Author Topic: Kerry, McCain Introduced Online Privacy Bill (but not really)  (Read 724 times)

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Offline decepticon

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Two high-profile U.S. senators have introduced legislation designed to give consumers more control over what information about them is collected online, but privacy advocates said the bill will do little to curb wide-spread data-collection practices now in place.

But members of privacy groups Consumer Watchdog, the Center for Digital Democracy (CDD) and Consumer Action said they couldn't support the bill. The legislation would take away some policy-making authority from the U.S. Federal Trade Commission and would take away the right of consumers to file lawsuits against companies for privacy violations, they said. The legislation also has no requirement for a national do-not-track mechanism that consumers can sign up for, and has an exemption for Facebook's data collection, critics said.

"The bill will not protect consumer privacy, who confront the ever-expanding consumer surveillance system," said Jeffrey Chester, CDD's executive director. "It is full of loopholes and definitional problems ... that basically sanction the existing data-collection marketplace."
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Offline Optimus

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Kerry/McCain Commit Treason Against 4th Amendment with BS Privacy Bill
« Reply #1 on: April 12, 2011, 11:26:07 pm »
April 12, 2011 7:56 PM PDT
Privacy 'bill of rights' exempts government agencies
by Declan McCullagh

news analysis Two U.S. senators introduced sweeping privacy legislation today that they promise will "establish a framework to protect the personal information of all Americans."

There is, however, one feature of the bill (PDF) sponsored by senators John Kerry (D-Mass.) and John McCain (R-Ariz.) that has gone relatively unnoticed: it doesn't apply to data mining, surveillance, or any other forms of activities that governments use to collect and collate Americans' personal information.

At a press conference in Washington, D.C., McCain said the privacy bill of rights will protect the "fundamental right of American citizens, that is the right to privacy." And the first sentence of the legislation proclaims that "personal privacy is worthy of protection through appropriate legislation."

But the measure applies only to companies and some nonprofit groups, not to the federal, state, and local police agencies that have adopted high-tech surveillance technologies including cell phone tracking, GPS bugs, and requests to Internet companies for users' personal information--in many cases without obtaining a search warrant from a judge.
Senators John Kerry and John McCain at press conference announcing privacy legislation

"What's a bill of rights if it doesn't provide rights against the government?" asks Jim Harper, director of information policy studies at the free-market Cato Institute.

Read more: http://news.cnet.com/8301-31921_3-20053367-281.html#ixzz1JNFQaYYs

“The Constitution is not an instrument for the government to restrain the people,
it's an instrument for the people to restrain the government.” – Patrick Henry

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