Author Topic: Abraham Bolden Secret Service Agent JFK Chicago Framed by the Mafia  (Read 3214 times)

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Offline SpaceCommand

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Alex was talking today about the Jackie Robinson of the Secret Service, saying "William Smith," but it was Abraham Bolden

http://www.google.com/#hl=en&source=hp&q=Abraham+Bolden&btnG=Google+Search&aq=f&aqi=&aql=&oq=&gs_rfai=&fp=a2bb30ecf4f91972

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/thom-hartmann/after-45-years-a-civil-ri_b_213834.html

After 45 Years, a Civil Rights Hero Waits for Justice

A great miscarriage of justice has kept most Americas from learning about a Civil Rights pioneer who worked with President John F. Kennedy. But there is finally a way for citizens to not only right that wrong, but bring closure to the most tragic chapter of American presidential history.

After an outstanding career in law enforcement, Abraham Bolden was appointed by JFK to be the first African American presidential Secret Service agent, where he served with distinction. He was part of the Secret Service effort that prevented JFK's assassination in Chicago, three weeks before Dallas. But Bolden was framed by the Mafia and arrested on the very day he went to Washington to tell the Warren Commission staff about the Chicago attempt against JFK.

Bolden was sentenced to six years in prison, despite glaring problems with his prosecution. His arrest resulted from accusations by two criminals Bolden had sent to prison. In Bolden's first trial, an apparently biased judge told the jury that Bolden was guilty, even before they began their deliberations. Though granted a new trial because of that, the same problematic judge was assigned to oversee Bolden's second trial, which resulted in his conviction. Later, the main witness against Bolden admitted committing perjury against him. A key member of the prosecution even took the fifth when asked about the perjury. Yet Bolden's appeals were denied, and he had to serve hard time in prison, and today is considered a convicted felon.

After the release of four million pages of JFK assassination files in the 1990s, it became clear that Bolden -- and the official secrecy surrounding the Chicago attempt against JFK -- were due to National Security concerns about Cuba, that were unknown to Bolden, the press, Congress, and the public not just in 1963, but for the next four decades.
And yet the same revolutionary beliefs for which our forebears fought are still at issue around the globe—the belief that the rights of man come not from the generosity of the state, but from the hand of God.

John F. Kennedy Inaugural Address

Offline SpaceCommand

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Re: Abraham Bolden Secret Service Agent JFK Chicago Framed by the Mafia
« Reply #1 on: April 12, 2010, 01:11:42 am »
http://www.milforddailynews.com/news/x1694332433/First-African-American-Secret-Service-agent-to-speak-in-Franklin

First African-American Secret Service agent to speak in Franklin

 By Joyce Kelly/Daily News staff
GHS
Posted Feb 25, 2009 @ 12:38 AM
FRANKLIN —

The date was April 28, 1961. The place, Chicago. President John F. Kennedy arrived at McCormick Place exhibition center to thank Mayor Richard J. Daley for helping him win the election.

Abraham Bolden remembers it like it was yesterday - cameras flashing, people knocking each other over to get a peek at the young president.

Bolden, a newly minted Secret Service agent, was stationed in front of the restroom in the lower level of the building, for which his colleagues teased him mercilessly. "Normally, a Chicago policeman would hold down such a detail, so my chances of seeing the president were slim to zero at that post."

"Lo and behold, I look up at the top of the steps, and there is President John F. Kennedy. The first thing he wants to do is use the washroom," recalled 73-year-old Bolden.

That chance encounter set into motion a chain of events that changed Bolden's life in ways he never imagined.

"He stopped in front of me, and had such a smile on his face. I could see the crow's feet at the corners of his eyes. He looked at me and asked if I was a Secret Service agent, and, if, to my knowledge, there has ever been a Negro assigned to the White House," Bolden said.

No, Bolden told him. Kennedy asked him to become the first.

Tonight, at a two-hour presentation on the JFK assassination at Horace Mann Middle School, Bolden will recount his bittersweet experiences on the White House detail, how racist agents opposed to civil rights often joked they would let Kennedy get shot, and other details from an insider to this piece of American history.

"One day he (Kennedy) introduced me to some folks, and called me 'the Jackie Robinson of the Secret Service.' It touched me deeply, to equate me with such an icon of the African-American community. It just touched me, I almost broke into tears," Bolden said.

His short career at the White House was an honor, but it was not without adversity. His supervisor and colleagues ordered him to "act like a nigger." Later, he says in his book "The Echo from Dealey Plaza," he was transferred back to Chicago and framed after trying to contact the Warren Commission regarding how JFK's Secret Service agents behaved before the assassination.

Bolden was imprisoned for over three years for supposedly selling government information to a suspect, and hopes to one day set the record straight.
And yet the same revolutionary beliefs for which our forebears fought are still at issue around the globe—the belief that the rights of man come not from the generosity of the state, but from the hand of God.

John F. Kennedy Inaugural Address