9/11/2001 Attacks Were An Inside Job > Frozen CIA Operative Tim Osmon/Osama bin Laden is re-killed for another fake narrative

*Goodbye CIA's Suicide Bombers (OBL), Hello CIA's SCADA Terror (Saif al-Adel)

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Dig:
So now that they re-killed the frozen corpse of CIA agent Tim Osmon/Osama bin Laden, we are introduced to a no face "threat" who relies on cybernetics to fulfill "Al-CIA-duh's objectives":
Former CIA Operative and Egyptian Special Forces officer named new Al Qaeda leader
http://www.rawstory.com/rs/2011/05/17/former-egyptian-special-forces-officer-named-new-al-qaeda-leader/
By Agence France-Presse
Tuesday, May 17th, 2011 -- 9:36 pm

WASHINGTON — Al-Qaeda has chosen a former Egyptian Special Forces officer as interim leader of the violent extremist group in the wake of Osama bin Laden's death earlier this month, CNN reported Tuesday. Saif al-Adel, a top Al-Qaeda strategist and senior military leader, has been tapped as "caretaker" chief of the group, CNN reported, citing former Libyan militant Noman Benotman, who has renounced Al-Qaeda's ideology. Pakistan's The News newspaper corroborated the claim, citing unnamed sources in an article datelined Rawalpindi, a city home to the military headquarters of the Pakistani Armed Forces near the capital Islamabad. The decision to chose Adel, also known as Muhamad Ibrahim Makkawi, came as militants grew increasingly restive over the lack of a formal successor to bin Laden, who was killed in a dramatic US commando raid deep in Pakistan on May 2, Benotman told CNN. Bin Laden's long-time deputy Ayman al-Zawahiri, another Egyptian, is considered to be his presumed successor. Benotman said the appointment of Adel on a temporary basis may be a way for the group to gauge reaction to having someone outside the Muslim holy region of the Arabian Peninsula at the helm.

So who is this CIA Operative? What are his plans?

Well, he is the kind of CIA Operative who has his own CIA publishing company which distributes his CIA books all over the world to manufacture more ghosts for the Pentagon to defend against. He is a Pentagon public relations dream come true. And what space does he operate in? Why cyberspace of course...


To appear in Handbook on Internet Crime
(Y. Jewkes and M. Yar, eds.),
Willan Publishing, 2009.
Terror‟s Web: How the Internet Is
Transforming Terrorism
Dorothy E. Denning
http://faculty.nps.edu/dedennin/publications/Denning-TerrorsWeb.pdf

In January 2004, jihadists launched two educational magazines on the Internet. The first, called the Al-Battar Training Camp, was introduced to give Muslim youth jihad training without the need to travel to a terrorist training camp. Published by the Military Committee of the Mujahideen in the Arabian Peninsula, the electronic publication offered instruction and exercises in the use of arms (WorldNetDaily, 2004). The sixth issue, published in March 2004, gave a detailed description of the organization structure of a project cell, described desired skill sets, and emphasized the importance of security, including the use of compartmentalization within project cells and dead drops (including websites) for communications up and down the chain of command (Mansfield, 2004). The magazine appeared to have been discontinued by the end of the year. The second magazine, called the Base of the Vanguard, was directed at new recruits who could not break cover to undergo formal training. Spearheaded by Saif al-Adel, the manual contains quotes and articles by al-Qa‟ida leaders, including bin Laden and al-Zawhiri. It gave technical advice on physical training, operations security, and light weapons; encouraged the use of weapons of mass destruction, and warned operatives to resist counter-terrorist psychological operations: "They will try and wear down your morale by publishing false reports about the arrest of other cells‟ (Burke, 2004). In late 2006, jihadists launched a third educational magazine thatfocused on technical issues. Called The Technical Mujahid, the first two issues covered information security technologies, including software tools for encryption (discussed later in this paper). The magazine was released by the Al-Fajr Media Center (CIIR, 2007).

Al-Qa‟ida‟s online training materials have been instrumental to jihadists planning attacks.  According to The Daily Telegraph, Nick Reilly, the 22-year old suicide bomber in the UK who tried unsuccessfully to detonate a series of nail bombs, learned how to make the bombs from videos posted on YouTube. The Telegraph also reported that Reilly had been "groomed by two men on the YouTube website who claimed to be living on the Afghan-Pakistan border and to be in touch with al-Qaeda‟ (Gardham, 2008).

Jihadists have expressed an interest in virtual reality tools, in particular flight simulation software (Internet Haganah, 2006a). Virtual reality might also be used for instruction in particular weapons such as surface-to-air missiles or to lead would-be suicide bombers through the process of detonating their bombs and receiving their promised virgins and other heavenly rewards.  Despite the benefits of online training, it comes at a price, as potential terrorists do not have the opportunity to meet established terrorists and develop personal bonds of trust. Further, online training in the use of physical weapons is not likely to be as effective as getting hands-on experience in a camp with experienced instructors. However, these limitations can be overcome if terrorists work in small groups that meet physically, and use on-line coaching to help them through difficulties. Al-Suri envisioned Muslim homes serving as training camps as well as staging grounds for waging jihad (CTC, 2006: 54).

In addition to learning from materials posted on jihadist websites, jihadists use the Internet for research. For example, in January 2002, the National Infrastructure Protection System (NIPC) reported that al-Qa‟ida members had "sought information on Supervisory Control and Data Acquisition (SCADA) systems available on multiple SCADA-related websites. They specifically sought information on water supply and wastewater management practices in the U.S. and abroad‟ (NIPC, 2002). Such information could be useful in planning either physical or cyber attacks against SCADA-controlled critical infrastructures.

Although most jihadist research may be conducted on public websites, there has been at least one reported incident of jihadists breaking into accounts to collect intelligence. According to Magnus Ranstorp, al-Qa‟ida hackers used simple password cracking tools, freely available on the Internet, to gain access to the e-mail account of a US diplomat in the Arab world.


The naming of Saif al-Adel as the new al-CIA-duh leader means that the CIA/SAIC/CICS/Kissinger/Ruth David are planning to blow up dams and nuclear reactors using STUXNET style attacks to blame it on this new CIA agent names Saif al-Adel.

HEY SAIF, YOU BETTER BLOW THE WHISTLE ASAP! CIA PATSIES LIKE YOU GOT A REAL HIGH MORTALITY RATE AND THEY ARE GOING TO SAY YOU WERE EATING PORK, GROWING POT, WATCHING YOURSELF ON TV, AND THAT YOU HAVE NORIEGA'S PORN STASH WHEN THEY GET DONE!

Dig:
Most Wanted • Most Wanted Terrorists • SAIF AL-ADEL

Conspiracy to Kill United States Nationals, to Murder, to Destroy Buildings and Property of the United States, and to Destroy the National Defense Utilities of the United States

SAIF AL-ADEL             
http://www.fbi.gov/wanted/wanted_terrorists/saif-al-adel            

Multimedia: Images
Aliases:
Muhamad Ibrahim Makkawi, Seif Al Adel, Ibrahim Al-Madani
DESCRIPTION Date(s) of Birth Used:    April 11, 1963;
April 11, 1960
Place of Birth:    Egypt
Height:    Unknown
Weight:    Unknown
Build:    Unknown
      Hair:    Dark
Eyes:    Dark
Complexion:    Olive
Sex:    Male
Citizenship:    Egyptian
Language:    Arabic

Scars and Marks:   None known
Remarks:   Al-Adel is thought to be affiliated with the Egyptian Islamic Jihad (EIJ), and is believed to be a high-ranking member of the Al-Qaeda organization.

CAUTION Saif Al-Adel is wanted in connection with the August 7, 1998, bombings of the United States Embassies in Dar es Salaam, Tanzania, and Nairobi, Kenya.
REWARD The Rewards For Justice Program, United States Department of State, is offering a reward of up to $5 million for information leading directly to the apprehension or conviction of Saif Al-Adel.
REWARD The Rewards For Justice Program, United States Department of State, is offering a reward of up to $5 million for information leading directly to the apprehension or conviction of Saif Al-Adel.
SHOULD BE CONSIDERED ARMED AND DANGEROUS

If you have any information concerning this person, please contact your local FBI office or the nearest American Embassy or Consulate.

Field Office: New York
Date(s) of Birth Used:    April 11, 1963;
April 11, 1960
Place of Birth:    Egypt
Height:    Unknown
Weight:    Unknown
Build:    Unknown
      Hair:    Dark
Eyes:    Dark
Complexion:    Olive
Sex:    Male
Citizenship:    Egyptian
Language:    Arabic

Scars and Marks:   None known
Remarks:   Al-Adel is thought to be affiliated with the Egyptian Islamic Jihad (EIJ), and is believed to be a high-ranking member of the Al-Qaeda organization.

CAUTION Saif Al-Adel is wanted in connection with the August 7, 1998, bombings of the United States Embassies in Dar es Salaam, Tanzania, and Nairobi, Kenya.
REWARD The Rewards For Justice Program, United States Department of State, is offering a reward of up to $5 million for information leading directly to the apprehension or conviction of Saif Al-Adel.
SHOULD BE CONSIDERED ARMED AND DANGEROUS

If you have any information concerning this person, please contact your local FBI office or the nearest American Embassy or Consulate.

Field Office: New York

Poster Classification: Most Wanted Terrorists

Dig:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Saif_al-Adel
In 2004, al-Adel was also alleged to be the author behind The Al-Battar Military Camp, a manual that advised prospective militants about how to strike easy targets.[23] On March 11, 2005, Al-Quds Al-Arabi published extracts from al-Adel's document "Al Quaeda's Strategy to the Year 2020".[24]

Remember how the Air Force wrote their 2020 manual?

How is this guy not Military Intelligence used to manufacture future conflicts?

Dig:
Guess what...he was captured in 2003.

Guess where...

IRAN

derrrr deeeeeeee  derrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrr


Al-Qaeda No.3, Saif al-Adel, captured in Iran
http://www.theage.com.au/articles/2003/05/27/1053801392866.html
May 28 2003 By Mark Forbes Foreign Affairs Correspondent Tehran

Al-Qaeda's third-ranked leader and alleged mastermind of this month's bombings in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia, has been seized in Iran, according to senior intelligence sources. The United States has identified Saif al-Adel as the most senior al-Qaeda member linked to the attacks that killed 34 people, including one Australian.  US intelligence believes al-Adel maintained contact with an al-Qaeda operative in Saudi Arabia, Abu Bakr al-Azdi, who directed the bombings on the ground. Intelligence sources said al-Adel, who used to be Osama bin Laden's personal bodyguard, approved the bombing plans before his capture by Iranian security forces at the start of the month, nine days before the attack. A reward of $US25 million ($A38 million), offered by the US Government for his capture, hangs over the head of al-Adel, who was promoted to number three after the capture of Khalid Sheikh Mohammed in Pakistan in March. Iran appears to be hoping to exchange al-Adel with Washington, in return for the handover of senior leaders in the anti-Iranian terrorist group Mujahideen-e-Khalq (MEK). Al-Adel would probably be initially deported to Egypt, his place of birth.  Washington has demanded Iran act against al-Qaeda leaders in the country and has conveyed a message via the United Nations of its "deep, deep concern that individuals associated with al-Qaeda have planned and directed the attack in Saudi Arabia from inside Iran". US officials identified al-Adel's presence in Iran as a major concern.  The Pentagon has recently forwarded plans to the White House on destabilising Iran's clerical government. If al-Adel was put into US hands, it would be a major blow to al-Qaeda and a significant move by Iran in the war on terror. It effectively removes one of the few remaining haven countries for the terrorist group. Al-Adel is believed to be one of several al-Qaeda figures being held, although publicly Iran has denied holding any senior operatives. It is believed that Iran, in talks with Australian Foreign Minister Alexander Downer this week, proposed a deal to take significant action on al-Qaeda if the US cracked down on the militant MEK. Formerly funded by Iraq's Saddam Hussein, the MEK are based in northern Iraq but were not heavily attacked during the US-led invasion.  Iran is concerned that the US military has talked of signing a ceasefire with the MEK, which is listed by the US State Department as a terrorist organisation. However, US sources said the group was being disbanded. Mr Downer delivered a strong message to the Iranians to be tougher on al-Qaeda, on behalf of both Canberra and Washington. The Iranians are believed to have used the meeting to convey messages back to the US. Iran wants the MEK leadership deported to Tehran for trial for assassinations and bombings. The US is believed to be prepared to remove the leadership from the region, but is reluctant to give them to the Iranians. Dr Rohan Gunaratna, author of Inside al Qaeda, last week said al-Adel was effectively al-Qaeda's operational commander. Previously he was Osama bin Laden's bodyguard, Dr Gunaratna said. Following the talks with Mr Downer, the secretary of Iran's Supreme National Security Council, Hassan Rowhani, said Iran would show no leniency to al-Qaeda members. "If they commit an offence inside Iran we will try them," he said.
Saif al-Adel in Iranian hands
http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-srv/world/specials/terror/adel.html
Washington Post, a Bilderberg Subsidiary

Adel is the key figure in a small group of al-Qaeda leaders believed to be under house arrest in Iran. The others include Sulaiman abu Ghaith, a Kuwaiti, and Saad bin Laden, a son of al-Qaeda's emir. U.S. intelligence officials said the group was detained when crossing into Iran from Afghanistan after the Sept. 11, 2001, attacks to avoid capture by U.S. forces. The Iranian government has never publicly acknowledged their presence, leading to much speculation about what restrictions they face and whether they can communicate with al-Qaeda operatives outside the country. "The question is, what does house arrest mean in the Iranian context?" said Michael Scheuer, a former CIA analyst who led the agency's unit dedicated to tracking Osama bin Laden. Scheuer and other analysts said it was likely that Adel and the others were being held by the Iranian government as a bargaining chip as well as a deterrent in its strained dealings with the U.S. government. Some U.S. officials worry that Iran could release the group or loosen their restrictions if the Bush administration presses too hard on other diplomatic disputes. "They're a guarantee against bad behavior," Scheuer said. The U.S. government has posted a $5 million reward for information leading to Adel's capture. He has been indicted for his role in the 1998 bombings of the U.S. embassies in Kenya and Tanzania, which killed more than 200 people. Al-Qaeda later claimed responsibility for the attacks. Also known as Mohammad Ibrahim al-Makkawi, Adel is believed to be about 44 years old and is a veteran of the Egyptian military. He traveled to Afghanistan in the 1980s to fight Soviet forces. He was valued for his military skills and became a key player in al-Qaeda's inner circle. But he often had bitter disagreements over strategy with bin Laden and his chief deputy, Ayman al-Zawahiri. "He clashed with them," said Osama Rushdi, an Egyptian political exile who worked alongside them in Afghanistan and Pakistan more than 15 years ago. "They didn't respect him as a military man and he didn't respect civilians." Several letters and Internet statements have been released since 2002 bearing Adel's name or aliases, leading analysts to believe that he maintains contact with al-Qaeda leaders in the region. Some U.S. intelligence officials think he may have played a direct role in organizing attacks in Saudi Arabia and elsewhere. One of the few clues to his whereabouts came in February, when an Egyptian relative of Adel's gave an interview to the London-based Arabic newspaper Asharq Al-Awsat, saying that Adel and other members of his family were in the custody of the Iranian Revolutionary Guards in Tehran.
The mythology noosphere narrative has been being built up for over 8 years!

Dig:
Hey look at the super elusive Saif al-Adel, he always shows up just exactly where the CIA needs more funding or to cover up war crimes with spooky threats (you cannot make up this narrative if you wanted to):

 
Saif al-Adel Back in Waziristan Region to help weakened Terror Network
http://www.spiegel.de/international/world/0,1518,725181,00.html
By Yassin Musharbash 10/25/2010

Former al-Qaida military chief Saif al-Adel spent the last nine years under house arrest in Iran. He has now returned to Waziristan in the border area between Pakistan and Afghanistan and appears to have got his old job back. With his help, the weakened terror network could reorganize itself. Saif al-Adel enjoys a truly outstanding reputation among Islamic militants around the world. The Egyptian, whose nom-de-guerre means "sword of justice," is considered a seasoned operational planner and an experienced field commander. He is often mentioned together with Khalid Sheikh Mohammed, the mastermind of the Sept. 11, 2001 attacks on New York and Washington. Among other things, the United States accuses him of involvement in the bombing of two US embassies in Africa in 1998. The last position Saif al-Adel held within Osama bin Laden's terror network was that of a very senior al-Qaida military chief, a role which put al-Adel at the very pinnacle of international jihadist terrorism.

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