Author Topic: On September 17, 1787  (Read 1106 times)

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Offline Angry Patriot

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On September 17, 1787
« on: September 17, 2009, 07:35:44 am »
On September 17, 1787, forty-two of the 55 delegates to the Constitutional Convention held their final meeting. Only one item of business occupied the agenda that day, to sign the Constitution of the United States of America.


Since May 25, 1787, the 55 delegates had gathered almost daily in the State House (Independence Hall) in Philadelphia to revise the Articles of Confederation. By the middle of June, it became apparent to the delegates that to merely amend the Articles of Confederation would not be sufficient. Instead, they would write an entirely new document designed to clearly define and separate the powers of the central government, the powers of the states, the rights of the people and how the representatives of the people should be elected.

After being signed in September of 1787, Congress sent printed copies of the Constitution to the state legislatures for ratification. In the months that followed, James Madison, Alexander Hamilton and John Jay would write the Federalist Papers in support, while  Patrick Henry, Elbridge Gerry, and George Mason would organize the opposition to the new Constitution. By June 21, 1788, nine states had approved the Constitution, finally forming "a more perfect Union."

No matter how much we argue about the details of its meaning today, in the opinion of many, the Constitution signed in Philadelphia on September 17, 1787 represents the greatest expression of statesmanship and compromise ever written. In just four hand-written pages, the Constitution gives us no less than the owners' manual to the greatest form of government the world has ever known.

We have no tribal council, nor can we vote anybody off the island. But, we do live in the land of the free, and as long as the Constitution stands, we always will.

http://usgovinfo.about.com/blconstday.htm
"The most important lesson of History is that nobody ever learns History's lesson"

Aldous Huxley

Offline Okinawa

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Re: On September 17, 1787
« Reply #1 on: September 17, 2009, 07:47:42 am »
No matter how much we argue about the details of its meaning today, in the opinion of many, the Constitution signed in Philadelphia on September 17, 1787 represents the greatest expression of statesmanship and compromise ever written. In just four hand-written pages, the Constitution gives us no less than the owners' manual to the greatest form of government the world has ever known.

http://usgovinfo.about.com/blconstday.htm

Powerful words that are worth the continued struggle for all people throughout the world. All of humanity are with the American people who believe and follow the Constitution.

When we give up learning we have no more troubles. Lao Tzu

Sai On http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sai_On

Sai On: Okinawa's Sage Reformer www.amazon.com/Saion-Okinawas-sage-reformer-introduction/dp/B0006CKRU0

Unspeakable Things www.personal.psu.edu/gjs4

Offline LG

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Re: On September 17, 1787
« Reply #2 on: September 17, 2009, 09:07:24 am »
If we were a Confederation instead of a Republic, we would have been better off.
8/8/08 was an INSIDE JOB!

Offline Triadtropz

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Re: On September 17, 1787
« Reply #3 on: September 17, 2009, 09:33:17 am »
In the USA a cop can look at you wrong and baker act you, stripping you of your freedoms and rights at the drop of a hat..this isn't the republic they envisioned ..trust me.
one man with courage makes a majority..TJ