Author Topic: ***FBI: All software must be redesigned to make it easier to commit treason  (Read 5524 times)

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Offline Dig

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FBI urges Congress to expand Internet wiretapping
http://www.rawstory.com/rs/2011/02/17/fbi-urges-congress-to-expand-internet-wiretapping/
By Eric W. Dolan
Thursday, February 17th, 2011 -- 9:39 pm

The FBI urged members of the House Judiciary Subcommittee on Crime, Terrorism and Homeland Security on Thursday to update the Communications Assistance to Law Enforcement Act (CALEA) and make it easier for authorities to eavesdrop on Internet. The act was passed in 1994 and requires telecommunication companies to design their equipment and services to ensure that law enforcement and national security officials can monitor telephone and other communications whenever necessary. "Over the years, through interpretation of the statute by the Federal Communications Commission, the reach of CALEA has been expanded to include facilities-based broadband internet access and Voice over Internet Protocol (VoIP) services that are fully inter-connected with the public switched telephone network," FBI General Counsel Valeria Caproni told the subcommittee.  "Although that expansion of coverage has been extremely helpful, CALEA does not cover popular Internet-based communications modalities such as webmail, social networking sites or peer-to-peer services."  "As a result, although the government may obtain a court order authorizing the collection of certain communications, it often serves that order on a provider who does not have an obligation under CALEA to be prepared to execute it," she explained. "Such providers may not have intercept capabilities in place at the time that they receive the order." The proposal to expand CALEA would require companies involved in online communications to re-engineer their software so that law enforcement could easily access it.
All eyes are opened, or opening, to the rights of man. The general spread of the light of science has already laid open to every view the palpable truth, that the mass of mankind has not been born with saddles on their backs, nor a favored few booted and spurred, ready to ride them legitimately

Offline Overcast

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This will require a SDK or API of some sort they'll have to provide to app developers... lol
That will be reverse engineered.

So when the (by and large) non-technical law enforcement is 'using it' to peep in on your system. There will be those, that are looking back - into the systems that are supposedly 'watching them'.

After all; when you open up a 'tunnel' in the world of IT - travel is possible either way. Of course, this opens up a dang-near infinite world of abuse. Both by government and others.

So what software must 'have this'? Office? Will that also be installed on the machines government and law-enforcement use?

Cops watching Ex-wives, copes watching Judges, cops watching those they wish to get revenge on, or could be used to get a superior fired for job advancement.

Think Wikileaks was bad now? LOL, just wait until the law mandates a virus be included in all software.

But... then... government knows what's best, eh? lol
But maybe I shouldn't say anything huh?
And dying in your beds, many years from now, would you be willin' to trade ALL the days, from this day to that, for one chance, just one chance, to come back here and tell our enemies that they may take our lives, but they'll never take... OUR FREEDOM!

Offline Optimus

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FBI: We need wiretap-ready Web sites -- now

CNET learns the FBI is quietly pushing its plan to force surveillance backdoors on social networks, VoIP, and Web e-mail providers, and is asking Internet companies not to oppose a law making those backdoors mandatory.

by Declan McCullagh May 4, 2012 9:24 AM PDT

The FBI is asking Internet companies not to oppose a controversial proposal that would require firms, including Microsoft, Facebook, Yahoo, and Google, to build in backdoors for government surveillance.

In meetings with industry representatives, the White House, and U.S. senators, senior FBI officials argue the dramatic shift in communication from the telephone system to the Internet has made it far more difficult for agents to wiretap Americans suspected of illegal activities, CNET has learned.

The FBI general counsel's office has drafted a proposed law that the bureau claims is the best solution: requiring that social-networking Web sites and providers of VoIP, instant messaging, and Web e-mail alter their code to ensure their products are wiretap-friendly.

"If you create a service, product, or app that allows a user to communicate, you get the privilege of adding that extra coding," an industry representative who has reviewed the FBI's draft legislation told CNET. The requirements apply only if a threshold of a certain number of users is exceeded, according to a second industry representative briefed on it.

The FBI's proposal would amend a 1994 law, called the Communications Assistance for Law Enforcement Act, or CALEA, that currently applies only to telecommunications providers, not Web companies. The Federal Communications Commission extended CALEA in 2004 to apply to broadband networks.

More: http://news.cnet.com/8301-1009_3-57428067-83/fbi-we-need-wiretap-ready-web-sites-now/
“The Constitution is not an instrument for the government to restrain the people,
it's an instrument for the people to restrain the government.” – Patrick Henry

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