Author Topic: New blast reported at reactor #2  (Read 4892 times)

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Offline LoreOnTerror

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New blast reported at reactor #2
« on: March 14, 2011, 06:44:28 pm »
14 March 2011 Last updated at 19:35 ET

Japan earthquake: New blast at Fukushima nuclear plant

A quake-stricken nuclear plant in Japan has been hit by a third explosion in four days, amid fears of a meltdown.

The blast occurred at reactor 2 at the Fukushima Daiichi plant, which engineers had been trying to stabilise after two other reactors exploded.

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-12740843
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Offline wouldntyouliketoknow

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Re: New blast reported at reactor #2
« Reply #1 on: March 14, 2011, 06:56:22 pm »
Operators Evacuated...


2.7m exposed of the ROD.


per cnn.../nhk

Offline wouldntyouliketoknow

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Re: New blast reported at reactor #2
« Reply #2 on: March 14, 2011, 06:59:15 pm »
The government waited TWO hours before announcing that there has been an explosion. They are talking in circles still.

BBC:
2333: More details on the reported blast at Fukushima's reactor 2. The explosion is feared to have damaged the reactor's pressure-suppression system, Kyodo says. It adds that "radiation tops legal limit" after the explosion

2340: Tokyo Electric officials are now holding a news briefing. They say the blast at reactor 2 happened "near the pressure vessel". They also confirm that some staff at the nuclear power plant are being evacuated.

Offline sharpsteve

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Re: New blast reported at reactor #2
« Reply #3 on: March 14, 2011, 07:34:26 pm »
Radiation at Fukushima plant briefly hits 8,217 micro-sieverts per hour, well above normal levels - Kyodo News http://bit.ly/fnlaRX

Offline ghost hacked

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Re: New blast reported at reactor #2
« Reply #4 on: March 14, 2011, 07:38:02 pm »
So when does the 4th one blow?
'We play the game with the bravery of being out of range.' - Roger Waters

Offline agentbluescreen

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Re: New blast reported at reactor #2
« Reply #5 on: March 14, 2011, 07:45:10 pm »
They're all doomed, the other ones are also all badly damaged. This is such a horrific corporate tragedy, far worse than the BP disaster. US Navy scientists and civil defense technicians  should have been there to assist from day one. But they were all out murdering imaginary brown enemies of Likudniks...

This is so sad - 8,217 µcvrt  -this is the fuel rods filly exposed and the containment pressure release is now also seized. this is 400 times worse than the earlier events

http://www.ustream.tv/channel/nhk-world-tv

Pray for them all

Offline agentbluescreen

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Re: New blast reported at reactor #2
« Reply #6 on: March 14, 2011, 07:50:37 pm »
So when does the 4th one blow?

They are giving up, they've pulled out the operators - just the mechanics running the water flooding - essentially firemen now "injecting" sea water. The containment vessel blew into the suppression room and that is now pressurizing.

Offline Valerius

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Re: New blast reported at reactor #2
« Reply #7 on: March 14, 2011, 07:55:49 pm »
Firemen are true heros, unlike talking heads and politicians.
"No man can put a chain about the ankle of his fellow man without at last finding the other end fastened about his own neck."  -Frederick Douglass

Offline ghost hacked

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Re: New blast reported at reactor #2
« Reply #8 on: March 14, 2011, 08:04:43 pm »
Firemen are true heros, unlike talking heads and politicians.

Agreed 100%. Firemen are true heroes.  I've had an uncle who was comendated , and my best friend is a firefighter over at the airport where I live.

I don't trust the news media anymore .. 'oh it's not that bad' ...  um no its horribly bad. My instincts and predictions so far have proven correct, I had a feeling after the 1st one went, the rest would go over the course of the next few days. I knew there would be more than 10,000 dead. I knew there would be high radiation, I knew there would be a strain on the food and water supply in the local area......

It does not take a genious to figure out what the f**k is going on. .....  worst crisis since WWII....  well at least the talking heads got that part right.
'We play the game with the bravery of being out of range.' - Roger Waters

Offline Catalina

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Re: New blast reported at reactor #2
« Reply #9 on: March 14, 2011, 08:07:15 pm »
Watch this!!! Anderson Cooper’s Live Reaction to Hydrogen Explosion: ‘Should I Get Out Of Here?’

http://www.breitbart.tv/anderson-coopers-live-reaction-to-hydrogen-explosion-should-i-get-out-of-here/
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Offline Ninjaman

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Re: New blast reported at reactor #2
« Reply #10 on: March 14, 2011, 08:07:59 pm »
I really wish i could go over there and help every one of them.

:(

Offline agentbluescreen

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Re: New blast reported at reactor #2
« Reply #11 on: March 14, 2011, 08:13:42 pm »
Watch this!!! Anderson Cooper’s Live Reaction to Hydrogen Explosion: ‘Should I Get Out Of Here?’

Yes that silly CIA Mob twinkie should get the hell off tv period

Offline Freeski

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Re: New blast reported at reactor #2
« Reply #12 on: March 14, 2011, 08:17:49 pm »
Yes that silly CIA Mob twinkie should get the hell off tv period

+1

Few are more annoying!
"He who passively accepts evil is as much involved in it as he who helps to perpetrate it. He who accepts evil without protesting against it is really cooperating with it." Martin Luther King, Jr.

Offline iks83

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Re: New blast reported at reactor #2
« Reply #13 on: March 15, 2011, 02:12:32 am »
I wonder why noone explains the radiation exposure. The info I found says that the yearly exposure of radiation is around 3,6 to 50 mSv depending if you work around radiation or not. But every site says something else its annoying. So with 8217 µSv per hour thats 8,212 mSv so people get their yearly dose of radiation in an hour.

Offline grapecrusher1

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Re: New blast reported at reactor #2
« Reply #14 on: March 15, 2011, 02:21:26 am »
I wonder why noone explains the radiation exposure. The info I found says that the yearly exposure of radiation is around 3,6 to 50 mSv depending if you work around radiation or not. But every site says something else its annoying. So with 8217 µSv per hour thats 8,212 mSv so people get their yearly dose of radiation in an hour.

I hear that -- rads, seiverts, micros, etc

looks like #3 and #4 are still smoking eastbound.
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Offline bigron

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Re: New blast reported at reactor #2
« Reply #15 on: March 15, 2011, 07:20:07 am »
Japan
Mar 16, 2011 
http://atimes.com/atimes/Japan/MC16Dh02.html 
 

 
Japan faces nuclear meltdown


By Victor Kotsev

Just as reactors number 1 and number 3 of the devastated Fukushima nuclear power plant in Japan - both of which had earlier experienced blasts that severely damaged their outer protective shells - appeared to be more or less out of the woods by late Monday, fresh disasters struck.

A third, even more severe explosion occurred at reactor number 2 a little after 6 am on Tuesday, breaching the crucial inner steel container that houses the reactor, forcing the evacuation of emergency workers from the plant and prompting fears of a nuclear "catastrophe". Meanwhile, a fire broke out in reactor number 4 as well, reportedly releasing large amounts of radioactive materials into the environment.

Within about two hours of these developments, radiation levels around the plant shot up to the unprecedented 8,217 micro sieverts per hour. This is more than eight times the maximum legal dose a person can be exposed to in an entire year. People living 20 to 30 kilometers away were ordered to stay indoors; those within a 20-kilometer radius of the plant had already been evacuated following the previous blasts. According to the Kyodo news agency, "minute levels'' of radiation were detected even in the capital Tokyo, 260 kilometers from the disaster.

Japanese authorities attempted to allay fears even as they appeared increasingly helpless to control the situation brought on by the magnitude 9 earthquake that struck Japan on March 11. "A worrisome situation remains but I hope to take the lead in overcoming this crisis," Japanese Prime Minister Naoto Kan said on Tuesday. Inside sources, however, indicate that the characteristically calm reaction of the government conceals a state of utter distress and chaos. Western "industry executives", quoted by The New York Times on Tuesday, said that their Japanese colleagues were "basically in a full-scale panic".

Experts disagree about the severity of the disaster. Many have attempted to compare it to the two most famous nuclear meltdowns in history, those at Chernobyl in Ukraine in 1986 and in Three Mile Island in the United States in 1979. At this point, however, such comparisons appear highly speculative. On the International Nuclear and Radiological Events Scale, Chernobyl, which sent radioactive dust over much of Europe, is rated at 7, the most severe ("major accident''), while Three Mile Island, which also featured a meltdown but did not release significant amounts of radiation into the environment, is rated 5 ("accident with wider consequences'').

On Saturday, the Japanese Nuclear Safety Agency rated the accident at Fukushima at 4 on the same scale, but now this assessment appears due for major revision. According to a Monday assessment by the head of France’s Nuclear Safety Authority, Andre-Claude Lacoste, the Fukushima crisis is "worse than Three Mile Island but not as great as Chernobyl".

Even the favorable comparison with Chernobyl is disputed. On the one hand, many have pointed out that the Japanese reactors shut down successfully immediately prior to the earthquake on Friday, something that precludes a disaster on the scale of Chernobyl. "There’s no comparison with Chernobyl,'' Israeli professor Arye Dubi, of the Department of Nuclear Engineering at Ben-Gurion University, said on Monday.

"Chernobyl was a 3,200-megawatt reactor which exploded while working at peak capacity. The three reactors in Japan are around 500 megawatts each and they were immediately and successfully turned off with the first tremors of the earthquake. Once it turns off, its output is reduced to about 5% or 25 megawatts.''

His assessment is backed by that of James Stubbins, a nuclear energy expert at the University of Illinois, who claimed, "The likelihood there will be a huge fire like at Chernobyl or a major environmental release like at Chernobyl, I think that's basically impossible."

This may be true from the point of view of nuclear physics, which concerns itself primarily with the amount of energy released, but it is not necessarily true from the perspective of radiological epidemiology, which takes into account a wider array of factors such as wind patterns, relative toxicity of the leaked elements, and population densities in the surrounding areas. On Saturday, even before the latest developments, Hebrew University of Jerusalem Professor Menachem Luria, an expert on air quality and poisoning, issued a stern prediction.

"This is very worrying,'' he said in an interview with the Israeli Channel 2. "There is no doubt that we have not seen anything like this in years, perhaps ever since nuclear experiments were conducted in the atmosphere in the 1950s. From what we can gather, this disaster is even more dangerous than Chernobyl, both from the standpoint of the population's exposure to radioactive material and the spread of radioactive contamination in the area."

Fukushima poses unique challenges, not least of which is that never before have so many nuclear reactors experienced failures at the same time. To add to the complexity of the situation, one of the afflicted reactors - number 3 - is loaded with a controversial mix of plutonium and uranium known as pluthermal MOX (mixed oxide fuel). It is considered highly toxic, since inhaling even small amounts of plutonium can be lethal.

In order to clear out some of the confusion, it is important to understand, in broad terms, what happens during a nuclear meltdown - for there is no doubt we are dealing with at least partial nuclear meltdown at the three reactors. Even after the process of nuclear fission has largely stopped, radioactive decay in the fuel continues to produce significant amounts of heat which, in the absence of continued cooling, can melt through several levels of protection inherent in reactors such as those in Fukushima.

This is currently happening at the plant, where cooling systems failed in the wake of the devastating earthquake and tsunami on Friday. The most striking example of this dynamic is the fire in reactor number 4, which ignited and released substantial amounts of radiation despite having been turned off months ago. According to reports, there was only spent fuel there, but once the water that was in it drained for unknown reasons, the spent fuel caught on fire.

All four afflicted units at Fukushima are second-generation boiling water reactors, built roughly 40 years ago, and contemporary to the reactors at Chernobyl and Three Mile Island. Over time, their safety mechanisms had been upgraded, but even so reactor number 1 had been scheduled for decommissioning later this year. Despite the improvements, they experienced multiple mechanical failures during the crisis.

In very simple terms, boiling water reactors can be compared to a nuclear-powered steam engine with multiple levels of protection. The fuel consists of ceramic uranium pellets covered in metal and immersed in light water. The heat generated by nuclear fission turns the water into steam, which then powers the electricity-generating turbines before being cooled down by a separate second cycle of cold sea water and returned to the reactor.

The cooling process keeps the temperature inside the reactor at around 550 degrees Fahrenheit (290 degrees Celsius). Additionally, the reactor itself is encased in a special steel container with numerous pressure valves. In the case of all modern reactors, the design features an additional external shell of reinforced concrete that is meant to block the release of radioactive substances in a worst-case scenario.

Should the circulation system fail - as happened in Fukushima - the water inside the reactor evaporates rapidly, and the temperature of the fuel rises uncontrollably. This brings the twin dangers of a meltdown and of a steam explosion. In the case of Three Mile Island, much of the fuel melted, but the steel container and the outer shell remained intact; in the case of Chernobyl, the steel container had started to melt when it was destroyed by a powerful steam explosion. There was no outer shell to contain the explosion.

In the three affected reactors at Fukushima, the water evaporated due to a power outage in the cooling system, the fuel started to melt, and the outer reinforced concrete shells of the reactors were blown off by what is presumed to be hydrogen explosions. The latter are very different from steam explosions inside the reactor, and were caused by gas that the engineers vented out in desperate attempts to prevent steam explosions. In the case or reactor number 2, however, the explosion also reportedly damaged the reactor container; if this information is correct, it means that practically all major mechanisms of protection were incapacitated.

There is a lot of uncertainty as to the precise situation of the reactors, and it is difficult to estimate the precise degree of the damage. Two of the most dangerous by-products of uranium fission are radioactive iodine, which causes thyroid cancer, and caesium. The Japanese government is already planning to distribute iodine tablets to the population, which would lessen the effects of the radioactive iodine. As of Tuesday, news agencies are reporting panic in Tokyo, at least among foreigners there, with many embassies evacuating staff members.

If the situation can be contained for another few days, there is a chance that the fuel will gradually cool down, and a major disaster will be averted. Reuters reported on Monday that desperate attempts to cool the reactors down by pumping sea water directly into them had produced results, and reactors number 1 and 3 had started to stabilize. However, even on Monday there were signs of major environmental pollution, and an American aircraft carrier 160 kilometers off-shore was forced to divert its course after passing through a radioactive cloud. In light of the developments on Tuesday at reactor number 2, the optimistic scenario seems improbable.

Meanwhile, Japan is struggling in the aftermath of the earthquake and tsunami that hit the northeast part of Japan, with more than 2,000 people confirmed dead and fears that that number could rise to 10,000 in this disaster alone. The crisis is also exacting an enormous economic toll, with estimates of the damage running into the hundreds of billions of dollars. Japanese stocks lost over 13% on Tuesday on radiation worries, after another steep decline on Monday, raising prospects of a new recession in a country where debt already runs at around 200% of gross domestic product.

Prime Minister Kan said on Sunday that Japan was facing its worst crisis since World War II. By all accounts, the disaster is now of previously unimagined proportions.

Victor Kotsev is a journalist and political analyst based in Tel Aviv.  

http://atimes.com/atimes/Japan/MC16Dh02.html