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Michael Chertoff and the Sabotage of the Ptech Investigation
« on: December 25, 2010, 03:55:09 pm »
Michael Chertoff and the Sabotage of the Ptech Investigation
http://911citizenswatch.org/?p=430
Friday, January 14, 2005

Remember Ptech? That’s the Boston software firm financed by Saudi businessman Yassin Al-Qadi, who also happens to be an al Qaeda bagman, whose clients happened to include numerous sensitive US federal branches and agencies, including the FAA, the FBI, the military and the White House.

A little background, from the mainstream, even, thanks to WBZ-TV:

Joe Bergantino, a reporter for WBZ-TV’s investigative team, was torn. He could risk breaking a story based on months of work investigating a software firm linked to terrorism, or heed the government’s demand to hold the story for national security reasons. In mid-June [2002], Bergantino received a tip from a woman in New York [Indira Singh] who suspected that Ptech, a computer software company in Quincy, Mass., had ties to terrorists. Ptech specialized in developing software that manages information contained in computer networks.

Bergantino’s investigation revealed that Ptech’s clients included many federal governmental agencies, including the U.S. Army, the U.S. Air Force, the U.S. Naval Air Command, Congress, the Department of Energy, the Federal Aviation Administration, the Internal Revenue Service, NATO, the Federal Bureau of Investigation, the Secret Service and even the White House.

“Ptech was doing business with every federal government in defense and had access to key government data,” Bergantino said.



Bergantino was ready to air the story by September, but the government had different plans. Federal authorities told Bergantino not to air the story because it would jeopardize their investigation and would threaten national security. According to federal authorities, documents would be shredded and people would flee if we ran the story, Bergantino said.

But Bergantino claims the government’s demand to hold off on the story was merely a pretext.

In October 2001, President George W. Bush signed an executive order freezing the assets of individuals linked to terrorism. According to Bergantino, the list identified Saudi Arabian businessman Yassin Al-Qadi as a key financial backer of Osama Bin Laden. As it turns out, Bergantino said, Al-Qadi also is the chief financier of Ptech. The government failed to investigate Ptech in October 2001 and didn’t start it’s investigation until August 2002 when WBZ-TV’s investigation called attention to Ptech.

Even if Ptech was unaware that the President’s October 2001 order contained the name of its chief financier, documents seized in a March 2002 government raid revealed Ptech’s connections with another organization linked to terrorism, Bergantino said. And again, the government failed to investigate Ptech.

Bergatino’s tipster was Indira Singh, who has said she recognizes the separate command and control communications system Mike Ruppert describes Dick Cheney to have been running on September 11th as having “the exact same functionality I was looking to utilize [for] Ptech.”

Now, how does Chertoff figure in the Ptech story? It goes back to the turf war of two years ago over Operation Greenquest, “the high-profile federal task force set up to target the financiers of Al Qaeda and other international terrorist groups.” The aggressive, Customs-led task force was folded into Homeland Security, sending both the FBI and its minders at the Department of Justice into a tizzy. They “demanded that the White House instead give the FBI total control over Greenquest.”

Now, consider this, also from the two-year-old Newsweek:

The FBI-Justice move, pushed by DOJ Criminal Division chief Michael Chertoff and Deputy Attorney General Larry Thompson, has enraged Homeland Security officials, however. They accuse the bureau of sabotaging Greenquest investigations by failing to turn over critical information to their agents and trying to obscure a decade-long record of lethargy in which FBI offices failed to aggressively pursue terror-finance cases.



One prime example of the tension is the investigation into Ptech, the Boston-area computer software firm that had millions of dollars in sensitive government contracts with the Air Force, the Energy Department and, ironically enough, the FBI. In what turned into a minor embarrassment for the bureau, the firm’s main investors included Yasin Al-Qadi, a wealthy Saudi businessman whom the Bush administration had formally designated a terrorist financier under the International Emergency Economic Powers Act. Al-Qadi has vigorously denied any connection to terrorism.

The Ptech case turned into an ugly dispute last year when company whistleblowers told Greenquest agents about their own suspicions about the firm’s owners. Sources close to the case say those same whistleblowers had first approached FBI agents, but the bureau apparently did little or nothing in response. With backing from the National Security Council, Greenquest agents then mounted a full-scale investigation that culminated in a raid on the company’s office last December. After getting wind of the Greenquest probe, the FBI stepped in and unsuccessfully tried to take control of the case.

The result, sources say, has been something of a train wreck. Privately, FBI officials say Greenquest agents botched the probe and jeopardized other more promising inquiries into Al-Qadi. Greenquest agents dismiss the charges and say the problem is that the bureau was slow to respond to legitimate allegations that an outside contractor with terrorist ties may have infiltrated government computers.

Whatever the truth, there is no dispute that the case has so far produced no charges and indictments against Al-Qadi or anyone else connected with Ptech. The company has denied wrongdoing.


U.S. Customs Service Launches "operation Green Quest" Multi-Agency Initiative to Target Sources of Funding for Terrorist Organizations; October 25, 2001
http://avalon.law.yale.edu/subject_menus/../sept11/customs_002.asp

Deputy Treasury Secretary Dam Remarks at the Launch of "Operation Green Quest"; October 25, 2001
http://avalon.law.yale.edu/subject_menus/../sept11/treas_016.asp

Treasury Undersecretary Gurule's Remarks at the Launch of "Operation Green Quest"; October 25, 2001
http://avalon.law.yale.edu/subject_menus/../sept11/treas_015.asp

Operation Green Quest
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Operation_Green_Quest
Operation Green Quest was a United States Customs Service-sponsored interagency investigative unit formed in October 2001 after the September 11 attacks, and concerned with the surveillance and interdiction of terrorist financing sources. Led by the U.S. Customs Service, and included agents and analysts from the Internal Revenue Service (IRS), the Secret Service, the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco and Firearms (ATF), the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI), the Office of Foreign Assets Control (OFAC), the Financial Crimes Enforcement Network (FinCEN), the U.S. Postal Inspection Service, and the Naval Criminal Investigative Service. Federal prosecutors from the U.S. Justice Department's Criminal Division also formed an integral part of Operation Green Quest. The director of Operation Green Quest was a senior special agent from U.S. Customs and the deputy director is a senior special agent from the IRS. According to Customs, by its fourth month of operation Operation Green Quest had initiated more than 300 probes into terrorist finances, seizing about $10.3m in smuggled US currency and $4.3m in other assets. Its work resulted in 21 searches, 12 arrests and four indictments.[1]

SAAR network raid
Its most spectacular operation of was March 20, 2002 raid 19 interrelated business and non-profit entities in Herndon, VA associated with an umbrella corporation known as the SAAR Foundation. No arrests were made and no organizations were shut down, but over 500 boxes of files and computer files were confiscated, filling seven trucks. Finding no incriminating evidence, much of the confiscated material has been returned. The raid would raise concerns of unfair persecution within the American Muslim community,[2] leading to an April 4, 2002 meeting in which several notable Muslim figures, including Palestinian-American financier and Republican organizer Talat M. Othman and Islamic Institute head Khaled Saffuri were received by Treasury Secretary Paul O'Neill as representatives of the Muslim-American community, and to voice complaints about the raid.

Operation Green Quest
http://911review.org/Sept11Wiki/OperationGreenQuest.shtml
From 9/11 Encyclopedia:

Created by the Treasury Department on Oct. 25, 2001 and announced by Deputy Treasury Secretary Kenneth Dam, Assistant Attorney General Michael Chertoff, Treasury Undersecretary of Enforcement Jimmy Gurule, and U.S. Customs Service Commissioner Robert C. Bonner.  Operation Green Quest is a multi-agency financial enforcement initiative intended "to augment existing counter-terrorist efforts by bringing the full scope of the government's financial expertise to bear against systems, individuals, and organizations that serve as sources of terrorist funding." The director of Operation Green Quest is a senior special agent from U.S. Customs and the deputy director is a senior special agent from the IRS. Operation Green Quest has a dedicated field unit in New York City. The field unit is comprised of experienced financial investigators from the long-standing "El Dorado" Task Force, which is led by U.S. Customs and IRS. http://www.customs.ustreas.gov/hot-new/pressrel/2002/0227-00.htm http://www.customs.ustreas.gov/enforcem/greenquest.htm http://www.customs.ustreas.gov/hot-new/pressrel/2001/1025-03.htm In December 2002, Operation Green Quest made news again, when they investigated at the network company Ptech

Operation Greenquest unresolved
http://counterterrorismblog.org/2007/10/operation_greenquest_unresolve.php
By Christopher Heffelfinger

Starting on Oct. 25, 2001, the Treasury Department began Operation Green Quest, aimed at seizing the assets of terrorist organizations using legitimate business or charitable cover in the United States. The multi-agency initiative intended to "augment existing counter-terrorist efforts by bringing the full scope of the government's financial expertise to bear against systems, individuals, and organizations that serve as sources of terrorist funding" has not yet yielded any convictions. To the best of my understanding, the trial against those charged with bankrolling terrorism operations is stalled in Federal Court in Alexandria, VA. The complex network of transactions through Switzerland and the Isle of Man is perhaps difficult to unravel, and there is a massive amount of evidence to sort. But the lack of prosecutorial action is empowering domestic groups that continue to deny any terrorism connections with the groups raided in late 2001 and early 2002.

I have a few longer academic pieces covering this ongoing case, but this excerpt from Strategic Insights sums up the gravity of the case:

"A few of charity-business networks have been identified in the course of post 9/11 investigation and enforcement efforts. Operation Green Quest uncovered such links in its investigation of Yassin al Qadi and his involvement with BMI, which stands for the Arabic Beit ul Mal, or House of Finance. Green Quest established that there were links between BMI and an Islamic charity called Mercy International. Mercy was, in turn tied with al Taqwa and was implicated in several al Qaeda operations including the bombing of American Embassies in Kenya and Tanzania.

"An investigation into the activities of a number of Saudi and other Middle East businessmen working out of Herndon Virginia also unveiled a network of some 100 intertwined companies and charities charged with funding al Qaeda and other terrorist groups. This included Islamic educational, cultural and charitable organizations as well as for-profit businesses and investment firms. Most of the Islamic educational and charitable organizations were “paper” organizations registered at a common address but having no apparent physical structure. This network became known as the Safa Group. The Safa Group was closely associated in the United States with the SAAR Foundation, a charity with branches in both Canada and the United States funded by Saudi Billionaire Salaeh Abdul Aziz- al Rajhi. Evidence was uncovered showing that the Safa Group, using the various affiliated charities and companies under its control, transferred money in convoluted transactions through a network of inter-related organizations designed to prevent investigators from tracking the ultimate recipients. Collateral evidence supported the view that these recipients included al Qaeda, Hamas and other associated terrorist groups." (Comras, Victor. "Al Qaeda Finances and Funding to Affiliated Groups," Strategic Insights, Volume IV, Issue 1)
October 9, 2007 10:31 AM    Print

SAAR Foundation
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/SAAR_Foundation

The SAAR Foundation was the flagship corporation representing of charities, think tanks, and business entities named after its founder, Saudi patriarch Sulaiman Abdul Aziz Al Rajhi. The SAAR Foundation achieved prominence as the key subject of a March 20, 2002 raid by federal agents, as a part of Operation Green Quest. The Foundation's overseas origins date to the 1970s. Its U.S. branch was incorporated as a 501(3)c on July 29, 1983 in Herndon, VA, and dissolved in December 2000, and renamed Safa Trust. As part of Operation Green Quest, on March 20, 2002 federal agents raided 14 interlocking business entities in Herndon, VA associated with the SAAR Foundation looking for ties to the Al Taqwa Bank and the Muslim Brotherhood. Over 500 boxes of files and computer files were confiscated, filling seven trucks. The raids led to the convictions of two people, including Abdurahman Alamoudi, who worked for the SAAR Foundation. Alamoudi admitted that he plotted with Libya to assassinate the Saudi ruler and was sentenced to 23 years in jail.[1][2][3]

Notable personnel
Yaqub Mirza, chief executive 1984-2002.
Ahmad Totonji
Ibrahim Hassabella


External links
CooperativeResearch link on the SAAR Foundation


References
^ Markon, Jerry, "Witness Is Silent in Terror Probe; Ex-Professor Says Grand Jury Testimony Would Endanger Him," The Washington Post, November 14, 2006, accessed January 27, 2010
^ Gerstein, Josh, "Judge Dismisses Suit Questioning Federal Tactics," New York Sun, November 8, 2007, accessed January 27, 2010
^ Gerstein, Josh, "A Prosecutor Is Called 'Relentless'," New York Sun, July 28, 2008, accessed January 27, 2010


Abdul Rahman Al-Amoudi, also known as Abdurahman Alamoudi, the founder of the American Muslim Council, pled guilty to financial and conspiracy charges in 2004, which resulted in a 23-year prison sentence.[1] Al-Amoudi was born in Yemen, raised in Yemen, and later immigrated to the United States. He founded the American Muslim Council, a lobbying group to advocate on behalf of Muslims in the United States, in 1990. The Council's aim was to inform and influence both Republicans and Democrats). Until 1998, Al-Amoudi was involved with the selection of Muslim chaplains for the U.S. military (through the American Muslim Armed Forces and Veterans Affairs Council, which he co-founded in 1991), and acted as a consultant to The Pentagon for over a decade. During this time Al-Amoudi served as an Islamic adviser to President Bill Clinton and a fundraiser for both the Republican and Democratic parties. More recently, Al-Amoudi worked with leading conservatives, such as Grover Norquist, president of Americans for Tax Reform. Al-Amoudi became a U.S. citizen in 1996.

Al-Amoudi and other Muslim leaders met with then-presidential candidate George W. Bush in Austin in July 2000, offering to support his bid for the White House in exchange for Bush's commitment to repeal certain anti-terrorist laws.

After the September 11, 2001 attacks, Al-Amoudi spoke at the Washington National Cathedral prayer service held to honor the memory of the victims. In 2004 he pled guilty to three charges of illegal financial transactions with the Libyan government, unlawful procurement of citizenship and impeding administration of the Internal Revenue Service, as well as a role in a Libyan conspiracy to assassinate then-Saudi Crown Prince Abdullah.
He agreed to cooperate in ongoing investigations in return for prosecutors dropping 31 other counts and possible reduction in a pending 23-year sentence and $750,000 in fines.[2][3] He was sentenced to 23 years in October 2004.[1] Al-Amoudi was described as an "expert in the art of deception" in a report by Newsweek journalists Mark Hosenball and Michael Isikoff, for expressing moderate, pro-American sympathies in his lobbying and public relations work with Americans, but then expressing support for Hamas and Hezbollah at an Islamist rally.[4]
All eyes are opened, or opening, to the rights of man. The general spread of the light of science has already laid open to every view the palpable truth, that the mass of mankind has not been born with saddles on their backs, nor a favored few booted and spurred, ready to ride them legitimately

Offline Dig

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Re: Michael Chertoff and the Sabotage of the Ptech Investigation
« Reply #1 on: December 25, 2010, 03:56:07 pm »
Yaqub Mirza
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Yaqub_Mirza

M. Yaqub Mirza[1] (b. Karachi, Pakistan) is a Herndon, VA -based businessman and Islamic activist. Mirza holds a M.Sc. from University of Karachi (1969), a Ph.D. in Physics (1974) and M.A. in Teaching Science (1975) from University of Texas at Dallas. Mirza was a co-founder of the International Institute of Islamic Thought. Mirza was a co-founder and trustee (1984–2003) of Amana Mutual Funds Trust, a Bellingham, Washington-based mutual fund that operates in accordance with Sharia financial principles. Since 1998 has been President and CEO of Sterling Management Group, Inc (SMG).[2] Mirza lectures on Entrepreneurship and has spoken at several institutions.[3]
All eyes are opened, or opening, to the rights of man. The general spread of the light of science has already laid open to every view the palpable truth, that the mass of mankind has not been born with saddles on their backs, nor a favored few booted and spurred, ready to ride them legitimately

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Re: Michael Chertoff and the Sabotage of the Ptech Investigation
« Reply #2 on: December 25, 2010, 03:58:21 pm »
International Institute of Islamic Thought
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/International_Institute_of_Islamic_Thought

The Institution is concerned with issues of Islamic thought. It was founded in 1981 in Pennsylvania, and is headquartered in Herndon, Virginia, in the suburbs of Washington DC. Controversy has surrounded islamist radicalism at the Institute, which was founded with seed money from the Muslim Brotherhood. The FBI has raided the Institute seeking evidence of contributing terrorists, while members have been arrested and found to be active leaders of terrorist organizations. An Institute book justified violence against Israel as liberation struggle, not terrorism.

Mission statement

The Institute is governed by a board of trustees that meets regularly, and periodically elects one of its members to serve as President.

The Institute describes itself as an intellectual forum working from an Islamic perspective to promote and support research projects, organize intellectual and cultural meetings, and publish scholarly works.

Publications

The Institute publishes works produced by its own research programs, as well as contributions from around the world, in Arabic, English, and other major languages. IIIT publications include over 400 titles, distributed in various series and topics, in addition to quarterly journals in English and Arabic.[1]

Notable personnelJamal al Barzinji
Ismail al-Faruqi   Taha Jabir Alalwani
Anwar Ibrahim   Yaqub Mirza
Ahmad Totonji


Controversy
Muslim Brotherhood

The Institute was founded in 1981 with seed money from the Muslim Brotherhood.[2] It has branches and offices in a number of major cities worldwide.[3]
Basheer Nafi and the Islamic Jihad and Hamas

In 1996 Basheer Nafi, who had been working as a top-level researcher and editor at the Institute, was arrested by federal Immigration and Naturalization Service agents and charged with immigration fraud. He was considered an active leader of the Islamic Jihad terrorist organization who was working for a network of academic front groups, and was linked as well to the Islamist militant group Hamas.[4][5][6] He pleaded guilty to a lesser violation of his visa status, and was deported and barred from entering the U.S. for five years.[7]
Book; targeting civilians with terror

An Institute book by IIIT official AbdulHamid AbuSulayman entitled "Violence," published in 2001, said Israel is a "foreign usurper" that must be confronted with "fear, terror and lack of security." The book maintained "Fighting is a duty of the oppressed people." Palestinian fighters must choose their targets "whether the targets are civilian or military," it said, adding that any such attacks should not be "excessive." The book said such attacks were justified acts of a liberation struggle, not terrorism.[2]
Sami Al-Arian and the Islamic Jihad

On March 20, 2002, Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) officials raided the Institute and closed the Institute temporarily. The agents were seeking evidence that the Institute was contributing to terrorists, and seized about 25 computers and documents that included financial records, mailing lists, and staff lists.[8] The search was part of a larger FBI-Customs Service series of raids that included 19 other business and non-profit entities known as Operation Green Quest. "Such a massive ream of documents came out of those search warrants," one law enforcement official said, "it takes incredibly lengthy investigative work."[9]

The raids led to the convictions of two people, including Abdurahman Alamoudi, who worked for the SAAR Foundation. Alamoudi admitted that he plotted with Libya to assassinate the Saudi ruler and was sentenced to 23 years in jail.[10][11][12]

A leader of the Institute, Iqbal Unus, his wife and daughter brought suit charging that their rights were violated and the government was guilty of assault, trespass, and false imprisonment when their home was searched in the raid. A federal judge dismissed the suit, however. The lawsuit had also named a terrorism researcher, Rita Katz, as a defendant, but the judge dismissed her from the case and awarded her $41,000 in legal fees.[11]

The Institute was a leading financier of Sami Al-Arian's now-defunct World and Islam Studies Enterprise, a "think tank" shut down after the FBI confiscated its files in 1995. That think tank raised money for the Palestinian Islamic Jihad, which the State Department labeled a terrorist group in 1995.[13][14] Al-Arian pleaded guilty in 2006 to helping a terrorist organization, and was sentenced to 57 months in prison. Taha Jaber Al- Awani, an officer of the Institute, was named an unindicted co-conspirator in Al-Arian's case.[15]

The Institute, whose money was believed to come from wealthy Saudi Arabians through the SAAR Foundation (a tightly connected Herndon-based network of more than 100 organizations; also known as the Safa Group), also funded other Al-Arian organizations, including the Tampa Bay Coalition for Justice and Peace, the Islamic Academy of Florida and the Islamic Committee for Palestine.[16][17] Two incorporators of the Islamic trust that owns the Islamic Academy of Florida were Jamal Barzinji and Hisham Al-Talib, both of whom also served as directors of the Institute.[18]

Attorneys for the Institute claimed that the raid violated its free speech and privacy rights, and asked U.S. Magistrate Judge Theresa C. Buchanan to order the boxes of records returned. But on May 4, 2002, the Judge found that the investigative agents had acted properly, and declined to lift her order sealing the affidavits, though she urged prosecutors to return seized property as soon as possible.[19]

In October 2002, Virginia Representative James P. Moran, Jr., said he was returning donations from the Institute, as: "I don't want any contributors to my campaign contributing to any individuals or organizations, even inadvertently, that might fund terrorism or organizations involved in terrorism."[20]

In 2007 he refused to answer questions to a grand jury about the Institute, and was found guilty of civil contempt an jailed for 13 months. On October 16, 2006, and on March 20, 2008, Al-Arian refused to answer questions about the Institute before a federal grand jury, asserting that he believed his life would be in danger if he testified. He was charged with criminal contempt the following month for unlawfully and willfully refusing court orders that he testify as a grand jury witness.[21][22][23][24] On September 2, 2008, he was released from custody and put under house arrest at his daughter Laila's residence in Northern Virginia, where he is being monitored electronically while he awaits trial on criminal contempt charges.[25] While under federal law, Al-Arian could not be jailed for more than 18 months for civil contempt, the law does not have a time limit for criminal contempt.[26]

The Institute canceled its $1.5 million offer to Temple University for an endowed chair in Islamic studies after concerns were raised about the Institute's possible funding of suspected terrorists, it was reported in January 2008. Negotiations between Temple and the Institute broke down after trustees and others pressed Temple to reject the gift. Temple president Ann Weaver Hart had said that “after much discussion and consideration, Temple decided to neither accept or reject this generous offer. The university indicated that no decision regarding this matter would be made until post-9/11 federal investigations of the IIIT are complete."[27]
Tarik A. Hamdi and al-Qaeda

In 2005, Tarik A. Hamdi, who had worked at the Institute, was accused in a federal affidavit of having been the "American contact" for one of Osama bin-Laden's front organisations, and having given a satellite telephone battery to a bin-Laden aide in Afghanistan for a telephone used by bin-Laden.[28][29]
Contributions to Esam Omeish candidacy for state assemblyman

In 2009 Esam Omeish ran for State Assemblyman in the Democratic Party primary election in the 35th District of the Virginia House of Delegates.[30][31] Omeish raised $143,734 for his campaign the fourth-largest amount of fundraising state-wide among all Virginia House of Delegates candidates.[32] His third-highest contributor was the International Institute of Islamic Thought.[33] Omeish had made controversial statements reflecting radical views, including "you have learned the way, that you have known that the jihad way is the way to liberate your land."[30][34][35], Omeish also accused Israel of genocide and massacres against Palestinians, and said the "Israeli agenda" controls Congress.[36][37] Omeish also was the one who hired Anwar al-Awlaki to what would become known as the "9/11 mosque" in Virgnia. Awalki, who had previously been investigated for links to Al Queda, was linked to the 9/11 hijackers, and is now targeted for killing by the US government.


References
^ "IIIT Publications," International Institute of Islamic Thought, accessed January 27, 2010
^ a b Mintz, John, and Farah, Douglas, "In Search Of Friends Among The Foes; U.S. Hopes to Work With Diverse Group", The Washington Post, September 11, 2004, accessed January 27, 2010
^ About Us International Institute of Islamic Thought
^ Schmitt, Christopher H., and Kurlantzick, Joshua, "When charity goes awry; Islamic groups say they may lose control of money they send overseas," U.S. News and World Report, October 21, 2001, accessed January 26, 2010
^ Fechter, Michael, "U.S. deports Jihad figure," Tampa Tribune, July 3, 1996, accessed January 26, 2010
^ Branigan, William, "U.S. Cites Immigration Offense In Quickly Deporting Palestinian; Herndon Arrest Followed FBI Probe of Think Tank," The Washington Post, July 5, 1996, accessed January 26, 2010
^ "Researcher with USF Link Deported," Miami Herald, July 4, 1996, accessed January 26, 2010
^ Markon, Jerry, "Muslim Anger Burns Over Lingering Probe of Charities", The Washington Post, October 11, 2006, accessed January 27, 2010
^ Markon, Jerry, "Muslim Anger Burns Over Lingering Probe of Charities", The Washington Post, October 11, 2006, accessed January 27, 2010
^ Markon, Jerry, "Witness Is Silent in Terror Probe; Ex-Professor Says Grand Jury Testimony Would Endanger Him," The Washington Post, November 14, 2006, accessed January 27, 2010
^ a b Gerstein, Josh, "Judge Dismisses Suit Questioning Federal Tactics," New York Sun, November 8, 2007, accessed January 27, 2010
^ Gerstein, Josh, "A Prosecutor Is Called 'Relentless'," New York Sun, July 28, 2008, accessed January 27, 2010
^ Jacoby, Mary, "Muslims denounce raids linked to Al-Arian," St. Petersburg Times, March 22, 2002, accessed January 26, 2010
^ Miller, Judith, "A Nation Challenged: The Money Trail; U.S. Raids Continue, Prompting Protests," The New York Times, March 22, 2002, accessed January 26, 2010
^ Fechter, Michael, "Affidavit Ties In Al-Arian", Tampa Tribune, October 18, 2003, accessed January 27, 2010
^ "Islam", St. Petersburg Times, March 11, 2003, accessed January 27, 2010
^ Jacoby, Mary, "Affidavit: Al-Arian's group got money from Saudi charity; The former USF professor's civil liberties group received $10,000 from a group linked to terrorism, a statement from a U.S. Customs Service agent says," St. Petersburg Times, August 1, 2003, accessed January 27, 2010
^ Jacoby, Mary, and Brink, Graham, "Saudi form of Islam wars with moderates," St. Petersburg Times, March 11, 2003, accessed January 27, 2010
^ Masters, Brooke A., "U.S. Magistrate Denies Muslim Groups' Request; Return Sought of Property Seized in Va.", The Washington Post, May 4, 2002, accessed January 27, 2010
^ "Rep. James P. Moran Jr. returns contributions from Muslim groups targeted in terrorism probe," AP, November 1, 2002, accessed January 26, 2010
^ U.S. v. Al-Arian, Indictment, U.S. District Court for the Eastern District of Virginia, June 26, 2008, accessed March 8, 2010
^ "Prof Accused of Terror Link in Contempt," Fox News, November 17, 2006, accessed January 27, 2010
^ Markon, Jerry, "Witness Is Silent in Terror Probe; Ex-Professor Says Grand Jury Testimony Would Endanger Him," The Washington Post, November 14, 2006, accessed January 27, 2010
^ Markon, Jerry, "Former Professor Indicted In Muslim Charities Case," The Washington Post, June 27, 2008, accessed January 27, 2010
^ "Ex-Professor in Palestinian Case Is Freed After 5 Years", The Washington Post, September 3, 2008, accessed March 8, 2010
^ Gerstein, Josh, "Al-Arian Indicted for Refusal To Testify in Charities Cases", New York Sun, June 27, 2008, accessed March 11, 2010
^ "U.S. probe makes Islamic group drop university offer," China Post, January 7, 2008, accessed January 27, 2010
^ Sherman, Mark, "'Bin Laden contact' working for Iraq ministry", The Independent, August 12, 2005, accessed January 27, 2010
^ "US man linked to al-Qaida works for Iraq", Bangor Daily News, August 12, 2005, accessed January 27, 2010
^ a b Osborne, James (June 8, 2009). "Clinton Invites Controversial Muslim Leader on Conference Call". Fox News. Retrieved December 31, 2009.
^ ""2009 Elections > Virginia > House of Delegates (35) > Esam S. Omeish (D); About The Candidate", ''The Washington Post'', accessed January 18, 2010". Projects.washingtonpost.com. Retrieved January 24, 2010.
^ "O'Donoghue, Julia, "Lots of Cash Flowed Into 35th Delegate Primary," ''Vienna Connection'', June 10, 2009, accessed January 21, 2010". Connectionnewspapers.com. June 10, 2009. Retrieved January 24, 2010.
^ "All Receipts Reported by Esam S Omeish Committees," VPAP, accessed January 26, 2010
^ Fisher, Marc (April 29, 2009). "From Fairfax To Richmond, "The Jihad Way?"". The Washington Post. Retrieved January 18, 2010.
^ "Transcript: Controversial Muslim Resigns from Virginia Commission," Hannity & Colmes (Fox News Network), Sean Hannity, Alan Colmes, September 27, 2007, accessed January 19, 2010
^ "Virginia Governor Tim Kaine Accepts Resignation of Controversial Appointee", FOX News, September 27, 2007, accessed December 9, 2009
^ Stealth jihad: how radical Islam is subverting America without guns or bombs, Robert Spencer, Regnery Publishing, 2008, ISBN 1-59698-556-9, 9781596985568, accessed December 9, 2009
All eyes are opened, or opening, to the rights of man. The general spread of the light of science has already laid open to every view the palpable truth, that the mass of mankind has not been born with saddles on their backs, nor a favored few booted and spurred, ready to ride them legitimately

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Re: Michael Chertoff and the Sabotage of the Ptech Investigation
« Reply #3 on: December 25, 2010, 04:04:31 pm »

The raids led to the convictions of two people, including Abdurahman Alamoudi, who worked for the SAAR Foundation. Alamoudi admitted that he plotted with Libya to assassinate the Saudi ruler and was sentenced to 23 years in jail.[10][11][12] A leader of the Institute, Iqbal Unus, his wife and daughter brought suit charging that their rights were violated and the government was guilty of assault, trespass, and false imprisonment when their home was searched in the raid. A federal judge dismissed the suit, however. The lawsuit had also named a terrorism researcher, Rita Katz, as a defendant, but the judge dismissed her from the case and awarded her $41,000 in legal fees.[11]

Rita Katz...woweeeeeeeeee


http://www.nysun.com/national/judge-dismisses-suit-questioning-federal-tactics/66099/
The lawsuit, when filed in 2004, also named a prominent terrorism researcher, Rita Katz, as a defendant. Judge Brinkema dismissed her from the case in 2005 and later awarded her $41,000 in legal fees. The Unuses argued that a 99-page affidavit prepared to obtain the search warrant was based on erroneous information provided by Ms. Katz to a Customs Service investigator heading up the probe, David Kane.
All eyes are opened, or opening, to the rights of man. The general spread of the light of science has already laid open to every view the palpable truth, that the mass of mankind has not been born with saddles on their backs, nor a favored few booted and spurred, ready to ride them legitimately

Offline pac522

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Re: Michael Chertoff and the Sabotage of the Ptech Investigation
« Reply #4 on: December 25, 2010, 04:27:23 pm »
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This country did not achieve greatness with the mindset of "safety first" but rather "live free or die".

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The problem is the virus called the Illuminati.  ~EvadingGrid

The answer to 1984 is 1776.