mad or excited, her blood pressure seemed to climb' (Lamb, 2001). Although Elizabeth is not listed as Marston’s collaborator in his early work, Lamb, Matte (1996), and others refer directly and indirectly to Elizabeth’s work on her husband’s deception research. She also appears in a picture taken in his polygraph laboratory in the 1920s (reproduced in Marston, 1938)."[3][4] Some have linked this device to Wonder Woman's Lasso of Truth, but a direct connection is difficult to demonstrate.

From this work, Marston had been convinced that women were more honest and reliable than men, and could work faster and more accurately. During his lifetime, Marston championed the causes of women of the day.

Marston was also a writer of essays in popular psychology.

In 1928 he published Emotions of Normal People, which elaborated the DISC Theory. Marston viewed people behaving along two axes, with their attention being either passive or active, depending on the individual's perception of his or her environment as either favourable or antagonistic. By placing the axes at right angles, four quadrants form with each describing a behavioral pattern:

    * Dominance produces activity in an antagonistic environment
    * Inducement produces activity in a favourable environment
    * Steadiness produces passivity in a favourable environment
    * Compliance produces passivity in an antagonistic environment.

Marston posited that there is a male notion of freedom that is inherently anarchic and violent, and an opposing female notion based on "Love Allure" that leads to an ideal state of submission to loving authority.

~~~~~~~~~~

Themes

Marston's Wonder Woman is often cited as an early example of bondage themes entering popular culture: physical submission appears again and again throughout Marston's comics work, with Wonder Woman and her criminal opponents frequently being tied up or otherwise restrained, and her Amazonian friends engaging in frequent wrestling and bondage play (possibly based on Marston's earlier research studies on sorority initiations). These elements were softened by later writers of the series. Though Marston had described female nature as submissive, in his other writings and interviews he referred to submission to women as a noble and potentially world-saving practice, leading ideally to the establishment of a matriarchy, and did not shy away from the sexual implications of this:

    "The only hope for peace is to teach people who are full of pep and unbound force to enjoy being bound ... Only when the control of self by others is more pleasant than the unbound assertion of self in human relationships can we hope for a stable, peaceful human society. ... Giving to others, being controlled by them, submitting to other people cannot possibly be enjoyable without a strong erotic element".[7]

About male readers, he later wrote: "Give them an alluring woman stronger than themselves to submit to, and they'll be proud to become her willing slaves!"[8]

Read entire article:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/William_Moulton_Marston

Link to,one of his Psch books: Integrative Psychology
http://books.google.com/url?id=N4v4qwkVw8IC&q=http://links.jstor.org/sici%3
Fsici%3D0002-9556(193404)46:2%3C365:IPASOU%3E2.0.CO%3B2-C&linkid=
2&usg=AFQjCNEf9OL7QkDcKKMA-C44rxiVUuEf
qg&source=gbs_web_references_r&cad=2_0


~~~~~~~~~~~~~ O ~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Images from Marston's book: Private Life of Julius Caesar



~~~~~~~



~~~~~~~



~~~~~~~~~~

Other FANTASTIC Links:

http://www.comicbookresources.com/?page=article&id=7921

http://www.castlekeys.com/Pages/wonder.html

http://pwbeat.publishersweekly.com/blog/category/books/

http://pwbeat.publishersweekly.com/blog/category/history/

~~~~~~~~~~~~



~~~~~~~~~~~~



~~~~~~~~~~~~



~~~~~~~~~~~~



~~~~~~~~~~~~



~~~~~~ OOO ~~~~~~~




St. Augustine: -The truth is like a lion; you don't have to defend it.
Let it loose; it will defend itself.-

Offline GoingEtheric

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Re: Comic Book Conspiracy- Symbols and Messages in Comic Books
« Reply #346 on: February 25, 2009, 07:54:38 pm »
more amazing finds Ford, many thanks for enlightening us
true that. You find some cool stuff Ford.
Jackson holly too

Offline akston

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Re: Comic Book Conspiracy- Symbols and Messages in Comic Books
« Reply #347 on: February 26, 2009, 10:28:07 am »
One really interesting avenue of investigation is associated with Dr. Strange. Apologies if this has already been covered, I unearthed it while looking into the Watchmen the other night but couldn't get into it in the context of that discussion. But there is a link, and that link is Roschach.



Dr. Strange is a co-creation of Stan Lee and Steve Ditko, there's a bit of history here. I'll try to keep this short, but I found it fascinating.

Steve Ditko started working for smaller comics companies and was supposedly an adherent of Objectivism - as I am, and which has nothing to do with the occult (other than to those Christians that assume all athiests are crypto-occultists of some sort). I have my doubts, and suspect it was more of a half-understood interest, for reasons that will soon become clear. He created a couple of characters based on Rand's uncompromisingly moral system. One was named Mr. A (after an Aristotelian maxim) and the other was called The Question.



During his tenure as a hero for the Charlton Comics label, the plotlines of The Question (at least according to online sources) would have this masked vigilante (who had roots in Ditko's love of Golden-Age heroes like The Spirit), demonstrating how minor ethical failings would lead individuals to greater transgressions as they tried to cover up their small lies, which metastasized into greater lies and led to associations with criminals. In the end, they are just as guilty as the greater criminals for the choices they've made.

Charlton Comics was acquired by Marvel. Alan Moore wanted to use the heroes from the Charlton Universe in his planned Watchmen series, but was overruled, so had to settle for basing his characters on The Blue Beetle, Captain Atom, Nightshade, The Question, and others.



As becomes clear, Rorschach - a cold-blooded vigilante with a twisted sense of justice that can only be described as immoral - is in fact a perversion of The Question, and an expression of Alan Moore's worldview rather than Ayn Rand's. But back to Dr. Strange.

I'm not sure what happened with Steve Ditko when he started working for Stan Lee, but I did find out that Lee was one of the very few playwrights - read 'propagandists' for the US Army.

Quote
Stan Lee joined, what was to become Marvel Comics, when he was 16 years old. Just one year later he was the youngest editor in the business. But when World War II came around, he joined the Army, serving in the Signal Corps. For three years, the Army had Lee write training films and manuals for all branches of military service. In addition, Stan Lee has the distinction of becoming one of only nine men, including William Saroyan, in the U.S. Army to be given the military classification "playwright."
http://www.ironmanarmory.com/STANLEE.html

Any attempts to trace the biographies of the prior owners of Marvel (Martin Goodman) and the magazine conglomerate it was part of didn't turn up any further specific information this forum would find interesting, at least not online. Unless you count Captain America, I haven't looked into that angle.

Anyways - Stan Lee created Dr. Strange with Steve Ditko, which was hugely popular with the college set in the 1960s for it's surrealistic renderings and bizarre, symbolic plotlines. What I really wanted to bring your attention to was this, however:



Note the window behind Dr. Strange. It's called the 'Anomaly Rue'. It turns out to be an artistic nod to Will Eisner's spirit.

Quote
  The shape in Doctor Strange's window [DSSS #62, #64, #66, #72]. An arcane geomagickal correlation.
On the name: David Quinn, the writer of Doctor Strange, Sorcerer Supreme at the time, told Neilalien he made up the name "anomaly rue".  On the symbol: From Ditko Looked Up: Eisner's artistic influence on Ditko is present in much of Ditko earliest work. The Spirit lived underground in a tomb in a cemetery and had an abstract German expressionist window - a circle with criss-crosses on it to create curved wedges of black - which Ditko adopted not only for Dr. Strange's mansion, but can be seen at various points throughout Ditko 1950s Charlton mystery stories. A close-up of a Spirit promo image where the tomb window can be seen:
http://www.neilalien.com/doc/names/



Now, look at the model of the solar system sitting in Ozymandias' laboratory or whatever that room is, at the end of The Watchmen. I've put the pic at the end of this post since it's so large. I'm sure I've seen that shape (or glyph?) elsewhere before, like as one of the windows in Rotwang's house in Metropolis, but I'm going to have to flip through the film and put up a screencap if I find one.

So what exactly is going on here? I bet there's a lot more to be dug up on Moore, Lee, Kirby, Ditko, and the comics industry at the time. I look forward to your comments.






stat·ism /ˈsteɪtɪzəm/
1. the principle or policy of concentrating extensive economic, political, and related controls in the state at the cost of individual liberty.

statismwatch.ca - a media compilation and forum exposing statism and its roots from a Canadian perspective

Offline Ford

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Re: Comic Book Conspiracy- Symbols and Messages in Comic Books
« Reply #348 on: February 26, 2009, 12:04:54 pm »
Some pretty interesting stuff. Charton was aquired by D.C. Comics, not Marvel. They have pretty much killed off all the Charton heroes.

Captain Atom / Dr. Manhatten - Became the supervillian known as Monarch, who was presumably killed by Superboy Prime

Blue Beetle / Owl Man- Shot in the head by Maxwell Lord, deceased. Replaced by a Hispanic teenager

The Question / Rosharch- Dead of lung cancer. Replaced by Hispanic lesbian woman

Thunderbolt/ Ozzymandis - Seldom used

Nightshade - Seldom used

I like these characters, and it's a shame that DC has screwed them up as much as they have. There is nothing wrong with diversity in comics, but they could do this with new characters instead of replacing the old ones. And heroes dying and coming back to life has become a cliche. 

Offline TheCaliKid

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Re: Comic Book Conspiracy- Symbols and Messages in Comic Books
« Reply #349 on: February 26, 2009, 12:10:40 pm »
Wonder Woman = 66

Look at the way it is drawn. Just like the Disney logo.
Better to beg for forgiveness, than to ask for permission

Offline Ford

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Re: Comic Book Conspiracy- Symbols and Messages in Comic Books
« Reply #350 on: February 26, 2009, 04:51:05 pm »
In this clip, starting at 6:55 Wonder Woman is representing her home island of Themyscira at a global warming confernece.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qgt7Ve9FGf4

"If your pollution continues to affect my home, my mother is less likely to withdraw than she is to attempt a military solution."

Offline Ford

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Re: Comic Book Conspiracy- Symbols and Messages in Comic Books
« Reply #351 on: February 27, 2009, 08:27:01 am »
This interview with Alan Moore blew me away.

http://conspiracygrimoire.com/2009/02/22/alan-moore-on-magick/
Quote
"I’ve realized that you have to be careful what you say and write, There is something spooky about writing. I read an interview with [cartoonist] Carol Lay recently where she mentioned that she had to take care not to draw anything too negative in her scripts because it would probably happen. Robert Crumb had agreed with her on this. He said that it’s really a kind of mind over matter thing, you draw something and then it happens, which is why Crumb always draws his sex fantasies. You’ll find yourself writing about events that haven’t happened yet, and at the same time, you’ll also find all kinds of eerie feedback between your text and life. When I started to notice that sort of stuff becoming predominant in my work, I realized I had a choice - I could either ignore it and assume that it is a product of my overtired perceptions, or I could explore it and see if there is anything interesting there."

Offline 37

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Re: Comic Book Conspiracy- Symbols and Messages in Comic Books
« Reply #352 on: February 27, 2009, 10:10:29 am »
Chills.

Stephen King and Philip K. Dick have both commented on the strange powers of storytelling in the real world.
"Whatever it is, I am against it."  -Groucho Marx

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Offline Ford

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Re: Comic Book Conspiracy- Symbols and Messages in Comic Books
« Reply #353 on: March 13, 2009, 08:12:41 pm »
Most of you will remember this cover.

http://mercurysgarden.blogspot.com/2009/03/deathstroke-terminator.html



Take a look at the barcode.



On the bar code, you can see the dates 1941 and 2001, with a 6 on both sides of them. Anyone familiar with bar codes knows that the sixes to the right of the center are symbolized by two thin lines. Two thin lines are also at the beginning, the center, and the end. The reason for these lines is supposedly so the scanner knows when to stop. If you take the two thin center lines and give them a value of 6, then you get 6, 1941, 6, 2001, 6. 1941 was the year Pearl Harbor was bombed, and of course our generation's Pearl Harbor occurred in 2001. Three sixes is the biblical mark of the beast.

The inside of the book deals with an altered race of humans called the "genetix", and Deathstroke"s crucifixtion and resurection. In one panel, the terrorist wars of 08 are referenced.


Offline therevolutionisinme

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Re:Symbols and Messages...now rockband the vid game!!!!! ahhhhhh
« Reply #354 on: March 14, 2009, 02:43:07 am »
if u have the xbox game rockband, please try and demonstrate what i am about to show u

modify ur character. add tattoos. use the default ones, look for one called AWESOMENESS/or awesome i forget.  modify it again, change the scale. take a good hard look at whats in front of u now...a pyramid w an all seeing eye and a serpent caduceus.

PLEASE COMMENT ON THIS! im horrified.

~colleen
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Offline Pupil

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Re: Comic Book Conspiracy- Symbols and Messages in Comic Books
« Reply #355 on: March 27, 2009, 12:58:32 am »
Take a look at the barcode.



On the bar code, you can see the dates 1941 and 2001, with a 6 on both sides of them. Anyone familiar with bar codes knows that the sixes to the right of the center are symbolized by two thin lines. Two thin lines are also at the beginning, the center, and the end. The reason for these lines is supposedly so the scanner knows when to stop. If you take the two thin center lines and give them a value of 6, then you get 6, 1941, 6, 2001, 6. 1941 was the year Pearl Harbor was bombed, and of course our generation's Pearl Harbor occurred in 2001. Three sixes is the biblical mark of the beast.

Construction on the Pentagon also started September 11, 1941:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Pentagon#Construction

Quote
Contracts totaling $31,100,000 were finalized with McShain and the other contractors on September 11, 1941, and ground was broken for the Pentagon the same day.

Offline ThePicard

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Re: Comic Book Conspiracy- Symbols and Messages in Comic Books
« Reply #356 on: April 27, 2009, 02:56:14 pm »
This interview with Alan Moore blew me away.

http://conspiracygrimoire.com/2009/02/22/alan-moore-on-magick/
"I’ve realized that you have to be careful what you say and write, There is something spooky about writing. I read an interview with [cartoonist] Carol Lay recently where she mentioned that she had to take care not to draw anything too negative in her scripts because it would probably happen. Robert Crumb had agreed with her on this. He said that it’s really a kind of mind over matter thing, you draw something and then it happens, which is why Crumb always draws his sex fantasies. You’ll find yourself writing about events that haven’t happened yet, and at the same time, you’ll also find all kinds of eerie feedback between your text and life. When I started to notice that sort of stuff becoming predominant in my work, I realized I had a choice - I could either ignore it and assume that it is a product of my overtired perceptions, or I could explore it and see if there is anything interesting there."





Stephen King and Philip K. Dick have both commented on the strange powers of storytelling in the real world.


Grant Morrison - comic book writer, novelist, playright, "counterculture" advocate - has also spoken of this concept, especially in regards to his comic "The Invisibles." I can't find the interview right now, but he essentially said that the things he was writing in his comic were starting to happen to him in real life.

Offline Ford

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Re: Comic Book Conspiracy- Symbols and Messages in Comic Books
« Reply #357 on: April 27, 2009, 10:12:37 pm »
Sorry I've been gone a bit, I've had some computer problems. Right now, they aren't letting me post pics to this forum, but check out this post from my blog and feel free to upload the pics here.


http://mercurysgarden.blogspot.com/2009/04/wonder-woman-vs-black-lightning.html

Offline 37

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Re: Comic Book Conspiracy- Symbols and Messages in Comic Books
« Reply #358 on: April 28, 2009, 08:38:37 am »
Sorry I've been gone a bit, I've had some computer problems. Right now, they aren't letting me post pics to this forum, but check out this post from my blog and feel free to upload the pics here.


http://mercurysgarden.blogspot.com/2009/04/wonder-woman-vs-black-lightning.html





Glad you're back, Ford.
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Offline 37

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"Whatever it is, I am against it."  -Groucho Marx

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