Author Topic: New Film ‘Machete’ evokes race war  (Read 30757 times)

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H0llyw00d

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Re: New Film ‘Machete’ evokes race war
« Reply #40 on: May 12, 2010, 10:49:29 am »
They even threw in a little slap in the face at who is "really" running things.




Jessica Alba is running things??

Offline IridiumKEPfactor

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Re: New Film ‘Machete’ evokes race war
« Reply #41 on: May 12, 2010, 10:55:34 am »
Jessica Alba is running things??
What the "Owl" building symbolizes.




Offline Dig

  • All eyes are opened, or opening, to the rights of man.
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Re: New Film ‘Machete’ evokes race war
« Reply #42 on: May 12, 2010, 01:00:36 pm »
They even threw in a little slap in the face at who is "really" running things.




the whole thing was shot in Austin and I think the architecture in Austin is very revealing.




Twilight view of Frost Bank Tower from Congress Avenue
Former/other names   FBT, Congress at Fourth, Fourth & Congress
General information
Location   401 North Congress
Austin, Texas[1]
Coordinates   30.266489°N 97.742689°WCoordinates: 30.266489°N 97.742689°W
Status   Complete
Groundbreaking   November 27, 2001
Constructed   2001-2003
Opening   January 23, 2004 [2]
Use   Office[1]
Height
Roof   515 ft (157 m)[1]
Top floor   400 ft (122 m)[1]
Technical details
Floor count   33[1]
Floor area   50,680 sq. m[1]
Elevators   10
Cost   137 million US dollars[3]
Companies involved
Architect(s)   HKS, Inc., Duda/Paine Architects
Structural engineer   Brockette Davis Drake[3]
Contractor   Constructors & Associates Inc.[1]
Developer   Cousins Properties


The Frost Bank Tower is a skyscraper in Downtown Austin, Texas, United States. Standing 515 feet (157 meters) tall and containing 33 floors, it is the third tallest building in Austin, behind the 360 Condominiums and the Austonian.[4] It was developed by Cousins Properties from November 2001 to December 2003 as a class A office building.[5]

It was the first high-rise building to be constructed in the U.S. after the 9/11 attacks.[6]

The building was officially dedicated in January 2004.[6]

The Frost Bank Tower was designed by Duda/Paine Architects, LLP and HKS, Inc. It has the title for tallest logo above ground in the city at 420 ft (128 m) which belongs to the logo's owner, San Antonio-based Frost National Bank, whose Austin headquarters and insurance division are in the building.[6] Notable tenants besides Frost Bank include the Austin offices of Morgan Stanley and Ernst & Young, as well as the headquarters of the University of Texas Investment Management Company (UTIMCO), managers of the Permanent University Fund. The silvery blue color glass facade was first used on the Reuters Building in New York City.[6] Cousins sold the building in 2006 to Equity Office Properties Trust for $188 million. Equity Office Properties then later sold the building to Thomas Properties.

Local newspaper columnist John Kelso noted that the tower resembles an enormous set of nose hair trimmers, while the Austin Chronicle, referring to the building's "owl face looking down over the city," claims the skyscraper helps keep Austin "characteristically weird." [7]

[edit]
History

In 1998, T.Stacy & Associates consolidated tracts of land at the site and sold it to Cousins Properties in 2001.[5] Cousins Properties soon developed the plan for the Frost Bank Tower. The original plan called for a 352 ft (107 m) tall building with 27 floors, but the final plan called for a 515 ft (157 m) tall building with 33 floors.[6] As the building commenced on November 27, 2001, it became the tallest building in the United States of America to start construction after the September 11 attacks. [6] Construction was finished about 2 years later in 2003, and the tower was officially dedicated in 2004. It officially became the tallest building in Austin, Texas, and the 4th tallest building outside of Dallas and Houston, Texas (excluding the Tower of the Americas in San Antonio, Texas).[8] In August 2003 cost of the building was estimated at 137 million U.S. dollars.[3]

After Austin's skyscraper construction boom, which began in 2007, Frost Bank Tower was soon surpassed in height by the 360 Condominiums at 563 ft (172 m) in 2008, and The Austonian at 683 ft (208 m) in 2010. As of 2010, it is the 50th tallest building in Texas.[8] In 2006, Cousins Propeties decided to sell the building for $188 million dollars to Equity Office Properties, whom eventually sold it to Thomas Properties.[9][10] Today, the there are many notable tenants in the building, including Frost Bank, Morgan Stanley, Ernst & Young, UTIMCO, and Heritage Title Co.[11][12][13][14]
[edit]
Architecture

Designed by HKS, Inc. and Duda/Paine Architects, LLP, the Frost Bank Tower is considered one of the most recognizable buildings in Austin.[15] The Frost Bank Tower starts as a rectangular building on the ground that eventually becomes a square point tower in the crown. The base of the building is expressed in honed finish limestone while the tower of the building is of blue low-e glass skin, which covers the entire tower. The Frost Bank Tower is one of only two places in the world with blue low-e glass skin, the other being the Reuters Building in New York City, which was the earlier structure.[6] The folded panes of the building step back to create a segmented pyramidal form. Lighting covers the crown, where 150 feet of lighting is turned on at night, and sometimes changes color for special occasions, such as the 2006 Rose Bowl, when the Austin-based University of Texas Longhorns defeated the USC Trojans.[16][17] The tower used massive amounts of glass in its construction. More than 200,000 sq ft (60,960 sq m) of glass was used for the facade of the building alone and 45,000 ft (13,716 m) feet was used for the crown.[6]
[edit]

Critic's Response

According to local radio talk show host Alex Jones, the building was inspired by the Bohemian Club.[18][19] Jones claims that when someone looks from a corner of the building, it shows a strong resemblance to an owl, which is supposedly representative of the club.
All eyes are opened, or opening, to the rights of man. The general spread of the light of science has already laid open to every view the palpable truth, that the mass of mankind has not been born with saddles on their backs, nor a favored few booted and spurred, ready to ride them legitimately

H0llyw00d

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Re: New Film ‘Machete’ evokes race war
« Reply #43 on: May 13, 2010, 06:12:53 pm »
Quote
going to do a youtube experiment right now (I don't see this Ver, ANYWHERE) am uploading this trailer, will note time of completion and then see how long it stays up...bets???...lol
PS: Upload is @ 51% now

ok...up @ 7:40pm est 5/6/2010
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FJBCWF52_Ls



Today:

Offline citizenx

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Re: New Film ‘Machete’ evokes race war
« Reply #44 on: May 13, 2010, 06:44:42 pm »
"She'a twentieth century fox...

got the world wrapped up inside a plastic box..."

H0llyw00d

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Re: New Film ‘Machete’ evokes race war
« Reply #45 on: May 13, 2010, 06:45:17 pm »
"She'a twentieth century fox...

got the world wrapped up inside a plastic box..."

lol...g00d one

Offline HeismaN

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Re: New Film ‘Machete’ evokes race war
« Reply #46 on: May 13, 2010, 06:53:56 pm »

Offline Freeski

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Re: New Film ‘Machete’ evokes race war
« Reply #47 on: September 01, 2010, 08:36:59 am »
The film opens this Friday.

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Will ‘Machete’ release spark racial violence?
http://www.prisonplanet.com/will-%e2%80%98machete%e2%80%99-release-spark-racial-violence.html

With the violent and racially-charged film ‘Machete’ about to hit theaters Friday, Alex Jones has once again questioned the film’s potential to heighten tensions in the immigration debate or even fuel riots or attacks. Though the production crew has downplayed fears of a ‘race war’ message, recent sightings of bloody ‘Machete’ promo posters plastered throughout Latin America suggest that this violent film may still stir controversy and strong reactions.
"He who passively accepts evil is as much involved in it as he who helps to perpetrate it. He who accepts evil without protesting against it is really cooperating with it." Martin Luther King, Jr.