Author Topic: Unexplained water pipe breakages in Los Angeles, California 9/16/09  (Read 13680 times)

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KimMPossible

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This is a newspaper report & we're including it in our Suspicious Activity Report! series, because we find this sudden spate of water pipe breakages extremely suspicious & ominous.

Remember, the powers that be love to forecast what they're about to do to you.

People, what will you do if the entire water system shuts down?

Please, please, please, stock up on bottled water & -- even better -- fill 55-gallon barrels NOW.

-- Kim




Two more L.A. water mains burst overnight, bringing more questions
Jessica Garrison
LATimes.com
September 16, 2009

Two more water mains broke overnight in the San Fernando Valley, the latest in a rash of problems hitting L.A.'s water system.

The first break occurred around 2:30 a.m. on Corbin Avenue in Warner Center, sending water into the street. The second break occurred around 4:30 a.m. on Burbank Boulevard in Winnetka.

Both incidents are under investigation.

Underground water pipes in Los Angeles have suffered significantly more "major blowouts" in the last three months, officials confirmed Tuesday after analyzing dozens of ruptures, some of which flooded streets, damaged vehicles and buildings and, in once case, created a sinkhole so big that it almost swallowed a firetruck.

And the city's engineers don't know why.


It could be fluctuating temperatures. It could be a statistical anomaly. It could be something else.

"It's strange," said William Robertson, general manager of the Bureau of Street Services, which repaves the ruined roads after the water recedes. "The thing that is puzzling is they are so spread out . . . all over the city. You can't link them to anything."



What Department of Water and Power officials can say with certainty is they want more money to fix the problem and plan to ask for a water rate hike. The blowouts underscore the fact that the city's aging water system, which has 7,200 miles of pipe and moves 600 million gallons of water a day, needs an upgrade, officials said.

"This all requires a lot of money," said Jim McDaniel, head of the city's water system.

But some City Council members, who would have to approve any rate increase, did not appear convinced.

"They have to make a case for that," said Councilwoman Jan Perry. She added that she is concerned about the rise in blowouts. "We have to get to the cause," she said. "People can get hurt. Property can be lost."

Los Angeles' water system was put in place by William Mulholland, who figured out how to tap water from the Eastern Sierra and the Owens Valley and designed an aqueduct system that let it flow to Los Angeles on the force of gravity alone.

The influx allowed semi-arid Los Angeles to boom -- and subdivisions marched outward in the 1920s and the years just after World War II.

The system remains a marvel to many engineers and still sends water over the Santa Monica Mountains from Sylmar to San Pedro using gravity. But parts of it are now almost 100 years old, and many of the pipes are wearing out. At the same time, new water quality standards are requiring the DWP to cover many reservoirs at great expense.

The age of the pipes has long been a concern to engineers and officials at the DWP, but most Angelenos were unaware of the urgency until earlier this month.

On Sept. 5, a 95-year-old trunk line ruptured under Coldwater Canyon Avenue, sending a torrent of mud and water shooting 10 feet into the air and into the streets of Studio City.

Less than 72 hours later, a broken main created a sinkhole not far away in Valley Village -- and nearly consumed a firetruck that responded. Days later, another broken main flooded Melrose Avenue near Fairfax High School.

And on Tuesday, there was another on Exposition Boulevard, which caused officials to close the thoroughfare between Crenshaw and Degnan boulevards and cut off water to several businesses.

Offline wildcat

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Re: Unexplained water pipe breakages in Los Angeles, California 9/16/09
« Reply #1 on: September 17, 2009, 10:52:18 am »
It happens everywhere. But they do tend to occur in clusters or cascades. There were burst water mains in our side streets which were fixed. Then the larger main street water mains started to burst. Every time one was repaired, the next one several blocks up the road would go two weeks later.  Maybe it is a combination of lunar cycles, reservoir pressure and heavy traffic load.

http://seattletimes.nwsource.com/html/localnews/2009079034_pipes18.html

KimMPossible

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Re: Unexplained water pipe breakages in Los Angeles, California 9/16/09
« Reply #2 on: September 17, 2009, 05:15:53 pm »
SUSPICIOUS ACTIVITY REPORTS: Various sources: Martial law, surveillance, water / food crisis Los Angeles 9/17/09

Suspicious Activity Reports!

Summary of latest intel:

They are planning to cut off the water to L.A.

They are planning to cut off the food supply to L.A.

They are planning to institute martial law in L.A.

-- Kim




The NWO ,poised and ready,in L A , Part 1

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The NWO,poised and ready ,in L A ,Part 2

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Sean Hannity exposes the man-made drought in California

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Let me be honest: When I get hungry, I walk into the kitchen, wash an apple, slice it and slap some peanut butter on it. Or sometimes I grab a can of almonds, pour a few in my hand and enjoy a little healthy snack. But, never do I think about where the foods are grown or how much work went into growing them. Recently that changed when Chase ("Hannity" producer) and I flew out to Fresno, California. We spent days visiting farms where nearly 300 crops (fruits, veggies and most nuts) are produced. It was quite a site. We flew above miles and miles of gorgeous, almond orchards and talked with farmers about different issues affecting our foods. The main concern and the reason for our research is this: Nearly 40,000 farmers in the Central Valley are unemployed because a judge ordered to turn off the irrigation system in order to save a small fish, which is endangered. The minnow is called the Delta Smelt and it lives in the water, which is pumped into the San Joaquin Valley. Environmentalists complained and a judge ordered the pumps be turned off. But, no water means no crops and no jobs. In turn, farmers are making tough decisions. They are losing their farms (in some circumstances third generation farms) and forced to fire the workers. Food banks can't keep shelves stocked because of all the needy families and eventually, farmers say, you and I will feel the effects. We will be forced to eat fruits, veggies and nuts from other countries (with few regulations, pesticides, etc). Most farmers are screaming "fish over family" and they are stressed, frustrated and fearful. But, environmentalists say the fish needs to be protected and without it the entire ecosystem is in danger. They want the fish to stay in its natural surroundings, not moved to another pond (aka not supposed to be there). It's a fascinating story and one that will take a long time to work out. But, no doubt, something has to be done. Watch the story tonight on "Hannity" at 9 PM EST. I'll be on set with Sean discussing the issue. Thanks for watching! - Ainsley Earhardt, FOX NEWS



California Farmers And Farmworkers Endangered By Minnows !!!

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Sean Hannity interviews Congressman Devin Nunes and Actor/Comedian Paul Rodriguez. A California Central Valley town (Huron) has lost it productivity because of the Endangered Species Act that protects minnows. Farmers and Farmworkers are now losing farms and jobs because the government shutdown a water pump station. Where is the United Farmworkers Union ? Ceasar Chavez is rolling in his grave. Delores Huerta, where are you !!!



Obama Card and the man-made drought

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Central California - The Next Dust Bowl

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Startling Development in Food Production. Farming communities begin to fail due to environmental regulations. Are we repeating the same mistakes?



**Water Cut Off to California City** - Mendota 41% Unemployment, Federal Disaster Area

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What happens when you introduce wacky evironmental regulation and taxes like cap an trade into a credit collapse, hyperinflationary economic situation? Meet your future, 41% unemployment

Disaster Request for a Drought-Hit County in California
http://www.nytimes.com/2009/06/20/us/20fresno.html?ref=global-home

Governor gets firsthand look at water shortage
http://www.fresnobee.com/1072/story/1484985.html

Despair flows as fields go dry and unemployment rises
http://www.latimes.com/business/la-fi-drought6-2009jul06

Offline N.E.P.

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Re: Unexplained water pipe breakages in Los Angeles, California 9/16/09
« Reply #3 on: September 17, 2009, 05:44:46 pm »
Wow!  :o good work.

Offline infowarrior_039

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Re: Unexplained water pipe breakages in Los Angeles, California 9/16/09
« Reply #4 on: September 18, 2009, 01:04:32 am »
about the martial law bit, the enitre world is inches away from full blown martial law. (under the UN)

KimMPossible

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Re: Unexplained water pipe breakages in Los Angeles, California 9/16/09
« Reply #5 on: September 18, 2009, 02:16:19 am »
L.A. Times didn't carry today's poisonous-mercury-tainting-California's-water-supply story, but they did carry this ...

More ominous forewarnings that something very, very bad is about to happen to southern California's water supply ...

-- Kim




Broken water main floods Topanga Canyon Boulevard
Jessica Garrison
LATimes.com
September 17, 2009


Workers monitor a broken water main on Topanga Canyon Boulevard in Canoga Park.

Topanga Canyon Boulevard in Canoga Park was shut down during the busy afternoon commute today after yet another broken water main flooded the street and sent dirty brown water pouring into nearby businesses.

The break — the fourth major gusher this week — occurred just before 3 p.m. in a 12-inch pipe under Topanga near Victory Boulevard.

Topanga is a major state highway connecting the 101 and 118 freeways, and some city officials predicted traffic chaos. Councilman Dennis P. Zine, who represents the area, said he wants the city Department of Water and Power to figure out what is going on beneath the streets — and fast.

Earlier this week, DWP officials said the city had been experiencing significantly more “major blowouts” in water pipes in the last three months. They said they don’t yet know why. In recent days, broken water mains have flooded portions of Studio City, created a sinkhole in Valley Village so big it almost swallowed a firetruck and flooded streets and damaged property around the city.

“Why is this happening?” Zine said. “We need to get answers.... Every day we hear of another one breaking.” The latest break cut water to about 50 customers, according to DWP officials.

It follows breaks earlier this week in the same area, including one on Corbin Avenue in Warner Center and another on Burbank Boulevard in Winnetka.

“It looks like a filthy, brown river,” said Shawn James, 43, who drove by the intersection about 3 p.m. and said he noticed water gushing out of a hole in the middle of the pavement.

Offline wildcat

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Re: Unexplained water pipe breakages in Los Angeles, California 9/16/09
« Reply #6 on: September 19, 2009, 07:15:31 pm »
The latest explanation is the ban on "water sprinkers". Apparently on the days that the ban is in effect, the water pressure is higher than normal.

So if everyone turns off their taps at the same minute, then the entire water network would explode?  ???

KimMPossible

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Re: Unexplained water pipe breakages in Los Angeles, California 9/16/09
« Reply #7 on: September 19, 2009, 09:38:22 pm »
The latest explanation is the ban on "water sprinkers". Apparently on the days that the ban is in effect, the water pressure is higher than normal.

So if everyone turns off their taps at the same minute, then the entire water network would explode?  ???

OMG. Please tell me this is true. If so, it is the most hysterical piece of propaganda I've seen yet! It's the fault of the pesky homeowner not watering their yards between 10 a.m. & 6 p.m. like they were told to do by the powers that be! :D

Oh, wildcat, please make my day & send me a link to a news story &/or a video that says this very thing!

Offline wildcat

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Re: Unexplained water pipe breakages in Los Angeles, California 9/16/09
« Reply #8 on: September 20, 2009, 12:46:56 pm »
http://latimesblogs.latimes.com/lanow/2009/09/council-demands-answers-on-cause-of-la-water-main-failures.html

But some experts said a prime suspect should be the city's recent decision to allow sprinklers to run only on Mondays and Thursdays.

They say that if more water flows through the system on those two days when people water their lawns and then pressure suddenly changes on other days, it could put added stress on already-aging pipes.

"As Sherlock Holmes used to say, when you eliminate everything, whatever is left is the reason.... If the pipe wasn't bad, and it [wasn't seismic activity] and it wasn't a funky contractor, well, what you've changed is this twice-a-week surge flow because of watering restrictions," said Richard Little, director of the Keston Institute for Public Finance and Infrastructure Policy at USC.

Jean-Pierre Bardet, chairman of USC's civil engineering department, who began informally consulting with DWP officials Thursday, concurred that water rationing should be thoroughly investigated, noting that the system's age makes it susceptible to problems.

KimMPossible

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Re: Unexplained water pipe breakages in Los Angeles, California 9/16/09
« Reply #9 on: September 21, 2009, 09:45:52 pm »
wildcat -- Got it -- thanks!



Oh my. Just when you thought the propaganda couldn't get worse, it gets even better ...

You know all those water main breaks in Los Angeles?

You know who's causing it?

(drum roll please)

(fasten your seatbelts)

(hold on to your hats)

And the answer is:

It's all those pesky homeowners not watering their lawns during daylight hours like they were told to do by the powers that be!

ROFLMPO (rolling on floor laughing my patootie off)

-- Kim




City Council members demand answers, solutions to L.A. water main failures
LATimes.com
September 19, 2009


Coldwater Canyon Avenue was littered with chunks of road after a trunk line burst Sept. 5, causing flooding several feet deep on some nearby streets.

Some L.A. City Council members are pressing the Department of Water and Power to quickly develop solutions amid a rash of major water main failures across the city.

Since Sept. 1, there have been  34 "major blowouts" in L.A.'s water system in which streets have flooded and pavement has buckled.



Click here for a map of the major water main breaks in Los Angeles in September 2009.
The latest occurred Friday afternoon on Myra Avenue in Silver Lake. By contrast, the city had only 21 such ruptures in all of September 2008, 17 in September 2007 and 13 in September 2006.

“These things keep happening and I would like an explanation of what’s going on,” said Councilwoman Jan Perry, who sits on the committee that oversees the agency. “We have to come up with a solution.”

Mike Eveloff, president of a homeowners association on the Westside, said he was struck by how much water has been wasted in the last few weeks.

Observing two separate blowouts near his home over the summer, he said:  “Being asked to conserve water and being asked to only water on Mondays and Thursdays and then seeing more water than you could ever save flowing out into the street,  it’s frustrating for people to see.”

City engineers are trying to determine what's causing the water main bursts and have been taking soil samples, sending pipe pieces to labs for testing and performing a statistical analysis on each break.

But some experts said a prime suspect should be the city's recent decision to allow sprinklers to run only on Mondays and Thursdays.

They say that if more water flows through the system on those two days when people water their lawns and then pressure suddenly changes on other days, it could put added stress on already-aging pipes.

"As Sherlock Holmes used to say, when you eliminate everything, whatever is left is the reason.... If the pipe wasn't bad, and it [wasn't seismic activity] and it wasn't a funky contractor, well, what you've changed is this twice-a-week surge flow because of watering restrictions," said Richard Little, director of the Keston Institute for Public Finance and Infrastructure Policy at USC.

Jean-Pierre Bardet, chairman of USC's civil engineering department, who began informally consulting with DWP officials Thursday, concurred that water rationing should be thoroughly investigated, noting that the system's age makes it susceptible to problems.

DWP officials said they are looking into the rationing, among numerous other possible causes. The rationing began in June, shortly before they noticed an uptick in major blowouts. There were 24 blowouts in July and 31 in August, increases from the same months last year.

Jim McDaniel, head of city water operations, refused to speculate on the cause, saying the inquiry is not complete.

Engineers also stressed that the city's 7,200 miles of pipe aren't actually leaking more than usual -- in fact, the number of leaks, about 1,400 a year, is down from the past and represents a lower rate per mile of pipe than in other cities. The problem is with bigger, more destructive leaks that send water shooting through streets.

"We have more breaks which actually have created major destruction," Bardet said.

The problem came to the DWP's attention Sept. 5, after a 5-foot-wide trunk line underneath Coldwater Canyon Avenue in Studio City exploded, sending a 10-foot gusher of water and mud into the air.

Homes and businesses were flooded, and the street, a major thoroughfare connecting the San Fernando Valley and the Westside, was closed for a week. That pipe was 95 years old, and officials suspected that age may have been a factor in its failure.

Less than 72 hours later, another, newer main burst in Valley Village, creating a sinkhole that swallowed half the firetruck that responded to the call about flooding. Firefighters crawled out the window and escaped to safety.

As officials analyzed those problems, they realized they had been seeing an increase in "major blowouts."

In the following days, there was at least one, and often two or three major breaks, snarling traffic, flooding streets and attracting media attention. On Thursday, a break temporarily closed Topanga Canyon Boulevard in Canoga Park.

At first, officials believed one culprit was the age of the system. The DWP has a $1.3-billion program to replace old pipe, funded by a water rate increase of about $2 per customer that the council authorized last year.

But as the blowouts continued, department officials began reaching out for help, sending data to universities and other experts.

Officials said it remains possible that the blowouts are a statistical anomaly. But experts like Little are somewhat more skeptical. He said the timing of the blowouts -- coming soon after the city imposed a major change in water usage with the restrictions -- is highly curious. This marks the first time the city has restricted water use to two days a week.

"To me that is an 'aha' moment," he said.

Little doubts that seismic activity is to blame and said that if he were investigating, he would study the way the shifting pressure from the rationing is hitting the water mains.

But his USC colleague Bardet raised a question investigators will have to answer: If rationing is to blame, wouldn't other cities like Long Beach with similar programs be seeing a surge in blowouts?

--Jessica Garrison

Check out the Times' map of L.A.'s water main breaks.

Offline wildcat

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Re: Unexplained water pipe breakages in Los Angeles, California 9/16/09
« Reply #10 on: September 22, 2009, 03:54:21 pm »
You make it sound like it should be something on the David Letterman show:

Dave [Speaking to Paul: You ever had a water mains burst on your road?

Paul: Oh yeah, the cops came out and put detours everywhere. We were driving round in circles for months.

Dave: You know they've been having a lot of those in Los Angeles recently?

Paul: Oh man!

Dave: Well, the engineers have been investigating, and they've ruled out earthquakes, landslides, subsidence,
slow tremors, heavy traffic and even volcanoes. Now they know the cause.

Paul: What?

Dave: Drum roll please ...

Paul: [Drum roll]

Dave: Home owners haven't been watering their gardens!

Paul: [Cymbal crash].

----

Seriously, I really do wonder if there isn't a fault line on the South side of the San Fernando valley, and it isn't just stretching the pipes a little bit every high tide.

http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/images/earth/earthquake/map-la-browse.jpg

KimMPossible

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Re: Unexplained water pipe breakages in Los Angeles, California 9/16/09
« Reply #11 on: October 01, 2009, 02:45:08 am »
Sorry, forgot to post latest ...

-- Kim



Water main breaks in Miracle Mile area
Victoria Kim
LATimes.com
September 28, 2009


Repairs have begun on southbound Fairfax Avenue at San Vicente Boulevard

A water main ruptured at San Vicente Boulevard and Fairfax Avenue this morning, interrupting service to dozens of customers in what is the latest in a series of breaks in Los Angeles’ water system.

The water main break was reported about 6 a.m., flooding the streets, said Maychelle Yee of the Department of Water and Power. Service was cut off to 40 to 50 DWP customers, mainly commercial businesses, while repairs are under way, Yee said.
 
The rupture comes on the heels of other water main breaks reported over the weekend in Encino and the Hollywood Hills.

The department averages about four leaks a day in the city’s 7,200 miles of aging pipes, and smaller leaks should not be confused with “major blowouts” causing street damage, Yee said. More than 30 blowouts have been reported so far in September.

Some experts have speculated that the city's recent decision to allow sprinklers to be used only on Mondays and Thursdays may be increasing stress on aging pipes because of sudden changes in pressure.

“We do realize this is a little bit higher than normal,” Yee said of the breaks. “We have several outside experts looking into it. We’re just looking at everything to see how that might be affecting it.”

Interactive map: Los Angeles water main breaks

Offline AlexanderStone

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Re: Unexplained water pipe breakages in Los Angeles, California 9/16/09
« Reply #12 on: September 22, 2017, 02:07:09 pm »
They're heating the mantle with haarp(esque weapons). If you know someone in that state; GET THEM OUT OF THERE!

It will be their testbed for water shortages, martial law, and needing 'foreign assistance' to quell unrest (they hope).

Offline AlexanderStone

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Re: Unexplained water pipe breakages in Los Angeles, California 9/16/09
« Reply #13 on: September 22, 2017, 02:14:52 pm »
about the martial law bit, the enitre world is inches away from full blown martial law. (under the UN)

UN is Nu backwards (egyptian deity)