Author Topic: Exelon and Tom Ridge conduct Chernyobl style Nuclear Reactor drill 3/23/2011  (Read 16563 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Offline Optimus

  • Globalist Destroyer
  • Global Moderator
  • Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 12,802
    • GlobalGulag.com
Dresden nuclear plant to be tested March 23
March 15, 2011, 10:43 am

Emergency response plans for the Dresden nuclear plant will be tested during a March 23 drill by the Illinois Emergency Management Agency, Exelon, and Will, Grundy and Kendall counties.

The drill comes even as a third explosion hit Japan's damaged Fukushima nuclear plant late Monday evening. The blast has spurred new fears of a partial nuclear meltdown at the plant's containment system.

State and federal nuclear agencies are taking a second look at local systems and standards in the wake of the Japan disaster. According to the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission, the Fukushima nuclear plants are roughly the same age and have similar containment designs as nuclear plants at Braidwood and Dresden.

The drill at Dresden will run from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m., said Pat Thompson, an IEMA spokesperson. The plant is located northeast of Goose Lake Prairie State Park and about 10 miles northwest of Wilmington.

An estimated 71,130 people live within the emergency planning zone surrounding the Dresden plant, according to the Illinois Emergency Management Agency.

The Federal Emergency Management Agency will evaluate the response of local government agencies during the drill, Thompson said, and will make its preliminary report on the response at 2 p.m. March 25 at the Grundy County Emergency Operations Center, 1320 Union St. in Morris.

More: http://daily-journal.com/archives/dj/display.php?id=469907
“The Constitution is not an instrument for the government to restrain the people,
it's an instrument for the people to restrain the government.” – Patrick Henry

>>> Global Gulag Media & Forum <<<

Offline MonkeyPuppet

  • Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 2,976
  • aut libertas aut mors
Re: Dresden Nuclear Plant, Illinois to be 'Tested' in Drill - March 23
« Reply #1 on: March 16, 2011, 04:14:28 pm »

Just hope we don't hear "Is this real-world or exercise?" at any point during this drill.

Income Tax: Shattering The Myths
w w w . original intent . o r g

The 1911 in .45 ACP... don't leave home without it!  Safety first!!

Offline donnay

  • Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 17,961
  • Live Free Or Die Trying!
Re: Dresden Nuclear Plant, Illinois to be 'Tested' in Drill - March 23
« Reply #2 on: March 16, 2011, 04:36:46 pm »
Just hope we don't hear "Is this real-world or exercise?" at any point during this drill.

Really!  SIGH!
Please visit my website: https://www.theherbsofthefield.com/

Offline feeditup

  • Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 857
Re: Dresden Nuclear Plant, Illinois to be 'Tested' in Drill - March 23
« Reply #3 on: March 16, 2011, 04:46:30 pm »
I am going to say that some time around the 20th or the 22 keep in mind 322 scull and bones, is coming up . we will have a crazy f**king quake and this is why there just keeping quiet about the japan deal         It should also be a real big full moon around then, to take the blame


Also which Jones hasn't talked much about WTF do we do if they do declare martial law under safety style set up ??? just go to the camps because of radiation or do we duck tap the windows . fend for are self's you know that if there where a major quake this could easily be done and no one would know that they where killing people in the camps they would just say " well the radiation killed them "
Facebook is the Barn of the sheep, time to break in, Tare some f**king wool up

Offline Dig

  • All eyes are opened, or opening, to the rights of man.
  • Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 63,090
    • Git Ureself Edumacated
Re: Dresden Nuclear Plant, Illinois to be 'Tested' in Drill - March 23
« Reply #4 on: March 16, 2011, 05:59:10 pm »
Did somebody f**king say Dresden?

Are the American Nazis gonna wreak what they think is payback on the average American citizen for Churchill's 24 hours fire bombing of over 800,000 in Dresden after WWII was already won?
All eyes are opened, or opening, to the rights of man. The general spread of the light of science has already laid open to every view the palpable truth, that the mass of mankind has not been born with saddles on their backs, nor a favored few booted and spurred, ready to ride them legitimately

Anti_Illuminati

  • Guest
http://cryptome.org/eyeball/dresden/dresden-eyeball.htm

http://cryptome.org/eyeball/npp/62npp-eyeball.htm

http://www.ready.illinois.gov/ittf/publications/2003ITTFAnnualReport.pdf

Old article from 2008:

http://www.reuters.com/article/2008/09/08/utilities-operations-exelon-dresden-idUSN0842729220080908
UPDATE 2-Exelon reduces Ill. Dresden 2 reactor for work



Mon Sep 8, 2008 1:57pm EDT

(Recasts, updates with company comment)

NEW YORK, Sept 8 (Reuters) - Exelon Corp (EXC.N) reduced the 867-megawatt Unit 2 at the Dresden nuclear power station in Illinois over the weekend for maintenance, a spokesman for the plant said on Monday.

He could not say when the unit would return to full power due to competitive reasons.

On Sunday, with the unit at 67 percent power, Exelon told the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission the isolation condenser was inoperable following surveillance testing. In the report, the company said it would have to fix the system within 14 days or shut the unit.

The spokesman said workers were performing maintenance to adjust the cooling flow valve stroke time to retest the system.

The 1,734 MW Dresden station is located in Morris in Grundy County about 60 miles southeast of Chicago. The plant's two 867 MW Units 2 and 3 entered service in 1970 and 1971.

Unit 3 ramped up to 99 percent Monday from 96 percent Friday.

Electricity traders noted Unit 3 would likely shut in early November for a refueling outage.

One MW powers about 800 homes in Illinois.

In 2004, the NRC renewed the plant's original 40-year operating licenses for both units for another 20 years until 2029 and 2031.

Exelon, of Chicago, owns and operates more than 38,000 MW of generating capacity, markets energy commodities, and transmits and distributes electricity to 5.4 million customers and natural gas to 480,000 customers in Illinois and Pennsylvania. (Reporting by Scott DiSavino; Editing by David Gregorio)

Offline Satyagraha

  • Global Moderator
  • Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 8,941
Exelon’s Dresden Nuclear Generating Unit 3 on Line
http://www.bloomberg.com/news/2010-11-26/exelon-s-dresden-nuclear-generating-unit-3-on-line-update1-.html

Nov 26, 2010

Exelon Corp.’s Dresden Generating Station unit 3 in Morris, Illinois, returned to the electrical grid at 3:36 p.m. local time today, the company said in an e- mailed statement.

The 867-megawatt Dresden 3 reactor returned to service after a planned refueling and maintenance outage that began on Oct. 31, Exelon said in the statement. The reactor is about 9 miles east of Morris, Illinois.

The work replenished about one-third of the reactor’s fuel and workers also performed more than 9,000 inspections and maintenance activities on various plant components and systems that can’t be done while the unit is operating.

Several “major” plant modifications designed to enhance Unit 3’s reliability, including installing new electrical windings in the main generator and replacing the unit’s main power transformer, also were completed, Bob Osgood, a plant spokesman, said in the e-mailed statement today. Osgood didn’t immediately return a telephone call seeking comment.

Unit 2 at the Dresden plant was operating at full capacity while Unit 3 was offline, Osgood said in the statement. Unit 1 was shut in 1978 after beginning commercial service in 1960.

Dresden’s two operating units can produce more than 1,700 megawatts net of electricity, enough to power more than 1.5 million average homes. Chicago-based Exelon said in the statement.

Reactors often close for maintenance and refueling during the spring and fall in the U.S., when demand for heating and cooling is lower. The outages can increase demand for natural gas and coal to generate electricity in place of nuclear power.
And  the King shall answer and say unto them, Verily I say unto you, 
Inasmuch as ye have done it unto one of the least of these my brethren,  ye have done it unto me.

Matthew 25:40

Offline Satyagraha

  • Global Moderator
  • Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 8,941
NRC PROPOPOSES $65,000 FINE AGAINST THE DRESDEN STATION
FOR FAILURES TO CONTROL AND ACCOUNT FOR SPECIAL NUCLEAR MATERIAL

http://www.tmia.com/old-website/News/NRCNews_ExelonProposedFine.htm

            The Nuclear Regulatory Commission has proposed a $65,000 fine against Exelon Generation Company for failure to properly implement its program for control and accounting of special nuclear materials at the Dresden Nuclear Station between 1959 and 2007. The plant is located in Morris, Ill.
 
            The NRC qualifies the following isotopes as special nuclear material: plutonium, uranium-233, uranium enriched in the isotope U-233 or U-235.
 
            In May 2007, the Dresden Nuclear Station reported to the NRC that the plant could not account for two fuel pellets and a number of in-core detectors which totaled less than one gram of fuel material. The discovery was made during a review of the station’s special nuclear material accounting records. According to a 1977 Dresden report, the fuel pellets were supposed to be placed in the spent fuel pool but could not be located during the 2007 inspection. During the same review, station personnel determined that some records for storing and shipping in-core detectors were missing. In-core detectors are used to measure the activity of neutrons in the reactor core.
 
            These accounting failures, although unacceptable, did not result in a safety or security hazard. The pellets could not have been removed from the plant by individuals without alarming the radiation monitoring equipment. The missing pellets and in-core detectors are likely still on-site or could have been transferred to an NRC-regulated disposal site.
 
In June 2007, the NRC conducted an inspection of the plant’s Material Control & Accounting program. NRC inspectors found that, contrary to NRC regulations, the utility failed to keep complete records; establish, maintain, and follow written Material Control & Accounting procedures sufficient to account for special nuclear material at the plant; and conduct a physical inventory of all special nuclear material on a yearly basis. The inspection report is not available to the public because it contains plant security information.
 
 
“The NRC takes the issue of accounting for nuclear materials very seriously,” said Regional Administrator James Caldwell. “Even though the missing material at Dresden does not represent a danger to the public, the NRC is taking strong measures to make sure that all special nuclear material is accounted for at Dresden and at every nuclear plant in the country.”
 
Dresden has conducted an extensive search for the pellets and the in-core detectors. The utility has also implemented corrective actions to make sure the accounting problems do not recur. Dresden’s Material Control & Accounting procedures have been revised. Exelon is revising corporate procedures to ensure that visual verification of special nuclear material is performed on an annual basis for all required locations and that all special nuclear material records are retained for the lifetime of every Exelon plant.
And  the King shall answer and say unto them, Verily I say unto you, 
Inasmuch as ye have done it unto one of the least of these my brethren,  ye have done it unto me.

Matthew 25:40

Offline Satyagraha

  • Global Moderator
  • Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 8,941
Exelon says radioactive leak has been contained
http://archive.chicagobreakingnews.com/2009/06/exelon-radioactive-leak-contained-not-in-water-supply.html
June 9, 2009 2:25 PM | 2 Comments

A radioactive leak at Exelon's Dresden nuclear power plant has been contained and isn't a risk to public health, authorities said today.

Leaked tritium -- a radioactive by-product of nuclear reaction that can cause cancer and birth defects -- was found Saturday during routine tests at the Grundy County plant, according to the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission.

The leak is not believed to have left the 1,700-acre plant site. Exelon officials said leaked tritium has not entered the public water supply.

But the company hasn't found the cause or source of the leak, which was discovered in a monitoring well and storm sewers at the 37-year-old plant, the oldest privately-financed nuclear reactor in the United States and not far from the Kankakee and Des Plaines Rivers.

Workers today were digging in the "general area" where a waste pipe is believed to have failed and are testing other wells at the plant, Exelon spokeswoman Krista Lopykinski said.

"There's no danger to public or staff safety," she said.

Records show Exelon officials took steps to hide radioactive tritium spills which escaped its Braidwood Generation Station in Will County between 1996 and 2003. It agreed to pay $11.5 million toward a new water supply for the neighboring village of Godley and is now required to inform state and federal officials of tritium spills as soon as they are discovered.

Nuclear Regulatory Commission spokeswoman Viktoria Mitlyng said the latest Dresden leak was "completely different" from the Braidwood leaks because it is limited to the plant site. Federal and state monitors are overseeing Exelon's clean-up effort and the firm is not expected to be fined, Mitlyng said.

But Paul Gunther, of anti-nuclear campaign group Beyond Nuclear, said Exelon has a history of "trivializing uncontrolled and unmonitored" tritium leaks.

"Where is that contaminated water going to be 10 years from now?" Gunther said. "Groundwater can move and its movement is hard to predict."

With a radioactive half-life of 12 years, the leak will pose a toxic hazard for 120 years, increasing the cost of decommissioning the site when the plant eventually closes, Gunther added.

Campaigners say Exelon should be more proactive in replacing aging underground pipes at Dresden, and rely less on monitoring wells to detect leaks after they've happened.

The level of leaked tritium detected in the monitoring well Saturday was 3.2 million picocuries per liter of water, more than three times what the Nuclear Regulatory Commission defines as safe for drinking water.
And  the King shall answer and say unto them, Verily I say unto you, 
Inasmuch as ye have done it unto one of the least of these my brethren,  ye have done it unto me.

Matthew 25:40

Offline Satyagraha

  • Global Moderator
  • Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 8,941
Contaminated leak at La Salle Generating Station
July 5, 2010

Steps are under way today to repair a tritiated water leak discovered Wednesday at La Salle Generating Station southwest of Seneca in Brookfield Township.

Workers performing regular environmental monitoring duties discovered the elevated tritium levels at the base of a storage tank on station property, and in an adjacent monitoring well.

About 715,000 picocuries per liter was measured in the groundwater beneath the leaking storage tank.
The federal maximum for drinking water is 20,000 picocuries of tritium per liter. The California level is 400 picocuries per liter. The tritium leak is the first for the station, which has been operating since the early 1980s.

“The number is extraordinarily high,” Nuclear Regulatory Commission Region 3 spokesman Victoria Mitlyng said. “However, this level is in the monitoring well on plant property. The wells going toward the edge of the property are being tested and show no detectable levels of tritium.”
There is no evidence at this point the tritium is moving anywhere, Mitlyng said.

Station Vice President Dave Wozniak said in a news release Thursday the station is taking action to repair the source of the leaks.
“This finding has no impact on public health or safety,” Wozniak noted in the release.

Tritium is a naturally occurring isotope of hydrogen that emits a very low level of radiation, and is found in more-concentrated levels in water used in nuclear generating stations.

The Nuclear Regulatory Commission has gone on record in the past stating public health and safety has not been jeopardized by similar releases at Exelon’s Dresden and Braidwood Stations.

The incident was found Wednesday in water samples in a bermed area at the base of a water storage, or condensation, tank, near the center of plant property.

Although La Salle Station is a boiling water reactor, as opposed to a pressurized water reactor like Dresden and Braidwood Stations at Morris and Braceville, some amount of tritium is still generated by the system.

“All reactors do have tritium,” Greg Roach, the Nuclear Regulator Commission’s senior resident inspector at La Salle Station, noted today. “There is tritium in a boiling water reactor, but the concentrations are lower.”

La Salle Station was removing water from the tank today into inside storage facilities and 20,000 gallon tanks on site.
Roach said the underground tritiated water plume has not moved away from the berm tank, which is centered in the station’s 3,055-acre site, about four miles south of Marseilles.

“We sampled the surrounding monitoring wells two weeks ago, and the results were negative,” Roach said. “This just happened. The cause is unknown at this point.”

There is no indication that tritated water has spread outside the station property, station spokesman Adam Slahor said Thursday in the news release.
Additional water samples taken from monitoring wells in the vicinity show less-than-detectable levels of tritium, the release noted.
“Our monitoring program functioned as designed, alerting us to the presence of tritium early so we can address the issue quickly and effectively,” Wozniak was quoted in the news release as saying.

Both generating units at La Salle Station are continuing to operate at full power, Slahor said today.

“We’re collecting all the equipment to help fix the leak,” he said. “We are removing water from the tank, then we’ll fix the crack, and then put the water back in the tank.”

NRC resident inspectors and specialists in the agency’s Region 3 office in Lisle are keeping a close eye on the situation, according to their news release.
“Agency resident inspectors …. are reviewing the nature and impact of the leak analysis and the utility’s repair plans (and) will monitor the plant’s activities,” the release noted in part.

The NRC’s health physics experts in the regional office are looking at the tritium levels and assessing if there are any possible impacts, the release goes on to say.

“So far, there is no indication that tritium has migrated off plant property. However, the NRC is getting additional information from the utility to make a sound assessment,” the release concludes.

The tritium assessment program was initiated at La Salle Station after a series of tritiated water leaks were disclosed at Braidwood Generating Station in Braceville in late 2005.

About 6,000 gallons of tritiated water leaked into the groundwater inside and outside Braidwood Station property in the incidents in the mid-1990s, but were not made public until a decade later.
And  the King shall answer and say unto them, Verily I say unto you, 
Inasmuch as ye have done it unto one of the least of these my brethren,  ye have done it unto me.

Matthew 25:40

Offline Satyagraha

  • Global Moderator
  • Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 8,941
A Nuclear Whistleblower at Home
http://www.alternet.org/story/16097

AlterNet exclusive: A former company man charges that casks designed to hold buried nuclear waste don't meet federal safety standards and could leak.
June 6, 2003  |    
 
Oscar Shirani just didn't understand when his former employer, Exelon, wouldn't stop its high-level nuclear waste container manufacturer. The containers, like the ones Shirani say headed for the Dresden plant in Illinois, are being filled with radioactive spent fuel and installed at nuclear plants around the country. Shirani fears the shoddy work will result in affecting the health of millions of people.

Despite their delicate and deadly cargo, the casks "are nothing but garbage cans" if their fabrication violates government specs, said Shirani.

Instead of giving him a medal for thorough work and dedication,
Shirani says Exelon convinced him to transfer to another job and then, conveniently, laid him off.


The self-described "company man," turned freshly minted whistleblower, might be able to do what anti-nuclear activists have been unable to accomplish -- pounding nails into the nuclear casket, forcing old plants to shut down. Then again, the federal government could acknowledge the alleged sub-standard work and hope the casks don't leak anytime in the next few thousand years.

The nuclear industry has turned to on-site radioactive waste storage in what's called "dry casks" in order to keep nuclear plants humming. Commercial nukes all have spent fuel pools. When those are filled up -- and most are at, or near, capacity already -- environmentalists expected the industry would be forced to turn off the plants.

Like a clogged septic tank, you have to quit flushing when it's full. But environmentalists were out-flanked by industry when it figured out a new "sewage" storage plan.

Industry hoped that it would have a permanent waste site at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, long before now. Nuclear plant owners, however, could see that a Yucca repository is a far off, if ever, possibility. They moved to simply build a new and different kind of above-ground septic tank.

What Shirani alleges is that those tanks (a company called Holtec designed them and uses U.S. Tool & Die to make them) are not being fabricated to Nuclear Regulatory Commission specs. While some believe NRC specs themselves don't provide much safety assurance, Shirani did.

"I thought the NRC was a big dog and a force," he said, but without the kind of oversight he maintains was thwarted, the safety of nuclear plants "is suspect."

Failure Points

Shirani's nuke casket story is akin to, say, ordering a new Hummer from the dealership. In the glossy brochure, the thick boxy steel can repel almost anything short of armor-piercing projectiles. But when you get the SUV home, you find it's made of glued fiberglass and spills passengers all over the sidewalk at every approaching pothole.

If the casks are shoddy, would they leak radioactivity and endanger public health? Shirani could only guess that it could affect "millions." Activists say they just don't know.

"Federal regulations should not make [Shirani], or us, or the NRC, or the cask owner guess about consequences," said David Lochbaum, Union of Concerned Scientists nuclear safety engineer. "The regulations require a certain level of performance and his findings were below that minimum level. It may not be that the cask will fail when challenged, but they are unnecessarily and illegally closer to the failure point."

Welds on the casks were performed by "unqualified welders"
and materials control was inadequate for the casks, Shirani reported to Exelon in mid-2000.


Fabrication engendered brittleness in materials, weakening them, Shirani notes. He maintains Holtec failed to report holes in the neutron shielding material. He allleges that Exelon "falsified" quality assurance documents and "misled" the NRC in last year's investigation of the problem. He found "hundreds of non-conformance items." Overall, he claims that what is being manufactured to hold nuclear waste is not what was approved in conceptual design by the federal government.

"I called my people in Washington and tried to get them to do something, but they didn't do anything," said Ross Landsman, NRC Region III inspector in a January deposition provided by Shirani.

"Every time I find some stuff wrong with any of the Holtec stuff, my brilliant cohorts in Washington say, 'Give them an exemption'," Landsman said sarcastically. "Holtec, as far as I'm concerned, has a non-effective QA (quality assurance) program and US Tool & Die has no QA program whatsoever."

Landsman added that the issues raised by Shirani on the casks headed for the Dresden plant had not been resolved, despite an August 2000 audit stating the problems had been fixed.

Cover Up?

Shirani had audited Holtec and its suppliers for the Nuclear Users Procurement Issues Committee, identifying what he calls "major design and fabrication issues" against Holtec in 1999 and 2000. He filed those with the NRC in November 2000. The NRC closed the allegations procedure a year later.

Shirani said he tried to put a "stop work" order on the casks' fabrication to no avail. Anti-nuclear activists have followed up on Shirani's claims, filing Freedom of Information Act requests to find out what the government did about these claims.

The activists are backing Shirani in his quest to get the NRC to look into the original allegations and their cover up through the NRC inspector general.

"The NRC has not contacted us," responded Brian Gutherman, Holtec manager of licensing. "The NRC did approve the design as a snapshot in time. We're allowed to make certain changes below the safety threshold." Gutherman said Holtec "is absolutely not concerned" about cask safety and potential leakage, and that between the NRC and Holtec's clients, "nowhere has anyone suggested such a thing." As for Shirani, Gutherman said, "He's just making things up."

If the casks are found to be fabricated below specifications, the NRC could simply let them be. "They could be accepted as is or get approval of the [changed] design. There could also be an exemption," said NRC spokesperson John Monninger. He added, though, there is a possibility the government won't let the casks be used at all.

Insider Information

Being a whistleblower isn't easy. You can be celebrated, like Jeff Wigand who revealed the dirt on tobacco purveyors Brown & Williamson and had a movie, "The Insider," made about him. Most likely, though, whistleblowers lose their livelihood, are mocked by their former peers and considered "eccentric" at best -- all this for deciding to follow the muse of conscience instead of the dominant paradigm.

"It's ethical cleansing," of the nuclear industry, chided Union of Concerned Scientists' Lochbaum -- a former industry man himself.

Shirani's former employer, Exelon, rejected the dust-up. "His case has been heard by numerous boards and agencies and it was dismissed. There is no substantiation for those claims," said Exelon spokesperson Ann Mary Carley She could, however, say that only the labor administrative review board has heard Shirani's complaints. The board's decisions are on appeal.

As a pro-nuclear power conservative company man, Shirani can't help still believing in the efficacy of the system -- but now he believes that the system can be flawed.

"Without the enforcement [of NRC regulations] I believe that we allow these people to spit on the face of quality and safety. This would be my top priority in my life more than my financial damage -- to see justice served."
And  the King shall answer and say unto them, Verily I say unto you, 
Inasmuch as ye have done it unto one of the least of these my brethren,  ye have done it unto me.

Matthew 25:40

Offline Satyagraha

  • Global Moderator
  • Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 8,941
Exelon Carbon Sequestration and Offsets
http://www.pewclimate.org/companies_leading_the_way_belc/company_profiles/exelon/carbon_sequestration.cfm

Carbon Sequestration Technology Development

Further reductions in GHG emissions intensity in the medium- to long-term will depend upon the development and availability of cost-effective technologies that allow for a stable, reliable, and affordable supply of electricity.

Working with the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI), Exelon is one of the funders of a CO2 Capture and Storage pilot.  An integrated test center that captures actual power plant flue gas CO2 and stores it safely deep underground is a crucial step to commercializing technologies that curb CO2 emissions.  This project focuses on the first step leading to a test center. 

Initially, EPRI proposes to build and operate a CO2 capture pilot plant, treating approximately a 5-megawatt (MW) equivalent of flue gas and focusing on a variation of solvent scrubbing using chilled ammonia.  This process appears to show great promise for significantly lower energy penalties, and therefore costs, than solvent processes being investigated by others.  The pilot will be a co-funded effort with ALSTOM, an international manufacturer of rail transport and power generation equipment, which will fund approximately half of the costs.

To view carbon sequestration and offsets programs of all BELC members, visit What's Being Done in the Business Community section of this site.
And  the King shall answer and say unto them, Verily I say unto you, 
Inasmuch as ye have done it unto one of the least of these my brethren,  ye have done it unto me.

Matthew 25:40


Offline agentbluescreen

  • Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 7,435
Really!  SIGH!

Yeah - heavy water is a natural substance, it's about as dangerous as beer.

Offline ekimdrachir

  • Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 7,144
  • METATRON ON
    • Go Outside
Illinois eh

Offline Dig

  • All eyes are opened, or opening, to the rights of man.
  • Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 63,090
    • Git Ureself Edumacated
Exelon
http://www.nndb.com/company/801/000059624/

Energy company, owner of Commonwealth Edison and PECO Energy.

Official Website:
http://www.exeloncorp.com/

Industry:
Energy

Ticker:
NYSE:EXC

Corporate headquarters:
Chicago, IL

Sales:
$15.8B (2003)

Employees:
20000 (2003)


EXECUTIVES
Name   Occupation   Birth   Death   Known for
Frank M. Clark   Business   c. 1946       CEO of Commonwealth Edison
Oliver D. Kingsley, Jr.   Business   c. 1942       President and COO of Exelon, 2003-04
Corbin A. McNeill, Jr.   Business   c. 1940       Co-CEO of Exelon, 2000-02
John W. Rowe   Business   c. 1945       President and CEO of Exelon
Jack Skolds   Business   c. 1950       EVP at Exelon, 2003-07
Pamela B. Strobel   Attorney   c. 1953       Former CAO, Exelon


CURRENT BOARD MEMBERS OR DIRECTORS
Name   Occupation   Birth   Death   Known for
M. Walter D'Alessio   Business   c. 1933       Legg Mason Real Estate Services
Nicholas DeBenedictis   Business   15-Sep-1945       Aqua America
Bruce DeMars   Military   3-Jun-1935       Director, Naval Nuclear Propulsion
Nelson A. Diaz   Judge   c. 1947       Of Counsel, Cozen O'Connor
Sue Ling Gin   Business   23-Sep-1941       Flying Food Group
Rosemarie B. Greco   Business   c. 1946       Pennsylvania Health Care Reform director
Paul L. Joskow   Economist   c. 1946       Alfred P. Sloan Foundation
John M. Palms   Physicist   6-Jun-1935       President, University of South Carolina, 1991-2002
William C. Richardson   Educator   c. 1940       President of Johns Hopkins, 1990-95
Tom Ridge   Politician   26-Aug-1945       US Secretary of Homeland Security, 2003-04
John W. Rogers, Jr.   Business   c. 1958       CEO of Ariel Capital Management
John W. Rowe   Business   c. 1945       President and CEO of Exelon
Stephen D. Steinour   Business   c. 1958       CEO of Citizens Financial, 2006-08
Donald Thompson   Business   1963       President, McDonalds USA



PAST BOARD MEMBERS OR DIRECTORS
Name   Occupation   Birth   Death   Known for
Edward A. Brennan   Business   16-Jan-1934   27-Dec-2007   CEO of Sears Roebuck, 1984-95
Edgar D. Jannotta   Business   c. 1931       Chairman, William Blair & Company
Corbin A. McNeill, Jr.   Business   c. 1940       Co-CEO of Exelon, 2000-02
All eyes are opened, or opening, to the rights of man. The general spread of the light of science has already laid open to every view the palpable truth, that the mass of mankind has not been born with saddles on their backs, nor a favored few booted and spurred, ready to ride them legitimately

Offline Dig

  • All eyes are opened, or opening, to the rights of man.
  • Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 63,090
    • Git Ureself Edumacated
Exelon
http://www.sourcewatch.org/index.php?title=Exelon

Exelon Corporation
Type   Public (NYSE: EXC)
Headquarters   10 South Dearborn St., 48th Floor
Chicago, IL 60603
Area served   IL, PA
Key people   John W. Rowe, CEO
Industry   Electric Producer, Distributor, and Utility
Products   Electricity
Revenue   $18.92 billion (2007)[1]
Net income   ▲ $2.74 billion (2007)[1]
Employees   17,800
Subsidiaries   ComEd
PECO
Exelon Generation
Exelon Power
Exelon Nuclear
Exelon Power Team
Website   ExelonCorp.com


Exelon Corporation is an electricity generating and distributing company headquartered in Chicago. It was created in October 2000, by the merger of PECO Energy Company and Unicom, of Philadelphia and Chicago respectively (Unicom was the owner of Commonwealth Edison). Exelon has 5.2 million electricity customers and, in the Philadelphia suburbs, 460,000 natural gas customers.

In June, 2005 Exelon had full or majority ownership of 19 nuclear reactors in 11 nuclear power plants.

On June 30, 2005, the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission approved the merger of Exelon and Public Service Enterprise Group, a New Jersey utility. Under this merger, Exelon would have become the largest utility in the United States.[2] The two companies later broke off the agreement[3] due to pressure put on the NJ Board of Public Utilities by public interest groups, including New Jersey Citizen Action.[4]The merger sat pending in front of the NJBPU for nineteen months before Exelon concluded that they were fighting a losing battle.[5]

A shareholder resolution filed by one Exelon shareholder for the Company's 2008 annual meeting criticizes executive pay levels at the Company.


Exelon leaves Chamber of Commerce over climate policy

In September 2009, Exelon announced it was quitting the U.S. Chamber of Commerce because of the lobbying organization's opposition to climate legislation.

Explaining the company's views, CEO John W. Rowe said, "Putting a price on carbon is essential, because it will force us to do the cheapest things, like energy efficiency, first."

Exelon is the third energy company to leave the Chamber, after PG&E and PNM Resources.[6]

Power portfolio

Out of its total 26,877 MW of electric generating capacity in 2005 (2.52% of the U.S. total), Exelon produces 66.7% from nuclear, 14.8% from natural gas, 9.5% from oil, 4.7% from hydroelectricity, 3.3% from coal, 0.6% from wind, and 0.2% from biomass. Exelon owns power plants in Illinois, Massachusetts, Maryland, New Jersey, Pennsylvania, Texas, and West Virginia.[7]

Existing coal-fired power plants

Exelon owned 3 coal-fired generating stations in 2005, with 895 MW of capacity. Here is a list of Exelon's coal power plants:[7][8][9]Plant Name   State   County   Year(s) Built   Capacity   2007 CO2 Emissions   2006 SO2 Emissions
Eddystone   PA   Delaware   1960   707 MW   4,128,000 tons   6,454 tons
Cromby   PA   Chester   1954   188 MW   1,129,000 tons   5,588 tons


In 2006, Exelon's 2 coal-fired power plants emitted 5.2 million tons of CO2 and 12,000 tons of SO2.

Exelon announces plan to shut coal plants in Pennsylvania

On December 2, 2009, Exelon announced that it would retire Cromby Generating Station and two units at Eddystone Generating Station in 2011. The closures include 144 MW of coal-fired power at Cromby and another 588 MW at Eddystone. Eddystone will continue to operate 820 MW of natural gas- and oil-fired generation. Exelon senior vice president Doyle Beneby said the retirements were due to "decreased power demand, over supply of natural gas and increasing operating costs," adding that, "these aging units are no longer efficient enough to compete with newer resources."[10] The announcement comes just one day after Progress Energy said it would shut 11 aging coal-fired power units totaling almost 1,500 MW in North Carolina.[11]

Exelon Nuclear

Exelon Nuclear has its headquarters in Warrenville, Illinois and is a business unit of Exelon Coroporation. It operates the largest nuclear fleet in the nation and the third largest in the world. Exelon's ten stations -- with 17 reactors -- represent approximately 20 percent of the U.S. nuclear industry's power capacity. The stations include: Braidwood Generating Station, Byron Generation Station, Clinton Power Station, Dresden Generating Station, LaSalle County Generating Station, Limerick Generating STation, Oyster Creek Generating Station, Peach Bottom Atomic Power Station, Quad Cities Generating Station, Three Mile Island Unit-1, Zion Generating Station.[citation needed]

Exelon supports the belief that nuclear power has an imporant role in the future energy supply and has stated that "20 to 30 new nuclear plants will be needed by 2030 in order to address climate change and enhance energy security."[citation needed]

Exelon intends to file a combined construction and operating license for a single unit in Texas by the end of 2008.[citation needed]

Exelon received approval in March for an early site permit at its Clinton Station in DeWitt County, Illinois -- the first permit of its kind granted in the industry. The permit is valid for up to 20 years.[citation needed]

Peach Bottom's sleeping guards
In 2007, whistleblower Kerry Beal told the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission that guards at the Peach Bottom Atomic Power Station were sleeping on the job. He had previously brought his concerns to a plant supervisor, but was told to "be a team player." [12]

Initially, the NRC "told the plant's owner to investigate even though the accusation involved company managers." The NRC's Inspector General later ruled that asking the plant's owner, Exelon, and its security provider, Wackenhut, to investigate themselves was a violation of NRC policies. Not surprisingly, neither Exelon nor Wackenhut "were unable to substantiate the claim. But, months later, 10 security officers were videotaped sleeping on duty." The NRC then launched its own investigation and confirmed the charges, leading Wackenhut to fire the guards and Exelon to fire Wackenhut. [12]

Relicensing Three Mile Island
To overcome local opposition to the re-licensing of the Three Mile Island's unit 1 reactor, Exelon agreed "to pay for an expanded community radiation monitoring system, increase charitable donations to community groups and continue its policy of not storing waste from other nuclear plants," reported the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette. "The company also agreed not to oppose the decommissioning of the TMI Unit 2 reactor, destroyed in the 1979 accident when equipment malfunction and operator error led to a partial meltdown of the reactor core and an air release of radioactive material." [13]

Environmental record
In 2005 Exelon was required to pay $602,000 for exceeding the permitted sulfur dioxide emission limit from April through October 2004 at Cromby Generating Station in Chester County, Pennsylvania.[14]

Coal lobbying

According to lobbying disclosure forms, Exelon $1.2 million from April to June 2008, "to lobby on tax credits for renewable energy sources," as well as "on telecommunications issues, trade cases involving uranium enrichment, energy policy, the Yucca Mountain nuclear waste disposal project, energy and water appropriations, and climate change." In addition to Congress, Exelon lobbied the Office of Management and Budget, the departments of Energy, Justice and Homeland Security, the Environmental Protection Agency, Federal Energy Regulatory Commission, Government Accountability Office, Federal Communications Commission and Securities and Exchange Commission. [15]

Dynergy is a member of the American Coal Ash Association (ACAA), an umbrella lobbying group for all coal ash interests that includes major coal burners Duke Energy, Southern Company and American Electric Power as well as dozens of other companies. The group argues that the so-called "beneficial-use industry" would be eliminated if a "hazardous" designation was given for coal ash waste.[16]

ACAA set up a front group called Citizens for Recycling First, which argues that using toxic coal ash as fill in other products is safe, despite evidence to the contrary.[16]

Donations to, and support from, Barack Obama

An October, 2006 issue of Harper's magazine reported that Barack Obama had accepted $70,000 in donations from Exelon, "a leading nuclear-plant operator based in Illinois," since 2004. The article said,

At a 2005 hearing at the Senate Committee on Environment & Public Works, of which Obama is a member, the senator —- echoing the nuclear industry's current campaign to promotes nuclear energy as “green” —- said that since Congress was debating “policies to address air quality and the deleterious effects of carbon emissions on the global ecosystem, it is reasonable—and realistic—for nuclear power to remain on the table for consideration.”[17]

Citizen activism

NAACP Clearing the Air Road Tour - April 2010
In April 2010, Jacqui Patterson of the NAACP Climate Justice Initiative interviewed community members in Bridgeport. Jacqui wrote the following account of the impacts of the Bridgeport Harbor Station:[18]
Bridgeport is the second-poorest city in Connecticut after Hartford, with a per capita income just over half of the state average. The plant is wedged between Bridgeport’s Downtown and South End neighborhoods, which are among the city’s poorest. The average income of people who live within one mile of the plant is just $11,400, and over 87% of the plant’s neighbors are people of color. Six schools are within a mile of the plant, as is the University of Bridgeport (the tenth-most racially diverse university in the country, with over 60% students of color).

The stories in Bridgeport solidified a pattern that has been consistent throughout the trip including high rates of respiratory illnesses, nuisance coal ash, and disproportionate exposure by low income communities of color.
I had the pleasure of meeting with Adrienne, who is administering a training program for green jobs, Audrey whose job in the public health department has and her lifelong residency in Bridgeport have shown the impact of the coal plant on the community, and Craig who has spent the majority of his 59 years in Bridgeport and was able to provide a tour of the neighborhood surrounding the plant.

As we started our tour at the plant, we weren’t able to begin our filming in front of the plant because we were run off by security who stated that filming in front of the plant was a felony offense by order of the department of Homeland Security! During the tour you’ll see on the footage several times where I filmed the plant from afar, including a bit where I filmed the largest mountain of coal I’ve seen yet in all my visits to coal plants. And it is completely uncovered, which is why even now I have coal dust on my car. Craig, who narrated our tour, omitted any indication of filming of the plant when I was doing it, seemingly out of fear that he might be implicated by my lawlessness so watch for the coal mountain because it won’t be mentioned!

Adrienne shared some history of the South End community, where the plant is located, and talked about concerns that have been expressed by residents bout coal soot covering their cars, not being able to open their windows, and not being able to hang out laundry because of the coal ash.
All eyes are opened, or opening, to the rights of man. The general spread of the light of science has already laid open to every view the palpable truth, that the mass of mankind has not been born with saddles on their backs, nor a favored few booted and spurred, ready to ride them legitimately

Offline Dig

  • All eyes are opened, or opening, to the rights of man.
  • Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 63,090
    • Git Ureself Edumacated
Exelon leaves Chamber of Commerce over climate policy

In September 2009, Exelon announced it was quitting the U.S. Chamber of Commerce because of the lobbying organization's opposition to climate legislation.

Explaining the company's views, CEO John W. Rowe said, "Putting a price on carbon is essential, because it will force us to do the cheapest things, like energy efficiency, first."

Exelon is the third energy company to leave the Chamber, after PG&E and PNM Resources.[6]

BP wanted the carbon tax

Halliburton wants the the carbon tax

Black and Veatch wants the carbon tax

General Electric wants the carbon tax

PG&E wants the carbon tax

EVERY ENERGY COMPANY PUSHING THE CARBON TAX ARE GETTING THEMSELVES INTO INSURMOUNTABLE DEBT AND SABOTAGING THEIR OWN INDUSTRIAL FACILITIES!
All eyes are opened, or opening, to the rights of man. The general spread of the light of science has already laid open to every view the palpable truth, that the mass of mankind has not been born with saddles on their backs, nor a favored few booted and spurred, ready to ride them legitimately

Offline Dig

  • All eyes are opened, or opening, to the rights of man.
  • Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 63,090
    • Git Ureself Edumacated
Tom Ridge is on the board of directors for Exelon. You all remember Tommy Boy right?



Tom Ridge Confesses Terror Alerts Were Bogus
http://www.sweetliberty.org/issues/homeland/ridge_bogus.html
 by URI DOWBENKO

As most intelligent Americans have already suspected, the so-called "terror alerts" announced by the Department of Homeland Security during the past several years were completely bogus and were used by the Bush-Cheney Regime as a propaganda ploy to promote the equally bogus "War on Terrorism."  Former Director of Homeland Security Tom Ridge said that Bush Regime officials forced him to elevate the "threat level" on what he calls "flimsy evidence," reports USA Today. Ridge, who introduced the goofy color-coded "terror alert" system in 2002, attempted to rationalize his behavior during a Washington press conference.  Current US Homeland Security chief Michael Chertoff (whose last name means "of the devil" in Russian) is allegedly deciding how quickly to scrap the color code alert system. The color alert system has not been changed since December 2003 when it was moved from yellow to orange.  "Red" presumably means that the entire nation gets shut down military dictatorship style, since presumably "terrorists" will be found hiding under every citizen's bed.  According to USA Today, "the level is raised if a majority on the President's Homeland Security Advisory Council favors it and President Bush concurs. Among those on the council with Ridge were Attorney General John Ashcroft, FBI chief Robert Mueller, CIA director George Tenet, Defense Secretary Donald Rumsfeld and Secretary of State Colin Powell." The color-coded system was a laughing stock from the start.  Wags noted -- if the color is orange, does that mean we should all wear orange and if you don't, then that means you're a terrorist.  The infantile American population, however, accepted this Ridge nonsense without protest.  Now that Tom Ridge has confessed that the terror alerts were bogus, bamboozled Americans can once again go back to sleep...
All eyes are opened, or opening, to the rights of man. The general spread of the light of science has already laid open to every view the palpable truth, that the mass of mankind has not been born with saddles on their backs, nor a favored few booted and spurred, ready to ride them legitimately

Offline Dig

  • All eyes are opened, or opening, to the rights of man.
  • Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 63,090
    • Git Ureself Edumacated
NBC and CBS are now hyping "radiation in Chicago...radiation in Chicago"




O'Hare Radiation Detectors Go Off After Flight From Japan Lands In Chicago


Radiation detectors were activated at O'Hare Airport Wednesday after several planes from Tokyo landed in Chicago.

In the last 24 hours, five or six planes landing at O'Hare from Japan tested positive for radiation, NBC Chicago reports. The levels of radiation were reportedly "way below anything harmful."

"We are aware of the radiation," Chicago Department of Aviation spokeswoman Karen Pride told CBS News. "We are adding screenings and precautionary measures."

According to several news reports, some passengers coming off the planes had traces of radiation on them. Chicago Mayor Richard M. Daley said the federal government dictates how to handle these situations.

"Every city can't have a policy," Daley said at a Thursday press conference, according to the Chicago Sun-Times. "One says yes. One says no. You can't do that. You have to have a federal policy dealing with anyone entering the country in regards to situations like that."

NBC reports that radiation detectors at Dallas-Fort Worth Airport also went off.

"U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) is monitoring developments in Japan carefully and is specifically assessing the potential for radiological contamination associated w...
MORE

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2011/03/17/ohare-radiation-detectors_n_837255.html
All eyes are opened, or opening, to the rights of man. The general spread of the light of science has already laid open to every view the palpable truth, that the mass of mankind has not been born with saddles on their backs, nor a favored few booted and spurred, ready to ride them legitimately

Offline Dig

  • All eyes are opened, or opening, to the rights of man.
  • Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 63,090
    • Git Ureself Edumacated
At DHS...it is a big party...

Happy hour with the Department of Homeland Security
http://www.politico.com/click/stories/1012/happy_hour_with_the_department_of_homeland_security.html
By KARIN TANABE | 12/1/10 1:40 PM EST Updated: 12/1/10 1:42 PM EST

A gaggle of current and former Department of Homeland Security officials joined forces at George in Georgetown Tuesday night for a happy hour, where former DHS heads Tom Ridge and Michael Chertoff and Deputy Secretary Jane Holl Lute spoke on behalf of Secretary Janet Napolitano, who was flying back from Mexico City and unable to attend. An almost-attendee of the night was White House press secretary Robert Gibbs, who happened to be walking by when Ridge arrived, but was really heading to Café Milano next door.
All eyes are opened, or opening, to the rights of man. The general spread of the light of science has already laid open to every view the palpable truth, that the mass of mankind has not been born with saddles on their backs, nor a favored few booted and spurred, ready to ride them legitimately

Offline TRY

  • Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 1,281
The nuclear plant side->

http://forum.prisonplanet.com/index.php?action=printpage;topic=203669.0
-
http://wn.com/Radioactive_Leaks_at_Illinois_Nuclear_Plant
-

FEMA side ->

http://www.govexec.com/story_page.cfm?articleid=47374&oref=todaysnews
-
Illinois nuclear plants built to withstand quakes- 
...But some have concerns about backup power supply, spent fuel!!!

...Mar 14 2011...

http://www.chicagotribune.com/news/local/ct-met-illinois-nuke-plants-qa-20110314,0,6253601.story?track=rss

...THIS IS A BIG HEADS UP HINT!!! ^^^
-

Steve Erickson

...February 16, 2010...
 
...Steve Erickson has fifteen years of experience in commercial nuclear power in the areas of operations training and emergency preparedness in both supervisory and technical positions. For CMCG he has specialized in Emergency Preparedness Drill & Exercise program management and improvement, including drill and exercise scenario development, conduct and critique. Industry recognized leader in design and execution of NEI 06-04 Phase III Hostile Action-Based Exercises, as well as identification and resolution of EP program enhancements resulting from these exercises...

...Prior to employment by CMCG Mr. Erickson served as Emergency Preparedness Drill and Exercise Coordinator for Exelon Nuclear, responsible for the emergency preparedness drill/exercise development and conduct for the Midwest region nuclear stations (Braidwood, Byron, Clinton, Dresden, LaSalle, Quad Cities and Zion), including personal coordination of four biennial NRC graded exercises, a two-state Ingestion Pathway Exercise which included NRC Region III and National HQ NRC full-participation, and the first two NEI 06-04 Phase III exercises. Major initiatives included: Maintenance and enhancement of a single set of EP procedures for drill and exercise scheduling, development, conduct and evaluation processes for the Exelon Fleet; Involvement as a core task force member for the NEI “Hostile Action-Based Exercise” industry initiative (NEI 06-04); Maintenance of a common plant process computer accident assessment display system; Standardized a fleet-wide exercise evaluation process; Single point coordinator for all aspects of the NEI 06-04 Phase III process for the Exelon fleet...

...Steve also served in the US Navy as a Nuclear Propulsion Plant Electrical Operator on board the USS Permit (SSN-594) and also served as Electrical Operator and Shutdown Reactor Operator. While part of crew, Permit received a Presidential Unit Citation, two Meritorious Unit Citations, and a personal Letter of Commendation from Commander of Sub Group Five. Graduated in top 10% of Naval Nuclear Power School...

...More folks here->

http://cmcgllc.com/author/admin/page/2/

-
http://www.usehazus.com/chug/index.php
-
https://www.dot.il.gov/techapp/Externaljob_Postings/35084.pdf
-
http://www.ready.illinois.gov/ittf/Publications/ITTF_MeetingSchedule.pdf
-
http://www.franklincountyema.com/
-
http://www.domesticpreparedness.com/Calendar_of_Events/

...The earthquake side->

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oBi5C1kuk8Y&feature=youtube_gdata_player

-
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=k1Ai3Z0cQOE&feature=youtube_gdata_player

-

***BIG Bump for this!!!
"The UN-natural STATE of AR-chem-SAS"
           -=-=--==--========✈
                         :(;)
 hBaRIUM aCLOUDSa RNUCLEAR pSKIES
          fRacking eaRthquakes

Offline Dig

  • All eyes are opened, or opening, to the rights of man.
  • Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 63,090
    • Git Ureself Edumacated
Chernobyl meltdown occured during military drill w/sabotaged industrial controls

What happened at Chernobyl?

Staff at the plant were running tests to find out how well they could cope with a temporary shutdown of the reactor's cooling system. The test went wrong and there was a power surge. The staff tried to shut the reactor down, but instead the nuclear reaction accelerated rapidly.

"For a few seconds it was generating thousands of times the normal power output," says Michael Bluck of Imperial College London. The extreme heat from the nuclear reaction triggered an explosion, which blew the roof off both the reactor vessel and the building containing it – exposing the reactor core to the outside world – and sending radioactive material hurtling into the atmosphere.

Fires then started. Most were put out within hours, but the one in the damaged reactor burned for many days, spreading radioactive material still further.

http://www.newscientist.com/article/dn20257-why-fukushima-daiichi-wont-be-another-chernobyl.html?full=true
All eyes are opened, or opening, to the rights of man. The general spread of the light of science has already laid open to every view the palpable truth, that the mass of mankind has not been born with saddles on their backs, nor a favored few booted and spurred, ready to ride them legitimately

Offline Dig

  • All eyes are opened, or opening, to the rights of man.
  • Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 63,090
    • Git Ureself Edumacated
http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/pages/frontline/shows/reaction/readings/chernobyl.html

A far more serious accident occurred seven years later at Chernobyl, in what was then still the Soviet Union. At the time of the accident--April 26, 1986--the Chernobyl nuclear power station consisted of four operating 1,000-megawatt power reactors sited along the banks of the Pripyat River, about sixty miles north of Kiev in the Ukraine, the fertile grain-producing region of the southwestern USSR. A fifth reactor was under construction.

All the Chernobyl reactors were of a design that the Russians call the RBMK--natural uranium-fueled, water-cooled, graphite-moderated--a design that American physicist and Nobel laureate Hans Bethe has called "fundamentally faulty, having a built-in instability." Because of the instability, an RBMK reactor that loses its coolant can under certain circumstances increase in reactivity and run progressively faster and hotter rather than shut itself down. Nor were the Chernobyl reactors protected by containment structures like those required for U.S. reactors, though they were shielded with heavy concrete covers.

Without question, the accident at Chernobyl was the result of a fatal combination of ignorance and complacency. "As members of a select scientific panel convened immediately after the...accident," writes Bethe, "my colleagues and I established that the Chernobyl disaster tells us about the deficiencies of the Soviet political and administrative system rather than about problems with nuclear power."

The immediate cause of the Chernobyl accident was a mismanaged electrical-engineering experiment.

Engineers with no knowledge of reactor physics were interested to see if they could draw electricity from the turbine generator of the Number 4 reactor unit to run water pumps during an emergency when the turbine was no longer being driven by the reactor but was still spinning inertially. The engineers needed the reactor to wind up the turbine; then they planned to idle it to 2.5 percent power. Unexpected electrical demand on the afternoon of April 29 delayed the experiment until eleven o'clock that night. When the experimenters finally started, they felt pressed to make up for lost time, so they reduced the reactor's power level too rapidly. That mistake caused a rapid buildup of neutron-absorbing fission by products in the reactor core, which poisoned the reaction. To compensate, the operators withdrew a majority of the reactor's control rods, but even with the rods withdrawn, they were unable to increase the power level to more than 30 megawatts, a low level of operation at which the reactor's instability potential is at its worst and that the Chernobyl plant's own safety rules forbade.

At that point, writes Russian nuclear engineer Grigori Medvedev, "there were two options: increasing the power immediately, or waiting twenty-four hours for the poisons to dissipate. [Deputy chief engineer Dyatlov] should have waited...

But he [had an experiment to conduct and he] was unwilling to stop...

He ordered an immediate increase in the power of the reactor."


Reluctantly the operators complied. By 1 a.m. on April 26, they stabilized the reactor at 200 megawatts. It was still poisoned and increasingly difficult to control. More control rods came out. A minimum reserve for an RBMK reactor is supposed to be 30 control rods. At the end, the Number 4 unit was down to only six control rods, with 205 rods withdrawn.

The experimenters allowed this dangerous condition to develop even though they had deliberately bypassed and disconnected every important safety system, including the emergency core-cooling system. They had also disconnected every backup electrical system, down to and including diesel generators, that would have allowed them to operate the reactor controls in the event of an emergency.

At 1:23 in the morning, the engineers proceeded with their experiment by shutting down the turbine generator. That reduced the electrical supply to the reactor's water pumps, which in turn reduced the flow of cooling water through the reactor. In the coolant channels within the graphite-uranium fuel core, the water began to boil.

Graphite facilitates the fission chain reaction in a graphite reactor by slowing neutrons. Coolant water in such a reactor absorbs neutrons, thus acting as a poison. When the coolant water in the Number 4 Chernobyl unit began turning to steam, that change of phase reduced its density and made it a less effective neutron absorber. With more neutrons becoming available and few control rods inserted to absorb them, the chain reaction accelerated. The power level in the reactor began to rise.

The operators noticed the power surge and realized they needed to reduce reactivity quickly by inserting more control rods. They hit the red button of the emergency power-reduction system. Motors began driving all 205 control rods as well as the emergency protection rods into the reactor core.

But the control rods had a design flaw that now proved deadly: their tips were made of graphite. The graphite tips attached to a hollow segment one meter (3.28 feet long), which attached in turn to a five-meter absorbent segment. When the 205 control rods began driving into the surging Number 4 reactor, the graphite tip went in first. Rather than reduce the reaction, the graphite tips increased it. The control rods displaced water from the rod channels as well, increasing reactivity further. All hell broke loose--The reactor exploded.

The explosion was chemical, driven by gases and steam generated by the core runaway, not by nuclear reactions; no commercial nuclear reactor contains a high enough concentration of U-235 or plutonium to cause a nuclear explosion. Medvedev, who had once worked at Chernobyl and who was on the scene within days, describes the explosion from the testimony of eyewitnesses.

Flames, sparks, and chunks of burning material went flying into the air above the Number 4 unit. These were red-hot pieces of nuclear fuel and graphite, some of which fell onto the roof of the turbine hall where they started fires...About 50 tons of nuclear fuel evaporated and were released by the explosion into the atmosphere...In addition, about 70 tons were ejected sideways from the periphery of the core, mingling with a pile of structural debris, onto the roof...and also onto the grounds of the plant...

Some 50 tons of nuclear fuel and 800 tons of reactor graphite...remained in the reactor vault, where it formed a pit reminiscent of a volcanic crater. (The graphite still in the reactor burned up completely in the next few days.)

Coolant water in such a reactor absorbs neutrons, thus acting as a poison. When the coolant water in the Number 4 Chernobyl unit began turning to steam, that change of phase reduced its density and made it a less effective neutron absorber. With more neutrons becoming available and few control rods inserted to absorb them, the chain reaction accelerated. The power level in the reactor began to rise.

The resulting radioactive release, Medvedev estimates, was equivalent to ten Hiroshimas. In fact, since the Hiroshima bomb was an airburst--no part of the fireball touching the ground--the Chernobyl release polluted the countryside much more than ten Hiroshimas would have done.

No commercial reactor in the United States is designed anything like the RBMK reactor. Cohen summarizes several of the differences:

1. A reactor which is unstable against a loss of water could not be licensed in the United States.

2. A reactor which is unstable against a temperature increase could not be licensed here.

3. A large power reactor without a containment [structure] could not be licensed here.

The absence of a containment structure is especially important. As Cohen point out about Chernobyl, "Post-accident analyses indicate that if there had been a U.S.-style containment, none of the radioactivity would have escaped, and there would have been no injuries or deaths."

But if the design of Russian and U.S. reactors is critically different, broad similarities between the two countries' management of nuclear-power development led both national programs into difficulty. In the U.S.S.R., writes Medvedev, "the ordinary citizen was made to believe that the peaceful atom was virtually a panacea and the ultimate in genuine safety, ecological cleanliness, and reliability." He quotes Soviet scientists and managers who waxed as enthusiastic in the heyday of nuclear power development as the U.S. AEC's Lewis Strauss. "Nuclear power stations are like stars that shine all day long!" academician M.A. Styrikovich claimed in 1980. "We shall sow them all over the land. They are perfectly safe!" The deputy head of the State Committee on the Utilization of Nuclear Energy, notes Medvedev, told the Soviet people that "nuclear reactors are regular furnaces, and the operators who run them are stokers"--an image corresponding to the glib coinage in the United States that nuclear power is "just another way to boil water."

Given such uninformed enthusiasm for technology, it isn't surprising that both the Soviet and U.S. nuclear power programs ran into difficulties, or that the difficulties in both cases were predominantly managerial. Nuclear power came to terrible disaster in the former Soviet Union because authority dominated there to the exclusion of informed technical discussion and judgment. "Accidents," writes Medvedev, "were hidden not only from the general public and the government but also from the people who worked at Soviet nuclear power stations. This latter fact posed a special danger, as failure to publicize mishaps always has unexpected consequences: it makes people careless and complacent."

Authority dominated in the early days of nuclear power in the United States as well. "The AEC and the JCAE," James Jasper notes, "placed themselves outside normal political accountability." Fortunately, both public and private sectors of the U.S. nuclear power industry learned the lessons of Three Mile Island and launched a major effort of improvement and regulation.

Three Mile Island and Chernobyl represent extreme instances of the problem that seems to trouble the American public more than any other about commercial nuclear power: its apparent danger. But risk is always relative. Friend and foe have estimated the relative risk of operating commercial nuclear power plants in the United States; their conclusions are instructive.

The most serious example of public exposure to radiation from a nuclear power plant is, of course, Chernobyl. The explosion at Chernobyl blew radioactive gas and dust high into the atmosphere, where winds dispersed it across Finland, Sweden, and central and southern Europe. "The sum if [Chernobyl] and exposures to people all over the world," writes Bernard Cohen, "will eventually, after about fifty years, reach 60 billion millirems, enough to cause about 16,000 deaths." (Millirem-mrem-is a measure of radioactivity; 1 mrem is estimated to increase one's risk of dying from cancer by about 1 in 4 million, corresponding to a reduction in life expectancy of about 2 minutes.) Cohen, a professor of physics and radiation health at the University of Pittsburgh, was responsible in the late 1980s for supervising the measurement of radon levels in some 350,000 U.S. homes. He puts Chernobyl's danger in context by pointing out that 16,000 deaths caused every year by air pollution from coal-burning power plants in the United States alone.

The rest of the world didn't choose to be irradiated by a badly designed and criminally misoperated Soviet nuclear power plant. Cohen's comparison is instructive but inappropriate. On the other hand, nuclear power serves useful purposes in the United States, and millions of Americans willingly buy the electricity that nuclear utilities generate. It ought to be appropriate to put nuclear-generated electricity in the context of other acceptable risks Americans take in the name of productivity, comfort, and convenience. Cohen does so, to startling effect:

Everything we do involves risk...There are dangers in every type of travel, but there are dangers in staying home--25 percent of all fatal accidents occur there. There are dangers in eating--food is one of the most important cause of cancer and of several other diseases--but most people eat more than is necessary. There are dangers in breathing--air pollution probably kills 100,000 Americans each year, inhaling radon and its decay products is estimated to kill 14,000 a year, and many diseases like influenza, measles, and whooping cough are contracted by inhaling germs...There are dangers in working--12,000 Americans are killed each year in job-related accidents, and probably ten times that number die from job-related illnesses--but most alternatives to working are even more dangerous. There are dangers in exercising and dangers in not getting enough exercise. Risk is an unavoidable part of our everyday lives.
All eyes are opened, or opening, to the rights of man. The general spread of the light of science has already laid open to every view the palpable truth, that the mass of mankind has not been born with saddles on their backs, nor a favored few booted and spurred, ready to ride them legitimately

Offline TRY

  • Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 1,281
***bump! Today's the day right? Wish we could get some 'in the field' reporting on this...
"The UN-natural STATE of AR-chem-SAS"
           -=-=--==--========✈
                         :(;)
 hBaRIUM aCLOUDSa RNUCLEAR pSKIES
          fRacking eaRthquakes

Offline stymo1

  • Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 1,890
Morris nuclear plant to conduct drill

March 23, 2011 (JOLIET, Ill.) (WLS) -- State and county emergency management agencies are scheduled to begin a drill at a local nuclear power plant Wednesday morning.

The Dresden nuclear power plant is in Morris.

Every nuclear power plant must conduct a drill every two years, so the drill has been planned for some time now. Emergency crews will be there with high-tech equipment to make sure that the power plant is safe.

The drill will test the response of state and local emergency agencies to a disaster at the Dresden nuclear power plant. The drill was scheduled years in advance, but it's timely in light of the nuclear disaster in Japan. The reactors at the Japanese power plant are much like that at Dresden and also around the same age.

In light of the Japanese disaster, Congressman Bobby Rush, the ranking Democrat on the House Energy and Commerce subcommittee, went on a tour of the Dresden plant last week to get reassurances about its safety. Dresden is the oldest privately owned nuclear power facility in the country.

"There will never be a nuclear facility built where there is a 100-percent guarantee that something won't happen," said Rush.

Read the rest here:
http://abclocal.go.com/wls/story?section=news&id=8029050
" It's called the American Dream because you have to be asleep to believe it." -- George Carlin

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=acLW1vFO-2Q

Offline Ninjaman

  • Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 299
oh wow, thats today

Offline Satyagraha

  • Global Moderator
  • Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 8,941
Morris nuclear plant conducts drill
http://abclocal.go.com/wls/story?section=news&id=8029050
March 23, 2011 (JOLIET, Ill.)

(WLS) -- State and county emergency management agencies began a drill at a southwest suburban nuclear power plant Wednesday morning.

The Dresden nuclear power plant is in Morris.

Every nuclear power plant must conduct a drill every two years, so the drill has been planned for some time now. Emergency crews were there with high-tech equipment to make sure that the power plant is safe.

The drill tests the response of state and local emergency agencies to a disaster at the Dresden nuclear power plant. The drill was scheduled years in advance, but it's timely in light of the nuclear disaster in Japan. The reactors at the Japanese power plant are much like those at Dresden and also around the same age.

In light of the Japanese disaster, Congressman Bobby Rush, the ranking Democrat on the House Energy and Commerce subcommittee, went on a tour of the Dresden plant last week to get reassurances about its safety. Dresden is the oldest privately owned nuclear power facility in the country.

"There will never be a nuclear facility built where there is a 100-percent guarantee that something won't happen," said Rush.

During the tour, officials pointed out improvements they have made throughout the years to make it safer, including vents and backup generators to prevent explosions and losses of cooling water, problems that crippled the Japanese plant.

"We have backup systems here now that, I believe, that if they had had them there they would not have gotten to where they are," said Tim Hanley, Dresden nuclear plant.

The safety of Illinois' nuclear reactors also is the focus of a forum later in the week hosted by Sens. Dick Durbin and Mark Kirk. The forum will examine whether Illinois is prepared for an emergency.

============================

Note: Stymo1 posted what is almost the identical article, two posts above.
There's a key difference...

Morris nuclear plant to conduct drill

March 23, 2011 (JOLIET, Ill.) (WLS) -- State and county emergency management agencies are scheduled to begin a drill at a local nuclear power plant Wednesday morning.


The earlier article was written before the drill began. I just posted the article written after the drill was underway.
Here's the thing: there is no difference in content, except for the time it was presumably written.
The article was 'canned'.
The story that we will get is already written.
If there's a problem - an 'event', you can bet those stories are already written as well.
Let's see if the same article is published later, with the heading stating, "State and county emergency management agencies have concluded a drill at a local nuclear power plant Wednesday morning."


That would be a good ending. Let's hope, and in the meantime, let's keep track of it.

And  the King shall answer and say unto them, Verily I say unto you, 
Inasmuch as ye have done it unto one of the least of these my brethren,  ye have done it unto me.

Matthew 25:40