Author Topic: DAYLIGHT/ORACLE8i(Ptech) used to rev-engineer 1918 virus-"H1N1" ICG/NCI  (Read 49646 times)

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Mike Philbin

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EAGLE EYE - film 2008
« Reply #40 on: August 11, 2009, 06:46:06 am »
EAGLE EYE - film 2008

just watched it. Oh. My. God.

Do you know what? I was wondering (during the viewing) why they make films like this, why would the six major media corporations disseminate this sort of fear-mongering, what is their corporate agenda? Eagle Eye is produced by Dreamworks.

Who owns DreamWorks? Dreamworks SKG was founded by three greats in the business, namely Steven Spielberg, David Geffen and Jeffrey Katzenberg. The business revolves around the production of motion pictures be it live action or animation, or television programs. Initially, the new production company had tie ups with major studios such as Paramount Viacom and Disney Company, but major decisions were made to make the company an independent film producer.

What REALLY prompted that decision to not tie-up with the majors?  Remember, Spielberg is the guy who made MINORITY REPORT and SHINDLER'S LIST. Unfortunately Geffen was photographed on a boat over at Rothschild's mansion with our (standing) Prime Minister LORD MANDELSEN this last weekend.

Reinforces the WAR AMONG THE ELITES for me in a major way.

Offline Satyagraha

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Re: DAYLIGHT/ORACLE8i(Ptech) used to rev-engineer 1918 virus-"H1N1" ICG/NCI
« Reply #41 on: August 11, 2009, 06:54:05 am »
Quote
Quote from: bigron on 24-06-2009, 07:03:21
Suspected U.S. strikes kill dozens in Pakistan
Story Highlights :

At least 55 dead in two suspected U.S. drone attacks in northern Pakistan

Pakistani intelligence sources say three Taliban commanders among dead

Taliban sources challenge figures; they say 45 dead including 40 local residents

Second drone attack targeted funeral for victims of first attack

-------------------------------------------------------
On Pakistani TV news tonight, in the wake of this drone attack that killed up to 60 people attending a funeral, they showed a clip from the movie "Eagle Eye" in which Americans send a drone to drop a bomb on a group of people attending a funeral. The killing is an absolute copy of what took place in the movie, and the predictive programming nature of the movie is not lost on Pakistani media. The US military advertised what it could do, then followed through.

 


From http://www.imdb.com/title/tt1059786/synopsis
Eagle Eye Synopisis
The film begins with the armed forces getting a lead on a suspected terrorist. As the man is a recluse, getting a positive ID proves difficult, and the DOD's computer system recommends that the mission be aborted. From continued aerial surveillance of the area, the suspect is apparently attending a funeral but the possibility that it is a facade makes those present all nervous - the system continues to recommend abort. The Secretary of Defense (Michael Chiklis) agrees with the abort recommendation, but the President orders the mission be carried out anyway. This turns into a political backlash when all those killed turn out to be civilians, and retaliatory bombings are carried out in response.

You could say this movie 'defines' predictive programming.

And  the King shall answer and say unto them, Verily I say unto you, 
Inasmuch as ye have done it unto one of the least of these my brethren,  ye have done it unto me.

Matthew 25:40

Offline Dig

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Re: DAYLIGHT/ORACLE8i(Ptech) used to rev-engineer 1918 virus-"H1N1" ICG/NCI
« Reply #42 on: August 11, 2009, 07:23:06 am »
one thing that strikes me is, this sort of research is generally developed on a need-to-know basis, under strict levels of access ....

so, if EVERYBODY's working on it, it's a) not that serious a threat nor is its intention to be used as a weapon or b) it won't matter who knows, it's intended for everybody.

These guys are like Nazi's. They document and brag about everything. They also do not think the American people read and over estimate thei TV mind control. A more pompous group of incestuous psychopathic genocidal maniacs you will never find.
All eyes are opened, or opening, to the rights of man. The general spread of the light of science has already laid open to every view the palpable truth, that the mass of mankind has not been born with saddles on their backs, nor a favored few booted and spurred, ready to ride them legitimately

Offline lavosslayer

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Re: DAYLIGHT/ORACLE8i(Ptech) used to rev-engineer 1918 virus-"H1N1" ICG/NCI
« Reply #43 on: August 11, 2009, 09:07:47 am »
Lavosslayer/Anti_Illuminati,

methinks you've got your next IMMEDIATELY IMPORTANT infowars article -- there's nothing like this out in the world, people are still under the impression that their government will protect them from a eugenics agenda - they don't realise it's gone CORPORATE a long while back. Is there new legislation that allows something like a genetic/cancer/biowar false flag operation of this global scale?

How soon can you get such an article submitted, guys?

Mike

That's my plan for today (after I finish a few things around the house). Gotta talk to you A_I when you get a chance. Mainly just to run all this by you the way I understand it and see if I'm on the right line of thinking before I start pouring out paragraphs.
"Those who would trade freedom for security deserve neither" -- Benjamin Franklin

Online TahoeBlue

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Re: DAYLIGHT/ORACLE8i(Ptech) used to rev-engineer 1918 virus-"H1N1" ICG/NCI
« Reply #44 on: August 11, 2009, 11:06:19 am »
Search: r1918 software tools Database


http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?artid=2677460
P58IPK: A Novel “CIHD” Member of the Host Innate Defense Response against Pathogenic Virus Infection - 2009 May 22
...
Here, we sought to determine for the first time the role of P58IPK using an in vivo virus infection model. To this end, we infected mice lacking P58IPK with either the mouse-adapted A/PR/8/34 (PR8) strain or the reconstructed 1918 (r1918) pandemic influenza virus.
...
 Genome copy numbers were normalized to β-actin values determined in parallel using Taqman gene expression assay endogenous control primer-probe sets (Applied Biosystems). Quantification of each gene, relative to the calibrator, was calculated by the instrument, using the equation 2ΔCT(infected)−ΔCT(mock) within the Applied Biosystems Sequence Detection Software version 1.3. The minor groove binding probe and primer sets for each gene were part of an Applied Biosystems assay set as follows: Mouse IL6: Mm00446190_m1; Mouse IFNβ: Mm00439546_s1.

http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?artid=2615558
Genomic analysis of increased host immune and cell death responses induced by 1918 influenza virus
2006 October 5; 443(7111): 578–581.
...
Here we show, in a comprehensive analysis of the global host response induced by the 1918 influenza virus, that mice infected with the reconstructed 1918 influenza virus displayed an increased and accelerated activation of h
host immune response genes associated with severe pulmonary pathology
...
To characterize the functional consequences of gene expression changes associated with infection with r1918, we performed pathway analysis of the gene expression data with Ingenuity Pathways Analysis (see Methods).
...
Probe labelling and microarray slide hybridization were performed with mouse oligonucleotide arrays (G4121A; Agilent Technologies)25. All data were entered into a custom-designed Oracle 9i backed relational database, Expression Array Manager, and were then uploaded into Rosetta Resolver System 5.0 (Rosetta Biosoftware) and Spotfire Decision Site 8.1 (Spotfire).

All primary expression microarray data are available at the University of Washington’s Public Microarray Data Download site (http://expression.microslu.washington.edu), in accordance with the proposed MIAME (minimum information about a microarray experiment) standards26.

http://viromics.washington.edu/conjoint547/PDF/Kash-Nature-2006.pdf
Genomic analysis of increased host immune and cell death responses induced by 1918 influenza virus
Received 19 June; accepted 18 August 2006.
Behold, happy is the man whom God correcteth: therefore despise not thou the chastening of the Almighty: For he maketh sore, and bindeth up: he woundeth, and his hands make whole ; He shall deliver thee in six troubles: yea, in seven there shall no evil touch thee. - Job 5

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Re: DAYLIGHT/ORACLE8i(Ptech) used to rev-engineer 1918 virus-"H1N1" ICG/NCI
« Reply #45 on: August 11, 2009, 12:01:02 pm »
http://www.scientific-computing.com/news/news_story.php?news_id=583
Coping with DNA reconstruction
15 August 2008

In the last few years, new DNA sequencing technologies have begun to replace the methods developed in the 1970s by double Nobel laureate Fred Sanger that dominated the first decade of the 'genome era'. Although new technologies are introduced and modified almost daily, three companies dominate the field: 454 Life Sciences (now owned by Roche), Illumina, and the tried and trusted Applied Biosystems. Thanks to these new methodologies, DNA is being sequenced ever more quickly and cheaply: it now costs fewer than $2,000 and take less than a day to sequence a gigabase. However, the data pouring off the new machines is in the form of much smaller fragments than that produced by Sanger sequencers. Scientists need to turn to novel approaches to assemble and analyse these 'tiny bits and pieces' of DNA.

'Tiny bits and pieces' was the title of a keynote address given by David Jaffe of the Broad Institute MIT and Harvard, Massachusetts, USA at the International Systems in Molecular Biology conference held in Toronto in July 2008. While conceding that short reads can be hard to work with, Jaffe described three already successful applications of the technology, epigenetics, analysis of DNA variation, and de novo genome assembly. He claimed that next-generation sequencing was becoming a 'general-purpose tool for answering any biological question that can be answered from a short DNA run'.

Software companies are investing heavily in methods for storing the enormous quantities of DNA data pouring off these new generation sequencers, and in assembling the short reads. They are now turning their attention to developing tools for analysing and extracting useful biological information from this data deluge. Two important players in this field are Synamatix, based in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia, and California-based Active Motif, which owes its interest in sequencing software to its acquisition of TimeLogic. These two companies have taken strikingly different approaches: while Synamatix prides itself on producing software that performs efficiently on most hardware platforms, Active Motif has developed hardware optimised for the specialist calculations needed for high-throughput sequence analysis

Arif Anwar, general manager of Synamatix, describes the company’s close relationship with the new sequencing technologies: 'We were founded in 2002, and we very soon realised that we were ideally placed to take advantage of these new technologies and develop fast, sensitive sequence assembly and analysis tools on ordinary PCs.' Their clients now include not only the large sequencing centres, but hospitals, agro-biotech companies, and small biology labs with a single sequencer.

'As our client range has broadened, we have developed a wider range of analysis tools to match. The range of things that can be done with next-generation sequences is growing all the time,' says Anwar. The core of Synamatix’ software is the SynaBASE database and SynaWORKS analysis platform, which can map 454, Illumina or AB reads to both genomic and cDNA sequences. The latter analysis is an alternative to the 'gold standard' of microarray technology for transcription analysis, and has some advantages: 'With our technology, unlike with microarrays, you don’t need to know which genes you are looking for,' he adds. 

Active Motif’s bioinformatics software products are all tied to custom field programmable gate array (FPGA) hardware that has been optimised to accelerate - up to 500 times - some of the most commonly used algorithms in the bioinformatics armoury, including hidden Markov models, Smith-Waterman and the ubiquitous BLAST. 'In conjunction with Invitrogen, we are exploring ways to apply our FPGA technology to the analysis of next-generation sequencing data,' says Chris Hoover, business development manager for TimeLogic. 'Our customers are already using their DeCypher systems to fill computational gaps in their next-generation analysis pipelines,' comments Hoover. And, in straitened economic times, these users may be particularly grateful for a perhaps unexpected benefit of optimised hardware. 'One of our accelerators has the number-crunching power of hundreds of general purpose CPU cores, but with power consumption no higher than a 15 watt light-bulb.'

It is encouraging that these companies are developing tools that are affordable and accessible for biologists to use, even without specialist bioinformatics support. This may be the best way of ensuring that next-generation sequencing reaches its full potential as a general-purpose tool. 

Behold, happy is the man whom God correcteth: therefore despise not thou the chastening of the Almighty: For he maketh sore, and bindeth up: he woundeth, and his hands make whole ; He shall deliver thee in six troubles: yea, in seven there shall no evil touch thee. - Job 5

Mike Philbin

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Re: EAGLE EYE - film 2008
« Reply #46 on: August 11, 2009, 02:54:05 pm »
EAGLE EYE - film 2008
just watched it. Oh. My. God.

You know, I've been thinking about this stunning film all day. Of course it's got the BIG BRASSY HOLLYWOOD HAL-LIKE computer in it, rather than a A.I. database that's run amok on the 'domestic field of war' but I really think everybody should see it.

I still can't work out why such a movie would be made other than as a counter-intel strategy of THE SAVIOURS, maybe that's what I was supposed to think.

:)

Offline Dig

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Re: EAGLE EYE - film 2008
« Reply #47 on: August 11, 2009, 05:35:12 pm »
You know, I've been thinking about this stunning film all day. Of course it's got the BIG BRASSY HOLLYWOOD HAL-LIKE computer in it, rather than a A.I. database that's run amok on the 'domestic field of war' but I really think everybody should see it.

I still can't work out why such a movie would be made other than as a counter-intel strategy of THE SAVIOURS, maybe that's what I was supposed to think.

:)

it is a pro-NWO anti-constitution movie.

see eschelon conspiracy to see how technology and the constitution can work together or wargames (original).
All eyes are opened, or opening, to the rights of man. The general spread of the light of science has already laid open to every view the palpable truth, that the mass of mankind has not been born with saddles on their backs, nor a favored few booted and spurred, ready to ride them legitimately

Offline John Galt

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Re: EAGLE EYE - film 2008
« Reply #48 on: August 11, 2009, 05:58:59 pm »
it is a pro-NWO anti-constitution movie.

see eschelon conspiracy to see how technology and the constitution can work together or wargames (original).

I just saw "Echelon Conspiracy" over the weekend, and it was easily the WORST movie I have seen this year. There's a hot chick in it, and the subject matter is somewhat interesting to us here, but it is not in the same class as "Eagle Eye". I'd give "Eagle Eye" 3 out of 4 stars, while I'd give "Echelon Conspiracy" maybe 1 star (for informational purposes and the hot chick, nothing else).

By the way, my Peer Guardian 2 software has recently been showing that "Echelon" is trying to connect to my PC. I'm a bit concerned.

Offline Dig

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Re: EAGLE EYE - film 2008
« Reply #49 on: August 11, 2009, 06:04:43 pm »
I just saw "Echelon Conspiracy" over the weekend, and it was easily the WORST movie I have seen this year. There's a hot chick in it, and the subject matter is somewhat interesting to us here, but it is not in the same class as "Eagle Eye". I'd give "Eagle Eye" 3 out of 4 stars, while I'd give "Echelon Conspiracy" maybe 1 star (for informational purposes and the hot chick, nothing else).

well, yeah angels and demons also has cool effects like eagle eye. but eagle eye was pro-NWO/anti-constitutional and so i think it sucks ass. the hot chick in eschelon conspiracy was just a bonus, not that big a deal really. the technology was impostant because it exposes Ptech and false flag terrorism controlled by interoperable systems.
All eyes are opened, or opening, to the rights of man. The general spread of the light of science has already laid open to every view the palpable truth, that the mass of mankind has not been born with saddles on their backs, nor a favored few booted and spurred, ready to ride them legitimately

Mike Philbin

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Re: DAYLIGHT/ORACLE8i(Ptech) used to rev-engineer 1918 virus-"H1N1" ICG/NCI
« Reply #50 on: August 12, 2009, 02:32:18 am »
Guys,

I'm not totally convinced by the "it is a pro-NWO anti-constitution movie" argument. I don't even think it's a pro-Constitution movie. Parents who have kids will know this. When baby doesn't wanna eat that plate of food, sometimes he's gonna sit all day in front of a cold plate of food until he stops crying...

You can't always get what you want.

I saw this film as highlighting the REAL CYBER BULLYING THREAT, that of coercion of so-called (or innocent) militia in government policy making. Mankind as a Profiled Commodity for the different factions to use against each other.

Happens all the time in Politics, as evidenced by the recent Sibel Edmonds 'Turkish Blackmail' testimony - and hopefully her forthcoming 9/11 testimony. I wonder how many REAL HACKERS there are in the world? I bet there's not that many, compared to government coders whose job it is is to f**k up the system under contract so that the general public can be manoeuvred around like pawns on a chess board.

 >:(



Offline adissenter2

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Re: DAYLIGHT/ORACLE8i(Ptech) used to rev-engineer 1918 virus-"H1N1" ICG/NCI
« Reply #51 on: August 12, 2009, 08:06:23 am »
Sane said

Quote
Night of the long Knives

do any of you know the significance of this event of the past that will soon be revisited?

was thinking of the implications of 'lists' earlier today and this thread just sparked a brush fire in my mind

ΜΟΛΩΝ ΛΑΒΕ! Molon Labe! Come and take them!

Mike Philbin

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Re: DAYLIGHT/ORACLE8i(Ptech) used to rev-engineer 1918 virus-"H1N1" ICG/NCI
« Reply #52 on: August 12, 2009, 09:24:40 am »
good summary of the elimination of 'all meaningful opposition within the German borders'
http://www.strimoo.com/video/16248440/Night-of-the-Long-Knives-Veoh.html

Anti_Illuminati

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Re: DAYLIGHT/ORACLE8i(Ptech) used to rev-engineer 1918 virus-"H1N1" ICG/NCI
« Reply #53 on: August 13, 2009, 02:30:15 am »
http://linkage.rockefeller.edu/wli/reading/nyt92099.html

Surfing the Human Genome

Databases of Genetic Code Are Moving to the Web


September 20, 1999, NYT

By LAWRENCE M. FISHER

SAN FRANCISCO -- Call it an end-of-the-century business case study.

Pangea Systems Inc. is a small but leading company in "bioinformatics," a hot new field that combines the two keystone technologies of the 1990s -- computing and biotechnology. But its products are expensive and difficult for mortals to use, which limits Pangea's potential market and reduces the prospects for a public stock offering.

What to do? This being 1999, the answer if you are Pangea is to dot-com yourself.

This week Pangea, which is based in Oakland, Calif., intends to begin a shakedown test of DoubleTwist.com, a new Web site intended to make online genetic and biological research fast, easy and available to any amateur or professional biologist. While the test phase is available only to faculty and students at Stanford University, the site is scheduled to go live for general use in December.

The DoubleTwist site, whose name is a play on the double-helix structure of DNA, holds the near-term promise of lifting Pangea above the pack of competitors chasing the business opportunities in bioinformatics. But other companies may not be far behind. And the implications go beyond the interests of professional biologists and biotechnology executives.

As more of the arcane secrets of genetics and molecular biology become available to the modemed masses, some industry executives foresee the day when an educated consumer might take a CD-ROM containing a laboratory's rendering of his or her genetic profile, and combine it with a Web surf through gene libraries to determine the person's predisposition toward adverse drug reactions, for example, or for Alzheimer's disease, colon cancer or other afflictions that might eventually be treatable through gene therapy.

To promote its name and capabilities, Pangea plans to let individuals who make only casual use of the site have access to its software and data base at no charge. Heavy users and corporations may obtain licenses to pay for access on a sliding fee scale -- which could run tens of thousands of dollars a year, but would still be significantly less than the $500,000 or more that Pangea now charges big pharmaceutical companies to buy its software outright.

"The power of bioinformatics has been somewhat limited to those who could afford it," said John Couch, Pangea's president and chief executive, who was an executive at Apple Computer in the late 1970s and early 1980s. "I've been trying to figure out how to empower the scientist the way we did computer users at Apple in the early days," Couch said. "We saw the opportunity to be the first Web portal that enabled scientists to do molecular research."

Celera Genomics Group is another company that has said it will offer its bioinformatics tools from its Web site, although it has not specified a launch date.

"This is an Internet company," said Craig Venter, president and chief executive of Celera, a unit of the PE Corp., which is based in Rockville, Md. Scientists and nonscientists alike, he said, will be able to use Celera's tools to gain insights into their genetic makeup. And as catalogs of common mutations correlated with disease become broadly available, he said, individuals will be able to make appropriate lifestyle changes or health-care decisions. "You'll be able to log on to our data base and get information about yourself," Venter said. "Our ultimate customer on the Internet is individuals."

Bioinformatics is a field that emerged from the Human Genome Project, the international quest -- which began in 1988 and is expected to be concluded in the next two years -- to spell out the precise sequence of the three billion letters in the human genetic code. The first industry spawned by the genome project was genomics companies, which sell data bases of individual genes whose sequences have already been identified or are developing drugs aimed at gene targets. As these efforts began to produce vast amounts of biological information, they needed powerful software to keep track and make sense of it all. And so, in the early 1990s, bioinformatics was born as a tool of genomics.

While the software created by the government-funded labs like the Whitehead Institute at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology is in the public domain, with intriguing names like Blast and Fasta, the genomics companies, like Human Genome Sciences Inc. and Incyte Pharmaceuticals Inc., have kept their tools for use by themselves or their licensed partners. That is Celera's primary business as well, despite Venter's intent to offer bioinformatics services on the Web.

It was not long before a few entrepreneurs and venture capitalists saw an opportunity in a pure-play bioinformatics company, which would sell not genes or data, but software. As private companies, none of the bioinformatics players publish revenue figures, but most say they are between $5 million and $10 million in annual sales, and growing. Indeed, some analysts predict a multibillion-dollar bioinformatics market within the next 10 years.

"Bioinformatics is not necessarily the next wave, but the glue that holds everything together," said Tim Wilson, an analyst with S.G. Cowen. "If you don't get that part right, it's hard to realize the value of genomics," he said. "The opportunity is something obvious to anyone who speaks to pharmaceutical companies."

With the DoubleTwist site, according to Pangea, a researcher would have many of the same capabilities previously available only to the company's big corporate customers, which include drug companies like Bristol-Myers Squibb and Hoechst Marion Roussel.

After logging on to the DoubleTwist site, a visitor could enter a partial sequence of a gene -- some combination of the letters A, C, T and G, which make up the genetic alphabet -- and then search for contiguous sequences that might lead to a full-length gene. Or if the code of a full-length gene were known, the researcher could ask in which tissues of the body that gene is found or found only when in the presence of cancer. To the extent the answer is available in the scientific literature, including patent filings, the software would retrieve it and highlight relevant passages. Other cross-referenced data might include notations on what biochemical materials are required for working with a given gene in the laboratory.

Such are the capabilities of the computational biology that underlies bioinformatics -- a field that Francis Collins, director of the Human Genome Project for the National Institutes of Health, says he now often counsels promising graduate students to look to for career opportunities. "I just think it is going to hit us like a freight train and we really have too small a supply of expertise in that area," he said.

But there has been a dichotomy between the opportunity and the market reality for Pangea and competitors like Netgenics Inc. of Cleveland; Informax Inc. of Rockville, Md.; Lion Bioscience AG of Heidelberg, Germany; Compugen Ltd. of Tel Aviv; the Genomica Corp. of Boulder, Colo.; and Molecular Applications Group of Palo Alto, Calif. Most of these companies are five years old or more, yet few are profitable.

Couch, Pangea's president, said the two hurdles to expanding the market have been complexity and cost. Besides the $500,000 price for Pangea's suite of software programs, a suite customer must make a comparable investment in hardware. And even though they have a point-and-click graphical user interface, like any Windows application, their sophistication has tended to restrict their use to bioinformatics specialists within large pharmaceutical or biotechnology companies, not to individual research scientists without special training.

In moving to the Web, Pangea will find neighbors with some similar-sounding offerings. This week, HySeq Inc., a genomics company in Sunnyvale, Calif., will launch GeneSolutions.com, which will sell genes and genetic information over the Web. And there are various Web sites, for example, that freely offer public-domain algorithms, or mathematical formulas, that can perform the basic tasks of bioinformatics. These include a technique called clustering and alignment, which pieces together full-length genes from the fragments spewed out by so-called automated sequencing machines that derive their data from DNA samples.

But these public-domain tools tend to be difficult to use, and limited in their application to specific gene data bases. Pangea's DoubleTwist, by contrast, will aggregate data from multiple sources, and then make it available using software agents -- small automated software programs that will scan the Web at a user's request and return answers to complex biological queries via e-mail. Theses agents can update information as it becomes available, suggest necessary laboratory supplies and provide links to vendors.

DoubleTwist is intended to complement rather than supplant Pangea's established software suites. But Couch said it was possible that a growing portion of the company's revenues would come from the Web rather than packaged programs. Rather than buy Pangea's software suite for $500,000, companies or academic institutions could spend, say $10,000 a year to provide each user access to these programs over the Web.

Pangea's competition in this arena is companies very much like itself: small, financed with venture capital and possessing more programming prowess than marketing skills.

All of these companies are looking for ways to differentiate themselves, and while an Internet presence is one way to do that, it is by no means the only one.

For example, Netgenics' programs run on corporate intranets, rather than the World Wide Web. But they are built using Internet technology like the Java programming language so that they can be easily adapted to the specific needs of different customers. "Pangea decided they would come up with the perfect schema for all types of drug discovery and put a nice graphic user interface on it," said Manuel J. Glynias, president and chief executive of Netgenics, which was founded in 1996. "We decided there was no perfect schema because every pharmaceutical company is different."

Netgenics did consider a Web-based electronic commerce business model, but decided a faster route to growth was to bundle consulting services with custom bioinformatics software. So far, customers include Abbott Laboratories and Pfizer. "We've very much targeted big pharma and biotech," Glynias said. "They're the only ones who can afford it, and really the only ones it makes sense for. At the end of the day you've got 50 big pharma and biotech companies and 100 medium-sized ones. It's not a big market."

If the market is small, creating a big company requires that each sale be large, and Netgenics bases its goals on finding at least 20 customers willing to pay $5 million annually for its services.

Another player, Lion Bioscience, takes that model a step further. It recently announced a deal in which it would develop new bioinformatics systems and identify target genes for drug development by Bayer A.G. for an investment estimated at $100 million. The figure includes an up-front equity stake in Lion as well as fees for use of Lion's existing information systems, research and set-up costs for a new subsidiary to be based in Cambridge, Mass., and royalties on drugs developed from the gene targets identified at the subsidiary.

Lion calls its concept iBiology, and like Netgenics' approach, it uses intranets rather than the Internet. "It goes far beyond the usual gene sequence analysis software," said Claus Kermoser, Lion's vice president for corporate development. "We crawl further up the value chain to include the chemical side, and also pharmacological and toxicology data. It's not just a software package, tools and data; it's a solution for pharmaceuticals research data management."

In fact, Lion is actually a hybrid of pure-play bioinformatics and genomics, because it sells gene targets along with information-processing capabilities. Similarly, Compugen, after building a successful business selling bioinformatics tools, has recently added a genomics thrust, selling novel gene variants the Compugen researchers have identified with the company's tools.

Compared with these other companies, which have aimed for a corporate clientele, Informax has taken a vastly different tack. For six years it has sold a program for individual scientists, Vector NTI, which is almost to biology what desktop publishing software was to print publications. At $3,500 a user, for the Windows or Macintosh versions, Vector NTI is not inexpensive. But because it is a purchase that typically can be authorized at the department level, it is the most widely used bioinformatics program in the industry. It is used at 60 pharmaceuticals companies, 250 biotechnology concerns and 500 academic institutions.

"We've built our franchise by meeting the needs of the bench biologist," said Timothy Sullivan, Informax's senior vice president for marketing and sales. "Informax took a bottom-up approach and did it well, versus Pangea and Netgenics, who started out at the enterprise level," he said. Informax recently introduced its own enterprise product, Software Solution for Bioscience, and hopes to use the leverage of its existing customer base to win sales at large companies.

One hurdle for all of these competitors is that the large companies that are their obvious customers often have substantial bioinformatics capabilities of their own -- expertise that the company may even view as a proprietary advantage.

"You're trying to do cutting-edge research, and if you're on the leading edge of the curve that means you also have to develop the software to do it," said Paul Godowski, director of molecular biology at Genentech Inc., the pioneering biotech company. "On the other hand, there are products out there from these third-party vendors we can import for our programs," Godowski. "It's a mixture, and I don't see that going away, certainly not at a place like Genentech."

No wonder Pangea is looking to cyberspace to expand its potential audience.

"Only a few select pharmas can afford the tools, and if they can, then in some cases they can also afford to produce their own software," Couch said. "Why not take the infrastructure we've created, add a graphic interface that makes it easier, and offer it directly to the scientist? We are taking the Internet, which was originally developed to do research, and giving it back to the researchers."

Copyright 1999 The New York Times Company

Anti_Illuminati

  • Guest
Re: DAYLIGHT/ORACLE8i(Ptech) used to rev-engineer 1918 virus-"H1N1" ICG/NCI
« Reply #54 on: August 28, 2009, 10:14:41 pm »
Well, well, well, looky what we already had posted BEFORE THIS ARTICLE EXISTED, AND BEFORE I EVEN HAD A CLUE OR REALIZED WHAT MY OWN COLLEAGUE AND FRIEND HAD SAID:


Vaccine Prioritization During an Influenza Pandemic

http://cipp.gmu.edu/archive/PandemicMonograph_1007.pdf

You ready for this?  You know what's significant (to say the least) about George Mason University?:
_____________________________________________________________


Publications: Conference Papers (Look at the titles of what they've worked on.) One of the documents in there from 1995 I think looked like they were wargaming a martial law scenario with their software.  It's all highly technical stuff that is beyond anything I can understand, but with some of it, you can get a general idea of what they're doing.  Seems to me what we have here is Ptech AI being used to calculate the most efficient way to overthrow the U.S. with staged avian flu pandemic, and cyber attacks carried out by Northcom/Booz Allen Hamilton; to be blamed on "homeland hackers", or Russians, or the Chinese, et.al., and kill us as as efficiently as possible.  Well, now it's algorithms are going to have to factor in the fact that this is now public.

Standard DOD project solicitation order. This one for a system that will "Synthesize Colored Petri Nets from a set of object oriented products." meaning a system that will let them virtually build  virus cultures.

Kinda like a custom tailored version of auto cad specifically for the purposes of Taking X product and X product and obtaining a synthetic virtual example of what x+x =  and how much of N+X+X  will accelerate or  decelerate the growth of these cultures.
It's a virtual bio-weapons design and testing system.

The rest of those projects are all part of the project to achieve an AI that they hope  will eventually have intelligence greater than that of several genius level people.... As well as other things of high notable interest ...

How far that has come we can only speculate past the point that they have handed out the contracts and any resulting patents we may be able to dig up based upon very deep long term targeted searching.......


But what your latest article  has shown is PTech setting up the ability for the DOD labs to engineer bio-weapons via CAD  essentially as well as testing substances for virus infectiousness so they can design the "Perfect Super Flu contagion"

Great find yet again .. shows they've been building this infrastructure from the get go. It shows they helped assist with the design of the virus and now help profit by designing the solution   .....

Essentially let me just lay out of  the full scope of the the conglomerate goal of the  projects discussed on the website Anti Illuminati gave us much earlier @ http://sysarch.gmu.edu/main/download/abstracts/1991-05-07-colored-petri-net-model-intelligent-nod/

The entire system described,  when completed would include a predictive controlling AI  to manage a virtual world . Think the matrix meets second life...

Based to host the primary target a virtual virus  simulation system.

Giving them the ability to A design a virus B test it using any set of parameters they give it and C have an AI system that can manage the system and record all of their data and generate real world projects with as close to 99.9% accuracy as possible.


So, for the average joe - who understands neither bio-science nor Information Technology : think of  second life or the Sims meets a game to virtually infect the world  with virtual flu that you can design and build . Ie your character gets sick and experiences the effects of a virus that can be created controlled in a computer based simulation that is so precise that it can then be used to duplicate the results in real life.


Get It? Got It ? Good. :/

but yeah great exposure on this....


luckee1

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Re: DAYLIGHT/ORACLE8i(Ptech) used to rev-engineer 1918 virus-"H1N1" ICG/NCI
« Reply #55 on: September 01, 2009, 07:04:55 pm »
I am sickened by this.   :'(

luckee1

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Re: DAYLIGHT/ORACLE8i(Ptech) used to rev-engineer 1918 virus-"H1N1" ICG/NCI
« Reply #56 on: September 30, 2009, 03:58:14 pm »
Work begins on national e-health record network
http://www.comcast.net/articles/news-health/20090930/US.MED.E.Records/
By DAVID TWIDDY, AP
6 hours ago


Work begins on national e-health record network
In this Wednesday, July 22, 2009 photo, Chief of Staff James Sanders shows an example of an electronic medical record during an interview in his office at the VA Medical Center in Kansas City, Mo. (AP Photo/Orlin Wagner)


KANSAS CITY, Mo. — Dr. James E. Sanders is a big believer of switching patient records from old paper files to sophisticated computer databases.

The electronic medical records system at the Department of Veterans Affairs' Kansas City Medical Center gives Sanders and his staff almost immediate access to medical histories, allowing them to seamlessly treat veterans from other states. But when patients aren't in the VA's system, it could mean hours or days before doctors have crucial information to properly care for patients.

"It's increasingly frustrating for us and other providers that it's difficult to find a workable interface," said Sanders, chief of staff for the Kansas City veterans hospital. "Our systems don't talk to each other."

Interoperability, or allowing providers to share records and view them from anywhere, is a requirement for facilities to receive some of the more than $17 billion in stimulus funding that the government is offering to encourage the adoption of electronic medical records. Congress will likely penalize providers who aren't doing so by 2014, cutting their Medicaid and Medicare payments, the Obama administration said.

But the debate over interoperability among health care providers, which has been going on for years, could take well beyond the 2014 timeframe to be solved, industry experts say.

"A private sector effort started 11 years ago and is still a going concern," said Carla Smith, executive vice president of the Healthcare Information and Management Systems Society. "Every year they solve an X number of problems. They're eating the elephant one bite at a time."

For an integrated system to work, developers at different companies have to agree on how their hundreds of programs uniformly present information and connect with each other. For example, if one uses its own set of abbreviations, the information would be useless to a doctor who uses a different program.

As opposed to a "national" system, some envision a "network of networks" that would resemble the model used in the banking industry for customers to access their accounts through ATMs nationwide.

Studies have found that less than 10 percent of U.S. health care providers are using electronic medical records.

Sanders, for instance, has access to one of the nation's most expansive computerized record systems, allowing VA staff to securely access patient data from 1,400 VA hospitals and clinic across the U.S. — but that benefit ends at the medical center's doors. When a patient isn't in that system, Sanders said his staff has to revert to receiving the records by fax and then scanning them into the system.

Dr. David Blumenthal, the Obama administration's health information technology director, acknowledged that a national system for sharing records is far off. He said federal officials hope to issue regulations controlling how medical information is shared by the middle of next year and plan to provide about $300 million in stimulus funds to develop regional and local information exchanges.

But he said the government will likely stay out of the thorny issue of exactly how that national system will work.

"We're very committed to innovation and we're very aware that the government is not the repository of all wisdom, especially in a field as dynamic as health information technology," Blumenthal said. "So we fully expect there will be a lot of different solutions to the exchange problem."

Regional groups, which use bridge programs to allow health care providers in a city or state to view patient records in each others' databases, have shown some success hurdling the differences between records software.

A survey this year by Washington, D.C.-based nonprofit firm eHealth Initiative found 57 health information exchange groups were operating in the U.S., up from 32 in 2007.

At the moment, there are hundreds of programs sold by scores of developers approved by the Certification Commission for Health Information Technology, a nonprofit group that evaluates whether medical record software meets federal and industry standards.

With billions of dollars in potential revenue at stake, the vendors have a big incentive to ensure that their products don't get shut out of a national system. Industry experts say that's made interoperability a key feature in most new programs.

"If you envision that everyone who has a computerized system can talk to another system in a standardized way, you've in essence started to build the foundation of a national network even if it didn't exist as such," said Rod Piechowski, senior associate director on policy for the American Hospital Association.

Offline Bacchanea

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  • Posts: 237
Re: ***MUST READ: The PROMIS Of DAYLIGHT And The ORACLE 8i
« Reply #57 on: October 02, 2009, 05:17:20 pm »
This is all fantasy. There is no technical detail whatsoever. I keep hearing these stories about systems that can control any computer or get any piece of information or understand any language, and it's just complete baloney.

Ummm... are you kidding me. I work at one of the aforementioned companies. No baloney.