Author Topic: 14 years ago, an attempted sabotage of a movie occured: Island of Dr. Moreau  (Read 8080 times)

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Offline Dig

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When this movie came out, it made absolutely no sense whatsoever. There was hardly any explanation for the total insanity of it. Read the production issues. Realize that while on set, Val Kilmer found out he was getting a divorce from a CNN interview his wife gave. Realize that during filming Marlon Brando's daughter committed suicide. Now watch the movie again. The top of the pyramid are not the military industrial complex, it is not even the pure bankers...it is eugenecists. This movie lays out most of the plan, and the book by HG Wells 100 years earlier laid out a plan that has never been diverted. You want to understand spider goats, fluoridation, microchipping, active denial systems, god complex, neo-feudalism, etc...watch this movie again. Oh, what have we allowed in the past 14 years...



Production
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Island_of_Dr._Moreau_(1996_film)

Unfortunately for New Line the production was plagued with problems from the outset. The first sign of trouble appeared when Kilmer suddenly decided - for reasons of his own - that he wanted his role cut by 40%. The original director on the project, Richard Stanley, knew that it was impossible to cut the role of UN diplomat, Edward Prendick (later changed to Edward Douglas) by such a drastic amount, but he wanted to keep Kilmer onboard, so he hit on the idea of switching him to the role of Dr. Montgomery, Moreau's assistant on the island. Kilmer agreed to this proposal, so the part of Prendick was given to Rob Morrow.

The chosen location for the film were the steamy, tropical rainforests of North Queensland, Australia, but just three days into filming, New Line fired Stanley, (a move that was believed to have been influenced by Kilmer) and brought in veteran film director, John Frankenheimer. The reasons for Stanley's dismissal are not very clear, but it's been said that he wasn't a strong enough director (to cope with Kilmer, who was going through a divorce at the time) and that he didn't have his process very well thought out. Frankenheimer, like virtually every member of the cast and crew, came on board because he wanted the opportunity to work with Brando.

When Morrow also decided to leave the production, Frankenheimer needed to find a new lead actor and brought in David Thewlis to play Douglas. Frankenheimer's vision of the movie was very different from Stanley's, and he and Brando decided to rewrite the script with the help of scriptwriters, Walon Green and Ron Hutchinson. The whole production was shut down for one and a half weeks while these changes were implemented.[1]

Once shooting resumed, however, the problems did not dissipate. New pages were turned in only a few days before they were shot and the breakneck pace Hutchinson kept up didn't equal quality. Frankenheimer and Kilmer had an argument on-set, which reportedly got so heated, Frankenheimer stated afterwards, "I don't like Val Kilmer, I don't like his work ethic, and I don't want to be associated with him ever again".[2] Because of this, there were two famous phrases Frankenheimer was quoted as saying to the press in reference to Val Kilmer. The first was, "There are two things I will never ever do in my whole life. The first is that I will never climb Mt. Everest. The second is that I will never work with Val Kilmer ever again." The second, more tongue-in-cheek phrase was, "Will Rogers never met Val Kilmer." Frankenheimer also reportedly clashed with Brando and the studio, as they were concerned with the direction he was taking the film.

According to Thewlis, "we all had different ideas of where it should go. I even ended up improvising some of the main scenes with Marlon." Thewlis went on to rewrite his character personally. The constant rewrites also got to Brando's nerve and having no motivation to keep rehearsing new lines, he was equipped with a small radio receiver. Thewlis recollects: "[Marlon would] be in the middle of a scene and suddenly he'd be picking up police messages and would repeat, 'There's a robbery at Woolworths.'" Even Brando clashed with Kilmer who didn't make any new friends with his continuously erratic behavior. According to Film Threat magazine, Brando pointed out to him: "You're confusing your talents with the size of your paycheck".

Kilmer has stated that the time filming on-set was "crazy." He was served with divorce papers from his then-wife Joanne Whalley, Brando was dealing with the suicide of his daughter Cheyenne, as well as the implications of a French nuclear test near the atoll he owned.

After a joke Stanley reportedly told to the production designer of burning the set down, security was tightened in case of him actually trying to sabotage the project.[3] One rumor surfaced (promoted by Stanley)[4] that he did however manage to sneak back on the set in full costume as one of the many human-animal hybrids.[5] Another reports that he also showed up at the film's wrap party where he ran into Kilmer, who was said to have apologized profusely for Stanley's removal from the film.
All eyes are opened, or opening, to the rights of man. The general spread of the light of science has already laid open to every view the palpable truth, that the mass of mankind has not been born with saddles on their backs, nor a favored few booted and spurred, ready to ride them legitimately

Offline Kilgore Trout

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I have this movie in my collection , I enjoyed it...crazy goings on there.
"I do not believe that there were, at the Council of Nicea,
three persons present who believed in the truth of what was set down.
If there were, it was on account of their ignorance."
J. M. Roberts, "Antiquity Unveiled", 1892

Offline citizenx

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So, here's the question:

Burt Lancaster and Michael York or Marlon Brando and Davd Thewliss?

Which version did you like better and why?

Backstory is quite interesting.  H.G. Wells is quite possibly the playbook for a lot of $hit nowadays.

Offline Dig

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So, here's the question:

Burt Lancaster and Michael York or Marlon Brando and Davd Thewliss?

Which version did you like better and why?

Backstory is quite interesting.  H.G. Wells is quite possibly the playbook for a lot of $hit nowadays.

Brando/Kilmer, the other one is crap.
All eyes are opened, or opening, to the rights of man. The general spread of the light of science has already laid open to every view the palpable truth, that the mass of mankind has not been born with saddles on their backs, nor a favored few booted and spurred, ready to ride them legitimately

Offline citizenx

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Yeah, I liked the remake, too.  Though it didn't do well critically.

It had some flaws, but the chemistry between Brando and Kilmer (which apprarenlty was somewhat 'real') was great.  The scene where Kilmer does Brando (let's make that clear, I mean imitates) is classic.

Offline Dig

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The scene where Kilmer does Brando (let's make that clear, I mean imitates) is classic.


it will never get old
All eyes are opened, or opening, to the rights of man. The general spread of the light of science has already laid open to every view the palpable truth, that the mass of mankind has not been born with saddles on their backs, nor a favored few booted and spurred, ready to ride them legitimately

Offline Dig

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Chemical Hallucinations, Mind Control, and Dr. Jose Delgado
http://www.cassiopaea.org/cass/delgado.htm
Laura Knight-Jadczyk
Updated on October, 1999

   
"Man does not have the right to develop his own mind. This kind of liberal orientation has great appeal. We must electrically control the brain. Some day armies and generals will be controlled by electric stimulation of the brain."
-Dr. Jose Delgado in front of Congress

"Free Will is the most important law in all of Creation."
-Cassiopaeans

The above quote by Dr. Jose Delgado is quite frightening, isn't it?

[...]

Clearly, "Dr. Delgado" must think that he is somewhere near the top of this foodchain, judging by his published remarks. Well, it seems that, by saying that he is desperately yearning to revert back to the primordial soup, Dr. Delgado DOES have some awareness of his path...

[...]

And here we have the problem. Such individuals not only desperately long to revert to the primordial soup, they want to take everyone else with them! And, in their mode of wishful thinking, they convince themselves that everyone else, in their "heart of hearts," wants the same thing!

But "Dr. Delgado" DOES comprehend. He is CONSCIOUS.

And, apparently, one of the prophets of the Gospel of Devolution is "Dr. Jose Delgado," wishfully thinking that he, and the rest of humanity are merely...

"gobs and gobs of living humanoidal tissue cultures in search of a little bedtime story."





Side note: Dr. Delgado progression of experiments are depicted in the remake of Island of Dr. Moreau w/ Marlon Brando and Val Kilmer.

1896...HG Wells The Island of Dr. Moreau...
http://www.bartleby.com/1001/14.html




  “The stores were landed and the house was built. The Kanakas founded some huts near the ravine. I went to work here upon what I had brought with me. There were some disagreeable things happened at first. I began with a sheep, and killed it after a day and a half by a slip of the scalpel. I took another sheep, and made a thing of pain and fear and left it bound up to heal. It looked quite human to me when I had finished it; but when I went to it I was discontented with it. It remembered me, and was terrified beyond imagination; and it had no more than the wits of a sheep. The more I looked at it the clumsier it seemed, until at last I put the monster out of its misery. These animals without courage, these fear-haunted, pain-driven things, without a spark of pugnacious energy to face torment,—they are no good for man-making.     30

  “Then I took a gorilla I had; and upon that, working with infinite care and mastering difficulty after difficulty, I made my first man. All the week, night and day, I moulded him. With him it was chiefly the brain that needed moulding; much had to be added, much changed. I thought him a fair specimen of the negroid type when I had finished him, and he lay bandaged, bound, and motionless before me. It was only when his life was assured that I left him and came into this room again, and found Montgomery much as you are. He had heard some of the cries as the thing grew human,—cries like those that disturbed you so. I didn’t take him completely into my confidence at first. And the Kanakas too, had realised something of it. They were scared out of their wits by the sight of me. I got Montgomery over to me—in a way; but I and he had the hardest job to prevent the Kanakas deserting. Finally they did; and so we lost the yacht. I spent many days educating the brute,—altogether I had him for three or four months. I taught him the rudiments of English; gave him ideas of counting; even made the thing read the alphabet. But at that he was slow, though I’ve met with idiots slower. He began with a clean sheet, mentally; had no memories left in his mind of what he had been. When his scars were quite healed, and he was no longer anything but painful and stiff, and able to converse a little, I took him yonder and introduced him to the Kanakas as an interesting stowaway.     31

  “They were horribly afraid of him at first, somehow,—which offended me rather, for I was conceited about him; but his ways seemed so mild, and he was so abject, that after a time they received him and took his education in hand. He was quick to learn, very imitative and adaptive, and built himself a hovel rather better, it seemed to me, than their own shanties. There was one among the boys a bit of a missionary, and he taught the thing to read, or at least to pick out letters, and gave him some rudimentary ideas of morality; but it seems the beast’s habits were not all that is desirable.

[...]

  “So for twenty years altogether—counting nine years in England—I have been going on; and there is still something in everything I do that defeats me, makes me dissatisfied, challenges me to further effort. Sometimes I rise above my level, sometimes I fall below it; but always I fall short of the things I dream. The human shape I can get now, almost with ease, so that it is lithe and graceful, or thick and strong; but often there is trouble with the hands and the claws,—painful things, that I dare not shape too freely. But it is in the subtle grafting and reshaping one must needs do to the brain that my trouble lies. The intelligence is often oddly low, with unaccountable blank ends, unexpected gaps. And least satisfactory of all is something that I cannot touch, somewhere—I cannot determine where—in the seat of the emotions. Cravings, instincts, desires that harm humanity, a strange hidden reservoir to burst forth suddenly and inundate the whole being of the creature with anger, hate, or fear. These creatures of mine seemed strange and uncanny to you so soon as you began to observe them; but to me, just after I make them, they seem to be indisputably human beings. It’s afterwards, as I observe them, that the persuasion fades. First one animal trait, then another, creeps to the surface and stares out at me. But I will conquer yet! Each time I dip a living creature into the bath of burning pain, I say, ‘This time I will burn out all the animal; this time I will make a rational creature of my own!’ After all, what is ten years? Men have been a hundred thousand in the making.” He thought darkly. “But I am drawing near the fastness. This puma of mine—” After a silence,

“And they revert. As soon as my hand is taken from them the beast begins to creep back, begins to assert itself again.”

Another long silence.     41

  “Then you take the things you make into those dens?” said I.     42

  “They go. I turn them out when I begin to feel the beast in them, and presently they wander there. They all dread this house and me. There is a kind of travesty of humanity over there. Montgomery knows about it, for he interferes in their affairs. He has trained one or two of them to our service. He’s ashamed of it, but I believe he half likes some of those beasts. It’s his business, not mine. They only sicken me with a sense of failure. I take no interest in them. I fancy they follow in the lines the Kanaka missionary marked out, and have a kind of mockery of a rational life, poor beasts! There’s something they call the Law. Sing hymns about ‘all thine.’ They build themselves their dens, gather fruit, and pull herbs—marry even. But I can see through it all, see into their very souls, and see there nothing but the souls of beasts, beasts that perish, anger and the lusts to live and gratify themselves.—Yet they’re odd; complex, like everything else alive. There is a kind of upward striving in them, part vanity, part waste sexual emotion, part waste curiosity. It only mocks me. I have some hope of this puma. I have worked hard at her head and brain—“And now,” said he, standing up after a long gap of silence, during which we had each pursued our own thoughts, “what do you think? Are you in fear of me still?”     43



Nothing has stopped their plan to eradicate the "animal" in humans.

He is describing a sheep or guerilla, but could this really be a way of hiding a practice by the elites that was exposed 40 years later? The exact type of experiments were done on humans by Dr. Mengele and then the same paperclipped Nazi scientists did it in the US with MK Ultra. Dr. Mengele's patients react to Dr. Mengele just as the animals did to Dr. Moreau with the pain, the fright, the obedience and even the twisted and conditioned sense of "slave love" based on trauma based mind control. Cathy O'Brien and many others have described this precise method of perfecting the super human slave to the elites. The documented project was called "MONARCH" for goodness sake.

Was Mengele just following a secret method of eugenic mind control practiced for over 50 years that Wells was allowed to observe and then begin the conditioning for? No matter if it was 110 years ago, 80 years ago, 50 years ago, or now... These actions are blatant crimes against humanity on its face and these "Dr. Moreau's" that saturate our ramp up to a scientific technocracy must be exposed for the sadistic psychopaths they readily admit they are.
All eyes are opened, or opening, to the rights of man. The general spread of the light of science has already laid open to every view the palpable truth, that the mass of mankind has not been born with saddles on their backs, nor a favored few booted and spurred, ready to ride them legitimately