Author Topic: Tap vs. Bottled–What Should You Drink?(Yahoo4Tap)  (Read 8973 times)

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Offline 37

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Tap vs. Bottled–What Should You Drink?(Yahoo4Tap)
« on: January 14, 2008, 12:34:24 pm »
Got Propaganda?

http://food.yahoo.com/blog/beautyeats/22317/tap-vs-bottled-what-should-you-drink

Tap vs. Bottled–What Should You Drink?

Glug, glug, glug--that’s the sound a ginormous number of us make as we sip bottled water in our cars, at the gym, behind our desks.

The sound you DON’T hear is the thwack of 60 million bottles a day being tossed into U.S. landfills, where they can take up to 1,000 years to biodegrade.

If that’s not enough to turn your conscience a brighter shade of green, add this: Producing those bottles burns through 1.5 million barrels of crude oil annually--enough fuel to keep 100,000 cars running for a year. Recycling helps but reusing is even better. Invest in a couple of portable, dishwasher-safe, stainless steel bottles like Klean Kanteens that won’t leach nasty chemicals into your water. (Don’t get into the habit of refilling the water bottle you just emptied; the polyethylene terephthalate it’s made of breaks down with multiple usings.)
 
4 REASONS TO TURN ON THE TAP

1. Tap water is tested daily
Under the Safe Drinking Water Act, water suppliers are required to provide an annual report on the quality of your local water and to test tap water daily. By comparison, the FDA examines bottled water only weekly, and consumers can’t get the agency’s results. You can easily get the lowdown on your state’s drinking water quality at  http://www.epa.gov/safewater/dwinfo/index.html

2. Tap water is a bargain 
Bottled water costs about 500 times more than tap. If you’re into really fancy labels, up to 1,000 times more.

3. Tap water is a tooth saver
It has more fluoride than bottled water, which helps prevent tooth decay. (Yes, you never outgrow your need for fluoride.)

4. Tap water is often tasty
Some places (New York City for one) have delicious water, but if you don’t love the flavor of yours, the solution is simple: Run your tap water through a Brita or Pur filter to remove most tastes and odors. The average home filter goes for $8.99 and produces the equivalent of 300 large (16.9 ounce) bottles of water. That’s about $0.03 cents a bottle, versus the $1.25 or so you’d pay in a market. 

One last thing: Don't just think about making this switch; actually do it. Today. It does the world and you good. Plus, allowing nagging, unfinished tasks (known as NUTs) to go undone can make your RealAge 8 years older!

"Whatever it is, I am against it."  -Groucho Marx

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Offline 2Revolutions

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Offline Nailer

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Re: Tap vs. Bottled–What Should You Drink?(Yahoo4Tap)
« Reply #2 on: January 14, 2008, 12:54:55 pm »
Tap and bottled are the same. My wife used to work at PEPSI where they bottled the water and it comes straight out of the city tap into a tank where it is then put into bottles. No extra filtering or additives.
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Offline larsonstdoc

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Re: Tap vs. Bottled–What Should You Drink?(Yahoo4Tap)
« Reply #3 on: January 14, 2008, 01:20:03 pm »


     In our town you can't drink the water out of tap.  We have distilled the water in our town and when we are done there is about a third of a cup of dirt and sand and whatever else there is.  If you live way up in Colorado or Montana you might get by with not filtering your water.
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Offline sid

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Re: Tap vs. Bottled–What Should You Drink?(Yahoo4Tap)
« Reply #4 on: January 14, 2008, 03:15:37 pm »
I went to a reverse osmosis system about 10 years ago.  Tap water tastes absolutely horrid after drinking the RO water for all these years.

setmefree

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Re: Tap vs. Bottled–What Should You Drink?(Yahoo4Tap)
« Reply #5 on: January 14, 2008, 04:04:19 pm »
So what about the Culligan deals in the grocery stores?  I refill my gallons with it.  I was wondering if I was just paying for tap.  I read the brochure on it but nothing about removing flouride.  If flouride is ok to swallow then why when you get a flouride treatment at the dentist do they make you spit it out?  Why not swallow toothpaste?  It's not brain surgery. 

Offline SlaveState

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Re: Tap vs. Bottled–What Should You Drink?(Yahoo4Tap)
« Reply #6 on: January 14, 2008, 04:30:51 pm »
Well water and then through a Berkey...tap water tastes like gasoline to me now.

Look into iodine supplementation, it will help remove fluoride from your thyroid where it does its worst.

setmefree

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Re: Tap vs. Bottled–What Should You Drink?(Yahoo4Tap)
« Reply #7 on: January 14, 2008, 04:37:05 pm »
Well water and then through a Berkey...tap water tastes like gasoline to me now.

Look into iodine supplementation, it will help remove fluoride from your thyroid where it does its worst.

Could this be why there is such a problem with obesity?  fluoride affecting the thyroid?

Offline SlaveState

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Re: Tap vs. Bottled–What Should You Drink?(Yahoo4Tap)
« Reply #8 on: January 14, 2008, 04:50:35 pm »
Yes, fluoride causes hypothyroidism in most people drastically slowing metabolism and also making people docile and lethargic. It's why fluoride is such a good opiate.

Almost all SSRI drugs (prozac etc.) are fluorine based as well.

Offline SlaveState

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Re: Tap vs. Bottled–What Should You Drink?(Yahoo4Tap)
« Reply #9 on: January 14, 2008, 04:57:25 pm »
Here is some info on iodine and fluoride:

http://findarticles.com/p/articles/mi_m0ISW/is_2003_May/ai_100767875

Iodine supplementation markedly increases urinary excretion of fluoride and bromide
Townsend Letter for Doctors and Patients,  May, 2003 
[/red]

Editor:

While the debate continues, regarding benefits and adverse effects of fluoridation of our water supply and bromination of our food supply, what can one do to minimize the toxic effects of these 2 halides? One approach in decreasing the body burden of fluoride and bromide is orthoiodo-supplementation, that is iodine/iodide supplementation in daily amount for whole body sufficiency.

Null and Feldman wrote an excellent appraisal of the fluoride controversy in the last 3 issues of this journal. (1-3) Another halide with toxic effects on the thyroid gland and the central nervous system is bromide. (4-6) Daily doses of bromide as low as 1 mg/kg body weight/day resulted in goitrogenic and thyrotoxic effects in rats. (7) This amount is the acceptable daily intake (ADI) for bromide, as proposed by the FAQ/WHO Pesticides Committees. Based on studies in human volunteers and rats, Van Leeuven et al, suggested that the ADI should be 10 times lower. (7) So, the controversy about the safety of bromide continues.

Is there a practical and simple way to lower the body's burden of fluoride and bromide? It has been known for sometime now that bromide competes with chloride in the extracellular space and that the total molar concentration of bromide plus chloride remains constant. (8) This concept has been used to decrease extracellular bromide levels by saline loading. However, the presence of bromide in the thyroid gland (9) and the central nervous system (10) suggests that there is another intracellular "pool" of bromide, not responding to chloride.
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In the thyroid gland, bromide competes with iodide for uptake, oxydation and organification. (9,11 and vido infra)

Therefore, increasing iodide intake should lower bromide levels in the thyroid, preventing and reversing its thyrotoxic and goitrogenic effects. The same applies to fluoride. Galletti and Joyet (12) evaluated the effect of 5-10 mg fluoride on thyroid functions in hyperthyroid patients. Although fluoride inhibited the iodide-concentrating mechanism of the thyroid, fluoride did not accumulate in the thyroid. Based on their radioactive tracer studies, they concluded "Fluorine does not impair the capacity of the gland to synthesize thyroid hormones when there is an abundance of iodide in the blood." Therefore, fluoride toxicity depends on iodide supply.

Based on a review of previous studies, we have calculated the amount of iodine/iodide necessary for sufficiency of the whole human body. (13) This amount was equivalent to 2 drops of Lugol solution, containing 5 mg iodine and 7.5 mg iodide. We tested a solid dosage form containing 2 drops of Lugol per tablet, administered daily for 3 months in 10 healthy women. There was no adverse effects observed on urinalysis, hematology, blood chemistry, thyroid functions and ultrasound of the thyroid. (14)

In the process of developing an iodine/iodide-loading test to assess sufficiency of the whole human body, we measured the amount of the 4 halides in 24h urine collections in 3 male and 3 female subjects under baseline conditions, and following a single ingestion of one, two and three tablets of the preparation, and in 5 of the subjects following one month on 3 tablets/day. Urinary levels of fluoride, chloride, bromide and iodide were measured by the ion-selective electrode procedure. (15) Chloride levels were measured directly in urine samples, and the other 3 halides were measured following chromatography on anion exchange resin. There was a progressive increase in urinary levels of fluoride and bromide with increasing intake of the preparation. The highest urinary levels were observed following 3 tablets. These high levels persisted even after one month on 3 tablets. The table presents the results obtained in a male subject following a single dose of one, two and three tablets; and after one month on 3 tabl ets of this preparation.

He did not reach iodine sufficiency even after one month on 3 tablets/day. Based on the results of the loading test, the body is considered iodine sufficient when at least 90% of the oral amount is excreted in the 24h urine collection. Urinary iodine levels in this subject were 149.6 uM/24h or 19 mg/24h representing only 51% of the dose.

The baseline level of urinary fluoride was very low, but bromide concentration was 18.4 mg/24h, 3 times the ADI recommended by Van Leeuwen et al. (6) Following supplementation with the iodine/iodide preparation, there was a progressive increase in the excretion of fluoride and bromide. With 3 tablets, the 24h excretion of fluoride was 17.5 times baseline level; and for bromide, 18 times baseline level. These high levels persisted even after one month of supplementation at 3 tablets/day, being 15 times baseline level for fluoride, and 16 times for bromide. After one month, the estimated total amount of halide excreted was 24 mg fluoride and 8700mg bromide. It is unlikely that such large amounts of halides came from the thyroid gland. It would seem that the whole body is being detoxified. Orthoiodo-supplementation could be used under medical supervision to detoxify the body from unwanted halides in a manner similar to the use of EDTA for the detoxification of heavy metals.

 The last national nutritional survey revealed that 15% of the US adult female population are iodine-deficient by the WHO standard, that is less than 0.05 mg/L urine. (16) Over the last 20 years, iodine was replaced with bromine in the bread making process. (13) The risk ratio for breast cancer 40 years ago was one in twenty and now one in eight. (17) It is of interest to note that breast tissue contains lactoperoxydase which is capable of oxydation and organification of iodide and bromide. The breast needs iodine for normal function and protection against breast cancer. (13) High bromide levels in breast tissue would compete with iodine, interfering with the cancer-protecting role of iodine in the breast.

The RDA for iodine is based on the amount of iodine/iodide needed to prevent goiter, cretinism and hypothyroidism. The optimal requirement of the whole human body for iodine has never been studied. Based on a review of published data, we previously proposed that an amount of iodine 100 times the RDA would be required for iodine sufficient of the whole human body. (13) This amount is equivalent to 2 drops of Lugol solution. We are pursuing further research on the use of the orthoiodo supplementation as a means of detoxification of fluoride and bromide; and for prevention and control of fibrocystic disease of the breast and breast cancer.

Reprint of the manuscripts describing the orthoiodo-supplementation, the iodine/iodide loading test and the technique for measuring urinary halide levels are available at no charge, upon request.
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Guy. E. Abraham, MD

c/o Optimox Corporation

P.O. Box 3378

Torrance, California 90510-3378

USA

800-223-1601

Fax:310-618-8748



Effect of increasing intake of an Iodine/Iodide supplement (Iodoral[R]),
on urinary excretion of halides in a male subject

                                      Supplementation*

Halide                  Pre  1 Tab       2 Tab     3 Tab     3 Tab x 1Mo

Fluoride (uM/24h)       2.8  12.0        22.6      48.9          42
Chloride (mM/24h)       297   341         305       333         370
Bromide (uM/24h)        230   240         584      4188         3625
Iodide (uM/24h)        0.76   25          59        109        149.6
Molar Ratio
Fluoride/Iodide         3.7  0.48        0.37      0.44         0.28
Bromide/Iodide          303   9.6         9.9      38.4         24.2
Chloride/Bromide       1291  1420         519       79         102.8

* 1 Tablet contains 7.5 mg of idoide as the potassium salt and 5 mg
iodine.

References

(1.) Null, G., Feldman, M., The Fluoride Controversy continues: An Update-Part 1.58. Townsend Letter, 233:58-62, 2002.

(2.) Null, G., Feldman, M., The Fluoride Controversy Continues: An Update -- Part 2...72. Townsend Letter, 234:72-78, 2003.

(3.) Null, G., Feldman, M., The Fluoride controversy Continues: An Update - Part 3...117. Townsend Letter, 235:117-121, 2003.

(4.) Ewing, J.A., Grant, WJ., The Bromide Hazard, South Med J, 58:148-152, 1965.

(5.) Sangster, B., et al, The influence of sodium bromide in man: A study in human volunteers with special emphasis on the endocrine and the central nervous system. Ed Chem Toxic, 21:409-419, 1983.


Offline Aden

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Re: Tap vs. Bottled–What Should You Drink?(Yahoo4Tap)
« Reply #10 on: January 14, 2008, 07:09:13 pm »

...yes, Aquafina and Dasani are both regular tap water.


Woah.. so why do I bother buying bottled water... I have seen bottled water that advertises "Fluoride Added", but i din't know it was in Dasani.  I know I feel better when i drink the Dasani than if I drink the tap water here.

Offline 70983

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Re: Tap vs. Bottled–What Should You Drink?(Yahoo4Tap)
« Reply #11 on: January 14, 2008, 07:13:44 pm »
Yeah i always thought dasani tasted pretty good...are you sure its just tap?
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setmefree

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Re: Tap vs. Bottled–What Should You Drink?(Yahoo4Tap)
« Reply #12 on: January 14, 2008, 07:35:04 pm »
If it's that windmill thing they have outside of grocery stores then yes... it is tap water ran through a filter. The filters usually take lead and things like that out but I'm not sure about the mercury and I know it does not remove the fluoride.

It's a culligan dispenser inside the store.

Offline SlaveState

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Re: Tap vs. Bottled–What Should You Drink?(Yahoo4Tap)
« Reply #13 on: January 15, 2008, 02:37:23 am »
Hey man.. so do you think a Berkey filter and tap water is a better substitute than ordering bottled spring water?  I was thinking about buying a filter. Worth the money I take it?

Berkey is definitely worth it. I've had mine for a few years and also ordered them as gifts for others. Keep in mind though that while the berkey will get out just about everything, it will not remove fluoride as it is so small. They do sell a post-filter element that will remove fluoride though. So if you run it through both you should be good.

You can get a water test done for about $70 that will tell you whats in your water including the levels of fluoride and chlorine. If I was going to rely on any water service I would get their water tested...bottled "spring" water has been found to have everything from arsenic to prozac in it.

Offline SlaveState

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Re: Tap vs. Bottled–What Should You Drink?(Yahoo4Tap)
« Reply #14 on: January 15, 2008, 03:06:30 am »
Something else I wanted to add...most bottled water comes in plastic that is known to leach various chemicals that act as estrogen precursors. In other words, drinking out of certain plastic bottles may make you effeminate. Not only that but once you dispose of it, these chemicals bleed into the environment and then effect groundwater and wildlife.

From my research only the most expensive brands from places like Whole Foods etc. come in decent plastic.

Quote
Baby feeding bottles and other everday plastic items could be causing serious harm, says researcher Frederick vom Saal. He believes that Bisphenol-A (BPA), a man-made chemical used to manufacture polycarbonate products such as hard plastic baby bottles and food storage containers, is extremely harmful.

Professor vom Saal, from the University of Missouri-Columbia, compiled the first study that brought the adverse health effects of BPA to light. He says he now has the backing of more than 95 other independent scientific studies with findings that match. California lawmakers will use this evidence as they consider the nation's first ban of BPA in plastic products made for babies and toddlers next week.

Professor vom Saal said recent studies have shown that BPA is extremely harmful, even in very low doses. The chemical acts like the female hormone estrogen and interferes with the body's natural processes. BPA has been linked to adverse effects on male reproduction, altered immune system function, behavioral changes, learning disabilities, brain damage and an increased chance for certain cancers. Researchers are most concerned about the exposure of babies to the chemical. "The science is clear and the findings are not just scary, they are horrific," vom Saal said. "When you feed a baby out of a clear, hard plastic bottle, it's like giving the baby a birth control pill."

The case for a new government safety standard concerning BPA is documented in vom Saal's article appearing in Environmental Health Perspectives. The last U.S. Environmental Protection Agency risk assessment for BPA was conducted in the 1980's. In his paper, vom Saal says that the latest research showing adverse effects of the chemical are all conducted with an amount of BPA less than the levels normally found in the human body. "If BPA was treated as a drug, it would have been pulled immediately," vom Saal said. "We are not saying get rid of plastics. This chemical can be replaced right now by safer materials and the public would never notice the difference."

Next week, vom Saal will speak to the California legislature which is proposing a bill banning the use of BPA in products made for children three years of age or younger.

Offline sid

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Re: Tap vs. Bottled–What Should You Drink?(Yahoo4Tap)
« Reply #15 on: January 15, 2008, 08:22:21 am »

You can get a water test done for about $70 that will tell you whats in your water including the levels of fluoride and chlorine. If I was going to rely on any water service I would get their water tested...bottled "spring" water has been found to have everything from arsenic to prozac in it.
You might try checking with your local city or county water dept.  Some of them will test your water for a small charge, sometimes for free, if you take a bottle of it in to them.  Universities and colleges sometimes will do this too if you get ahold of the right department.