Author Topic: DARPA is planning on Chemical Cartography Testing in Urban areas.  (Read 5041 times)

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Offline RabidSheep

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https://www.fbo.gov/index?s=opportunity&mode=form&tab=core&id=ca325aa4048e5bf6ddd0c7eb58c89a2e&_cview=0

Solicitation Number:
DARPA-BAA-11-03
Notice Type:
Presolicitation
Synopsis:
Added: Nov 08, 2010 11:23 am
DARPA seeks the comprehensive acquisition and analysis of atmospheric trace gases present in selected urban areas, along with concentration modeling to increase the spatial and temporal resolution. The ultimate objective is to provide a basis for the future creation of spatial and temporal chemical maps on a scale suitable for the chemical reconnaissance of a city. See attached DARPA-BAA-11-03 for full solicitation details.


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https://www.fbo.gov/utils/view?id=bb34b71a10dc891843176d7243bd1ddd


Broad Agency Announcement
Chemical Cartography: Urban Data Acquisition
STRATEGIC TECHNOLOGY OFFICE
DARPA-BAA-11-03
November 8, 2010

TABLE OF CONTENTS

1.1 PROGRAM OVERVIEW   4
4.3.2 Restrictive Markings on Proposals    13
4.5.1 Proposal Submission Deadline   18
5.1.1 Overall Scientific and Technical Merit   19
5.1.2 Proposer’s Capabilities and Related Experience   19
5.1.3 Cost and Schedule Realism   19
5.1.4 Plans and Capability to Accomplish Technology Transition    19
5.1.5 Potential Contribution and Relevance to the DARPA Mission   19
6.1 AWARD NOTICES   20
6.2 MEETING AND TRAVEL REQUIREMENTS   20
6.3 HUMAN USE    20
6.4 ANIMAL USE   21
6.5 PUBLIC RELEASE OR DISSEMINATION OF INFORMATION   21
6.6 EXPORT CONTROL   22
6.7 SUBCONTRACTING    22
6.8 ELECTRONIC AND INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY   22
6.9 EMPLOYMENT ELIGIBILITY VERIFICATION   23
6.10 Additional Requirements and Responsibilities relating to Alleged Crimes by or against Contractor Personnel in Iraq and Afghanistan   23
6.11 Central Contractor Registration (CCR) and Universal Identifier Requirements   23
6.12 Reporting Executive Compensation and First-Tier Subcontract Awards    23
6.13 REPORTING    25
6.13.1 Representations and Certifications   25
6.13.2 Wide Area Work Flow (WAWF)   25
6.13.3 T-FIMS   25
6.13.4 i-EDISON   25
6.14 Agency Contacts   25
7.1.2 Non-Procurement Contract Proposers    27


Part One: Overview Information

Federal Agency Name – Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA), Strategic Technology Office
Funding Opportunity Title – Chemical Cartography: Urban Data Acquisition
Announcement Type – Initial Announcement.  
Funding Opportunity Number – Broad Agency Announcement (BAA) DARPA-BAA-11-03
Dates
Posting Date: Monday, November 8th, 2010
Proposers’ Day: Monday, November 15th, 2010
Questions due to DARPA: 4:00PM ET, Wednesday, December 15th, 2010
Consolidated Question and Answer responses will be posted to: https://www.schafertmd.com/conference/cicuda/
Proposal Due Date: 4:00PM ET, Thursday, January 6th, 2011
BAA Closing Date: 4:00PM ET, Monday, May 2nd, 2011

Description of the funding opportunity: DARPA seeks the comprehensive acquisition and analysis of atmospheric trace gases present in selected urban areas, along with concentration modeling to increase the spatial and temporal resolution. The ultimate objective is to provide a basis for the future creation of spatial and temporal chemical maps on a scale suitable for the chemical reconnaissance of a city.
Anticipated individual awards – Multiple awards are anticipated.
Types of instruments that may be awarded - Procurement contract or other transaction.
Agency contact: The BAA Coordinator for this effort may be reached at:
Electronic mail: [email protected].
DARPA/STO
ATTN: DARPA-BAA-11-03   
3701 North Fairfax Drive
Arlington, VA 22203-1714
Part Two: Full Text of Announcement

1. Funding Opportunity Description
The Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency often selects its research efforts through the Broad Agency Announcement (BAA) process.  The BAA will appear first on the FedBizOpps website, http://www.fbo.gov/.  The following information is for those wishing to respond to the BAA.

DARPA is soliciting innovative research proposals in the areas of urban data collection and development of urban transport and dispersion models to enable urban chemical map creation. DARPA seeks the comprehensive sampling and analysis of atmospheric trace gases present in selected urban areas, and subsection concentration prediction to provide a basis for the future creation of spatial and temporal chemical maps on a scale suitable for the chemical reconnaissance of a city.  Proposed research should investigate innovative approaches that enable revolutionary advances in science, devices, or systems. Specifically excluded is research that primarily results in evolutionary improvements to the existing state of practice.

This program is intended to augment the capabilities presently being developed by the Hyperadsorptive Atmospheric Sampling Technology (HAST, DARPA-BAA-07-64) and Panoptic Analysis of Chemical Traces (PACT, DARPA-BAA-08-62) efforts.  Proposers are encouraged to familiarize themselves with their respective Broad Agency Announcements1.

1.1 PROGRAM OVERVIEW
The Chemical Cartography: Urban Data Acquisition program will develop models to create three-dimensional high resolution spatial and temporal chemical composition ground-truth maps of trace gases in urban areas from a sparse set of chemical collection samples.  These maps will provide chemical concentration data for subsections of typical urban areas comprised of a mix of residential and commercial buildings, highways, public transportation, and utilities.  Data collection will be used to provide input values for models that will predict high resolution spatial and temporal chemical composition maps.

Chemical Reconnaissance Background
The Chemical Cartography program is part of a larger effort, Chemical Reconnaissance, which also includes the existing HAST and PACT programs. The ongoing HAST program is creating low-cost, portable gas sampling units which use solid-phase sorbents to comprehensively acquire trace gases from military and urban environments.  These trace gases are transported in the HAST samplers to a central location, where the HAST system extracts the trace gases, and passes them into a stationary PACT system.  The ongoing PACT program has the goal of automatically separating, interrogating, and identifying all components of these gas mixtures that were present in the atmosphere at greater than ten parts per trillion by volume (pptv).  Through a combination of large-scale, low-cost manufacturing techniques and full-scope automation, the PACT system with inputs from the HAST samplers, will scale to a combined throughput of 300,000 samples per day, at per-sample costs of $0.10 for acquisition and $0.10 for identification. Chemical Cartography is intended to augment these anticipated capabilities.

DARPA anticipates that the information content acquired by the HAST and PACT systems will overwhelm existing mapping, anomaly detection and source location capabilities.  The Chemical Cartography effort addresses this concern.  The Chemical Cartography: Urban Data Acquisition program is anticipated to be the forerunner to Chemical Cartography:  Anomaly Detection and Attribution. Chemical Cartography: Urban Data Acquisition (the subject of this BAA) is expected to provide data for use in the potential Chemical Cartography:  Anomaly Detection and Attribution effort

Chemical Cartography:  Anomaly Detection and Attribution will analyze the chemical diversity anticipated in complex urban environments where thousands of distinct chemical species are present. It is expected that this analysis will provide anomaly detection, source attribution, efficient sampling strategies, and the generation of actionable intelligence.  Observed chemical concentrations reveal substantial information when processed in the context of the local environment.  Trace gases may include products of local facilities and activities and can be used to validate the presence of those facilities and activities, or to signal possible illicit activity. For example, trace gases that are innocuous in one context (e.g. diethyl ether near an engine shop) may have high intelligence value in a different location, or at a different concentration.  To fully exploit this information, concentration maps must be integrated with Geospatial Information System (GIS) databases, meteorological observations, and previously identified facilities and processes.  Additionally, understanding and identifying activity-specific patterns of trace gases is crucial to identifying ‘dual-use’ substances with legal and illegal/illicit uses.

PLEASE NOTE:   The potential Chemical Cartography: Anomaly Detection and Attribution effort is NOT the subject of this BAA.  Anticipated capabilities of the potential Chemical Cartography: Anomaly Detection and Attribution effort are also NOT the subject of this BAA.

Chemical Cartography: Urban Data Acquisition Overview
The anticipated Chemical Cartography: Anomaly Detection and Attribution effort requires a comprehensive set of ground truth data, which may be prohibitively expensive.  The Chemical Cartography: Urban Data Acquisition effort was developed to address this concern.  Chemical Cartography: Urban Data Acquisition will develop models to create three-dimensional high resolution spatial and temporal chemical composition ground-truth maps from a sparse set of chemical collection samples.

Behavior of the diverse chemical species within an urban environment adds a layer of complexity to the chemical map. Chemical properties will lead to different transport, dispersion, and interaction patterns within the environment. This can include chemical reactions, degradation, and sorption to surfaces. Thousands of chemicals will be present within an urban environment. Accurately characterizing their movement and interaction within this environment must be addressed to create a realistic urban chemical map.  To allow future analysis efforts to fully exploit this information, concentration maps must be integrated with Geospatial Information System (GIS) databases, meteorological observations, and previously identified facilities and processes.
In addition to the complex chemical profile, urban chemical profiles are extremely sensitive to environmental and man-made effects. Meteorological and environmental effects such as wind speed and direction, humidity, foliage, sunlight, and temperature may influence the rate of emissions or alter the chemical after release.  For example, high humidity may limit water evaporation and thus alter surface absorption, whereas sunlight may promote reactions that change the chemical composition.  These factors affect the atmospheric stability and the associated mixing layer which can greatly affect the downwind concentration. The chemical make-up of urban areas is also dependent on human activities. Urban chemical backgrounds include contributions from traffic from cars, buses, trains and planes which may follow a pattern, such as rush hours or flight schedules. Urban areas also contain residential and commercial buildings which contribute to the chemical make-up of the area. For example, dry cleaners and fast food restaurants will have particular chemical signatures; however, these may only be present during operating hours.

The ultimate goal of the Chemical Cartography: Urban Data Acquisition program is to capture the essential elements of this complex chemical environment in a high-fidelity, three-dimensional chemical composition map. The Chemical Cartography: Urban Data Acquisition program is divided into two technical areas: Urban Data Collection and Urban Data Modeling.  These technical areas are designed to complement one another, however, a proposal does not need to address both.  It is required that data collected through Technical Area One (Urban Data Collection) be shared with all performers on Technical Area Two (Urban Data Modeling) throughout the program, regardless of teaming arrangements.  A data format will be specified by DARPA at the program kickoff meeting.

PLEASE NOTE:  Proposers selected for the Chemical Cartography: Urban Data Acquisition program may be prohibited from proposing to the anticipated Chemical Cartography: Anomaly Detection and Attribution effort or other future efforts addressing  automated chemical cartography data interpretation. Proposers intending to propose to future efforts must include a description of organizational conflicts of interest and how they would be addressed in the Management Approach, Section 4.4.2.1, Section II.G.

DARPA seeks innovative proposals in the following Areas of Interest:

1.1.1 Technical Area One: Urban Data Collection
Data collection and analysis will provide ground truth chemical data for an urban area comprised of a mix of residential and commercial buildings, highways, public transportation and utilities. The Urban Data Collection Technical Area is divided into two tasks: Source Characterization and Chemical Composition Characterization.

1.1.1.1 Technical Area One - Task 1: Urban Source Characterization
This task will develop and characterize a representative set of at least ten local urban sources.  Local urban sources are defined as discrete and identifiable operations such as residences, gasoline stations, restaurants, and dry cleaning stores that have particular patterns of emissions throughout the day.

Due to temporal and seasonal variability, chemical, meteorological, and topographical data will be collected for multiple periods of at least 48 hours’ duration to characterize each source. The individual samples taken throughout the collection period will be taken in less than thirty minutes, and use a variety of sampling media, such as sorbent tubes and SUMMA canisters.  Each point will be sampled at least every 6 hours. During this task, chemical, meteorological, and meta-data will be collected.  Chemical data entails concentration data for all chemicals found at greater than one part per billion (by volume) concentration for each sample point. For determining chemical concentrations, a representative set of calibrations along with a methodology for approximating the concentrations of non-calibrated chemicals will be used. This task will also collect meteorological data consisting of at least wind speed, wind direction, turbulence, temperature, relative humidity, barometric pressure, cloud cover, and solar insolation.  Proposals must describe plans for continuous meteorological data collection which may include dedicated towers and collection at sample sites. Meteorological and environment effects on data are anticipated to be seasonal, so samples representative of each season will be collected during this 14 month effort. Metadata collection may include imagery, databases of urban features (infrastructure, traffic patterns, etc.), and other sources of information that may be important for source attribution. Metadata collection must also include a labeled feature map of the area, which describes each significant feature in that location.  For example, labels may include “residential,” “restaurant,” etc.

1.1.1.2 Technical Area One - Task 2: Urban Chemical Composition Characterization
This task will select at least two 0.5km x 0.5km subsections of the urban area for high-resolution sampling. Proposals should be written based on collection at a single 0.5km x 0.5km subsection and include an option for additional sections. Each focus area should include at least five urban features which may include a gasoline filling station, fast food restaurant, dry cleaning store, or representative industrial operation such as painting or welding.

Sample collection and analysis will be used to develop a representative urban chemical composition map. This task will distribute samplers over each subsection within the selected urban environment, spaced no more than fifty meters apart. Only in exceptional circumstances of physical obstructions may this resolution be decreased. DARPA welcomes all sampling approaches and spatial and temporal configurations. Proposals should not be limited to grid configurations and may propose a higher sampling resolution. For ten percent of the ground samples, an additional sample will be taken at the maximal building height that correlates with the (x,y) coordinates of the ground point.  Due to temporal and seasonal variability, multiple collection periods of at least 48 hours’ duration will be used to characterize each subsection. The individual samples taken throughout the collection period will be taken in less than thirty minutes, and use a variety of sampling media, such as sorbent tubes and SUMMA canisters.  Each point will be sampled at least every six hours.  Proposers must describe their sampling strategy, including the degree to which samples can be acquired in parallel.

During this task, chemical, meteorological, and meta-data will be collected. Chemical data comprises concentration data for all chemicals found at parts-per-billion concentrations and above for each sample point. For determining chemical concentrations, a representative set of calibrations along with a methodology for approximating the concentrations of non-calibrated chemicals will be used. Meteorological data consists of wind speed, wind direction, turbulence, temperature, relative humidity, barometric pressure, cloud cover, and solar insolation. Meteorological and environmental effects on data are anticipated to be seasonal, so it is important to obtain samples representative of each season during this 14 month effort. Proposals must describe plans for meteorological data collection which may include dedicated towers and collection at sample sites. Metadata includes three-dimensional shape files for the focus area, as well as the surrounding perimeter urban area up to 2.5km x 2.5km (a 1km band around the 0.5km x 0.5km area), see Figure 1. The surrounding area should be studied to determine possible upwind sources not located within the focus area. For each significant feature in the shape file (e.g., buildings), a label must briefly describe that location. For example, labels may include “residential,” “restaurant,” etc.  Useful metadata also may include imagery, databases of urban features (infrastructure, traffic patterns, etc.), and other sources of information.


Figure . The 0.5km x 0.5km focus area is outlined in red, while the surrounding 2.5km x 2.5km perimeter urban area is outlined in blue.

This task also includes releases of environmentally benign tracer gases. At least three chemically distinct tracer gases will be continuously released during each 30 minute sample collection period.  For example, a team might propose to release a perfluorocarbon, a monoterpene, and a more polar compound such as a volatile ester that is generally regarded as safe2. (Note that these categories are given as examples and are not necessarily indicative of DARPA’s preferences.) These compounds have distinct chemical and physical properties and would be anticipated to have significantly different behaviors in the environment, particularly with regard to temperature (volatility), persistence in the environment (reactivity), and the effects of damp or wet surfaces (surface absorption).  Effective tracer gases must be relatively rare in the sampled environment so that releases are readily distinguished from ambient sources.  The releases will be used to help validate urban transport and dispersion models, as well as to characterize chemical behavior within an urban environment.  The goal is to select trace gases that will exhibit different environmental behaviors such as surface absorption, UV degradation and chemical reactions.  To assist in model validation, during any tracer gas release, a subset of the grid should be sampled every three hours.  The size of this subset should be chosen to accurately capture the behavior of the tracer within the urban environment.

Proposals must also clearly describe a proposed data format for all chemical concentration data, meteorological data, and metadata.  Proposals must specify if the proposed data format requires a special interface for viewing. At the program's kickoff meeting, DARPA will provide a decision regarding the format required for data deliverables.

Proposals should be written to address the baseline metrics and include an option in the schedule and cost volume for any proposed improvements over the baseline metrics. Proposals that do address capabilities beyond the baseline metrics (e.g. superior spatial or temporal resolution capabilities, detecting chemicals present at lower concentrations, or acquiring advanced meteorological, environment, and metadata information) may be considered to have higher Overall Scientific and Technical Merit (see Section 5.1.1, below) than proposals that do not.

Offline RabidSheep

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Re: DARPA is planning on Chemical Cartography Testing in Urban areas.
« Reply #1 on: January 06, 2011, 01:48:12 am »
Side effects of Perfluorocarbon ( from wiki: yeah I am lazy)

Some common side effects were recorded while performing clinical studies such as delayed febrile reaction and flu-like symptoms. The magnitude of the side effects is directly related to the size of the emulsion droplets, if the particles are smaller than 0.2μm it seems to be undetectable for the reticuloendothelial system. These side effects occur when the body is excreting/eliminating the perfluorocarbon. The excretion depends on vapour pressure and lipid solubility of the perfluorocarbons. It usually takes on average three to four days for the compound perfluoroocytl bromide and eight days for perfluorodichlorooactane. This process is relatively slow since perfluorocarbons are inert to biochemical degradation. The perfluorocarbon will then diffuse back into the blood where they dissolve into plasma lipids. The plasma lipids will then transport the perfluorocarbon molecules to the lungs where they are excreted through exhalation along with other gases.[14]


Offline RabidSheep

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Re: DARPA is planning on Chemical Cartography Testing in Urban areas.
« Reply #2 on: January 06, 2011, 11:47:26 pm »
https://www.schafertmd.com/conference/cicuda/      (from the BAA posted before)

Chemical Cartography: Urban Data Acquisition Proposers' Day


It's fun for everyone!!!! And it already happened

Chemical Cartography: Urban Data Acquisition Proposers' Day will be held on Monday, November 15th, 2010 from 8:30 AM to 2:00 PM at the Capital Conference Center in Arlington, VA. All participants are requested to register using this site. Please register no later than 5:00 PM EST Tuesday, November 9th, 2010.

DARPA/STO will host an unclassified proposers’ day workshop in support of the Chemical Cartography: Urban Data Acquisition Program Broad Agency Announcement (BAA). The BAA (DARPA-BAA-11-03) can be found on the FedBizOpps website, https://www.fbo.gov/index?s=opportunity&mode=form&id=ca325aa4048e5bf6ddd0c7eb58c89a2e&tab=core&_cview=0.

The goal of Chemical Cartography: Urban Data Acquisition is to develop three-dimensional ground-truth maps of trace gases in urban areas. These maps will provide chemical concentration data for subsections of typical urban areas comprised of a mix of residential and commercial buildings, highways, public transportation, and utilities.

All administrative correspondence and questions related to the Chemical Cartography: Urban Data Acquisition Proposers' Day should be directed to the following email address: [email protected].

Please Note:

Attendance will be limited to the first 100 registrants, and no more than two representatives per organization. The Proposers’ Day will be unclassified and open to the general public.

All attendees will be required to present government-issued photo identification upon entry to the event. Additionally, all US Citizens are required to submit a US Citizenship Verification form in order to attend this workshop. Please download and complete the Citizenship Verification Form and return by email to: [email protected] or fax to: (703)807-9918 no later than 5:00 PM EST Tuesday, November 9th, 2010.

Non-US citizens are required to submit a DARPA Form 60 “Foreign National Visit Request”. Please download and complete DARPA Form 60 and return by email to: [email protected] or fax to: (703)807-9918 no later than 5:00 PM EST Tuesday, November 9th, 2010.

The Proposers’ Day does not constitute a formal solicitation for proposals or proposal abstracts. Attendance is voluntary and is not required to propose to any potential related Broad Agency Announcements or potential research solicitations on this topic. DARPA will not provide reimbursement for any costs incurred to participate in this Proposers' Day .

Date/Time: Monday, November 15th, 2010

Location: The Capital Conference Center, 3601 Wilson Blvd.,6th Floor, Arlington, VA 22201

LUNCH WILL BE PROVIDED


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Participants



Chemical Cartography: Urban Data Acquisition Proposers' Day will be held on Monday, November 15th, 2010 from 8:30 AM to 2:00 PM at the Capital Conference Center in Arlington, VA. All participants are requested to register using this site. Please register no later than 5:00 PM EST Tuesday, November 9th, 2010.

The following people have indicated that they plan to attend the Chemical Cartography: Urban Data Acquisition Proposers' Day Meeting.
1. Alderman, Karen (Deloitte)
2. Beckett, Dave (Ball Aerospace and Technologies)
3. Berg, Larry (Pacific Northwest National Laboratory)
4. Bertozzi, Andrea (UCLA)
5. Bieringer, Paul (National Center for Atmospheric Research)
6. Brauch, Tom (Advanced Monitoring Methods)
7. Brown, Michael (Los Alamos National Laboratory)
8. Burton, Robert (BAE Systems)
9. Chen, Charles (Northrop Grumman)
10. Clawson, Kirk (NOAA Field Research Division)
11. Collins, Greg (Naval Research Laboratory)
12. Commons, Tim (Ball Aerospace & Technology Corp.)
13. Cottingame, William (Northrop Grumman Aerospace Systems)
14. Cramer, Jeffrey (U.S. Naval Research Laboratory (Chemistry Division))

15. Danko, Todd (Lockheed Martin Advanced Technology Laboratories)
16. Dean, Louis (Fugro)
17. Dennison, Frank (SAIC)
18. Fuschino, Robert (AirDat, LLC)
19. Garvey, Dennis (US Army Research Laboratory)
20. Gigrich, James (Agilent Technologies)
21. Gullickson, Richard (DTRA TVT)
22. Hielsberg, Matthew (Texas A&M)
23. Johnson, Kevin (NRL)
24. Kosovic, Branko (National Center for Atmospheric Research)
25. kuhlman, michael (battelle)
26. Kurdila, Andrew (virginia tech)
27. Lietzke, Christopher (ITT Corporation)
28. Marshall, Jeff (SCS Engineers)
29. Miles, Susan (QinetiQ North America, Inc.)
30. Myerholtz, Carl (Agilent Technologies)
31. O'Brien, Daniel (Battelle)
32. Pace, John (Dugway Proving Ground)
33. Pearson, Eric (SRI International)
34. peglow, steven (SAIC)
35. roberson, scott (Lockheed Martin)
36. Ruiz, Michael (Deloitte Consulting LLP)
37. Sengupta, Louise (BAE Systems)
38. Sharpley, Robert (University of South Carolina)
39. Storwold, Donald (U.S. Army Dugway Proving Ground / Meteorology Division)
40. strong, janet (NGC-ES)
41. Teran, Joseph (UCLA)
42. Thomas, Richard (ENSCO. Inc.)
43. Titterton, Paul (SRI International)
44. Tobin, Charles (ITT IS)
45. Tsai, Yen-Hsi (University of Texas at Austin)
46. vincent, robert (Raytheon BBN Technologies)
47. Wahl, Jon (PNNL)
48. Wang, Yansen (US Army Research Laboratory)
49. Weiss, Steve (QinetiQ North America)
50. Williams, Renee (Signature Science)