Author Topic: IPv4 Internet addresses "running out" is total propaganda & here's why  (Read 16955 times)

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Far and wide: This map was created using data from the researchers' census. About a quarter of the address space is still unassigned (blue), a quarter appears to be relatively densely populated (green), and nearly half of the space has few servers or did not respond to queries (red).

Credit: University of Southern California's Information Sciences Institute


Probe Sees Unused Internet

A survey shows that addresses are not running out as quickly as we'd thought.
Robert Lemos

In a little more than two years, the last Internet addresses will be assigned by the international group tasked with managing the 4.3 billion numbers. And yet, while most Internet engineers are looking to Internet Protocol version 6 (IPv6), the next-generation Internet addressing scheme, a research team has probed the entire Internet and found that the problem may not be as bad as many fear. The probe reveals millions of Internet addresses that have been allocated but remain unused.

In a paper to be presented later this month at the Proceedings of the ACM Internet Measurement Conference, a team of six researchers have documented what they claim is the first complete census of the Internet in more than two decades. They discovered a surprising number of unused addresses and conclude that plenty will still be lying idle when the last numbers are handed out in a few years' time. The problem, they say, is that some companies and institutions are using just a small fraction of the many million addresses they have been allocated.

"People are very concerned that the IPv4 address space is very close to being exhausted," says John Heidemann, a research associate professor in the department of computer science at the University of Southern California (USC) and the paper's lead author. "Our data suggests that maybe there are better things we should be doing in managing the IPv4 address space."

The census, carried out every quarter since 2003 but only recently published, is the first comprehensive map of the Internet since David Smallberg, then a computer-science student at the University of California, Los Angeles, canvassed the Internet's first servers--all 300-plus of them--following the switchover from the ARPANET in early 1983.

Internet Protocol version 4 (IPv4) addresses are typically managed as network blocks consisting of 256 addresses (known as a C block), 65,536 addresses (known as a B block), or approximately 16.8 million addresses (known as an A block). About a quarter of the A block addresses--the largest segments of the Internet--were given out in the first days of the Internet to early participants and to companies and organizations including Apple, IBM, and Xerox.

Today, A blocks are issued by an organization called the Internet Assigned Numbers Authority (IANA) to large Internet service providers or to regional registrars to which the A blocks are resold. But because accelerating use of the Internet is quickly eating up the remaining free blocks of network addresses, the last blocks will likely be given out between the end of 2010 and 2011.

The next-generation Internet address scheme, IPv6, solves the shortage by vastly increasing the number of addresses available. While IPv4 offers about 4.3 billion addresses for the earth's 6.7 billion people, IPv6 will offer 51 thousand trillion trillion per person. However, the move to IPv6 has progressed slowly because of cost and complexity, even with recent mandates for use of IPv6 within the U.S. government.

The new map of the Internet suggests that there is room for more hosts even if addresses are running out. The map reveals that, while roughly a quarter of all blocks of network addresses are heavily populated and therefore efficiently used, about half of the Internet is either used lightly or is located behind firewalls blocking responses to the survey. The last quarter of network blocks consists of addresses that can still be assigned in the future.

The USC research group used the most innocuous type of network packet to probe the farthest reaches of the Internet. Known as the Internet Control Message Protocol, or ICMP, this packet is typically used to send error messages between servers and other network hardware. Sending an ICMP packet to another host (an action known as pinging) is generally not seen as hostile, Heidemann says. "There are certainly people who misunderstand what we are doing," and interpret it as the prelude to an attack, he says. "By request, we remove them from the survey, but its fewer people than you might think. Pings are pretty innocuous."

The researchers found that ICMP pings stack up well against another method of host detection, the Internet's main means of transmitting data: the Transmission Control Protocol, or TCP. TCP-probing is a common technique used by network scanners, but it tends to take longer and is considered more aggressive than ICMP pings, so it may be blocked. To compare the effectiveness of each technique, the team probed a million random Internet addresses using both ICMP and TCP, finding a total of 54,297 active hosts. ICMP pings elicited a response from approximately three-quarters of visible hosts, while TCP probes garnered a response slightly less than two-thirds of the time.

In total, the researchers estimate that there are 112 million responsive addresses, with between 52 million and 60 million addresses assigned to hosts that are contactable 95 percent of the time.

The survey may miss computers behind firewalls or computers that do not respond to pings, but the overall conclusion--that the Internet has room to grow--is spot on, says Gordon Lyon, a security researcher who created the popular network scanning tool NMAP.

"There are huge chunks of IP space which are not allocated yet, and also giant swaths which are inefficiently allocated," Lyon says. "For example, Xerox, GE, IBM, HP, Apple, and Ford each have more than 16 million IP addresses to themselves because they were allocated when the Internet was just starting."

http://www.technologyreview.com/web/21528/?a=f

Offline IridiumKEPfactor

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Great find. So many of the Ip blocks may be owned but not in use. With the developement of better routers and NAT firewalls many many systems can sit behind fewer IPs and if systems need access to them that can be connected via VPN setups. There is no need for every server on a network to have an external IP and there is no need for a company to own more than 16 million IP addresses not even a thousand or 500 hundred.

The current internet has room for growth.




Here is the I.P. v6 internet via IP sonar software.



Offline agentbluescreen

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Not only are large corporate hosting companies (and to a lesser extent ISPs) not using large portions of the blocks they are squatting on, because they reserved them for room to grow , but many deliberately keep old unused servers online many now with old HTTP 1.0 (non-virtual hosting) daemons operating that make the ICMP and TCP testing invalid since these derelict servers still actively work but have no content on them. Usually they are part of old server farms that got bought out by larger firms using newer technology and their own netblocks yet still bound to older legacy contracts of the acquired company (Concentric's acquisition of XO for instance) so there are also other (newer then but old news now) technologies like virtual hosting that negate the need for large netblocks which have not been accounted for and lots of IPV4 addresses totally wasted aside from those yet to be ever used by squatters who've reserved them needlessly in earlier days before Vhosting HTTP1.1 was developed.

With virtual hosting one HTTP1.1 IPV4 address can have a server daemon serving a hundred (or even way more) different domain names, whereas back in the day with HTTP1.0 that server IP address was dedicated to just one domain name. Nowadays it is only clients (ISP customers) who need IP addresses and most of those are shared by wireless or wired routers in the home, hotel or office, for the particular Internet Service account/modem the provider assigns just one address to..

IPV6 is still way way ahead of it's time as a large portion of the bandwidth fees large providers charge is also fixed rents on tons of excess IP netblocks they can't and will never likely need or use. but unfortunately the virtual geography situation makes them reluctant to part with contiguous blocks dedicated to their corporation, despite most of them being way too big for their needs.



Offline agentbluescreen

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Mybe someday when you need a WAN IP address for your shaver and hair dryer we might be worrying about IPV6 again but until we colonize Alpha Centauri it doesn't seem to be much of a pressing need anymore.

Offline Satyagraha

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BULLShit propaganda today in the UK...

Web could run out of addresses next year, warn web experts
Businesses urgently need to upgrade to IPv6, a new version of the internet's addressing protocol that will hugely increase the number of available addresses.
By Claudine Beaumont, Technology Editor
Published: 6:38PM GMT 02 Nov 2009
http://www.telegraph.co.uk/technology/news/6488193/Web-could-run-out-of-addresses-next-year-warn-web-experts.html

A survey, conducted by the European Commission, found that few companies are prepared for the switch from the current naming protocol, IPv4, to the new regime, IPv6. Web experts have warned that we could run out of internet addresses within the next two years unless more companies migrate to the new platform.
(Oh, the "experts" are saying this. Must be true.)

The IPv4 and IPv6 protocols refer to the way in which web addresses are created and assigned. Each website has a unique IP address, represented by a string of numbers, such as 192.168.1.1, which are then given a user-friendly web address, such as telegraph.co.uk, to make them easier to remember.
 
The IPv4 protocol uses 32-bit addresses, which enables the web to support around 4.3 billion unique addresses. By contrast, IPv6 uses 128-bit web addresses, creating billions of possible new web addresses – experts estimate it could assign a unique address for every blade of grass on the planet.

The EC survey found that of the 610 government, educational and other industry organisations questioned across Europe, the Middle East and Asia, just 17 per cent have upgraded to IPv6. The Commission has warned that the timely deployment of the protocol is vital to the growth and stability of the internet.

"In the last 10 years, the internet has become hugely important worldwide from a socio-economic perspective," said Detlef Eckert, a director in the Commission's information society and media directorate-general. "Only by ensuring that all devices connected to the internet are compatible with IPv6 can we stay connected and safeguard sustainable growth of the internet and the global digital economy, now and in the years to come."

"We'll be down to our last tens of thousands or hundreds of thousands of web addresses by the end of next year," warned Sam Pickles, lead enterprise engineer of F5 Networks. "New companies looking to establish a presence on the internet will have no option but to adopt the IPv6 address format. Many government and military organisations worldwide have adopted IPv6 for their internal systems already, and its adoption by companies, and eventually home users, is virtually certain."

Switching to IPv6 is relatively straightforward, said Pickles, but will require significant investment from companies and internet service providers.

"Some additional spending will be required to migrate to the new addressing format, and ensure that systems using the old IPv4 format can interface with new IPv6 networks," he said. "Initial installation of new equipment will most likely affect systems at the edge of the corporate network, interfacing with the internet, such as routers and firewalls."

The move to the IPv6 protocol will also necessitate some changes to domestic set-ups,
said Pickles, but it should be a relatively straightforward process.
"Consumers will eventually also need to replace equipment in the home,
although this is likely to be introduced by ISPs in gradual stages," he said.
"The most likely device needing replacement initially will be the (Ptech-equipped) home broadband router, connected to the phone line."

And  the King shall answer and say unto them, Verily I say unto you, 
Inasmuch as ye have done it unto one of the least of these my brethren,  ye have done it unto me.

Matthew 25:40

Offline Satyagraha

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Re: Fresh new BS: NSA To Build $1.5 Billion Cybersecurity Data Center
« Reply #5 on: November 03, 2009, 06:34:37 am »
Oh THANK GOD the NSA is looking to protect us from those 14-year-olds in their parents' basements who can hack into the FAA systems and steer planes into buildings...  I feel safer.

NSA To Build $1.5 Billion Cybersecurity Data Center
http://www.informationweek.com/news/government/security/showArticle.jhtml?articleID=221100260
The massive complex, comprising up to 1.5 million square feet of building space, will provide intelligence and warnings related to cybersecurity threats across government.

By J. Nicholas Hoover
InformationWeek
October 29, 2009 01:07 PM

The National Security Agency, whose job it is to protect national security systems, will soon break ground on a data center in Utah that's budgeted to cost $1.5 billion.

The NSA is building the facility to provide intelligence and warnings related to cybersecurity threats, cybersecurity support to defense and civilian agency networks, and technical assistance to the Department of Homeland Security, according to a transcript of remarks by Glenn Gaffney, deputy director of national intelligence for collection, who is responsible for oversight of cyber intelligence activities in the Office of the Director of National Intelligence.

"Our country must continue to advance its national security efforts and that includes improvements in cybersecurity," Sen. Robert Bennett, R-Utah, said in a statement. "As we rely more and more on our communications networks for business, government and everyday use, we must be vigilant and provide agencies with the necessary resources to protect our country from a cyber attack."

The data center will be built at Camp Williams, a National Guard training center 26 miles south of Salt Lake City, which was chosen for its access to cheap power, communications infrastructure, and availability of space, Gaffney said. The complex will comprise up to 1.5 million square feet of building space on 120 to 200 acres, according to the NBC affiliate in Salt Lake City.

According to a budget document for the project, the 30-megawatt data center will be cooled by chilled water and capable of Tier 3, or near carrier-grade, reliability. The design calls for the highest LEED (Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design) standard within available resources.

The U.S. Army Corps of engineers will host a conference in Salt Lake City to provide further detail the data center building and acquisition plans. The project will require between 5,000 and 10,000 workers during construction, and the data center will eventually employ between 100 and 200 workers.

As part of its mission, NSA monitors communications "signals" for intelligence related to national security and defense. Gaffney gave assurances that the work going on at the data center will protect civil liberties. "We will accomplish this in full compliance with the U.S. Constitution and federal law and while observing strict guidelines that protect the privacy and civil liberties of the American people," Gaffney said.

On Nov. 30, the Department of Homeland Security will formally open a new cybersecurity operations center, the National Cybersecurity and Communications Integration Center, in Arlington, Va. The facility will house the National Cyber Security Center, which coordinates cybersecurity operations across government, the National Coordinating Center for Telecommunications, which operates the government's telecommunications network, and the United States Computer Emergency Readiness Team, which works with industry and government to protect networks and alert them of malicious activity.

InformationWeek Analytics has published a report on the 10 steps to effective data classification. Download the report here (registration required).
And  the King shall answer and say unto them, Verily I say unto you, 
Inasmuch as ye have done it unto one of the least of these my brethren,  ye have done it unto me.

Matthew 25:40

infections

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Once they start microchipping us, there is going to be a massive influx of web connected infrastructure everywhere throughout the world -- shopping centers, schools, businesses everywhere etc providing total uplink all of the time

Offline Dig

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Re: IPv4 Internet addresses "running out" is total propaganda & here's why
« Reply #7 on: November 03, 2009, 09:36:15 am »
Mybe someday when you need a WAN IP address for your shaver and hair dryer we might be worrying about IPV6 again but until we colonize Alpha Centauri it doesn't seem to be much of a pressing need anymore.

i am sure the pentagon has that plan on the books!
All eyes are opened, or opening, to the rights of man. The general spread of the light of science has already laid open to every view the palpable truth, that the mass of mankind has not been born with saddles on their backs, nor a favored few booted and spurred, ready to ride them legitimately

EvadingGrid

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Re: IPv4 Internet addresses "running out" is total propaganda & here's why
« Reply #8 on: November 03, 2009, 09:41:36 am »
As I have hinted at previously :

"Go through the motions of trying to obtain an IPv6 Address, see what you find out"

Anti_Illuminati

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Re: IPv4 Internet addresses "running out" is total propaganda & here's why
« Reply #9 on: November 03, 2009, 10:48:31 am »
As I have hinted at previously :

"Go through the motions of trying to obtain an IPv6 Address, see what you find out"

Lose the elitist bullshit attitude.  That would be like if over a year ago I had said "branch off where Indira Singh left off with her research and see what you find out."  Acting like it's all f*ckign secret or some shit.  Instead of insinuating that you are holding this arcane knowledge, (which is somehow too sensitive for you to just flat out explain out of your own mouth) just speak up, as no one is benefiting in any way whatsoever by your coy challenge.

Do you actually expect someone to do that ("go through the motions"), to only post exactly what your feigned privileged information would have achieved while also having spared everyone's unnecessarily piqued curiosity?

infections

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Re: IPv4 Internet addresses "running out" is total propaganda & here's why
« Reply #10 on: November 03, 2009, 11:54:06 am »
Maybe its a guessing game or one of those treasure hunt type things >.<

EvadingGrid

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Re: IPv4 Internet addresses "running out" is total propaganda & here's why
« Reply #11 on: November 03, 2009, 01:16:11 pm »
Its going to depend upon who you are, were you live.

But, Try this complex arcane method :  ::)

See if you can visit your ISP's Website and find out if you can 'upgrade' to an IPv6 Account.
Then randomly sample a few other ISPs', see if they offer IPv6.
What you can or can not find one ?

There were whole countries that could not get a proper IPv6 connection, unless you want to subcontract to some third party after filling in many forms as a researcher... Dig around, the situation changes. If you are at University, you won't have any problems. If you just want to anonymously get a connection, good luck.

I said Investigate, not buy is because there is a real good chance that your Router or Cable Modem does not do IPv6.

As to : is IPv6 Evil ?

The quick use less answer :
Its a bit like asking 'Is Nuclear Power Evil ?' or 'Are Guns Evil ?'

The longer slightly more useful answer:

As to the assignment of IPv4 Addresses, they did in the early days give away huge blocks of IPv4 addresses to people like MIT. It is known that these institutions are sitting on huge blocks of free unused IPv4 Addresses. The solution is not IPv6, but to get these institution to release the unused IPv4 addresses, but is that going to happen and should it happen ?

But IPv6 is not just about address space.

It is true that it increases the address space, and yes they drive the point home that one day we will run out of IPv4. But that is not the entire story. IPv6 contains features not found inside IPv4. What is inside that is interesting it contains the Internet Protocol Security (IPsec).

Internet Protocol Security (IPsec)

It is an intergrated part of the OSI Level 3 - Network Layer. The bit that connects Point to Point the Packet Delivery. Think in terms of posting, a package if that helps. Another way of looking at is the analogy of the telephone system, its the bit which connects one telephone number through the exchanges to the other telephone number.

Anyway, the point is this Security Layer is built into IPv6, and that it is below OS or Application level, its pretty low level.

7  Application Layer
6  Presentation Layer
5  Session Layer
4  Transport Layer
3  Network Layer
2  Data Link Layer
1  Physical Layer

It could be used for good, as in two people connect to exchange data in a secure method. However it could be missused as a tool to roll out Internet2. Its all about security, but not about privacy. You are not going to be able to get some patch from "#Warez" to bypass security built into Layer 3, its low level ( Boy I hope I'm wrong about that ). Seriously, this is not going to be like get a crack for PhotoShop... Worse it is going to be combined with another Technology called Shiboleth.

Shiboleth
http://shibboleth.internet2.edu/


Ignore the spin, what it means is you will not be able to connect without being tracked and traced. They try to claim it is all about protecting your privacy. Its true it could be used in a benevolent fashion, at least it is being used in that manner by the testers in universities.

However, dig deeper. The Shiboleth can be used to control where you can reach on the internet2. It can be used to track and trace every site you visit.


Put it all together

Its up to you to make your own mind up.
I picked on Security, but another aspect to consider would Net Neutrality.

Offline ekimdrachir

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Re: IPv4 Internet addresses "running out" is total propaganda & here's why
« Reply #12 on: November 03, 2009, 01:18:07 pm »
"While IPv4 offers about 4.3 billion addresses for the earth's 6.7 billion people, IPv6 will offer 51 thousand trillion trillion per person."

This doesn't even make any sense! Why would they need that many??

Offline ekimdrachir

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Re: IPv4 Internet addresses "running out" is total propaganda & here's why
« Reply #13 on: November 03, 2009, 01:19:58 pm »
I mean its not like they're planning on having that many people, or the current amount even, and besides who is gonna have internet in the post industrial world? They make no sense. We will have 500,000 inbred elites with 50 trillion trillion web addresses all to themselves.

Mike Philbin

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Re: IPv4 Internet addresses "running out" is total propaganda & here's why
« Reply #14 on: November 03, 2009, 01:55:59 pm »
Eugenics suggests that they need, yes, about 500,000 (a chip ID for each) + a few for their global companies (maybe a few each for their gadgets in their cars/homes?).

Nothing else. No more than, what, fifty million extra ip addresses for extras?

Seems odd. In fact, the whole global plan seems 'to cock'. I can't work out these fools any more.

Freaks.

I mean its not like they're planning on having that many people, or the current amount even, and besides who is gonna have internet in the post industrial world? They make no sense. We will have 500,000 inbred elites with 50 trillion trillion web addresses all to themselves.

EvadingGrid

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Re: IPv4 Internet addresses "running out" is total propaganda & here's why
« Reply #15 on: November 05, 2009, 12:29:15 pm »
* EvadingGrid Waits


Offline Dig

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Re: IPv4 Internet addresses "running out" is total propaganda & here's why
« Reply #16 on: November 05, 2009, 12:39:20 pm »
The only thing I can think of is a recent report that came out that "the powers that be" wish to account for every byte flowing on the Internet and Identify/Tag it (the most insane thing I ever heard in my life).

Perhaps they have been made to believe that by identifying every byte in existence, they can use effects based operations/behavioural modification/full spectrum dominance/interoperable systems in a way that leaves nothing left for chas (free will/humanity) to deal with.

I think a review of the video called the esoteric agenda may help to explain how fearful the elite scumbags are of the future awakening and their archaic and draconian attempts to stop it.
All eyes are opened, or opening, to the rights of man. The general spread of the light of science has already laid open to every view the palpable truth, that the mass of mankind has not been born with saddles on their backs, nor a favored few booted and spurred, ready to ride them legitimately

Offline TelepesT

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Re: IPv4 Internet addresses "running out" is total propaganda & here's why
« Reply #17 on: November 05, 2009, 09:32:40 pm »
Every lightbulb and toaster will have an IPv6 address -  connected to the smart grid

No more walking around with the lights on like a member of the elite.




Smart grid is a way to push US IPv6 upgrade
Cisco has a cunning plan
By Nick Farrell
Friday, 18 September 2009, 10:13

WHILE EVERYONE in the US is enthusiastic about plans to upgrade the nation's electric power infrastructure to a 'smart grid' there could be a spinoff benefit for Internet IPv6 adoption.

According to Internet News, Cisco has started its own smart grid push as an effort to peddle its products.

Cisco's cunning plan seems to focus on smart grid services and solutions to secure the electrical system from potential 'terrorist' attacks, which the US seems obsessed with but have very seldom if ever happened.

The networking giant is chasing what it thinks is a $20 billion a year industry. It is a pretty good plan because the US Department of Homeland Security is investigating a report about potential threats to the West Coast power grid.

Marie Hattar, Cisco's vice president of network systems and security solutions marketing, said that the smart grid is likely to further IPv6 adoption. With changes to the network there will be a large number of new devices added that will require connectivity, so they will need to use IPv6.

IPv6, the successor technology to IPv4, has a 128-bit addressing space, enabling it to handle far more addresses than its predecessor, which uses  32-bit addresses. If utilities adopt IP-enabled power metering for millions of subscribers connected to the electrical grid there could be problems addressing them all over IPv4.

However Ipv6 has shedloads of addresses and is therefore future proof, as Cisco obviously is keen to point out. µ

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Offline zdux0012

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Re: IPv4 Internet addresses "running out" is total propaganda & here's why
« Reply #18 on: November 06, 2009, 09:56:14 am »
 
 www.infowars.com
 
 and

 somethingElse.infowars.com

 can go to the same ip address and still return different results.

 So a single address could have an almost unlimited number of websites. 

Furthermore 99% of people are behind a router or router(s), so the number of needed ip addresses is drastically reduced. (my 10 computers all use the same ip address. Internally they each have a different address which benefits me and is unknown to the rest of the world, meanwhile any webpage I serve could be located on any one of the computers).
Get off of Windows / Mac!! You are not safe.
Get an OS you can trust. Linux, Free BSD. Ask for help!

Offline rawiron1

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Re: IPv4 Internet addresses "running out" is total propaganda & here's why
« Reply #19 on: November 06, 2009, 10:41:41 am »
You have people hogging IPs that they don't use and never will.  You should only be able to put a hold on an IP for 2 years.  You ain't using it in 2 years you loose it.

Jason
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Offline TelepesT

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Re: IPv4 Internet addresses "running out" is total propaganda & here's why
« Reply #20 on: November 06, 2009, 11:37:55 am »

 www.infowars.com
 
 and

 somethingElse.infowars.com

 can go to the same ip address and still return different results.

 So a single address could have an almost unlimited number of websites. 

Furthermore 99% of people are behind a router or router(s), so the number of needed ip addresses is drastically reduced. (my 10 computers all use the same ip address. Internally they each have a different address which benefits me and is unknown to the rest of the world, meanwhile any webpage I serve could be located on any one of the computers).



You are talking about Autonomous Networks and Domains/ Sub Domains

Domains
THe domain infowars.com will have a public IP address but infowarrior.inforwars.com will also have a public IP address.


Autonomous Networks
Within a corporation you could have 10,000 computers all going thru a Gateway device - a Router this router would need to have at least a single connection to the Public Internet
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Offline Gandalf

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Re: IPv4 Internet addresses "running out" is total propaganda & here's why
« Reply #21 on: November 06, 2009, 12:26:53 pm »
IPv6 is just a new protocol that has 128 bit addressing, typically divided in 8 blocks of 16 bits (x:x:x:x:x:x:x:x , where x = 0 to FFFF). There are a total of 2^128 possible addresses. IPv6 has some other features too, like packet priority.

The currently used IPv4 system has 32 bits, typically arranged in 4 blocks of 8 bits (x.x.x.x , where x = 0 to 255)), allowing for a little over 4 billion addresses (2^32 - some reserved address ranges).

Every computer that is properly connected to the Internet must have a unique IP address. A web server, like the one at infowars.com (IPv4 208.100.11.18) and your computer has its own IP address.
People with multiple computers often share one single IP address using a method called NAT with a device like a home router, like a Linksys wireless router. This saves IP address on the Internet, but this configuration has problems, because the computers which are behind NAT cannot properly receive connections from the outside, or properly communicate with each other. This is why programs like bit torrent don't work properly behind NAT.

I'm not saying that a switch from IPv4 to IPv6 won't be used as an excuse to eliminate the free Internet in some way, it likely will, and I believe the new censored Internet 2 uses IPv6. But, DON'T BE AFRAID of IPv6, it's not the true problem *.

Here is an example IPv4 and IPv6 website

* Note: IPv6 does have a possible privacy issue. On certain operating systems and configuations, the hardware MAC address of your ethernet or wireless network card on your computer (which is like a unique serial number, no two 48 bit MAC addresses are the same) is used to set the last 48 or 64 bits of your IPv6 address. This means that by knowing the IPv6 address of your computer, I can identify you no matter what method you are using to connect to the Internet, such as a free wifi hotspot. For instance, if you visit a website, they might identify you and give you custom ads even if you have cookies disabled in your browser.

Offline Gandalf

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Re: IPv4 Internet addresses "running out" is total propaganda & here's why
« Reply #22 on: November 06, 2009, 12:39:36 pm »
IPv6 is just a new protocol that has 128 bit addressing, typically divided in 8 blocks of 16 bits (x:x:x:x:x:x:x:x , where x = 0 to FFFF). There are a total of 2^128 possible addresses. IPv6 has some other features too, like packet priority.

The currently used IPv4 system has 32 bits, typically arranged in 4 blocks of 8 bits (x.x.x.x , where x = 0 to 255)), allowing for a little over 4 billion addresses (2^32 - some reserved address ranges).

Every computer that is properly connected to the Internet must have a unique IP address. A web server, like the one at infowars.com (IPv4 208.100.11.18) and your computer has its own IP address.
People with multiple computers often share one single IP address using a method called NAT with a device like a home router, like a Linksys wireless router. This saves IP address on the Internet, but this configuration has problems, because the computers which are behind NAT cannot properly receive connections from the outside, or properly communicate with each other. This is why programs like bit torrent don't work properly behind NAT.

I'm not saying that a switch from IPv4 to IPv6 won't be used as an excuse to eliminate the free Internet in some way, it likely will, and I believe the new censored Internet 2 uses IPv6. But, DON'T BE AFRAID of IPv6, it's not the true problem *. In fact, continuing the use of IPv4 might even be worse in this respect

Here is an example IPv4 and IPv6 website

These two links go to a wiki page on my home computer. MY computer's IPv4 address is 98.214.148.147 and its IPv6 address is 2001:470:1f10:209::2. The following two links are to two wiki pages which you can edit if you arrive successfully. The first link uses IPv4 and the 2nd IPv6.

IPv6: http://[2001:470:1f10:209::2]/wiki/index.php/Ipv6
You'll have to paste that in your browser because the forum is buggy.
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Ipv4: http://98.214.148.147/wiki/index.php/Ipv4

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* Note: IPv6 does have a possible privacy issue. On certain operating systems and configurations, the hardware MAC address of your ethernet or wireless network card on your computer (which is like a unique serial number, no two 48 bit MAC addresses are the same) is used to set the last 48 or 64 bits of your IPv6 address. This means that by knowing the IPv6 address of your computer, I can identify you no matter what method you are using to connect to the Internet, such as a free wifi hotspot. For instance, if you visit a website, they might identify you and give you custom ads even if you have cookies disabled in your browser.

Offline Gandalf

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Re: IPv4 Internet addresses "running out" is total propaganda & here's why
« Reply #23 on: November 07, 2009, 11:20:56 am »
No IPv6 visitors to my website yet? Come on, it's almost 2010 we need to be IPv6 ready :)

Offline Gandalf

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Re: IPv4 Internet addresses "running out" is total propaganda & here's why
« Reply #24 on: November 07, 2009, 02:09:24 pm »
Here's an interesting article about IPv6 security. It also says some other interesting things like:

Quote
The issue should be of particular concern to the U.S. government, since it???s leading the way in transitioning to IPv6. The federal government required that the backbone networks of all of its agencies be moved to IPv6 by the end of June 2008. Last year the Defense Department grabbed a block of about 281 trillion IPv6 network addresses. The government is also requiring vendors to produce products that enable IPv6, though it???s unclear how many security products are up to date in monitoring and protecting IPv6 connections.

Yeah this IPv6 switch thing is a concern, especially how it's kind of being forced on us by the powers that be. IPv6 itself is not a threat, in fact it is really good because it eliminates the short comings of IPv4. But the problem is they're making a new Internet 2 and they chose to use IPv6 on Internet 2, so the real reason they're getting us ready for IPv6 is not to improve the Internet, but to get everyone ready for a smooth transition to the new Internet 2. What would have been really nice is if originally Internet 1 had used something like IPv6 from the get go

Yeah it's true that a great portion of the IPv4 address space is wasted. This is probably being done on perpose to try and sabotage the existing Internet.
Look how many addresses these companies own
Level 3 Communications (A US government run company): has 4.0.0.0 - 4.255.255.255, and 8.0.0.0 - 8.255.255.255 or 0.6% of all IP addresses.
General Electric Company: 3.0.0.0 - 3.255.255.255 (0.3% of the Internet)
IBM Corporation - 9.0.0.0 - 9.255.255.255
Xerox Corporation - 13.0.0.0 - 13.255.255.255

Offline Obama

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Re: IPv4 Internet addresses "running out" is total propaganda & here's why
« Reply #25 on: March 18, 2010, 08:24:20 am »
cool, thanks
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Offline lordssyndicate

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Re: IPv4 Internet addresses "running out" is total propaganda & here's why
« Reply #26 on: March 22, 2010, 11:36:46 am »
........ Irregardless ..... as far as whether or not there needs to be a larger IP to draw from  is no the question... The new IP system is designed to be a filter contrl mechanism... It has no other real perpose other than to be able to tie a social security number to a permanent IP address... This is the true purpose of IPv6 Your new  personal IP will be your static IP for life .....

Meaning the least secure member of this whole system who this system was designed to imperil is the end user and only the end user....
"Biotechnology it's not so bad. It's just like all technologies it's in the wrong HANDS!"- Sepultura