Author Topic: SwRI - SFBR - Tom Slick - The Other Battelle - Only Private BSL-4  (Read 42590 times)

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Offline TahoeBlue

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SwRI - SFBR - Tom Slick - The Other Battelle - Only Private BSL-4
« on: September 17, 2009, 11:38:27 am »
This thread is dedicated to the foundations set up by Thomas ( Tom ) Slick ( OIL ) , Anyone in San Antonio should be able to help with information. The SFBR in San Antonio has the ONLY privately held Biosaftey Level Four facility in the U.S.


Shoddy Perimeter Security for BSL-4 Labs at Georgia State University and Southwest Foundation for Biomedical Research
...
"Throughout the 1980s and into the 1990s the foundation continued to play a vital role in promoting pioneer research. Studies of heart disease covered a wide range of genetic research, population studies, and primate testing, and the foundation supplied the first baboon heart for transplant into a human in 1984. Scientists also conducted tests for the study of cancer, viral diseases, and disorders in newborn babies. The foundation increasingly focused on AIDS research and the development of possible vaccines through testing with chimpanzees."

In 1999, Southwest Foundation for Biomedical Research completed construction of the nation's first new biosafety level 4 laboratory in 20 years. "When the lab 'went hot' in March 2000, it became the only operational BSL-4 lab owned by a private institution...The Southwest Foundation for Biomedical Research is the only institution in the country to house both a BSL-4 lab and a national primate research center. This combination of expertise and unique resources has given SFBR a key role in a new Research Center of Excellence for Biodefense and Emerging Infectious Diseases," headed by The University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston. (14)

Southwest Research Institute

Southwest Biomedical Research Institute

http://www.sfbr.org/About/founder_2.aspx


Founder Tom Slick with the Foundation's first president, Dr. Harold Vagtborg.

Himself a successful inventor and deeply interested in the ideals of scientific research, Tom Slick created a series of research organizations to meet the challenge to better mankind. After graduating from college, he decided to “realize in bricks and mortar the nonprofit approach to scientific research” that had always fired his imagination.

On December 16, 1941, when he was only 25, he established the Foundation of Applied Research (FAR) by a trust indenture. Endowed with 1,875 shares of the Slick-Urschel Oil Company, FAR's mission was to provide fundamental research and advanced education, covering agricultural research, the natural sciences and medicine. FAR's name was changed in 1952 to the Southwest Foundation for Research and Education, succeeded by the Southwest Foundation for Biomedical Research in 1984.

By 1940, Mr. Slick had already purchased 1,602 acres of land extending from Leon Creek west to Potranco Road and south of Culebra Road. Located eight miles west of downtown San Antonio, this section was the site of the Foundation's original laboratories and became the first part of his famed Essar Ranch, a phonetic name for the letters “S” and “R,” standing for “Scientific Research.” Its corrals were populated by herds of valuable breeding stock. His cattle breeding success included the original “Brangus,” a hybrid that combined the heat resistance of the Brahman and the meat quality of the Angus. The area would ultimately grow to a 4,000-acre tract.

After the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor, Tom Slick volunteered for the U.S. Navy and was commissioned as a lieutenant in September 1942. It was during this time that he was to make a decision that would shape the future of his dreams for humanity and ensure their success.

While in the South Pacific, he came across an old 1937 Reader's Digest article on the Armour Research Foundation of Chicago, then headed by Dr. Vagtborg, who would later become Southwest Foundation's first president. In the article, Dr. Vagtborg was quoted as saying: “We can improve anything.” When asked about the story, Dr. Vagtborg claimed he was misquoted, because what he actually said was, “Anything can be improved.” Nevertheless, Mr. Slick later said it was then and there that he decided he was going to recruit Dr. Vagtborg to assist him in developing his research institutions.

The conventional wisdom was that Mr. Slick's dream was wishful thinking on a grand scale because San Antonio did not have a university with graduate education, an extensive library system, or a major industrial complex to support an institute of applied research. “It was in the wrong place at the wrong time,” one skeptic duly noted. However, Mr. Slick did not believe it.

Undeterred in his quest to see his vision succeed, Tom Slick surrounded himself with strong business advisers and friends who became the board of Southwest Foundation. A significant step forward came in the late 1950s, when the Foundation moved to its current location at Military Drive and constructed a modern laboratory building.

As Tom Slick's vision, energy and drive powered the Foundation's early years, his family joined in his quest with great enthusiasm. His mother, Berenice Slick Urschel, was often the first donor when major projects were conceived. Meanwhile, his younger brother, Earl Slick, who along with Tom founded Slick Airways, served as a trustee from the institution's conception.

Wanting to create a broad and permanent base of support for the Foundation's research programs, Tom's sister, Betty Moorman, suggested the establishment of a high-caliber club whose members would make an annual contribution to Southwest Foundation. And so The Argyle, a stately southern mansion that originally served as the headquarters to a horse ranch, was purchased and converted into a unique, 1,400-member-strong, private club devoted to financial support of the Foundation's life-saving research. Betty's husband, Lewis J. Moorman Jr., also shared her brother Tom's vision and served as the Foundation's chairman for more than a decade. Other family members and descendents are involved with Southwest Foundation to this day.

Indeed, Tom's family, friends and many others – even those who met Tom only briefly – caught his contagious enthusiasm and joined in his mission to build a “city of science” that would benefit all of humanity through advances in research. This shared vision, commitment and philanthropic support provided the impetus Southwest Foundation needed to become what is today one of the leading independent biomedical research institutions in the United States.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Southwest_Foundation_for_Biomedical_Research

Southwest Foundation for Biomedical Research (SFBR), located in San Antonio Texas, is one of the nation’s leading independent research institutions, specializing in genetics, and in virology and immunology. It was founded in 1941 by Thomas B. Slick, Jr. as a philanthropic endeavor. SFBR is sustained by government and corporate grants and contracts, and donations from the public.[1]

Quick Facts:

• Located on a 332-acre campus on the northwest side of San Antonio.
• 75 doctoral level biomedical scientists, including 28 principal investigators.
• More than 200 research projects.
• 400 staff members.

Specialized Resources:

• The Southwest National Primate Research Center [2], a part of SFBR, is an international resource that provides specialized facilities and expertise in research with nonhuman primates to investigators from around the US and other countries. It maintains 4,000 nonhuman primates.
• SFBR maintains the only privately owned Biosafety level 4 (BSL-4) laboratory in the United States. It develops bioterrorism defenses and novel strategies against incurable infectious diseases.
• SFBR’s AT&T Genomics Computing Center, "the world's largest computer cluster devoted to statistical genetic analysis," helps scientists find genes that influence susceptibility to diseases at record speed.

Among SFBR’s Many Accomplishments:

• Developed high frequency ventilator to rescue premature babies from death or lifelong disabilities.
• Played key role in developing the current hepatitis B vaccine now administered in 116 countries.
• Identified genes that influence heart disease, diabetes, obesity, and other common health problems.
• Developed vaccines, antibodies and antitoxins for deadly agents of bioterrorism such as Ebola, botulinum neurotoxins, and anthrax.
• Developed promising hormone-derived therapies with potential to treat breast and prostate cancer.
• Developed invaluable animal models for research on cancer, heart disease, obesity, AIDS, and hepatitis among other public health problems that afflict millions around the globe.
• Created methods to diagnose infections with herpes B virus, which is lethal to humans.

Some of SFBR’s Current Research Projects:

• Investigating genetic and dietary factors that have major roles in influencing susceptibility to cardiovascular disease, diabetes, and obesity.
• Evaluating novel approaches to curing hepatitis C, which infects three percent of the world’s population and is the leading cause of liver failure in the US.
• Developing vaccine strategies for Ebola, AIDS, Lassa fever, West Nile virus, Japanese encephalitis viruses, and herpes.
• Genetically characterizing the parasites which cause malaria and schistosomiasis, with the common goal of developing more effective drugs and disease control strategies for these global health problems.
• Studying genetic determinants of susceptibility to Chagas disease and intestinal worm infections in order to come up with novel strategies for these diseases common in the developing world.
• Studying ways of preventing or treating diseases caused by respiratory syncytial virus (RSV), herpes simplex virus, and dengue virus.

Memberships include: Association of Independent Research Institutes, Research!America, Scientists Center for Animal Welfare, BioMed SA

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Southwest_Research_Institute

Southwest Research Institute (SwRI), headquartered in San Antonio, Texas, is one of the oldest and largest independent, nonprofit, applied research and development (R&D) organizations in the United States. Founded in 1947 by Thomas Slick, Jr., SwRI provides contract research and development services to industrial and government clients. The Institute is governed by a board of directors, which is advised by approximately 100 trustees.

SwRI initiates contracts with clients based on consultations and prepares a formal proposal outlining the scope of work. Subject to client wishes, programs are kept confidential. As part of a long-held tradition, patent rights arising from sponsored research are often assigned to the client. SwRI generally retains the rights to Institute-funded advancements. It has received nearly 900 patents since 1950, 32 of them in 2008.

SwRI consists of 11 technical divisions that offer multidisciplinary, problem-solving services in a variety of areas in engineering and the physical sciences. Nearly 2,000 projects are open at the Institute at any one time. These projects are funded almost equally between the government and commercial sectors. SwRI’s total revenue for the fiscal year 2008 was $563 million, supported by a staff of more than 3,300. During 2008, SwRI provided $7 million to fund innovative research through its internally sponsored R&D program.

SwRI’s headquarters occupy almost more than two million square feet of office and laboratory space on a more than 1,200-acre (4.9 km2) site in San Antonio. The Institute serves clients from more than 20 locations worldwide.

One of its most recent projects is the New Horizons unmanned exploratory mission to Pluto.
Behold, happy is the man whom God correcteth: therefore despise not thou the chastening of the Almighty: For he maketh sore, and bindeth up: he woundeth, and his hands make whole ; He shall deliver thee in six troubles: yea, in seven there shall no evil touch thee. - Job 5

Offline Satyagraha

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Re: SwRI - SFBR - Tom Slick - The Other Battelle - Only Private BSL-4
« Reply #1 on: September 17, 2009, 11:59:11 am »
This is strange... why would Dr. Vagtborg (Slick's bff) be interested Antarctic expedition vehicles, hmmm?

http://www.joeld.net/snowcruiser/snowhist.html
The Antarctic Snow Cruiser

"... In the spring of 1939 the Research Foundation learned that the government was considering appropriations for a possible Antarctic expedition. Mr. Vagtborg and Dr. Poulter presented the completed plans for the Snow Cruiser to the expedition officials in Washington on April 29, 1939. The officials were enthusiastic over the idea and it was agreed the Foundation would supervise the construction and finance the cost, estimated at $150,000. The Snow Cruiser would then be loaned to the U.S. Antarctic Service, who would defray the costs of operation and maintenance, and then return the Cruiser to the Foundation upon return of the expedition."

Antarctica was the only continent untouched by the 1918 Flu...

Journal of Wildlife Diseases, 29(4), 1993, pp. 568-571
© Wildlife Disease Association 1993

Hunting the 1918 Flu: One Scientist's Search for a Killer Virus
Fred Charatan, retired geriatric physician
http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?artid=196410
 
Kirsty Duncan, a professor of medical geography at the University of Toronto, has written about a 1998 expedition to retrieve tissues from people buried in Spitzbergen, Norway, who were killed by the 1918 flu pandemic.​pandemic.

In three waves, the pandemic raged in every continent except Antarctica. It is estimated to have killed 20 to 40 million people and it is well described here in a 22 page introductory review. Fifteen years after the pandemic, Christopher Andrews and Wilson Smith, at the National Institute for Medical Research (NIMR) at Mill Hill in Britain, isolated the first human influenza virus, which was found to spread by airborne droplets.

----------------------------------------------------------

And what DID pop up in Antarctica?

Evidence of ortho- and paramyxoviruses in fauna from Antarctica
FJ Austin and RG Webster

ABSTRACT
Serum antibodies to influenza A viruses and paramyxoviruses were detected in Adelie penguin (Pysoscelis adeliae) and Antarctic skua (Stercorarius skua maccormicki) sera in the Ross Sea Dependency. An avian paramyxovirus was isolated from a penguin cloacal swab.


----------------------------------------------------

This makes me wonder if we haven't been using Antarctica as a living biowarfare lab for years?

And  the King shall answer and say unto them, Verily I say unto you, 
Inasmuch as ye have done it unto one of the least of these my brethren,  ye have done it unto me.

Matthew 25:40

sociostudent

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Re: SwRI - SFBR - Tom Slick - The Other Battelle - Only Private BSL-4
« Reply #2 on: September 17, 2009, 12:17:58 pm »
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Paramyxovirus

Paramyxoviruses (from Greek para-, beyond, -myxo-, mucus or slime, plus virus, from Latin poison, slime) are viruses of the Paramyxoviridae family of the Mononegavirales order; they are negative-sense single-stranded RNA viruses responsible for a number of human and animal diseases.

Genera

    * Subfamily Paramyxovirinae
          o Genus Avulavirus (type species Newcastle disease virus)
          o Genus Henipavirus (type species Hendravirus; others include Nipahvirus)
          o Genus Morbillivirus (type species Measles virus; others include Rinderpest virus, Canine distemper virus, phocine distemper virus, Peste des Petits Ruminants virus (PPR))
          o Genus Respirovirus (type species Sendai virus; others include Human parainfluenza viruses 1 and 3, as well some of the viruses of the common cold)
          o Genus Rubulavirus (type species Mumps virus; others include Human parainfluenza viruses 2 and 4, Simian parainfluenza virus 5, Menangle virus, Tioman virus)
          o Genus TPMV-like viruses (type species Tupaia paramyxovirus)
    * Subfamily Pneumovirinae
          o Genus Pneumovirus (type species Human respiratory syncytial virus, others include Bovine respiratory syncytial virus)
          o Genus Metapneumovirus (type species Avian pneumovirus, Human metapneumovirus)
    * Unassigned viruses
          o Fer-de-Lance virus
          o Nariva virus
          o Tupaia paramyxovirus
          o Salem virus
          o J virus
          o Mossman virus
          o Beilong virus

Physical structure

Virions are enveloped and can be spherical, filamentous or pleomorphic. Fusion proteins and attachment proteins appear as spikes on the virion surface. Matrix proteins inside the envelope stabilise virus structure. The nucleocapsid core is composed of the genomic RNA, nucleocapsid proteins, phosphoproteins and polymerase proteins.

[edit] Genome structure

The genome consists of a single segment of negative-sense RNA, 15-19 kilobases in length and containing 6-10 genes. Extracistronic (non-coding) regions include:

    * A 3’ leader sequence, 50 nucleotides in length which acts as a transcriptional promoter.
    * A 5’ trailer sequence, 50-161 nucleotides long
    * Intergenomic regions between each gene which are three nucleotides long for morbillivirus, respirovirus and henipavirus, variable length (1-56 nucleotides) for rubulavirus and pneumovirinae.

Each gene contains transcription start/stop signals at the beginning and end which are transcribed as part of the gene.

Gene sequence within the genome is conserved across the family due to a phenomenon known as transcriptional polarity (see Mononegavirales) in which genes closest to the 3’ end of the genome are transcribed in greater abundance than those towards the 5’ end. This mechanism acts as a form of transcriptional regulation.

The gene sequence is:

    * Nucleocapsid – Phosphoprotein – Matrix – Fusion – Attachment – Large (polymerase)

[edit] Proteins

    * N – the nucleocapsid protein associates with genomic RNA (one molecule per hexamer) and protects the RNA from nuclease digestion
    * P – the phosphoprotein binds to the N and L proteins and forms part of the RNA polymerase complex
    * M – the matrix protein assembles between the envelope and the nucleocapsid core, it organizes and maintains virion structure
    * F – the fusion protein projects from the envelope surface as a trimer, and mediates cell entry by inducing fusion between the viral envelope and the cell membrane by class I fusion. One of the defining characteristics of members of the paramyxoviridae family is the requirement for a neutral pH for fusogenic activity.
    * H/HN/G – the cell attachment proteins span the viral envelope and project from the surface as spikes. They bind to sialic acid on the cell surface and facilitate cell entry. Note that the receptor for measles virus is unknown. Proteins are designated H for morbilliviruses and henipaviruses as they possess haemagglutination activity, observed as an ability to cause red blood cells to clump. HN attachment proteins occur in respiroviruses and rubulaviruses. These possess both haemagglutination and neuraminidase activity which cleaves sialic acid on the cell surface, preventing viral particles from reattaching to previously infected cells. Attachment proteins with neither haemagglutination nor neuraminidase activity are designated G (glycoprotein). These occur in members of pneumovirinae.
    * L – the large protein is the catalytic subunit of RNA dependent RNA polymerase (RDRP)
    * Accessory proteins – a mechanism known as RNA editing (see Mononegavirales) allows multiple proteins to be produced from the P gene. These are not essential for replication but may aid in survival in vitro or may be involved in regulating the switch from mRNA synthesis to antigenome synthesis.

[edit] Pathogenic paramyxoviruses

A number of important human diseases are caused by paramyxoviruses. These include mumps, measles, which caused 745,000 deaths in 2001 and respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) which is the major cause of bronchiolitis and pneumonia in infants and children.

The parainfluenza viruses are the second most common causes of respiratory tract disease in infants and children. They can cause pneumonia, bronchitis and croup in children and the elderly.

Human metapneumovirus, initially described in about 2001, is also implicated in bronchitis, especially in children.

Paramyxoviruses are also responsible for a range of diseases in other animal species, for example canine distemper virus (dogs), phocine distemper virus (seals), cetacean morbillivirus (dolphins and porpoises) Newcastle disease virus (birds) and rinderpest virus (cattle). Some paramyxoviruses such as the henipaviruses are zoonotic pathogens, occurring naturally in an animal host, but also able to infect humans.

Hendra virus (HeV) and Nipah virus (NiV) in the genus Henipavirus have emerged in humans and livestock in Australia and Southeast Asia. Both viruses are contagious, highly virulent, and capable of infecting a number of mammalian species and causing potentially fatal disease. Due to the lack of a licensed vaccine or antiviral therapies, HeV and NiV are designated as biosafety level (BSL) 4 agents. The genomic structure of both viruses is that of a typical paramyxovirus.[1]

External links
morphology, genome, replication, pathogenesis (special access required)
CSIRO Paramyxovirus press release
Animal viruses
Viral Bioinformatics Resource Center
ViralZone

Offline Satyagraha

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Re: SwRI - SFBR - Tom Slick - The Other Battelle - Only Private BSL-4
« Reply #3 on: September 17, 2009, 12:29:25 pm »
This thread is dedicated to the foundations set up by Thomas ( Tom ) Slick ( OIL ) , Anyone in San Antonio should be able to help with information. The SFBR in San Antonio has the ONLY privately held Biosaftey Level Four facility in the U.S.


The Southwest Foundation for Biomedical Research is the only institution in the country to house both a BSL-4 lab and a national primate research center. This combination of expertise and unique resources has given SFBR a key role in a new Research Center of Excellence for Biodefense and Emerging Infectious Diseases," headed by The University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston. (14)



TahoeBlue -  what's your thinking here.. we can go off on a number of tangents; is there some specific area you want to focus on?

Also, this quote above is terrifying; "The Southwest Foundation for Biomedical Research is the only institution in the country to house both a BSL-4 lab and a national primate research center" ... who's in charge? Who do they work with? Do they get government contracts? This seems like the perfect lab for 12 Monkeys.

And  the King shall answer and say unto them, Verily I say unto you, 
Inasmuch as ye have done it unto one of the least of these my brethren,  ye have done it unto me.

Matthew 25:40

Offline TahoeBlue

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Re: SwRI - SFBR - Tom Slick - The Other Battelle - Only Private BSL-4
« Reply #4 on: September 17, 2009, 12:42:12 pm »
TahoeBlue -  what's your thinking here.. we can go off on a number of tangents; is there some specific area you want to focus on?

Also, this quote above is terrifying; "The Southwest Foundation for Biomedical Research is the only institution in the country to house both a BSL-4 lab and a national primate research center" ... who's in charge? Who do they work with? Do they get government contracts? This seems like the perfect lab for 12 Monkeys.

Yes, these private foundations can do whatever experiments they like with very little oversite. They do not have to make anything public. 
Quote
Subject to client wishes, programs are kept confidential.

I am looking for references to Slick himself having a close relationship with "primates". 

Are these research centers creating disease?

Developed vaccines, antibodies and antitoxins for deadly agents of bioterrorism such as Ebola, botulinum neurotoxins, and anthrax

Played key role in developing the current hepatitis B vaccine now administered in 116 countries.

Created methods to diagnose infections with herpes B virus, which is lethal to humans.

Evaluating novel approaches to curing hepatitis C, which infects three percent of the world’s population and is the leading cause of liver failure in the US.

Behold, happy is the man whom God correcteth: therefore despise not thou the chastening of the Almighty: For he maketh sore, and bindeth up: he woundeth, and his hands make whole ; He shall deliver thee in six troubles: yea, in seven there shall no evil touch thee. - Job 5

Offline TahoeBlue

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Re: SwRI - SFBR - Tom Slick - The Other Battelle - Only Private BSL-4
« Reply #5 on: September 17, 2009, 12:53:46 pm »
Confirmed, third largest after Battelle and Stanford (SRI)....

http://www.tshaonline.org/handbook/online/articles/SS/sqs2.html

SOUTHWEST RESEARCH INSTITUTE. Southwest Research Institute, an independent, nonprofit, applied engineering and physical sciences research and development organization, is the United States's third largest applied science center, after Batelle and Stanford. The institute is eight miles west of downtown in the city limits of San Antonio. It was founded in 1947 as a public trust for charitable and educational purposes by Thomas Baker Slick, Jr.,qv a San Antonio oilman, rancher, and philanthropist. The institute began operations on what was then a part of the Essar Ranch, a Slick family holding. The ranch headquarters, a three-story Victorian home, served as the institute's first offices and laboratories. In 1993 the institute grounds consisted of 765 acres, with more than 1.5 million square feet of floor space for laboratories, workplaces, and offices. The staff in 1988 numbered 2,600, composed of about 1,100 scientists and engineers, 1,000 technicians, and 500 administrative support personnel. The institute has program development offices in the Washington, D.C., and Detroit, Michigan, areas and in Houston. It has grown from one building in 1947 to more than 100 permanent structures. In fiscal year 1992 its gross research and development revenues were around $232 million, and its total assets slightly exceeded $187 million.

...

The institute has conducted research and development for most of the large industrial corporations in the United States and for many of the world's large firms. The United States Department of Defense is its largest government client.

The Belvoir Fuels and Lubricants Research Facility, the United States Army's primary resource for fuels and lubricants research, is located on the institute grounds and is operated for the army by SWRI personnel. For more than thirty-five years the institute has had a close scientific relationship with the Southern Gas Association, an international consortium of seventy oil and gas companies, and has conducted the research program for the SGA's Pipeline and Compressor Research Council.

In another discipline, the National Engineering Rehabilitation Center, partially funded by the United States government, is located at SWRI, and institute scientists conduct research necessary to evaluate equipment and devices intended for disabled people. The institute also operates the Center for Nuclear Waste Regulatory Analyses for the Nuclear Regulatory Commission, an $80 million project. The institute is managed by a president, two executive vice presidents, and thirteen technical and administrative vice presidents. It is governed by an eighteen-member board of directors, which in turn is advised by a 150-member voluntary board of trustees representing industry, business, science, and academia.

The institute's first president was Harold Vagtborg. Martin Goland came to the institute in 1955 and assumed the presidency in 1959, at Vagtborg's retirement. He continued as president in 1993.
Behold, happy is the man whom God correcteth: therefore despise not thou the chastening of the Almighty: For he maketh sore, and bindeth up: he woundeth, and his hands make whole ; He shall deliver thee in six troubles: yea, in seven there shall no evil touch thee. - Job 5

Offline TahoeBlue

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Re: SwRI - SFBR - Tom Slick - The Other Battelle - Only Private BSL-4
« Reply #6 on: September 17, 2009, 01:16:07 pm »
This is was one track I was on... the JFK / Oswald timeline.....

Quote from: Sane
What about all of the cancer research scientists and Oswald's girlfriend. Using cancer as an assassination/population control project to slow kill many in the population and extract wealth from the elite to these research centers...

http://forum.prisonplanet.com/index.php?topic=3170.0

History Channel Suppresses Evidence:
US Gov Using Cancer to Kill Dissidents/Population Control


In the following suppressed Documentary, The Men Who Killed Kennedy, Lee Harvey Oswald's ex-girlfriend reveals the project involving human subjects in a US labratory to use cancer as an acceptable method of assassination against dissidents around the world.  The same people that headed this project were also intimately involved in multiple plots to kill US Citizens including the President of the United States of America.  Watch this entire episode [segment 3 is most revealing], then ask yourself how many dissidents to US government policies have died of cancer.


Suppressed Episode Two:
VIDEOS:

1     2     3     4    5

More information here: http://forum.prisonplanet.com/index.php?topic=2554.msg10129#msg10129
Behold, happy is the man whom God correcteth: therefore despise not thou the chastening of the Almighty: For he maketh sore, and bindeth up: he woundeth, and his hands make whole ; He shall deliver thee in six troubles: yea, in seven there shall no evil touch thee. - Job 5

Offline TahoeBlue

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Re: SwRI - SFBR - Tom Slick - The Other Battelle - Only Private BSL-4
« Reply #7 on: September 17, 2009, 02:01:04 pm »
http://www.uiw.edu/sanantonio/jenningsargyle.html
The Argyle’s Fascinating History
...

Miss Alice and Bob O’Grady operated the Argyle for nearly a half century, until Alice became ill and died. In 1940, the O’Grady family sold the property. Bob O’Grady was elected the first mayor of Alamo Heights and served for seventeen years.

The Argyle became a rooming house for a short time before closing, and then the old mansion seemed to pale and slump into its surrounding overgrown lawns and gardens. In 1943 Miss Lucy White acquired the mansion and kept it until 1955, when it was purchased by the Southwest Foundation for Research and Education, now the Southwest Foundation for Biomedical Research.

Harold Vagtborg writes in The Story of Southwest Research Center that “it was decided that it should be used as a private social club, with dues used to help support the Foundation. A membership association was formed, and 600 carefully selected individuals were invited to join the Argyle.” Today, it maintains the kind of haven for fine dining and warm hospitality that Miss Alice loved and that a famed British travel writer remembered as an exotic place transported from another enchanting world.
Behold, happy is the man whom God correcteth: therefore despise not thou the chastening of the Almighty: For he maketh sore, and bindeth up: he woundeth, and his hands make whole ; He shall deliver thee in six troubles: yea, in seven there shall no evil touch thee. - Job 5

Offline TahoeBlue

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Re: SwRI - SFBR - Tom Slick - The Other Battelle - Only Private BSL-4
« Reply #8 on: September 17, 2009, 09:31:24 pm »
Yes, now I remember. Tom Slick was the basis for many cartoon and adventure features in the late fifties (Sky King, Clutch Cargo). He searched for Bigfoot and the yeti. Flew his own plane and convieniently died in 1962 when his plane disintegrated in flight over Montana... Also around the time of the JFK assassination...

Also being a cryptozoologist would be an excellent cover for travelling to many distant locales for the CIA...

http://www.sfbr.org/About/founder_3.aspx

In a codicil to his will written in August 1958, Mr. Slick described his life's ambitions: “It has always been my intention to work towards the building up of a great center for human progress through scientific research at our Southwest Research Center. I would like this effort to grow to be as big as it soundly can, and at the same time to embrace as wide a range of scientific research as is practical. Equally, if not more important than size and scope, should be the efforts to achieve the highest quality of accomplishment.”

Tragically, Tom Slick would not to live to see his dream through to its completion. Like his father before him, Mr. Slick died at age 46. On October 6, 1962, Mr. Slick and his pilot, Shelly Sudderth of Dallas, were killed in the crash of their twin-engine plane in the mountains of southwestern Montana. The plane, a Beechcraft Bonanza 35, apparently disintegrated in flight some 40 miles south of Dillon, Mont. A few years earlier, Mr. Slick had survived another plane crash in the jungles of Brazil while on a diamond-hunting expedition.

“I know of no other man who accomplished so much in the interest of his fellow man, in even a normal lifetime, as Tom Slick did in an all too short one,” Dr. Vagtborg recalled. “The Carnegies, Rockefellers and Welshs left foundations to start philanthropic programs in the public interest after they passed on. We, however, had the unique and deep pleasure of having Tom, as a young man, with us year by year as we built towards his vision. We shared his enthusiasm and were privileged to work shoulder to shoulder with this modest man who cast himself in the position of co-worker. The endowment he left the Foundation is helping us to achieve the goals we set together.”

And so today, Southwest Foundation for Biomedical Research and its sister organizations are living tributes to the great visionary, Thomas Baker Slick Jr. We share his belief that “basic research is the key to life's mysteries” and diligently work to carry out his dream of building a “great center for human progress through scientific research.”


http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tom_Slick
Thomas Baker "Tom" Slick, Jr. (1916 – October 6, 1962) was a San Antonio, Texas based inventor, businessman, adventurer, and heir to a oil business. Slick's father, Thomas Baker Slick, Sr., a.k.a. "The King of the Wildcatters", had made a fortune during the Texas oil boom of the 1920s.

Tom Slick graduated from Phillips Exeter Academy in 1934 and Yale University in 1938. At Yale he was a pre-medicine biology major and earned Phi Beta Kappa honors. During his Yale years, Slick and some of his classmates traveled to Scotland to look for the Loch Ness Monster. The group found nothing, but Tom's search for unknown animals had begun. After he graduated from Yale, Slick became a consultant to the War Production Board during World War II and served in the Navy. He later pursued graduate studies at Harvard and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology.

During the 1950s, Slick was an adventurer. He turned his attention to expeditions to investigate the Loch Ness Monster, the Yeti, Bigfoot and the Trinity Alps giant salamander. Slick's interest in cryptozoology was little known until the 1989 publication of the biography Tom Slick and the Search for Yeti, by Loren Coleman. Coleman continued his study of Tom Slick in 2002 with Tom Slick: True Life Encounters in Cryptozoology. That book mentions many of Tom Slick's adventures, in politics, art, science, and cryptozoology, including his involvement with the CIA and Howard Hughes.

Tom Slick was a friend of many celebrities, including Howard Hughes and fellow flier Jimmy Stewart. Stewart, for example, assisted a Slick-backed expedition in carrying a piece of the Pangboche Yeti hand back to England for scientific analysis, Loren Coleman was to discover from Slick's files and confirmation from Stewart before his death.

Slick founded several research organizations, beginning with the forerunner of the Southwest Foundation for Biomedical Research (SwFBR) in 1941. His most well-known legacy is the non-profit Southwest Research Institute (SwRI), which he founded in 1947 to seek revolutionary advancements in technology. SwRI continues to advance pure and applied science in a variety of fields from lubricant and motor fuel formulation to solar physics and planetary science. He also founded the Mind Science Foundation in San Antonio in 1958 to do consciousness research.

He was an advocate of world peace. In 1958 he published the book, Permanent Peace: A Check and Balance Plan. He funded the Tom Slick World Peace lectures at the LBJ Library, and the Tom Slick Professorship of World Peace at the University of Texas.

Slick died in 1962 in an airplane crash near Dell, Montana at the age of 46, the same age at which his father died.

Nicolas Cage was to have portrayed Slick in a movie, Tom Slick: Monster Hunter, but the project stalled.[1]


http://www.texasescapes.com/ClayCoppedge/Tom-Slick.htm

Tom Slick
by Clay Coppedge 
 
First, there was the name. Tom Slick. It sounds daring and adventurous, like Clutch Cargo, Johnny Quest or Indiana Jones. That trio of heroes are each fictional but Tom Slick lived in the real world, even if he spent a lot of time and money looking for creatures that many people believed to be unreal.

Tom Slick made a name for himself in Texas and in the wider world as millionaire oilman, rancher, businessman and philanthropist. His father, Thomas Baker Slick, Sr., was a famous and wildly successful wildcatter known as “Lucky Tom.” He died young, at the age of 46.

After his mother remarried, Tom Slick, Jr.’s stepfather was kidnapped by gangster Machine Gun Kelly, an ordeal that ended with the release of his stepfather and Kelly pleading “Don’s shoot G-men! Don’t shoot G-men!” when the FBI tracked him down.

Maybe as a result of that experience and his wealth, Tom Slick, Jr. would become a private man who shunned the spotlight. He settled in San Antonio with his millions, an insatiable, sometimes unconventional curiosity and a strong desire to do great things without drawing a lot of attention to himself.

That wasn’t always possible. Spending millions of dollars to look for creatures that science has never acknowledged does tend to draw attention. Slick's biographer, Loren Coleman, refers to Slick as “Texas’ forgotten millionaire.”

In addition to his oil and ranching business and contributions to research science, Slick also made a name for himself as a cryptozoologist: one who searches for animals that science has never officially acknowledged. Think Loch Ness Monster, and then think Yeti, Sasquatch or Bigfoot and you get the idea.

Slick drew some national attention when he funded and participated in expeditions to the Himalayas in the 1950s in search of the yeti, the original abominable snowman. Slick and his teams never found anything that science could hang its hat on and say, “By golly, I think we have discovered a new creature! A yeti!” but they unearthed some tantalizing clues that, as the years have gone by, have unfortunately been lost.

When Slick and his team was pounding the Himalayas for proof of the yeti’s existence, there was a considerable if not widespread belief that yetis existed but in such harsh and remote environments that finding one, even its remains, was almost impossible.

Yeti fever peaked in the late 1950s then plunged when famed mountaineer Sir Edmund Hillary effectively put an end to the public’s fascination with any notion of an abominable snowman.

Hillary, the first man credited with climbing Mt. Everest, signed on with a TV crew featuring Marlin Perkins of “Wild Kingdom” fame and went to the Himalayas in sort of a made-for-TV search for the yeti. In lieu of actually spotting one, Hillary tracked down fakes and misrepresentations and used them to debunk the whole notion of a yeti, or abominable snowman.

Annoyed but undeterred, Slick turned his attentions to another reported man-ape creature, this one said to be living deep in the woods of the Pacific Northwest: Sasquatch, often referred to as Bigfoot.

That we know anything at all about Tom Slick’s search for the yeti and Bigfoot is due almost entirely to Coleman’s efforts. A cryptozoologist himself, Coleman spent the better part of 30 years researching Tom Slick’s life, particularly as it related to his contributions to cryptozoology. The result was his 1989 book “Tom Slick and the Search for the Yeti.”

Coleman wrote in the introduction to his book: “This man would throw his fortune behind a serious search for the mysterious creatures. Who was this man? He was a handsome, lean, prematurely white-haired man, soft spoken, with a slight Southern drawl. Tom Slick was his name, more fictional-sounding than real. And in many ways, Tom Slick’s life was the stuff legends are made of…Tom Slick was given many names during his short, event-filled life. But today, hardly anyone remembers him. And that’s a shame.”  Order Here 
 
Had he lived past the age of 46 – he died in 1962 when the plane he was riding in exploded over Montana – Slick might have hooked up with or even founded the Texas Bigfoot Research Conservancy, which carries on Slick’s interests, primarily in East Texas. 

The Texas Bigfoot is believed to be a Southern Cousin of the Pacific Northwest’s Sasquatch. Of the 100 or so sightings reported on the center’s website, the center deems about 75 of those sightings as legitimate in the way that sightings of unidentified flying objects are legitimate; both remain unidentified.

Persistent reports of a Sasquatch-like creature living along the Sulphur River, just across the state line in Arkansas, inspired the movie “Legend of Boggy Creek.”  Order Here 
 
The modern day Texas Bigfoots (Bigfeet?) go by many names, some of which sound like high-end fishing lures: Night Screamer, Hawley Him, Haskell Rascal, Wooly Bugger and Caddo Critter. The people at the Texas Bigfoot Research Conservancy believe the sightings indicate a primate, albeit an elusive one of which no remains have ever been positively identified. Recent sightings have occurred in the Sam Houston National Forest, near the San Jacinto River.

We might say that all this started with Tom Slick, but to call him Texas’ first cryptozoologist we would have to dismiss the Comanche, Tonkawa and other Texas tribes who believed strongly in a man-ape creature in the same way that they believed in, say bears.

When viewed objectively and as a whole, we may be doing Tom Slick an injustice to focus solely on his searches for abominable snowmen, Bigfoot and several other perhaps mythical creatures. This was a man who founded what is today the Southwest Foundation for Biomedical Research, the Institute of Inventive Research, the Southwest Research Institute and the Mind Science Foundation. Much of the work he founded continues today.

Slick helped develop Brangus cattle and at one time had one of the three largest herds of Angus cattle in the country. Following in the footsteps of his wildcatter father, he discovered the Benedum Field in West Texas, one of the largest oil strikes in the United States after World War II.

Most of us don’t have any reasonable expectation of having Tom Slick’s resources or of leaving such a legacy. What most of us have in common with Tom Slick is that we too want to know, once and for all, if there is or ever was such a creature as the yeti or Bigfoot.

Like Tom Slick, we just want to know. 
Behold, happy is the man whom God correcteth: therefore despise not thou the chastening of the Almighty: For he maketh sore, and bindeth up: he woundeth, and his hands make whole ; He shall deliver thee in six troubles: yea, in seven there shall no evil touch thee. - Job 5

Offline TahoeBlue

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Re: SwRI - SFBR - Tom Slick - The Other Battelle - Only Private BSL-4
« Reply #9 on: September 17, 2009, 09:44:47 pm »
Another interesting article....

http://energyissues.blogharbor.com/blog/_archives/2008/5/20
  Wildcatter's Son
by Energy Issues on Tue 20 May 2008 07:52 AM CDT
Many memorable characters searched for black gold in early-Oklahoma, but none more colorful than Tom Slick Sr.  Slick came from the oil fields of Pennsylvania to drill for oil in Oklahoma.  He was a true “wheeler dealer,” finding new and innovative ways of securing leases from reluctant mineral owners and raising money from investors.  Most of all, he had a special knack for finding oil.

Tom Slick, Sr. earned the title, King of the Wildcatters, when he drilled the discovery well for the giant Cushing Field in 1912.   He died at the age of forty-six, but not before selling his Oklahoma holdings to Prairie Oil and Gas Company for – what was at the time – a vast sum of money.  He left fifteen million dollars to his son, Tom Slick, Jr., who by all accounts was perhaps even more colorful than his father.

Tom, Jr. also led an interesting life and knew many celebrities on a first-name basis.  Among them were Howard Hughes and Jimmy Stewart.  During his life, he founded Slick Oil, Slick Airways, Texstar, Transworld Resources and two research institutes.  His passion, however, was the study of cryptids – creatures unknown to science.

Tom, Jr. financially backed expeditions to find Bigfoot and the Loch Ness Monster, though perhaps his search for the Abominable Snowman is the most bizarre.  He financed an expedition to Tibet, supposedly in search of Yeti. 

The expedition coincided with the invasion of Tibet by the Chinese and the ouster of the Dalai Lama.  Supposedly, Tom, Jr. worked with the CIA and helped spirit the Dalai Lama out of Tibet before the Chinese could capture him. 

Tom, Jr. died in a plane crash in 1962 after losing most of his fortune. [thats the first I heard that he was going broke?]
Behold, happy is the man whom God correcteth: therefore despise not thou the chastening of the Almighty: For he maketh sore, and bindeth up: he woundeth, and his hands make whole ; He shall deliver thee in six troubles: yea, in seven there shall no evil touch thee. - Job 5

Offline TahoeBlue

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Re: SwRI - SFBR - Tom Slick - The Other Battelle - Only Private BSL-4
« Reply #10 on: September 19, 2009, 01:29:26 pm »
Interesting article from 2003....

http://lists.envirolink.org/pipermail/ar-news/Week-of-Mon-20030929/007335.html
S.A. science giants at loggerheads By Cindy Tumiel
San Antonio Express-News, September 29, 2003
articles and photos
http://news.mysanantonio.com/story.cfm?xla=saen&xlb=180&xlc=1062361
...
Last week, six decades after their founding and 41 years after their founder's death in a Montana plane crash, the two sibling science organizations headed for court in a squabble over their parent's final wishes.

Like many courthouse disputes, this is a fight over money - the institute's reported $55 million in cash reserves - that has simmered for decades. The foundation says it is entitled to substantial cash payments from the institute, now that the research enterprise is pulling in $339 million worth of contracts a year from government agencies, Fortune 500 companies and garage-based entrepreneurs with ideas they want to test or develop into products.

The foundation has a long and intimate connection to many of San Antonio's most prominent and monied families. The Argyle, a private club housed in an Alamo Heights mansion, is dedicated to philanthropic support of the foundation, which also subsists on federal grants.

The foundation's 33-member board of trustees - which initiated the lawsuit - includes car dealer B.J. "Red" McCombs, SBC Chairman and CEO Edward E. Whitacre Jr., Valero Chairman Bill Greehey, car dealer Robert M. Cavender, Harte-Hanks Chairman Larry D. Franklin, Tower Life Insurance President James P. Zachry, Holt Companies Chairman B.D. Holt, and Clear Channel President and CEO Mark Mays. San Antonio Express-News Vice President of Community Relations Veronica Salazar also is a member.

The institute's board is a more businesslike 15 members, but it also includes some prominent names, including Ultramar Diamond Shamrock Chairman Emeritus Roger R. Hemminghaus and Zachry Group CEO H. Bartell Zachry Jr.
The institute has made payments to the foundation - a minimum of $50,000 a year and $100,000 last year, according to the institute. But foundation trustees are eyeing what they say is a $55 million cash reserve that the research institute has accumulated over a number of successful years. They contend the foundation is obligated to share in that prosperity.

The foundation's board of directors filed a lawsuit Wednesday in Bexar County Probate Court saying the institute "has willfully dishonored Mr. Slick's philanthropic vision and plan by denying its obligation to provide financial support to the foundation." The suit squarely aims at that sizable cash reserve.
...

Tom Slick died during a hunting trip in 1962 when  his small private plane broke apart in flight and plunged into a Montana hillside. ...Then Slick's niece Catherine Nixon Cooke ...

Slick was involved in both foundations during his life, when both entities struggled to stay afloat. There was no expectation that the institute would make payments to the foundation at that point because the revenues were not
there, Denman said.

In the past decade though, both the foundation and the institute have flourished into major components of San Antonio's research and biomedical industry. Southwest Foundation's 2002 annual report spotlights six consecutive years of record totals in grants and contracts. Last year, foundation scientists had $45.8 million in support from the National Institutes of Health, other government sources and philanthropic donors.

The foundation is home to a federally funded primate center, where scientists are searching for genetic roots of atherosclerosis, hypertension and cholesterol metabolism. Researchers at the foundation have enrolled
1,400 members from 40 extended Mexican American families in a hunt for genes related to obesity, diabetes and heart disease.


But its campus is aging and is undergoing a massive renovation. A $40 million capital campaign to pay for it has raised about $36 million. Past contract research at the institute has helped bring about consumer products such as Liquid Paper and peanut butter M&Ms.
...
Behold, happy is the man whom God correcteth: therefore despise not thou the chastening of the Almighty: For he maketh sore, and bindeth up: he woundeth, and his hands make whole ; He shall deliver thee in six troubles: yea, in seven there shall no evil touch thee. - Job 5

Offline TahoeBlue

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Re: SwRI - SFBR - Tom Slick - The Other Battelle - Only Private BSL-4
« Reply #11 on: September 19, 2009, 01:54:54 pm »
The Power to create super parasites....

http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/155709.php
Scientists Map Genome For Parasite Causing Widespread Infections
Article Date: 30 Jun 2009 - 0:00 PDT

Scientists at the Southwest Foundation for Biomedical Research (SFBR) in San Antonio have for the first time constructed a genetic map of the parasite that causes schistosomiasis, a chronic intestinal infection that can damage internal organs and, in children, impair growth and cognitive development. Schistosome parasites are flatworms that infect more than 200 million people a year worldwide. Infection results in an estimated 200,000 deaths annually in sub-Saharan Africa alone, while 20 million suffer severe disease, according to the World Health Organization.

"A genetic map is the essential tool needed for finding the genes that are responsible for drug resistance and pathogenesis in this parasite. In the case of drug resistance, identification of underlying mutations is critical for management of this disease" said Timothy Anderson, Ph.D., of SFBR's department of genetics.

"First, identification of mutations allows us to better understand the mechanism of action of the drugs used, and to redesign drugs to restore treatment efficacy. Second, identification of mutations involved allows us to efficiently monitor the spread of resistance in parasite populations using simple molecular methods."

The new study was published in the June 30, 2009 issue of the journal Genome Biology, and was supported by the National Institutes of Health.

Anderson, Charles Criscione, formerly of SFBR and now at Texas A&M University in College Station, and Phil LoVerde, now at the University of Texas Health Science Center in San Antonio used two adult flatworms to breed 88 S. mansoni offspring. By comparing the genetic information of the offspring to the parents, they generated a genetic map of chromosomes of the pathogen. Key contributers to the study included Claudia Valentim of SFBR and UTHSCSA and Hirohisa Hirai of Kyoto University in Japan.

These parasites have a complex lifecycle. Adult male and female worms measuring around half an inch, live in pairs in the blood vessels, and eggs are expelled in the feces or urine. The larval parasites initially develop in water snails and human infection occurs when parasite larvae burrow through the skin of people entering the water. There are an estimated 400,000 imported cases in mainland USA. These parasites are an increasing public health threat in developing countries as a consequence of large scale dam construction projects.

The researchers are planning further research using the genetic map to understand why some parasites cause more pathology than others.
Behold, happy is the man whom God correcteth: therefore despise not thou the chastening of the Almighty: For he maketh sore, and bindeth up: he woundeth, and his hands make whole ; He shall deliver thee in six troubles: yea, in seven there shall no evil touch thee. - Job 5

Offline TahoeBlue

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Re: SwRI - SFBR - Tom Slick - The Other Battelle - Only Private BSL-4
« Reply #12 on: September 19, 2009, 10:48:39 pm »
Tom Slick's relationship with the CIA and saving the Dalai Lama. And yes he was a YALE man...

Also of interest was 1957-1958 was the beginning of the H2N2 Pandemic.... was Slick distributing the new novel H2N2 ? See: Personal recollections of the 1957 H2N2 flu pandemic --by JTCoyoté

http://www.cryptomundo.com/cryptozoo-news/slick-317/
...

Tom Slick (above, after his March 15, 1957, near-death accident in Nepal) was most famous, of course, for his expeditions in search of the Abominable Snowmen, the Yeti of the Himalayan Mountains.

In 1957, Tom Slick personally headed his first of many sponsored expeditions to Nepal in search of the Yeti, with Peter Byrne and Sherpa guides along for his deadly serious initial reconnaissance. From noting the timeline for Slick’s trek, remarkably, I discovered that Slick began his actual search in earnest in the Arun Valley on March 17, 1957.

On March 18th and 19th, 1957, the Government of Nepal issued press releases and answered reporters’ questions that they officially forbade all foreign mountaineers from “killing, injuring, or capturing a Yeti.” Slick’s party was allowed to carry guns for their self-defense. But they also had steel traps to capture a Yeti, and the new law was specifically targeted at Slick’s expedition

Especially interesting to me is a question I have never had fully answered: Was the character in the movie The Abominable Snowman of the Himalayas of the American Yeti hunter and exploiter “Tom Friend” (shown above next to the film’s Yeti body) based, in some part, on the real Texan Yeti hunter Tom Slick?

What was one of the other missions of Tom Slick’s 1957 expedition? Apparently, it may have been spying on the Chinese in Tibet. Certainly that was what the Russians thought.



This April 27, 1957, article (above) in The New York Times carried the claims that Tom Slick was behind an effort to subvert the Chinese and free Tibet. (It would be revealed years later that Tom Slick and his Slick Airways were working closely with the OSS and the CIA.)

Two years later, what date would the CIA pick to begin the exit of the Dalai Lama from Tibet? March 17, 1959. Who may have been helping with that trek? Tom Slick and Peter Byrne. Perhaps it was Tom Slick that picked the date, not the CIA?

Colonel Fletcher Prouty has written about this secret mission to Tibet. In 1955, Prouty was appointed the first “Focal Point” officer between the CIA and the Air Force for Clandestine Operations per National Security Council Directive 5412. He was Briefing Officer for the Secretary of Defense (1960-1961), and for the Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff.

Prouty, in his 1973 book about the CIA, Secret Team, writes: “This fantastic escape and its major significance have been buried in the lore of the CIA as one of those successes that are not talked about. The Dalai Lama would have never been saved without the CIA.”

On March 17, 1959, three groups, the Dalai Lama, his immediate family and senior advisors, escaped from Lhasa, Tibet.

John Prados writing in The Presidents’ Secret Wars: CIA and Pentagon Covert Operations Since World War II (New York: Morrow, 1986), notes: “Tenzin Gyatso [the Dalai Lama] was disguised as a common soldier of the guard…. The best information [about the fleeing Dalai Lama] came from the CIA…. The CIA was so well informed because it had furnished an American radio operator, who traveled with the Dalai Lama’s party…There may have been other CIA agents with the party as well.”

Who were these individuals? Who helped the Dalai Lama’s party get out of Tibet? None other than Peter Byrne, Tom Slick’s man in Nepal. He may forget it, but he told me so in 1988, when I was interviewing him about his years of work, overt and covert, with Tom Slick of San Antonio, Texas. I go into further details in my book, Tom Slick: True Life Encounters in Cryptozoology (Fresno: Linden Press, 2002).
Behold, happy is the man whom God correcteth: therefore despise not thou the chastening of the Almighty: For he maketh sore, and bindeth up: he woundeth, and his hands make whole ; He shall deliver thee in six troubles: yea, in seven there shall no evil touch thee. - Job 5

Offline Satyagraha

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Re: SwRI - SFBR - Tom Slick - The Other Battelle - Only Private BSL-4
« Reply #13 on: September 22, 2009, 11:51:18 am »
TahoeB - What about expanding the content of this thread to cover those regional Bioweapons facilities around the country? This morning an article popped up in the News thread about an outbreak of plague at the Univ. of Chicago lab... found some info and posted it here...

http://forum.prisonplanet.com/index.php?topic=136108.msg819834#msg819834

I think this is a good thing to dig in to... these are private bioweapons labs for heaven's sake; funded by (as in the case of the Yale facility) Rockefeller eugenicists.. and with little oversight or accountability!! Scary bunch and I think we should drill down to see what we can find. (The Yale facility being kept separate as part of Annie Le case for now.)

This 'pandemic' of swine flu, in my opinion, is a 'test run'. They're watching the transmissibility of the virus, priming the pump to condition people into lining up for vaccines out of fear, setting up the legislative framework for martial law, getting the cops and firefighters ready to give injections or haul us all off to fema camps... THIS is A TEST ... and if they sell billions of dollars in vaccines, and kill thousands of people, well that's ok. But that's not enough. They'll be back next time having prepared the way for the next 'big' pandemic.

I think that next big pandemic will come from these NGO labs possibly... they are operating under the radar (unlike Ft.Detrick,or CDC...), and in spite of publishing documents that describe their activities as relatively safe and harmless, they have been making mistakes, and establishing a track record for future 'mistakes'. Note that this month marks the SECOND TIME the plague has escaped in the Univ. of Chicago Lab.

With regard to the current 'swine' flu ... I expect that at some point in the next few months they'll make an announcement similar to "Oh THANK GOD, that due to our terrific response, we have averted certain disaster... ok everyone, go back to sleep..."

And the people will sigh with relief (and increase their level of trust in the government), and go back to Dancing with the Stars.  

But the mission, for the NWO, was a terrific success. They've accomplished a lot: mass conditioning of people; earning their 'trust' that in any pandemic emergency, the government will save us. (Look at how well that swine flu thingy went!!!)

Once we're sufficiently conditioned to follow orders and bend over - they'll release the big 'cull' ... these may be arbovirii - who knows... some old dredged up plagues, some recombined weaponized concoction they cook up in one or more of these labs. And these labs are all over the world; Brazil, France, US, etc.. we have to find them and expose them.


And  the King shall answer and say unto them, Verily I say unto you, 
Inasmuch as ye have done it unto one of the least of these my brethren,  ye have done it unto me.

Matthew 25:40

Offline TahoeBlue

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Re: SwRI - SFBR - Tom Slick - The Other Battelle - Only Private BSL-4
« Reply #14 on: September 22, 2009, 12:46:09 pm »
TahoeB - What about expanding the content of this thread to cover those regional Bioweapons facilities around the country? This morning an article popped up in the News thread about an outbreak of plague at the Univ. of Chicago lab... found some info and posted it here...

Malcolm Casadaban - Scientist killed from bacteria he was researching

The other thread: Malcolm Casadaban -Another Research Scientist is Dead - Possible Assassination?

Current National Biocontainment Laboratories (NBL) and Regional Biocontainment Laboratories (RBL)


Notice that many are under contruction and that the BSL-4 are not yet completed

http://www3.niaid.nih.gov/LabsAndResources/resources/dmid/NBL_RBL/site.htm
Current National Biocontainment Laboratories (NBL) and Regional Biocontainment Laboratories (RBL)




National Biocontainment Laboratories (NBLs)

Boston University Medical Center
National Emerging Infectious Diseases Laboratory (NEIDL)  http://www.bu.edu/dbin/neidl/en/
Principal Investigator: Dr. Mark Klempner
(Under construction)

University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston  Galveston National Laboratory
http://utmbcare.com/GNL/about/index.shtml
Principal Investigator: Dr. Stanley Lemon (Under construction)


Regional Biocontainment Laboratories (RBLs)

Colorado State University (Fort Collins) Regional Biocontainment Laboratory
http://ghrc.colostate.edu/index.asp
Principal Investigator: Dr. William Farland

Duke University Medical Center (Durham) Global Health Research Building (GHRB)
http://humanvaccine.duke.edu/modules/
rsch_bldg/index.php?id=1home/index
Principal Investigator: Dr. R.Sanders Williams

George Mason University
George Mason University Biomedical Research Laboratory
http://brl.gmu.edu/
Principal Investigator: Dr. Charles Bailey
(Under construction)

Tufts University, Cummings School of Veterinary Medicine (Grafton, MA)
Regional Biosafety Laboratory-New England (RBL-NE)
http://www.tufts.edu/vet/rbl/
Principal Investigator: Dr. Deborah Kochever
(Under construction)

Tulane National Primate Research Center  (Covington, LA)
Regional Biocontainment Laboratory
http://www.tulane.edu
Principal Investigator: Dr. Andrew Lackner
(Under construction)

University of Alabama at Birmingham  School of Medicine
Southeast Biosafety Laboratory Alabama (SEBLAB)
http://main.uab.edu/show.asp?durki=61656
Principal Investigator: Dr. Richard Marchase

University of Chicago  The Ricketts Laboratory
http://www.htrl.uchicago.edu/
Principal Investigator: Dr. Keith Moffat
 
University of Hawaii at Manoa
Pacific Regional Biocontainment Laboratory
http://www.hawaii.edu/
Principal Investigator: Dr. James R. Gaines
(Under construction)

University of Louisville
The Center for Predictive Medicine
http://www.louisville.edu/community/biosafetylab/
Principal Investigator: Dr. Manuel Martinez
(Under construction)

University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey (Newark)
New Jersey Medical School Center for Infectious Disease Research—RBL
http://www.umdnj.edu/
Principal Investigator: Dr. Robert L. Johnson

University of Missouri-Columbia College of Veterinary Medicine
University of Missouri—Columbia Regional Biocontainment Laboratory
http://www.rbl.missouri.edu
Principal Investigator: Dr. James Coleman
(Under construction)

University of Pittsburgh
The Regional Biocontainment Laboratory at the Bioscience Tower III (BST3)
http://www.cvr.pitt.edu
Principal Investigator: Dr. Donald Burke

University of Tennessee Health Science Center (Memphis)
University of Tennessee Health Science Center Regional Biocontainment Laboratory
http://www.utmem.edu/research/RBL/
Principal Investigator: Dr. Gerald Byrne
(Under construction)
Behold, happy is the man whom God correcteth: therefore despise not thou the chastening of the Almighty: For he maketh sore, and bindeth up: he woundeth, and his hands make whole ; He shall deliver thee in six troubles: yea, in seven there shall no evil touch thee. - Job 5

Offline Satyagraha

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DHS Biosecurity Agents & Toxins Conference: August 2009
« Reply #15 on: September 22, 2009, 08:50:17 pm »
FOR OFFICIAL USE ONLY
Office of Infrastructure Protection’s Biosecurity Assessments and Activities
prepared for
The 2nd Annual Select Agent and Toxin Conference
August 2009





Vulnerability Assessment Authorities
• Homeland Security Presidential Directive-7 (HSPD-7) and the National Infrastructure Protection Plan (NIPP) require DHS to identify, prioritize, and coordinate the protection of critical infrastructure and key resources (CIKR).

• DHS is responsible for ensuring that comprehensive vulnerabilityassessments are performed for nationally critical CIKR, and conducting or supporting vulnerability assessments that address the specific needs of the NIPP’s comprehensive approach to CIKR protection.

• The Senate Appropriations Committee Report to the Consolidated Security, Disaster Assistance, and Continuing Appropriations Act, 2009 (P.L. 110-329) directs DHS to report to the Committee by March 20, 2009, on the progress made to expand vulnerability assessment capacity.




Site Assistance Visits

• Collaborative process for conducting information-gathering visits and providing security recommendations at high-risk sites.

• Conducted by DHS in coordination and collaboration with other Federal, State, and local government entities, and CIKR owners and operators.

• Increases owner/operator awareness of vulnerabilities and provide options for enhancing protective measures to reduce vulnerabilities.

• Provides detailed reports to private sector partners –used to make security enhancements.

• Information informs sector-based Characteristics and Common Vulnerabilities (CV), Potential Indicators of Terrorist Activity (PI) and Protective Measures (PM) reports.

• Conducted eight SAVson BSL 3 and 4 laboratories.



Buffer Zone Protection Program


• DHS-administered grant program to help local law enforcement and CIKR owner/operators increase security within site “buffer zones,”the area outside of a facility that can be used by an adversary to conduct surveillance or launch an attack.

• Provides a coordinated process to identify and assess vulnerabilities, conduct security planning, implement preparedness activities, coordinate protective measures, and obtain mitigation equipment needed to enhance security.

• Annual grant program provides $50 million to approximately 200 facilities of national significance.

• Since FY04, approximately $300 million in BZPP grants distributed to State and local law enforcement to purchase authorized equipment to enhance protection capabilities in the buffer zone of the identified facility.

• Completed 25 BZPP assessments on BSL 3 and 4 laboratories and provided over $4.3 million of grant funds to local law enforcement agencies.



Vulnerability Assessment Teams

• Federal Team Lead (FTL) / Protective Security Advisor (PSA):
• Provides leadership, instruction, and direction to the team;
• Monitors the quantitative and qualitative results;
• Focuses on internal and external requirements; and
• Coordinates documentation.

CBRNE Specialists (optional)
• Conducts analysis and mitigation based on a balanced assessment;
• Works closely with sites to identify and understand explosion hazards; and
• Conducts 3-D Blast and Plume Modeling.

Physical Security / Assault Planning Specialists:
• Identifies weaknesses and vulnerabilities;
• Incorporates a risk-based approach; and
• Develops Buffer Zone Plans.

Infrastructure Interdependencies and Systems Analysts:
• Designs risk analysis for engineering systems.
• Provides subject matter expertise:
• Infrastructure interdependencies;
• Operation processes; and
• Computer-based systems and reliability modeling.



Partnership with National Guard Bureau

• DHS and DoD signed a Memorandum of Agreement (MOA) to leverage the capabilities of the National Guard (NG) and the West Virginia National Guard Joint Interagency Training and Education Center (JITEC) to conduct vulnerability assessments.

Ten teams from 9 states involved in the program
NV, OR, WA, TX, GA, VA, MI, MN and WV

• DHS/NG teams have conducted over 200 vulnerability assessments since FY08.
   • GA team conducted August 2008 CDC SAV
   • TX and VA teams conducted December 2008 SFBR SAV
 
• Potential increase of 10 additional teams in FY09.



Infrastructure Protection Report Series (IPRS)

• Increase awareness and improve understanding of infrastructure protection


• Combined Protective Paper and two-page summer report on BSL-4 laboratories.




Common Vulnerabilities

• No security director as an executive staff member (sole function).
• No established security protocols in response to unusual incidences.
• No screening of packages or vehicles entering facility.
• Inadequate relationship between first responders in consideration to exigent circumstances requiring emergency response to facility.
• Insider threat to facility operations.
• Potential for stealing or diverting agents during shipping and transfers.
• Inconsistent background checks on employees that do not have “entry”access to BSL laboratory.
• No annual or semi-annual updates of background checks for laboratory personnel.
• Co-location of laboratory with other facilities-full access to facility can be gained.
• Inconsistent security procedures across facilities.Perimeter security inadequate or in need of repair/replacement.
• No procedure for “non-existing” badge challenges.



Recommended Protective Measures

• Designate security director to develop, implement, and coordinate security related activities.
• Develop a comprehensive security and emergency response plan.
• Establish liaison and regular communication with local law enforcement and emergency response officials.
• Conduct background checks on all employees and establish procedures for reporting change of life information (bankruptcies, divorce, marriage, etc).
• Incorporate security awareness and response procedures into new employee training.
• Install intrusion detection systems in sensitive areas.Provide adequate locks, gates, doors, and other barriers for designated secure areas.
• Install barriers at HVAC systems, hatches, and power substations.
• Implement adequate policies and procedures for cyber and controlsystems security.
• Immediately cancel all access to terminated staff (employees andcontractors).
• Develop and maintain emergency response plans, notifications process, and calling procedures.



Executive Order
• E.O. 13486 “Strengthening Laboratory Biosecurity in the United States”
• Issued on January 9, 2009 after WMD Commission Report.
• Established a Working Group
  -To ensure that facilities that possess biological select agents and toxins have appropriate security and personnel assurance practices to protect against theft, misuse, or diversion to unlawful activity.
 
• Working Group tasked to provide a Report to President within 180days
• Report will include a summary of existing laws; recommendations for new legislation; options for establishing oversight mechanisms; and a comparison of the range of existing security programs compared to security programs in other fields and industries.
• Created interagency sub-working groups
• Review and analyze current regulations, policies, procedures, and other documents
• Identify gaps in current regulations, policies, procedures, and practices
• Recommend ways to strengthen biosecurity



DHS Full/Sub-Working GroupsParticipation)

Full Working Group Representation

* Representatives from DHS/Office of Health Affairs represent DHS at the senior-level

* Dr. Tillman Jolly (Assistant Chief Medical Officer)

Physical Security Sub-Working Group
• DHS Office of Infrastructure Protection co-chairs with Department of Defense
• DHS Office of Infrastructure Protection/ISC
• DHS Office of Security
• DHS Chief Security Officer-Plumb Island

Transportation Security Sub-Working Group
• DHS Transportation Security Administration  DHS Office of Infrastructure Protection




DHS Sub-Working Groups Participation(con’t)[/color]


Select Agent Rule Sub-Working Group
DHS Office of Infrastructure Protection’s Homeland Infrastructure Threat and Risk Analysis Center (HITRAC)
DHS Office of Health Affairs

Personnel Security/Reliability Sub-Working Group
* DHS Office of Infrastructure Protection's Infrastructure Security Compliance Division
* DHS Office of Security



Future Initiatives
Memorandum of Agreement


*In efforts to further the BSL security initiatives, IP executed a Memorandum of Understanding
(MOU) with CDC, US Department of Agriculture’s Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service (APHIS), and FBI concerning the sharing of select agent facility location and toxin information.

* IP’s Infrastructure Information Collection Division (IICD) receivedthe facility lists from CDC and APHIS and developed a way forward for obtaining thedata in database format.

* IP will continue to work with CDC and APHIS to obtain data clarification and analyze information in a risk-base manner.

S&T and IP Coordination

• IP Security Specialists have provided subject mater expertise (SME) to S&T site visits to offer security assistance in the form of a Site Assistance Visit.

• IP has provide program overviews during two S&T visits since January 2009. IP continues to support this effort and provide SME support to S&T.
And  the King shall answer and say unto them, Verily I say unto you, 
Inasmuch as ye have done it unto one of the least of these my brethren,  ye have done it unto me.

Matthew 25:40

Offline TahoeBlue

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Re: SwRI - SFBR - Tom Slick - The Other Battelle - Only Private BSL-4
« Reply #16 on: September 23, 2009, 11:40:05 am »
Can anyone find a list of all BSL-3 and BSL-4 labs in the U.S. I think somewhere there was a thread of known BSL-4 labs in the U.S. (how about the world?). So was the WMD report SO scary?

So with god-Like powers Bush issues Executive Orders just before leaving office?
Jan 9 is before jan 20 right.? And everybody hops?

Quote
Executive Order
E.O. 13486 “Strengthening Laboratory Biosecurity in the United States” - Issued on January 9, 2009 after WMD Commission Report.

http://cstsp.aaas.org/BiosecurityComment.html

Laboratory Biosecurity Comment page
AAAS is asking for your opinions on laboratory, pathogen, and personnel security to help inform important governmental policy decisions.

Since 2001, the U.S. government has made significant changes to how laboratory research is conducted, particularly with a select group of pathogens called “select agents.” The US has expanded the select agent list, increased restrictions on access, limited foreign scientists from visiting the U.S., and is currently debating additional oversight of legitimate biological research to minimize the potential biosecurity risks of the research and advancing biotechnologies.

More information about current biosecurity policy initiatives are listed below.

On January 9, 2009, President George W. Bush issued Executive Order 13486 on Stengthening Laboratory Biosecurity, which established an interagency working group to review all laws and regulations regarding select agents, oversight of high-containment laboratories (biosafety levels 3 and 4), and personnel reliability (vetting personnel seeking access to select agents).

This review will encompass accountability, storage, transportation, and handling of select agents. At the public consultation on May 13 and May14, the discussion included:
1) licensure of scientists;
2) training programs for biosecurity and safety;
3) common set of operating standards for all institutions;
4) a tiered approach to classifying select agents;
5) the feasibility and consequences of inventorying biological agents;
6) feasibility and strategies for implementing a program on allowing access to high-containment laboratories (“personnel reliability”); and
7) sharing information about the research facilities’ security plans.
Behold, happy is the man whom God correcteth: therefore despise not thou the chastening of the Almighty: For he maketh sore, and bindeth up: he woundeth, and his hands make whole ; He shall deliver thee in six troubles: yea, in seven there shall no evil touch thee. - Job 5

Offline Satyagraha

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Re: SwRI - SFBR - Tom Slick - The Other Battelle - Only Private BSL-4
« Reply #17 on: September 23, 2009, 01:24:06 pm »
Can anyone find a list of all BSL-3 and BSL-4 labs in the U.S. I think somewhere there was a thread of known BSL-4 labs in the U.S. (how about the world?).

http://www.sunshine-project.org/biodefense/blsmapside1.jpg

NOTE: The sunshine project website was shut down ... so this map is almost 2 years out of date.
As of 1 February 2008, the Sunshine Project is suspending its operations.
Although this website is no longer updated, it remains online as an archive of our activities and publications from 2000 through 2008.
If you have any questions, please contact us by e-mail at [email protected]. Thank you for your interest.


We need to capture all their info to archive here on Prison Planet Forum... while it's still sitting out there.
And  the King shall answer and say unto them, Verily I say unto you, 
Inasmuch as ye have done it unto one of the least of these my brethren,  ye have done it unto me.

Matthew 25:40

Offline Satyagraha

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Re: SwRI - SFBR - Tom Slick - The Other Battelle - Only Private BSL-4
« Reply #18 on: September 23, 2009, 01:28:30 pm »
The Sunshine Project
News Release
3 July 2007
http://www.sunshine-project.org/publications/pr/pr030707.html

Texas A&M Bioweapons Accidents More the Norm than an Exception

• From anthrax in Albuquerque to tuberculosis in New York, the public is kept in the dark about many biolab incidents

• It is unclear if the government is aware of the extent, the danger continues to grow with mushrooming biodefense research

• Need for stronger federal biolab oversight, reduced and rationalized biolab system

• "Instead of a 'culture of responsibility', the federal government has instilled a culture of denial... so labs hide problems, and think that accident reporting is for masochists... "

Far more accidents have happened in biodefense and other high containment labs in recent years than the public knows about. It is not clear if the federal government is even aware of the extent of the problems. The rash of biolab accidents is a result of the massive expansion of the biodefense program, which has brought research on bioweapons agents to scores of new labs in recent years.

What is needed, according to the Sunshine Project, is to reduce the number of facilities and people handing bioweapons agents in the United States and to bring the fragmented and frequently unenforced hodgepodge of federal biolab rules and suggestions together into a unified, mandatory, and enforced system that ensures laboratory safety and public accountability.

The Sunshine Project has recently released information about unreported accidents with biological weapons agents that resulted in an order from the US Centers for Disease Control (CDC) for Texas A&M University to cease and desist all research with "select agents", as bioweapons agents are called in federal regulations.

Here, the Sunshine Project releases information on other accidents that it has confirmed involving select agents and/or biosafety level three (BSL-3) labs. None of these accidents, to the Project's knowlege, have been made public before:

- In mid-2003, a University of New Mexico (UNM) researcher was jabbed with an anthrax-laden needle. The following year, another UNM researcher experienced a needle stick with an unidentifed (redacted) pathogenic agent that had been genetically engineered;

- At the Medical University of Ohio, in late 2004 a researcher was infected with Valley Fever (C. immitis), a BSL-3 biological weapons agent. The following summer (2005), a serious lab accident occurred that resulted in exposure of one or more workers to an aerosol of the same agent;

- In mid-2005, a lab worker at the University of Chicago punctured his or her skin with an infected instrument bearing a BSL-3 select agent. It was likely a needle contaminated with either anthrax or plague;

- In October and November of 2005, the University of California at Berkeley received dozens of samples of what it thought was a relatively harmless organism. In fact, the samples contained Rocky Mountain Spotted Fever, classified as a BSL-3 bioweapons agents because of its transmission by aerosol. As a result, the samples were handled without adequate safety precautions, until the mistake was discovered. Unlike nearby Oakland Children's Hospital, which previously experienced an anthrax mixup, UC Berkeley never told the community;

In addition to lab-acquired infections and exposures, other types of dangerous problems have occurred, such as unauthorized research, equipment malfunction, and disregard for safety protocols:

- In February 2005 at the University of Iowa, researchers performed genetic engineering experiments with the select agent tularemia without permission. They included mixing genes from tularemia species and introducing antibiotic resistance. The University reported the incident to the National Institutes of Health, but public disclosure was (to our knowlege) never made;

- In September 2004 at the University of Illinois at Chicago, lab workers at a BSL-3 facility propped open doors of the lab and its anteroom, a major violation of safety procedeures. A alarm that should have sounded did not;

- In March 2005 at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, lab workers were exposed to tuberculosis when the BSL-3 lab's exhaust fan failed. Due to deficiences in the lab, a blower continued to operate, pushing disease-laden air out of a safety cabinet and into the room. An alarm, which would have warned of the problem, had been turned off. The lab had been inspected and approved by the US Army one month earlier;

- In December 2005 at the Albert Einstein College of Medicine at Yeshiva University in New York City, three lab workers were exposed (converted) to tuberculosis following experiments in a BSL-3 lab. The experiments involved a Madison Aerosol Chamber, the same device used in the February 2006 experiments that resulted in the Texas A&M brucella case;

- In mid-2004, a steam valve from the biological waste treatment tanks failed at Building 41A on the NIH Campus in Bethesda, Maryland. The building houses BSL-3 and BSL-4 labs. Major damage was caused, and the building was closed for repairs;

It is very important to note that these and other examples of lab accidents are drawn from biosafety committee meeting minutes of institutions that actually record such incidents in records that are (at least nominally) available to the public. Often, this is not the case, such as that of Texas A&M, which only released accident information under extreme pressure. Thus, the sample of institutions named above is skewed toward those that have been more open about their accidents than others.

There is no reason not to presume that many more similar accidents have occurred but have yet to come to light.

"One can see in Texas A&M's statements and actions an ingrained resistance to transparency about accidents," says Sunshine Project Director Edward Hammond, "this is the result of an irrational and ineffective federal system in which incentives are tilted against reporting and transparency."

Add Hammond, "Instead of a 'culture of responsibility', the federal government has instilled a culture of denial. Reporting requirements, to the extent that they exist, are not well-enforced unless NGOs or the press make a stir, so labs hide problems, and think that accident reporting is for masochists, an attitude clearly reflected by A&M's President, who says that he now regrets reporting the the Q Fever infections."


 
And  the King shall answer and say unto them, Verily I say unto you, 
Inasmuch as ye have done it unto one of the least of these my brethren,  ye have done it unto me.

Matthew 25:40

Offline Satyagraha

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Re: SwRI - SFBR - Tom Slick - The Other Battelle - Only Private BSL-4
« Reply #19 on: September 23, 2009, 01:42:43 pm »
Here's an archive of the 'big picture' -- BIOweapons facilities paperwork collected by sunshine project.

Institutional Biosafety Committee Archive
http://www.sunshine-project.org/ibc/archive.html

This page contains links to downloadable pdf's, organized by sector (government, education, private, etc.)
There are TONS of these, and we need to download and archive, because I don't expect that site to remain intact for long.

Notes on the page:


IBC Minutes Archive

Click on any institution name below to see its IBC Minutes (pdf).

Status: 211 institutions added to date. Over 875 MB of IBC minutes.

Tips for exploration:

• Compare 3 years of "minutes" from the Southwest Foundation for Biomedical Research (a spook-filled BSL-4 lab) with those of the University of Virginia. Or Walter Reed Army Institute of Research against Vanderbilt University, among other contrasting possibilities.

• Spot abject failures apparent in replies such as that of the Illinois Institute of Technology, which has a lab specializing in aerosolization of bioweapons agents. And the University of South Carolina, whose President sits on the NSABB.

• Figure out what's missing from many minutes that cover recombinant DNA; but say nothing about pathogens (such as with the University of Pittsburgh's otherwise reasonably comprehensive reply), or accidents (many), or anything else. Some committee's minutes reveal that they are little if anything more than signature mills.

• Ponder meeting consistency. Why do some IBCs meet monthly and others barely meet? (Annually (or less)? It frequently does not relate the the size and scope of the research at the institution.

• Ponder format consistency. There is remarkable variability of the format and details of minutes between and even within institutions. Why such a lack of consistency and standardization?

• Identify trash minutes. Federal guidelines require keeping of minutes to which the public has access. Thus, the minutes obviously should be useful to the public by enabling understanding of the research and committee review. But some institutions keep minutes that reveal nothing - defeating the very purpose of the public access rules. Sometimes, this is a cynical policy deliberately designed to thwart public oversight. Examples of such retrograde institutions include the University of Hawaii and the University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center.

• Search for accidents (there are a couple dozen). Wonder why many IBCs don't consider accidents at all. Search for some widely-reported accidents, such as the Boston University tularemia incident (you won't find it), or the disappearing plague mice at the Public Health Research Institute (ditto) or the brucella infection at Texas A&M (ditto). Some institutions won't put the embarrassing parts in writing.

• Find references to select (bioweapons) agents. Some IBCs are reliably straightforward; but many black out references or use other tricks to pretend they aren't there. In almost every circumstance, there is no reason for IBCs to do this. Some IBCs don't consider select agent work at all - who, then, does?

• Find labs in unexpected places - like the BSL-3 select agent virus lab at the Connecticut Agricultural Experiment Station, which does not really have an IBC. Who would have suspected to find such a facility at the tiny state's experimental farm? Or the anthrax lab at the obscure University of Scranton.

• Fill in the Blank. Frequently, IBCs will inexplicably redact information that can easily be found elsewhere. In some cases, we have filled in the redactions with notes in the PDF file, for example, the University of New Mexico and University of Louisiana Lafayette.

• For laughs: Study the redactions made by the University of South Florida, read the cover letter from the University of New Hampshire, or view East Carolina University's reply (which accidentally included loads of material they intended to withhold).


And  the King shall answer and say unto them, Verily I say unto you, 
Inasmuch as ye have done it unto one of the least of these my brethren,  ye have done it unto me.

Matthew 25:40

Offline Satyagraha

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Re: SwRI - SFBR - Tom Slick - The Other Battelle - Only Private BSL-4
« Reply #20 on: September 23, 2009, 02:24:10 pm »
The IBC archive joins the Sunshine Project's CRISP-ER web mashup, released in 2005. CRISP-ER provides enhanced National Institutes of Health grant data by pairing NIH grant summaries with financial and biosafety information. The mashup affords better access to information than NIH itself gives to the public. CRISP-ER is online at:

http://www.sunshine-project.org/crisper

As of September 1, 2009, the CRISP system is no longer supported and it will become unavailable on October 31, 2009

The minutes can be dry; but with close examination, the archive provides an unprecedented window into review - and failure to review - contemporary biotechnology and biodefense research.

In fact, even though the IBCs operate under federal rules, because the government itself has never systematically collected or reviewed these materials, or enforced those rules, placing the minutes in the archive will enable NIH and other branches of government to assess the effectiveness of many committees for the first time ever.

The Sunshine Project
News Release
25 April 2007

Biosafety Archive for Biodefense Public Accountability
Joins funding mashup in shining light on biotechnology research

25 April 2007 - To promote transparency and public accountability of biodefense research, the Sunshine Project has opened an online archive of US Institutional Biosafety Committee (IBC) meeting minutes. The unique internet document collection will be of interest to grassroots organizations, safety and security NGOs, and other policy researchers. It will also enable the federal government to systematically evaluate many individual biosafety committees and the overall performance of the system for the first time ever.

"Greater public accountability of biodefense and related research will lead to safer communities and more sound policies," says Sunshine Project Director Edward Hammond, "We aim to build an applied kind of transparency, one that extends into the heart and the frontiers of scientific research and that transcends often empty political and scientific rhetoric about openness."

Hammond says that transparency is more than publishing articles. "Talented and well run research labs should always produce publications, but scientific articles often don't tell the whole story. By definition, they are a partial and self-selected record. We aim for more thorough disclosure including records that objectively detail labs and their oversight and which are more readily useful to the public interested in lab operations." Such records include committee minutes, safety reviews, accident reports, and funding proposals.

The freely available website contains minutes from 210 companies, public, private, and nonprofit institutions. The majority conduct research at biosafety level three (BSL-3) or higher. Nearly a gigabyte of records are available now and cover three years of IBC meetings at each institution, generally from mid-2003 through mid-2006, or whatever portion thereof the lab was able or willing to muster in response to requests under the NIH Guidelines for Research Involving Recombinant DNA Molecules. The archive presently contains the equivalent of paper files stacked over seven feet tall, and it will be expanded to cover more institutions in the near future.

Importantly, the archive is accompanied by suggestions about how to analyze and compare different labs. Its URL is:

http://www.sunshine-project.org/ibc/archive.html

And  the King shall answer and say unto them, Verily I say unto you, 
Inasmuch as ye have done it unto one of the least of these my brethren,  ye have done it unto me.

Matthew 25:40

Offline Satyagraha

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Re: SwRI - SFBR - Tom Slick - The Other Battelle - Only Private BSL-4
« Reply #21 on: September 23, 2009, 02:41:09 pm »
Ok... here's what they're saying at NIH:

The CRISP system has been replaced by the RePORT Expenditures and Results (RePORTER) query tool. This new tool retains all of the features of CRISP while providing additional query fields, hit lists that can be sorted and downloaded to Excel, NIH funding for each project (expenditures), and the publications and patents that have acknowledged support from each project (results).  RePORTER also provides links to PubMed Central, PubMed, and the US Patent & Trademark Office Patent Full Text and Image Database for more information on research results.  New features will be added to RePORTER in several releases throughout fiscal year 2010.

http://crisp.cit.nih.gov/

They're going to do a better job CONTROLLING what you search for and what you will find.
And  the King shall answer and say unto them, Verily I say unto you, 
Inasmuch as ye have done it unto one of the least of these my brethren,  ye have done it unto me.

Matthew 25:40

Offline TahoeBlue

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Re: SwRI - SFBR - Tom Slick - The Other Battelle - Only Private BSL-4
« Reply #22 on: February 14, 2011, 01:01:56 pm »
Interesting side story?

http://www.angelfire.com/sc2/hewgleyhomepage/
INTELLIGENCE, SURVEILLANCE AND SPIES: One Family's Ordeal
William Albert Hewgley

1964- 1978; section manager SouthWest Research Institute*, San Antonio, Tx

http://www.angelfire.com/ca6/bolandletters/index.html
THE HEWGLEY SURVEILLANCE CASE: Letter to the House Permanent Select Committee on Intelligence

Foreword: In 1975 while living in San Antonio, Texas, and working at Southwest Research Institute(SwRI), the author started encountering sporadic, physical surveillance in the workplace and on business trips. In early 1976, the next year, the author was contacted by a CIA officer who was operating out of an agency office in Austin, Texas, and asked to assist them in recruiting a foreign national as a spy. (While the author was employed there over the period 1964 to 1978, SwRI performed a lot of classified work for the CIA.) On the day of the first visit of the CIA officer to the author's home, the author and his family members were placed under continuous surveillance.

As of this update, the surveillance is still in progress but at a level below earlier years. In 1978, after concluding that this illegal surveillance was not going to stop, the author started sending letters of complaint to high level officials of the U.S. government. One such letter is the following, which was sent to the Chairman of the House Permanent Select Committee on Intelligence.
...
On February 12, 1978... That day we discovered an eavesdropping system in the attic and were able to pinpoint the specific wire used as an antenna. Microphone pickups had been installed in the living room ceiling, in a hallway partition, in a partition between the master bedroom and William Allen's bedroom, and in the partition of my wife's and my bathroom.
Behold, happy is the man whom God correcteth: therefore despise not thou the chastening of the Almighty: For he maketh sore, and bindeth up: he woundeth, and his hands make whole ; He shall deliver thee in six troubles: yea, in seven there shall no evil touch thee. - Job 5