Author Topic: Ex-IBM Employee reveals TV Abandoned Analog Band to Make Room for RFID  (Read 14981 times)

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Anti_Illuminati

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I just saw this BULLSH*T, DISGUSTING, TREASONOUS INFO HERE THAT WAS ON A COMMERCIAL ON T.V.  WHEN THEY CONVERT TO DIGITAL TV, GET READY FOR FALSE FLAGS, BECAUSE THEY WILL HAVE THEIR COMMUNICATION FREQUENCIES FREED FOR TENS OF THOUSANDS OF BRAINWASHED 1ST RESPONDERS/EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT PERSONNEL NATIONWIDE, THEY BASICALLY WANT TO FORCE REVERSE 9/11 TYPE TECHNOLOGIES INTO EVERYONE'S LIFE AND PROPAGANDIZE IT LIKE IT WAS COMPLETELY NORMAL.  THEY CAN CARRY OUT UNLIMITED FALSE FLAGS ONCE THEY HAVE FULL INTEROPERABILITY BECAUSE NO ONE WILL BE ABLE TO CATCH THEM CARRYING OUT THESE CRIMES, AND NO ONE WILL BE ABLE TO WHISTLEBLOW OR STOP THEM. BECAUSE THEY WILL RUN ABSOLUTELY EVERYTHING FROM THE GROUND UP, JUST LIKE ON 9/11, BUT NATIONWIDE, AND WORLDWIDE EVENTUALLY.

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"Computers can't talk to each other" lie is over, give it the F*CK UP NWO

http://www.qmags.com/download/default.aspx?pub=SGNL&upid=20070701&fl=others/SGNL/SGNL_20070701_Jul_2007.pdf

Interoperability Articles: Week of April 16th – May 13th

Table of Contents

1.   Weldon, Harman Reintroduce HERO Act to Free Spectrum for Public Safety   2
2.   Homeland Security Grants Improve Communication   3
3.   Push for first-responder interoperability begins   4
4.   Houston Cops Take On Fire Calls   5
5.   Nebraska Homeland Security Grants to Fund Interoperable Communication Projects   7
6.   Senate Committee Vets Homeland-Security Measures   9
7.   House committee passes first-responder grant-reform bill   9
8.   L.A. Harbor Ports to Get $6.7 Million for Security   10
9.   Homeland Security Training Offered as New Continuing Ed Program   12
10.   Democrats Call for Complete Authorization: Homeland Security Priorities Must be Addressed   13
11.   First Responders Push Congress to Act on Broadcast Frequency Issue   14
12.   LEOPARD Challenge   15
13.   Maryland Fire and Rescue Institute Awarded Federal Fire Grant   17
14.   Grant tabbed for emergency communications   18
15.   High-Tech Giants Push for Digital-TV   20
16.   Vital West Virginia Highway Corridor Now Served by Interoperable Radio System   21
17.   Disaster Software Standards May Get Muscle from DHS   22
18.   Agencies no longer pass on pass-the-hat funding OMB says     23
19.   Survey knocks state security   24
20.   Dispatch center work begins   26
21.   IAFC Releases Interoperability Handbook   27
22.   Public-safety decries broadcaster 'cavalier attitude' as it continues to fight for spectrum   28
23.   Unclogging the grant pipeline   28

 

Weldon, Harman Reintroduce HERO Act to Free Spectrum for Public Safety

Pat West, Senior Editor

Apr 20, 2005 11:05 AM
URL:  http://firechief.com/news/weldon-reintroduce-hero042005/
Rep. Curt Weldon (R-Pa.) and Rep. Jane Harman (D-Calif.) reintroduced the Homeland Emergency Response Operations Act on Thursday, April 14. The HERO Act (HR 1646) will improve interoperable communications for first responders by setting a firm deadline for freeing badly needed broadcast frequencies for public safety radio communications.

“Enabling our first responders to have the radio spectrum they need to talk to one another is vitally important,” said Weldon. “If an attack occurred in Los Angeles or Philadelphia, first responders converging on the scene from dozens of state, local and federal agencies would need interoperable communications and instant information about everything going on at the incident.”

Harman noted the spectrum currently used becomes too crowded during emergencies. “On 9/11, we learned the hard way that our first responders are in dire need of improved communications,” said Harman. “It has been more than three and a half years since terrorists attacked our country, and we have yet to fix the problem of first responder communication.”

The solution to the problem has been pending since 1997, when Congress told the Federal Communications Commission to allocate 24MHZ of spectrum from TV channels 60-69 for new and expanded public safety radio communications operations. The FCC did so, but the spectrum can't be used in most heavily populated areas until digital television broadcasters move off those channels. Previous legislation conditioned transfer of those channels when digital television is in 85% of American households, a very uncertain date. According to information from Weldon's office, at present only about 2% of American households have digital television.

The HERO Act  
•   Sets a firm deadline of Jan. 1, 2007, for the FCC to provide public safety agencies sole access to the broadcast spectrum Congress set aside for them.
•   Removes the digital television threshold requirement.  
The bill is supported by the Congressional Fire Service Institute, the National Governors Association, the Council of State Governments, the Association of Public-Safety Communications-Officials-International, Inc., the International City/County Management Association, the International Association of Chiefs of Police, the International Association of Fire Chiefs, the Major Cities Police Chiefs Association, the National Association of Counties, the National Emergency Management Association, the National League of Cities, the National Sheriffs’ Association, and the Major County Sheriffs’ Association.

In a unified position paper sent to Congress in March, the organizations asked Congress to act on their "urgent need" for a firm deadline for the digital television transition to clear the spectrum for public safety:  "Public safety agencies have been waiting since 1997 for this spectrum. FCC rules are in place, states have issued licenses, interoperability standards have been adopted and radio equipment already exists to operate in the new spectrum. However, without a firm date for the end of the DTV transition, and thus a firm date for the nationwide availability of new spectrum, most public safety agencies cannot begin detailed planning, purchasing and constructing new radio systems," the position paper said.  

Weldon is vice chair of the House Homeland Security Committee and Harman is ranking member of the House Permanent Select Committee on Intelligence.

© 2005, PRIMEDIA Business Magazines & Media Inc.


Homeland Security Grants Improve Communication
By Governor Dave Heineman
Article Posted: 04/25/2005 10:15:12 AM
URL: http://www.swnebr.net/newspaper/cgi-bin/articles/articlearchiver.pl?157325

Dear Fellow Nebraskans:

I was recently joined by Lt. Governor Rick Sheehy, Nebraska’s homeland security director, to announce the distribution of more than $23 million in federal funds to 75 counties as part of the 2005 Homeland Security grant allocations.

The statewide focus in recent years has been to upgrade communications networks for first responders and to improve local, regional and state interoperability. This funding makes a real difference in ensuring emergency personnel and local law enforcement have the ability to communicate with one another on a day to day basis.

I want Nebraskans to know that these grants have a direct impact on public safety. The ability to communicate more effectively in an emergency translates into time, and those extra moments can make a life or death difference.

Few states understand better than Nebraska the diverse challenges of protecting rural, urban and suburban areas. New this year is $5.1 million in funding for Douglas, Washington and Sarpy Counties as part of an initiative that addresses the specific needs of the greater Omaha metro area and surrounding communities.

Urban areas face very different challenges in responding to an act of terrorism, natural disasters and other emergencies. This funding will coordinate preparedness efforts with emergency management officials, law enforcement, fire and rescue personnel, health care providers, utility companies, and volunteer coordinators.

In many instances, counties have joined together to address regional communications needs.
This coordination has been a major factor in our state being able to quickly evaluate grant proposals and direct funding to local communities. The following are some of the major projects receiving homeland security grant funding for 2005.

The southeast Nebraska Counties of Cass, Johnson, Nemaha, Otoe, and Richardson will receive $741,000 to make upgrades to the regional communications network and link to the Douglas County and area utility communications systems. Lancaster County will receive $1 million to provide interoperable communications equipment to Lincoln and Lancaster County first responders, including wireless data equipment that supports GIS mobile mapping.

The northeast area of Cedar, Dakota, Dixon, Knox, Thurston, and Wayne Counties will receive $1.9 million to begin building a communications system to unite this six-county region and allow for interoperability with other Nebraska and South Dakota first responders.

In the north central area, Boyd, Brown, Holt, and Rock Counties will receive $451,000 to update and expand communications systems and improve interoperability in the Sandhills region. Cherry and Keya Paha Counties will receive $226,000 to enhance communications and expand interoperability with regional neighbors and South Dakota.

In the central Nebraska region of Adams, Buffalo, Dawson, Franklin, Frontier, Gosper, Hall, Hamilton, Harlan, Kearney, Lincoln, Nuckolls, Phelps, and Webster Counties will receive $1.7 million to continue efforts to develop a regional network for first responders and coordinate with more counties in south-central and southwestern Nebraska.

In the southwest Nebraska area, the counties of Chase, Dundy, Furnas, Hitchcock, Perkins, and Red Willow will receive $1.2 million to expand coverage and coordinate with the central Nebraska region to enhance regional communications across a wider area.

The western Panhandle area of Cheyenne, Deuel, Garden, Kimball, and Morrill Counties will receive $295,000 to continue expanding communications capabilities and improve interoperability across western Nebraska and Wyoming. Scotts Bluff County will receive $351,000 to upgrade from analog to digital technology and coordinate with Banner and Sioux Counties.

Our first priority in terms of Nebraska’s homeland security needs has been to ensure that everyone from emergency personnel and law enforcement, to state and local officials can communicate effectively. We have made significant progress in improving local and regional interoperability in recent years.

I want to commend our homeland security planning team, the Nebraska Emergency Management Agency and local emergency management personnel across the state for their commitment to this goal, in keeping with Nebraska’s coordinated, integrated and comprehensive approach to homeland security planning.
 

Push for first-responder interoperability begins

By Matt Heger/Staff Writer
Monday, April 25, 2005
URL: http://www.marshallnews.com/story/1095068.html
 
As the nation pays close attention to its ability to deal with potential disasters; interoperability -- the ability for various emergency responders to communicate efficiently during a crisis -- has been on the forefront of discussions.
To address interoperability capabilities, millions of dollars in Homeland Security Department grants are expected to become available in Missouri in July.
Hoping to secure some of these funds to help address that issue locally, about 25 representatives of counties in the Missouri State Highway Patrol Troop A region met in Concordia last Wednesday.

Representatives came from regional planning commissions and county governments, as well as fire and police departments which could potentially benefit. Saline County representatives included Rick Childers of the Pioneer Trails Regional Planning Commission, Marshall Assistant Police Chief Bob King, Presiding County Commissioner Becky Plattner and Marshall Fire Chief John Rieves.

Childers said that, while there were probably more questions than confirmation, there was an overall agreement that the project is worth looking into further.
"A lot of what people were trying to decide … 'Is there a real project in this?' I think there is," Childers said. Rieves agreed.

Should Marshall emergency personnel need to communicate with responders from outside the area, they are limited to which radio frequencies communications with other agencies can occur on -- such as fire and police mutual aid channels. In a large disaster, Rieves said those limited channels can become overwhelmed by radio traffic as many organizations try to respond.

Rieves said interoperability might not be the highest priority for the area right now, "but it's close to the top of the list." He listed equipment and training as other emergency responder needs. "I think everything ties itself together," Rieves said, adding that even with equipment and training, communication is still a vital component for responders. "It's a high priority. Possibly not the highest, but when you get together the other things, you need communication."

Childers said that officials will meet on county level through the next few weeks to decide what local needs are before money becomes available. Then, when the grant guidelines are announced, he said they will be prepared to see if grants match those needs. Contact Matt Heger at [email protected].net

 
Houston Cops Take On Fire Calls

By: HEATHER CASPI
April 19, 2005
URL: http://www.officer.com/article/article.jsp?siteSection=1&id=23037

Houston cops are now dashing to fires to alongside firefighters as part of a post 9/11 effort to improve communication between the two agencies. "Ever since 9/11, we read in a lot of reports that was a major problem with the emergency response -- that no one could communicate with each other," said Senior Houston Police Officer Pat Siddons. Siddons, a former volunteer firefighter and a 21-year Houston police veteran, initiated a joint response program in which several designated police officers carry fire department pagers and respond 24 hours a day to multiple alarm incidents.

"I wanted to get a better relationship with the fire department, and the way I figured we could do that was if certain officers would respond to all the multiple alarm fires and see what the fire department needed," Siddons said. Four police officers volunteered to share response duties to major fire department incidents, in addition to covering their regular assignments. Once they arrive at the fire scene, they report to designated fire officers for briefing.

This puts the police in a better position to assist with traffic control, crowd control and evacuations, Siddons said, taking those burdens off the fire department and creating an every day working relationship. The police can now interpret the fire department's commands and actions and relay that information to police officers so they can respond appropriately, by clearing the way for approaching units, evacuating the area around a hazmat incident, etc.

Even more importantly, however, police are already on scene and up to speed in case an incident turns into a large-scale emergency or terrorist event,
Siddons said. The officers get incident command started for the police department so they can quickly turn it over to department leaders for a joint fire and police response. "What it's preparing us for is any major incident in the city of Houston," Siddons said. The program began a year and a half ago after the city created a combined dispatch center for police, fire and EMS on the same CAD system. Before that, the fire and police departments only communicated if they had to, by phone, Siddons said.

Now, the fire and police departments each have one of the others' radio channels and can switch over when necessary. In addition, Siddons and a police sergeant have all fire department frequencies so they can talk on any channel. Each department also has radio interoperability equipment so that during a mutual aid incident, they can bring all radio channels together. Houston Fire Department PIO Jack Williams said the police and fire departments now have the best working relationship and communication they've ever had. "It's night and day from what it used to be," he said.

Both sides agreed that although the cooperation takes effort, it actually reduces the overall workload for both agencies by making cooperation easier and quicker. They added that as far as they know, this program is unique among major U.S. cities.
"We do this enough on small incidents and small scenes, then when that big scene comes we've already got that groundwork laid and it's just going to make things a lot better for the two agencies, and also for the general public," Williams said.

Siddons said the added cost to the police department is minimal, just the cost of additional fuel for the designated police officers to respond to fire incidents in their city vehicles. He said the police officers are not paid extra, and that it does impact their daily routine and family life. However, "We're dedicated to getting this program up and running and keeping the communication channels open between the two agencies," he said. "It's just a job responsibility that we have taken on." The joint response program is up for review in July, and both Siddons and Williams expect to continue. "It's a very good system," Williams said. "We're impressed with the returns we're getting."


GOVERNMENT TECHNOLOGY

Nebraska Homeland Security Grants to Fund Interoperable Communication Projects

By News Staff
Apr 26, 2005
URL: http://govtech.net/news/news.php?id=93770
 
Nebraska Gov. Dave Heineman recently announced the distribution of more than $23 million in federal funds as part of the 2005 Homeland Security grant allocations.

"I want Nebraskans to know that these grants have a direct impact on public safety," Gov. Heineman said. "This funding makes a real difference in helping first responders communicate more effectively. That ability to communicate translates into time, and those extra moments can make a life or death difference in an emergency."

The Governor was joined by Lt. Governor Rick Sheehy, Nebraska's homeland security director, in announcing this year's grants. Nebraska received more than $18 million outside of greater Omaha and surrounding communities, which this year were designated as a separate metropolitan security area. Most of Nebraska's federal security funds will be awarded to 75 counties in the coming days. The collaborative efforts of many of those counties are represented in 17 major communications projects throughout the state.

In addition, Douglas, Washington and Sarpy Counties will receive a combined $5.1 million in funding as part of the Tri-County Urban Area Security Initiative (UASI), which was developed to address the strategic needs of urban areas in responding to an act of terrorism, as well as natural disasters and other emergencies.

Lt. Gov. Rick Sheehy said, "These communications projects will continue the important work of previous years and will significantly improve local and regional interoperability. I want to commend our homeland security planning team, the Nebraska Emergency Management Agency and local emergency management personnel for developing these coordinated, integrated and comprehensive projects according to the Nebraska Model."

The following fall under the umbrella of major projects for the 2005 grants:

Lancaster County will receive $1 million to provide interoperable communications equipment to Lincoln and Lancaster County first responders, including wireless data equipment that supports GIS mobile mapping. Dodge County will receive $348,000 to upgrade its communications system and integrate with Douglas, Washington and Saunders Counties.

Washington and Sarpy Counties will each receive $110,000 to expand coverage and integrate with Douglas County's communications system. Saunders County will receive $75,000 to continue expanding its coverage and integrate with Douglas, Lancaster and Sarpy County systems.

The southeast Nebraska Counties of Cass, Johnson, Nemaha, Otoe, and Richardson will receive $741,000 to continue upgrades to communications capabilities. Funding will also be used to link to the Douglas County and OPPD communications systems.

The northeast area of Cedar, Dakota, Dixon, Knox, Thurston, and Wayne Counties will receive $1.9 million to begin building a communications system to unite this six-county region, as well as allow for interoperability with other Nebraska and South Dakota first-responders. Antelope, Madison, Pierce, and Stanton Counties will receive $841,000 to expand coverage and develop interoperability within the region and with adjacent regions. Platte County will receive $381,000 to upgrade and integrate with counties in nearby regions.

The north central area of Boyd, Brown, Holt, and Rock Counties will receive $451,000 to update and expand communications systems and improve interoperability in the Sandhills region. Cherry and Keya Paha Counties will receive $226,000 to enhance communications and expand interoperability with regional neighbors and South Dakota.

The central Nebraska region of Adams, Buffalo, Dawson, Franklin, Frontier, Gosper, Hall, Hamilton, Harlan, Kearney, Lincoln, Nuckolls, Phelps, and Webster Counties will receive $1.7 million to continue developing regional interoperability and coordinate with a greater number of counties in south-central and southwestern Nebraska. Hooker, McPherson, Thomas, Logan, Blaine, Loup, Garfield, Wheeler, Valley, Greeley, Custer and Sherman Counties will receive $693,000 to continue enhancing their communications systems and to further enhance interoperability within the region.

The southwest Nebraska area Counties of Chase, Dundy, Furnas, Hitchcock, Perkins, and Red Willow will receive $1.2 million to expand coverage and coordinate with the central Nebraska region to enhance regional interoperability across a wider area.

Arthur, Grant, Keith and Counties will receive $296,000 to upgrade and better coordinate communication with adjacent counties, significantly improving communication with the Panhandle and Sandhills parts of the state.

Scotts Bluff County will receive $351,000 to upgrade from analog to digital technology and coordinate with Banner and Sioux Counties. The western Panhandle area of Cheyenne, Deuel, Garden, Kimball, and Morrill Counties will receive $295,000 to continue expanding communications capabilities and improve interoperability across western Nebraska and Wyoming.

Box Butte, Dawes, Sheridan, and Sioux Counties will use $324,000 to upgrade first responder communications equipment and communicate with officials in Wyoming and South Dakota.

As in previous years, funding was administered through two programs that call for 80 percent local distribution and 20 percent state distribution. The state's share is $1.8 million and will be used to connect state agencies to the Nebraska State Patrol statewide dispatch system, improving law enforcement response capabilities and coordination.

Steps to upgrade the existing state communications system to link with regional systems and provide improved capabilities for state agencies also will begin this year. Of the state's total funding, $964,000 will be directed to providing training exercises for local first responders and emergency managers. Another $450,000 will help fund two emergency medical response teams.

This year's grants were based on assessments made by local jurisdictions prior to the 2004 Homeland Security grant program.


Senate Committee Vets Homeland-Security Measures
TelecomWeb Network
April 26, 2005
URL: http://www.telecomweb.com/news/1114456680.htm

The U.S. Senate’s Homeland Security and Governmental Affairs Committee gave the nod to a measure authorizing at least six international-border-community interoperable communications demonstration projects to evaluate the needs of first responders. Project goals include: evaluating communication equipment needs, fostering the standardization of interoperable equipment, identifying solutions that will facilitate communications across national borders; helping to ensure that emergency response providers can communicate with each other during an emergency and providing training and equipment for first responders at U.S. borders.

The measure was offered by Sen. Carl Levin (D-Mich.) as part of S. 21, the Homeland Security Grant Enhancement Act, which would alter the federal grant formula for state and local governments. In related news, the Department of Homeland Security's Critical Infrastructure Warning Information Network (CWIN), which was designed to provide survivable, high-speed communications should public networks be unavailable, now connects emergency operations centers in all 50 states and Washington, D.C., according to Arrowhead Global Solutions, the project's prime contractor. CWIN, which is the survivable link in the Homeland Security Information Network, has no logical dependency on the Internet or the public switched network, and it remains viable under emergency conditions to provide key decision makers with the ability to direct and manage incident response activities.
 

House committee passes first-responder grant-reform bill
By Heather Forsgren Weaver
Apr 22, 2005
URL: http://rcrnews.com/news.cms?newsId=22337

WASHINGTON-The House Homeland-Security Committee Thursday passed its version of a bill designed to change the way grants are awarded to first responders. "The Faster and Smarter Funding for First Responders Act of 2005 is a good piece of public policy. At its most fundamental level, it is designed to expedite the delivery of federal assistance to first responders where it is needed most and, at the same time, to end undisciplined spending on homeland security," said Rep. Christopher Cox (R-Calif.), chairman of the House Homeland-Security Committee. "Thanks to all of you-especially our nation's law enforcement, fire and emergency medical services-for assisting us in developing this legislation over the past 18 months.

This legislation is for you-for the people who rush into burning buildings when everyone else rushes out; for the people who willingly place themselves in the line of fire to protect the innocent, and for the people who save the sick and wounded under the most trying of circumstances." It was not surprising that the first-responders grant-reform bill passed the House Homeland-Security Committee considering every member was a co-sponsor. The Senate Homeland-Security Committee recently passed its version of a first-responder grant-reform bill, setting up an almost certain clash with the House of Representatives over minimal state funding.

Many senators, including Maine Republican Susan Collins, who chairs the Senate Homeland-Security Committee, believe that each state deserves at least some funding-0.55 percent for each state in the Senate bill-because a terrorist attack could hit at any time, anywhere. The House bill currently allocates 0.25 percent to each state with the rest being awarded based on risk. Both bills must now be debated on the floors of the two chambers before negotiators from each house work out a compromise, because both bodies must pass identical bills before being sent to the president for approval. Both the House and the Senate last year included first-responder grant-reform language in their versions of the intelligence-reform bill but since the two versions reflected the ideological separation, the issue was put off.


Los Angeles Times
L.A. Harbor Ports to Get $6.7 Million for Security

By Greg Krikorian, Times Staff Writer
April 15, 2005
URL: http://www.latimes.com/news/local/la-me-terror15apr15,1,5909772.story?coll=la-headlines-california&ctrack=1&cset=true

•  The federal grants will fund testing and analysis of technologies that can help safeguard the handling of cargo containers.

The Department of Homeland Security announced Thursday that the Los Angeles and Long Beach ports would receive $6.7 million as part of a national initiative to strengthen cargo security at the nation's busiest commercial harbors.

The grants, which also were announced for the ports of New York/New Jersey and Seattle/Tacoma, will fund the testing and analysis of commercial technologies that can better safeguard U.S. ports' handling of about 10 million containers a year.

The technologies include tracking devices on containers, intrusion-detection seals and more sophisticated X-ray equipment.

Before Thursday's announcement, the three regional ports already had received $55 million for technology testing. The earlier grants included $13.7 million for the Los Angeles and Long Beach ports, which combined represent the third-largest seaport in the world, handling 45% of the nation's container cargo.

The technology funds targeted at the three major ports are in addition to the department's port security grants that provide money to smaller ports throughout the United States. This summer, federal officials are expected to announce $150 million in such grants, more than twice the $65 million allocated in fiscal 2004.

For some time, U.S. lawmakers have been urging the department to turn more attention to protecting the nation's ports. Homeland security officials said they were screening 100% of the nation's "high-risk" cargo, using overseas intelligence, manifests and other investigative techniques, including inspections.

In practice, officials acknowledge, that translates into actual inspections of about 5% or 6% of the containers entering the country. Under existing security protocols, containers from regular trading partners such as Germany are not routinely inspected, but containers from such high-risk states as Yemen are opened and searched.

"Our ports remain vulnerable to those who would do us harm or wreak havoc on our economy," U.S. Rep. Jane Harman (D-Venice) said in applauding the latest Department of Homeland Security grants.

"This funding will help increase the security of cargo containers without disrupting the vital flow of business," Harman said.

Since the beginning of the year, security officials at the ports of Los Angeles and Long Beach intercepted two separate groups of Chinese immigrants trying to enter the country illegally inside cargo containers.

The incidents, the most recent on April 3, illustrate the importance of tightening security measures at the nation's ports, said Harman, who is a member of the Homeland Security Committee and ranking member of the House Permanent Select Committee on Intelligence.

"Instead of people seeking better circumstances, these stowaways could have been terrorists or the containers could have been filled with components of a dirty bomb," Harman said.

Harman's comments came on the day she reintroduced legislation to provide public safety agencies greater access to broadcast frequencies for communications in emergencies.

"On 9/11, we learned the hard way that our first responders are in dire need of improved communications," said Harman, whose legislation co-author is Rep. Curt Weldon, the Pennsylvania Republican who is vice chairman of the Homeland Security Committee.

"It's been more than three and a half years since terrorists attacked our country and we have yet to fix the problem of first-responder communication," she said.


Meanwhile, a panel of terrorism experts told a Rand Corp. conference in Santa Monica that the nation had made significant homeland security strides since the Sept. 11 attacks.

At the same time, the experts said, the United States must reach out more to young Muslims and brace itself for a decades-long battle against terrorists that will require diplomacy, vision and sacrifice.

Domestically, they said, the nation also must move away from viewing homeland security as nothing more than what Rand terrorism expert Brian Jenkins described as "a matter of gates and guards."

James Gilmore, the former Virginia governor who led a groundbreaking U.S. terrorism commission before the Sept. 11 attacks, sounded a similar theme.

"My concern is that we have decided we are going to protect everything and as we all know the old adage, 'If you protect everything, you really protect nothing,' " he said.

Without a more focused national policy on security priorities, Gilmore said, the nation will waste huge sums of money on measures that will drain the country's economy while needlessly upending the lives of citizens.

"Do we really want the government having all this information about us? Do we really want, every time we get on a plane, to be patted down by people in rubber gloves, which I find nauseating? Do you really want cameras on every corner?" Gilmore asked.

"Many people keep saying, 'Well, we just have to give up some freedom so we can have more security,' " Gilmore said. "I'm here to tell you, I think we are going to have to give up more security in order to maintain our freedom."


California State University, Sacramento
Homeland Security Training Offered as New Continuing Ed Program
April 25, 2005

Public officials and business owners seeking ways to operate more securely post-Sept. 11 can take a new six-week course in emergency preparedness starting May 17 at Sacramento State's College of Continuing Education.

"Introduction to Emergency Management and Homeland Security" will be offered on Tuesdays, 6:30 to 9:30 p.m., May 17 to June 21, in Napa Hall. The course provides 1.8 continuing education units.

The course will offer an overview of state and federal homeland security programs and examine strategies for maintaining operations during a crisis, managing crisis communications, and planning emergency preparedness exercises. The course will be taught by Rocky Saunders, an analyst with the state's Office of Emergency Services and formerly the California Legislature's principal consultant on emergency preparedness. There will also be guest presentations by homeland security experts, emergency management planners, and emergency first responders.

Development of this course reflects a nationwide movement that began after the Sept. 11 terrorist attacks to help government agencies and publicly held companies demonstrate that they're prepared to protect employees and maintain operations in the event of a natural or man-made disaster. Sacramento State joins a growing number of California universities to offer instruction in this area. The College of Continuing Education plans to develop a certificate program in this subject.

More information about the course is available from the College of Continuing Education at (916) 278-4433. Media assistance is available from Sacramento State Public Affairs at (916) 278-6156.


PR NEWSWIRE
Democrats Call for Complete Authorization: Homeland Security Priorities Must be Addressed
April 27, 2005
URL: http://www.prnewswire.com/cgi-bin/stories.pl?ACCT=109&STORY=/www/story/04-27-2005/0003489177&EDATE=

   WASHINGTON, April 27 /PRNewswire/ -- The House Committee on Homeland Security will mark up its first Department of Homeland Security authorization bill today as a standing committee.  Congressman Bennie G. Thompson (D-MS), Ranking Member of the Committee,said this about the process:
    
"What we do today will help set the course for where the Department is headed over the next year.  I hope we will do what is right.  As we go through this process this week, there are homeland security priorities that are critical and must be addressed if we are to protect our nation. Unfortunately, the base bill that is being introduced does not address the priorities."
    
At the mark-up, the Democrats on the Committee will introduce the "Complete Homeland Security Act," the Democratic substitute to the Republican plan for authorizing the Department of Homeland Security.  The substitute addresses such priorities as port security, critical infrastructure, aviation, diversity, first responders, and management that the Republicans authorization bill fails to address.  Some of the funding highlights of the Democratic plan include:

    * $380 million to hire, equip and train 2,000 new border patrol agents;

    * $1 billion in funding for port, rail, and transit security;

    * $500 million for communications interoperability;

    * $900 million to begin halving the length of time for completing the
      Coast Guard's Deepwater program;

    * and full funding for the 9/11 Act's commitment to detention spaces, air
      passenger and cargo screening, and radiation portal monitors.

The amendments offered in the substitute bill comprise a thorough approach to border protection, mandate the protection of key critical infrastructure, support the development of new technologies, and create structural change at the Department of Homeland Security itself.  In describing the substitute's contents, Congressman Thompson said, "The first thing we need to do is make sure the Department has its act together internally. If the Department's Inspector General and Privacy Offices are weak and its staff lacks basic employee protections, then the agency is destined to fail or be mediocre at best.  In addition, if it can't get its own computer networks to talk to one another, how can it possibly help our first responders talk to one another in a time of crisis?"
    
The Congressman also stated, "I wish that the base legislation before us would have been more comprehensive. We need a bill that addresses all the glaring gaps in homeland security, as well as the deficiencies our oversight has uncovered at the Department."
    
The Complete Homeland Security Act is available on the Democratic Homeland Security Committee website at http://www.house.gov/hsc/democrats/.

 
First Responders Push Congress to Act on Broadcast Frequency Issue
By Greta Wodele, National Journal's Technology Daily
May 3, 2005
URL: http://www.all-hands.net/pn/modules.php?op=modload&name=News&file=article&sid=1953

While lawmakers are squabbling over legislation to free up airwaves for police and firefighters, first responders say they do not care which lawmaker or committee takes credit, but that Congress acts. Robert Gurss, director of government affairs for the Association of Public Safety Communications Officials, said Monday that the first responder group supports efforts by California Democrat Jane Harman and Pennsylvania Republican Curt Weldon to force certain broadcasters operating on four television channels off the airwaves to provide the spectrum for public safety. Their legislation, known as the HERO Act, would set a firm date of Jan.1, 2007.

The group also supports legislation by House Energy and Commerce Committee Chairman Rep. Joe Barton, R-Texas, who wants to force all broadcasters to relinquish their second television frequencies by the same date. Barton's panel has jurisdiction over the issue. Gurss acknowledged Barton's bill is likely to carry the day. "If the only way its going to happen, politically, is to address all the spectrum, so be it," he said. "We want it, however we can get it."

In 1997, Congress established a transition to digital television promising first responders 24 megahertz once broadcasters vacated spectrum for analog stations. Recently, Harman, Weldon and other lawmakers on the House Homeland Security Committee have framed the debate as a turf war between their panel and Barton's committee.

Harman said the Homeland Security panel of which she is a member cannot bring up the Harman-Weldon measure because Barton's panel has oversight authority. She and others also argued the television broadcasters are waging an effective lobbying strategy to stop the Energy and Commerce panel from taking up the issue.

"[W]e can't get anywhere in the Commerce Committee, as you know, because the broadcasters are blocking us," she said last month. Weldon and Rep. Bill Pascrell, D-N.J., said the Homeland panel needed to stand up to the broadcasters.

Barton, for his part, told broadcasters last month that he would introduce his legislation within three weeks. He added he would be open to delaying that date a "little bit," but not by two or three years, he said. There is no similar legislation this year in the Senate.

The National Association of Broadcasters Monday said the so-called interoperability issue has been resolved, pointing to comments by former Homeland Security Secretary Tom Ridge in 2004 that first responders in the top, high-risk urban areas are able to talk to each other.

It had been a problem for decades, and on Sept. 11, 2001 several New York City firefighters died after experiencing radio transmission problems. The 9/11 Commission called the impaired communication on that day a "critical element" that hindered rescue efforts.

The NAB also said while it supports a firm date for the transition, broadcasters support certain lawmakers' claim that a premature end to analog stations would be disruptive to millions of Americans.

http://www.govexec.com

 
LEOPARD Challenge
LEOPARD Challenge Coming to Washington D.C., May 25-26; Regional Qualifier Being Held at U.S. Law Enforcement Conference and Expo
Contact: Linda Dickerhoof, 703-243-4515, [email protected]
4/27/2005 3:44:00 PM
URL: http://releases.usnewswire.com/GetRelease.asp?id=46490
News Advisory:

The Law Enforcement Officer Performance and Reaction Drill, also known as the LEOPARD Challenge, will hold its Mid-Atlantic regional qualifying event at the U.S. Law Enforcement Conference and Exposition (U.S. LAW), May 25-26, 2005 at the Washington Convention Center, Washington D.C.

The LEOPARD Challenge is a competition based on physical skills routinely encountered in the law enforcement setting. It demonstrates the highest level of police offer fitness, giving participants a chance to race against the clock and each other, and sequentially negotiate a series of linked policing tasks, including laser-shooting scenarios.

All LEOPARD Challenge competitors who want to participate in the 2005 U.S. National Championships, televised on ESPN, must participate in one of the regional qualifying events. All registered U.S. LAW, GOVSEC or READY Expo attendees are eligible to run the LEOPARD Challenge course, which costs $15 per participant. This is the second year that the Leopard Challenge has taken place in conjunction with the U.S. Law Enforcement Conference and Exposition.

The LEOPARD Challenge will take place from 10 a.m.-12:30 p.m. Thursday May 26. The LEOPARD Course will be open from 10 a.m.-3 p.m. Wednesday May 26 for practice drills. The winners of the Mid-Atlantic LEOPARD regional challenge will be announced during a ceremony at 2 p.m. Thursday May 26.

"We welcome the LEOPARD Challenge back to U.S. LAW this year," said Robert Harar, chairman of National Trade Productions, the company which produces GOVSEC, U.S. LAW and READY. "The goal of co-locating GOVSEC, U.S. LAW and READY is to bring together government security, law enforcement, and first responder professionals under one roof, and the LEOPARD Challenge is a way to show government security and first responder professionals the physical challenges that law enforcement face every day. The more common understanding we have between these very vital groups, the easier information sharing and collaboration will be."

In its third year, U.S. LAW focuses on the needs of the law enforcement community to help improve their ability to protect as well as address the challenges facing federal, state and local law enforcement. The goal of the U.S. LAW education program is to address and provide solutions for the pressing issues facing law enforcement professionals.

The U.S. LAW Exhibition hall will allow attendees to review and compare technology and services from more than 500 of the industry's leading homeland security suppliers. Exhibitors include Beretta, Glock, Harley-Davidson Motor Company, Oakley, RiskWatch, Inc., Videoalarm, Inc., and other producers of biometrics systems, bioterrorism detection equipment, night vision equipment, surveillance systems, bomb disposal, computer forensics, firearms storage and security devices, weaponry, disaster planning and recovery, emergency communications, evacuation and escape systems, HAZMAT systems, and other tools being used to keep our homeland safe.
 
U.S. LAW is co-located with GOVSEC, the Government Security Expo and Conference, and READY, The Emergency Preparedness and Response Conference and Exposition. These three events bring together government security, law enforcement, and emergency responders at the federal, state, and local levels, who are working together to implement the Department of Homeland Security's National Incident Management System. GOVSEC, U.S. LAW and READY provide a forum where these integral members of the national defense system can learn from peers, hear from leaders, and talk to industry professionals about the latest technologies.

For more information on U.S. LAW, please visit http://www.uslawenforcement.com.
About the U.S. Law Enforcement Conference and Exposition
The U.S. Law Enforcement Conference and Exposition (U.S. LAW) is an annual, industry-wide event focused on the needs of the law enforcement community to help improve their ability to protect as well as address the challenges facing federal, state and local law enforcement.

The goal of the U.S. LAW education program is to address and provide solutions for the pressing issues facing law enforcement professionals. U.S. LAW and its two co-located conferences, GOVSEC and READY, foster communication and cooperation between industry and government security, law enforcement and emergency responders at the federal, state, local, and tribal levels to protect America's citizens and critical assets. For more information on GOVSEC, U.S. LAW, and READY, visit http://www.govsecinfo.com. GOVSEC's Title Sponsor is USProtect -- http://www.usprotect.com

 
Maryland Fire and Rescue Institute Awarded Federal Fire Grant

May 05, 2005
URL: http://somd.com/news/headlines/articles/1986.shtml

WASHINGTON - Congressman Steny H. Hoyer (D-MD) announced today that the Maryland Fire and Rescue Unit (MFRI) at the University of Maryland, College Park has been awarded a federal Fire Grant in the amount of $750,000. As co-chair of the Congressional Fire Services Caucus, Congressman Hoyer was very active in helping establish and fund the Assistance to Firefighters Grant Program, which helps local fire departments in Maryland and across the country buy equipment and provide adequate training.

"I am a strong supporter of the work done at MFRI which offers integration, teamwork, and training to fire personnel and provides a safer and more effective means for rescue workers to be successful domestic defenders," said Congressman Hoyer. "The award of this grant is a perfect example of how federal Fire Grant funds are working to improve the safety of firefighters in our state, but also throughout the country. This grant will provide MFRI with critical research and development funds to continue their innovative research that is helping to ensure that firefighters are able to safely perform their job."

The Maryland Fire and Rescue Institute was awarded a federal Fire Grant in the amount of $750,000 under the program of Fire Prevention. The grant, in coordination with University of Maryland resources, will be used to support the Institute's research and development of new technologies to locate and monitor firefighters at the scene of an emergency to help ensure safer operations on the ground. MFRI is working to develop a system that will allow fire commanders to monitor the vital signs of firefighters at the scene of an incident and obtain biofeedback including blood pressure and respiration rate. The system will provide critical information about the physical condition of firefighters, and will provide detailed information about whether they are in danger.

"This grant will allow the Maryland Fire and Rescue Institute to continue our work on technology that will help first responders locate firefighters at the scene of an incident by allowing us to monitor and gain instant biofeedback on a firefighters' vital signs," said Steve Edwards, Director of the Maryland Fire and Rescue Institute. "We appreciate Congressman Hoyer's support of the Fire Grant program as this funding will allow MFRI, in cooperation with the University of Maryland, to develop innovative technology that will improve firefighters' health and safety."

Congressman Hoyer helped start the Assistance to Firefighters Grant Program because fire departments often have difficulty purchasing proper equipment. A ladder truck for a local fire department can run upwards of $750,000 and outfitting one firefighter with turnout gear and breathing apparatus can approach $4,500. In addition, departments must fund training programs for paid and/or volunteer firefighters.

The program funding can be used for the following: turnout gear; breathing apparatus; communications equipment; wellness and fitness programs; computer and technology improvements for record keeping and training purposes; training in fire-fighting, emergency response and arson prevention; improving the enforcement of fire codes; and modifying fire stations and fire training facilities to protect the health and safety of the firefighter personnel.

President Bush's budget blueprint for fiscal year 2002 eliminated funding for the Firefighter program, contending that the fire grant program "does not represent an appropriate responsibility of the federal government." Congressman Hoyer and other members of Congress have historically fought to restore funding to the program, and secured $650 million in fiscal year 2005, $150 million more than the President's request for 2005. However, the President's budget for fiscal year 2006 proposed another $150 million decrease in funds for the program and Congressman Hoyer will fight to restore these funds.

The President's budget also eliminates funding for the Staffing for Adequate Fire and Emergency Response Firefighters (SAFER) Grant Program. Last year, Congressman Hoyer was successful in securing $65 million in funding for the SAFER Program in the Homeland Security funding bill. Funding for this historic new federal grant program will help career and volunteer fire departments hire new firefighters, recruit and retain volunteer fire fighters, and provide relief to the thousands of local fire stations across the country that are currently operating short of staff. Last month, a group of 120 U.S. Representatives, led by Congressman Hoyer, sent a letter to the Chairman and Ranking member of the Homeland Security Appropriations Subcommittee urging them to include funding in the FY 2006 Homeland Security Appropriations bill for fire fighter staffing.

Since 2001, Maryland has received more than $24 million in grant funding from the Assistance to Firefighters Grant Program. Fire departments that have received grants in Maryland's Fifth District include La Plata, Hughesville, Mechanicsville, Solomons, Laurel, Prince George's County Fire/Emergency Medical Services Department and Arson Investigation Unit, Seventh District, Leonardtown, College Park, Cobb Island, Second District, Brandywine, Greenbelt, Benedict, Waldorf, Newburg, Prince Frederick, Potomac Heights, Bryans Road, Berwyn Heights, and Ridge.

Offline InfoTruth

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No thank you DHS but I won't be getting any propaganda radio anytime soon. But thanks for looking out. :D
It's bullshit and it's bad for ya.

George Carlin

Offline SuzakaDusk

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Ex-IBM Employee reveals TV Abandoned Analog Band to Make Room for RFID
« Reply #2 on: January 21, 2010, 11:41:33 am »
http://qbit.cc/ex-ibm-employee-reveals-tv-abandoned-analog-band-to-make-room-for-rfid/

Ex-IBM Employee reveals TV Abandoned Analog Band to Make Room for RFID
Posted on January 21st, 2010 qbit No comments
Clearing out the high power analog tv emissions will improve signal to noise ratio for RFID emitting in the 700MHz band, and potentially allow passive satellite tracking of these RFID signals.

I’m thinking about getting a stainless steel wallet to protect against having any “enhanced” RFID cards tracked or skimmed remotely.

————

(AFP/dprogram.net) According to a former 31-year IBM employee, the highly-publicized, mandatory switch from analog to digital television is mainly being done to free up analog frequencies and make room for scanners used to read implantable RFID microchips and track people and products throughout the world.

So while the American people, especially those in Texas and other busy border states, have been inundated lately with news reports advising them to hurry and get their expensive passports, “enhanced driver’s licenses,” passport cards and other “chipped” or otherwise trackable identification devices that they are being forced to own, this digital television/RFID connection has been hidden, according to Patrick Redmond.

Redmond, a Canadian, held a variety of jobs at IBM before retiring, including working in the company’s Toronto lab from 1992 to 2007, then in sales support. He has given talks, written a book and produced a DVD on the aggressive, growing use of passive, semi-passive and active RFID chips (Radio Frequency Identification Devices) implanted in new clothing, in items such as Gillette Fusion blades, and in countless other products that become one’s personal belongings. These RFID chips, many of which are as small, or smaller, than the tip of a sharp pencil, also are embedded in all new U.S. passports, some medical cards, a growing number of credit and debit cards and so on. More than two billion of them were sold in 2007.

Whether active, semi-passive or passive, these “transponder chips,” as they’re sometimes called, can be accessed or activated with “readers” that can pick up the unique signal given off by each chip and glean information from it on the identity and whereabouts of the product or person, depending on design and circumstances, as Redmond explained in a little-publicized lecture in Canada last year. AFP just obtained a DVD of his talk.

Noted “Spychips” expert, author and radio host Katherine Albrecht told AMERICAN FREE PRESS that while she’s not totally sure whether there is a rock-solid RFID-DTV link, “The purpose of the switch [to digital] was to free up bandwidth. It’s a pretty wide band, so freeing that up creates a huge swath of frequencies.”

As is generally known, the active chips have an internal power source and antenna; these particular chips emit a constant signal. “This allows the tag to send signals back to the reader, so if I have a RFID chip on me and it has a battery, I can just send a signal to a reader wherever it is,” Redmond stated in the recent lecture, given to the Catholic patriot group known as the Pilgrims of Saint Michael, which also is known for advocating social credit, a dramatic monetary reform plan to end the practice of national governments bringing money into existence by borrowing it, with interest, from private central banks. The group’s publication The Michael Journal advocates having national governments create their own money interest-free. It also covers the RFID issue.

“The increased use of RFID chips is going to require the increased use of the UBF [UHF] spectrum,” Redmond said, hitting on his essential point that TV is going digital for a much different reason than the average person assumes, “They are going to stop using the [UHF] and VHF frequencies in 2009. Everything is going to go digital (in the U.S.). Canada is going to do the same thing.”

Explaining the unsettling crux of the matter, he continued: “The reason they are doing this is that the [UHF-VHF] analog frequencies are being used for the chips. They do not want to overload the chips with television signals, so the chips’ signals are going to be taking those [analog] frequencies. They plan to sell the frequencies to private companies and other groups who will use them to monitor the chips.”

Albrecht responded to that quote only by saying that it sounds plausible, since she knows some chips will indeed operate in the UHF-VHF ranges.

“Well over a million pets have been chipped,” Redmond said, adding that all 31,000 police officers in London have in some manner been chipped as well, much to the consternation of some who want that morning donut without being tracked. London also can link a RFID chip in a public transportation pass with the customer’s name. “Where is John Smith? Oh, he is on subway car 32,” Redmond said.

He added that chips for following automobile drivers – while the concept is being fought by several states in the U.S. which do not want nationalized, trackable driver’s licenses (Real ID ) – is apparently a slam dunk in Canada, where license plates have quietly been chipped. Such identification tags can contain work history, education, religion, ethnicity, reproductive history and much more.

Farm animals are increasingly being chipped; furthermore, “Some 800 hospitals in the U.S. are now chipping their patients; you can turn it down, but it’s available,” he said, adding: “Four hospitals in Puerto Rico have put them in the arms of Alzheimer’s patients, and it only costs about $200 per person.”

VeriChip, a major chip maker (the devices sometimes also are called Spychips) describes its product on its website: “About twice the length of a grain of rice, the device is typically implanted above the triceps area of an individual’s right arm. Once scanned at the proper frequency, the VeriChip responds with a unique 16 digit number which could be then linked with information about the user held on a database for identity verification, medical records access and other uses. The insertion procedure is performed under local anesthetic in a physician’s office and once inserted, is invisible to the naked eye. As an implanted device used for identification by a third party, it has generated controversy and debate.”

The circles will keep widening, Redmond predicts. Chipping children “to be able to protect them,” Redmond said, “is being promoted in the media.” After that, he believes it will come to: chip the military, chip welfare cheats, chip criminals, chip workers who are goofing off, chip pensioners – and then chip everyone else under whatever rationale is cited by government and highly-protected corporations that stand to make billions of dollars from this technology. Meanwhile, the concept is marketed by a corporate media that, far from being a watchdog of the surveillance state, is part of it, much like the media give free publicity to human vaccination programs without critical analysis on possible dangers and side effects of the vaccines.

“That’s the first time I have heard of it,” a Federal Communications Commission official claimed, when AFP asked him about the RFID-DTV issue on June 2. Preferring anonymity, he added: “I am not at all aware of that being a cause (of going to DTV).”

“Nigel Gilbert of the Royal Academy of Engineering said that by 2011 you should be able to go on Google and find out where someone is at anytime from chips on clothing, in cars, in cellphones and inside many people themselves,” Redmond also sai
Words can not describe how I feel, I am exiled in the UK away from my husband and babies and I so much love and miss them, I am heartbroken about my ordeal. I am so upset and overwhelmed by it all. I am not taking anything for my depression. I'm trying to hang in there, but it is hard.

Offline gEEk squad

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Re: Ex-IBM Employee reveals TV Abandoned Analog Band to Make Room for RFID
« Reply #3 on: January 21, 2010, 12:50:22 pm »
Great article. Good find.

Mike Philbin

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Re: Ex-IBM Employee reveals TV Abandoned Analog Band to Make Room for RFID
« Reply #4 on: January 21, 2010, 01:07:05 pm »
RFID is a wide open format that any Radio Shack jockey could hack.

We are f**ked, BY DESIGN.

worcesteradam

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Re: Ex-IBM Employee reveals TV Abandoned Analog Band to Make Room for RFID
« Reply #5 on: January 22, 2010, 05:31:27 pm »
this is for their 'internet of things'
i assume google mapping is work toward that end, to

Offline ekimdrachir

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Re: Ex-IBM Employee reveals TV Abandoned Analog Band to Make Room for RFID
« Reply #6 on: January 22, 2010, 06:36:21 pm »
This is MASSIVE!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

Offline thor

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Re: Ex-IBM Employee reveals TV Abandoned Analog Band to Make Room for RFID
« Reply #7 on: February 22, 2010, 07:37:39 am »
this is some scary shit!! and heres me thinking that the switch over to digital was for better quality t.v!!! now i know, on a different matter, can anyone give information about the u.k? in particular scotland? ive just been woken up to all this illuminate shit and need a crash course.

 a strange thing has happened to me though, ever since i started researching this stuff, my internet connection has slowed to a snails pace?? is this a coincidence or a tactic by these knob-jockeys??

Offline Kilika

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Re: Ex-IBM Employee reveals TV Abandoned Analog Band to Make Room for RFID
« Reply #8 on: February 22, 2010, 07:53:28 am »
The crash course is simply to start reading, and these forums is a great start. It's ALOT to take in at first.

Is the move to DTV soley to free up bandwidth, for whatever planned use? Not sure, but technologocally speaking, it makes sense, if for no other reason that CRT monitors and tv's are now completely not needed and are an industrial waste nightmare. Newer digital stuff has it's pollutants for sure, but digital technology has made the whole media industry so much easier. If you've ever worked with media of any type BEFORE the digital age, you know what I'm talking about. I did, back in the early 80's, and I had no computers to get the job done. It was all by hand, stencils, opaque projectors and the like. Truly old school multimedia.

For many things, going digital makes alot of sense. The problem is in how it might be used.
"For the love of money is the root of all evil: which while some coveted after, they have erred from the faith, and pierced themselves through with many sorrows."
1 Timothy 6:10 (KJB)

Offline ekimdrachir

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Re: Ex-IBM Employee reveals TV Abandoned Analog Band to Make Room for RFID
« Reply #9 on: February 22, 2010, 08:55:15 pm »
Google chris martensen crab course, fantastic course

Offline Jon_C.

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Re: Ex-IBM Employee reveals TV Abandoned Analog Band to Make Room for RFID
« Reply #10 on: February 23, 2010, 10:46:12 am »
Interesting posts.

I've been under the presumption that the move to go towards digital was for the purpose of controlling information. By eliminating the "rabbit ears" used by television owners it thusly eliminated free standing television stations from broadcasting regionally. So, for example, if a local news station in rural America began reporting on mandatory vaccinations, RFIDs, Interment camps, or anything that subverted the news reported by the national media it can now be shut down, due to "Technical difficulties".

No longer could we have a Sunday morning preacher speaking on the evils of a new world order to some small market. Before digitalization, you could pay for your air time and broadcast what you wanted and were subject to the authority of your local station (who was subject to the FCC). If the local station wasn't receiving complaints about the shows content then the program continued to air. Today things have changed. One might be able to watch the Sunday preacher much more clearly on there T.V.s, not having to wrestle with their antennas, but, if the T.V. preacher begins providing a message that questions the government then he won't be heard from for much longer.

See, for there to be a New World Order there can't be all these different broadcasting networks providing conflicting and divisive messages. All the networks need to be providing similar content. Radio will be next. If the fairness act becomes law then all the conservative and Christian radio stations will be forced to provide balanced programming and if they don't they'll be fined to death. National Radio (NPR) would be what's left. With T.V. and Radio becoming controlled the Internet would be the next to be policed.

Offline jeremystalked1

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Re: Ex-IBM Employee reveals TV Abandoned Analog Band to Make Room for RFID
« Reply #11 on: February 23, 2010, 11:10:12 am »
I’m thinking about getting a stainless steel wallet to protect against having any “enhanced” RFID cards tracked or skimmed remotely.

Aluminum is substantially better.  You'll get the same protection with roughly 1/4 the thickness when you use aluminum.

Check out the skin depth table in this article if you want the raw data.

http://areyoutargeted.com/2010/02/13/factors-relevant-to-shielding-against-energy-weapons/

Offline Kilika

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Re: Ex-IBM Employee reveals TV Abandoned Analog Band to Make Room for RFID
« Reply #12 on: February 23, 2010, 12:03:53 pm »
Interesting posts.

I've been under the presumption that the move to go towards digital was for the purpose of controlling information. By eliminating the "rabbit ears" used by television owners it thusly eliminated free standing television stations from broadcasting regionally. So, for example, if a local news station in rural America began reporting on mandatory vaccinations, RFIDs, Interment camps, or anything that subverted the news reported by the national media it can now be shut down, due to "Technical difficulties".

No longer could we have a Sunday morning preacher speaking on the evils of a new world order to some small market. Before digitalization, you could pay for your air time and broadcast what you wanted and were subject to the authority of your local station (who was subject to the FCC). If the local station wasn't receiving complaints about the shows content then the program continued to air. Today things have changed. One might be able to watch the Sunday preacher much more clearly on there T.V.s, not having to wrestle with their antennas, but, if the T.V. preacher begins providing a message that questions the government then he won't be heard from for much longer.

See, for there to be a New World Order there can't be all these different broadcasting networks providing conflicting and divisive messages. All the networks need to be providing similar content. Radio will be next. If the fairness act becomes law then all the conservative and Christian radio stations will be forced to provide balanced programming and if they don't they'll be fined to death. National Radio (NPR) would be what's left. With T.V. and Radio becoming controlled the Internet would be the next to be policed.

Without question it is about control. You bring up the media arm of the NWO, but they've had control of it for years. Digital makes it in practice easier and technically makes it more "managable". Digital allows them to tie all the other digital devices together, so that literally everywhere around you, there's a place to access the digital world of cell phones, texting, biometric identification, video clarity, etc. We know the Fed is managing the cash, but who is managing the process that allows all this digital world to function? Start by asking who owns and runs the internet. Whoever has final say over things involving the internet, they run this digital world.

For just a small sample of the situation that the public now finds itself in by enjoying all the wonders of digital technology, look at recent events in Iran and what the public had to deal with there. What do you do when the government simply turns the internet or cellphones off? Who you going to call then? Technical support in India? Personally, I say call on Jesus and the rest will work itself out.
"For the love of money is the root of all evil: which while some coveted after, they have erred from the faith, and pierced themselves through with many sorrows."
1 Timothy 6:10 (KJB)

Offline ekimdrachir

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Re: Ex-IBM Employee reveals TV Abandoned Analog Band to Make Room for RFID
« Reply #13 on: February 23, 2010, 03:40:50 pm »








dont forget your kids


H0llyw00d

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Re: Ex-IBM Employee reveals TV Abandoned Analog Band to Make Room for RFID
« Reply #14 on: April 11, 2010, 08:22:36 pm »
Back in 2005, I was contracted to put up these sensors @ one of Sam W's Corporate glomhole, job killing Superstore's. Had no idea what these did....yet! They resembled a smoke detector, about the same diameter with only a single amber LED on the face. All my job was to do was locate the several dozen pre-wired Cat5e ends, put a rj45 end on it, plug into sensor and make sure each were on the network w/ no IP addy issues. Here's some strange parts, for one, I could not find ANYBODY who could tell me what these did exactly. 2nd, I had 5 days to do this....BUT, could only be done between the hours of 11pm till 7am....Dead of night. Now, could be because I was all over the floor, so maybe less customers had something to do with it. I had to literally go way up the company ladder to find out that this was a new technology called RFID. Now Wallyswerld can track every friggin piece of product all over & all the way out to the parking lot. I remember wiring up 3 of them just for the front "lobby" part when i still didn't know what they were and asking myself now why are there 3 of these @ the entrance??? Now I'm sure this is all for Shoplifters, after all, that was the very first answer I got, which only made me ask more questions...but we know how that goes.....I was also asked somewhere in the chain,"Why are you being so damned nosy?" Honestly, I have no idea what its true purpose is, but its just creepy that its all treated like a company taboo, and forbidden to mention the "great seeing eye"........ 
I don't patronize walleyswerld, before or after doing that bit of work and I "try to do the Mom&Pop local shops....but they're about void now....sigh....
SO if ever in a wallyswerld, look up in the steelwork...look hard...lil bastids are hard to see, but if ya see something that looks like a smoke detector...I'm sure its there for your safety then.....righhhhhhht!

Offline TheProxy

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Tell me something I don't know. It doesn't take a high MHZ to talk from computer to Computer. Not only that there using the LowerBand to Spy on your Higher Band. So they do know what your watching.. and when your watching it. with everone having HDMI Connections they know when you turn off your TV as well (or even RGB Connection) They both use a Handshake when connecting to the TV.
I bring a message Those who would try to take our freedom... Pray.
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Offline CaptBebops

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The move to DTV was to bring an improved picture and sound.  Giving up the lower VHF frequencies was a good idea because DTV works better with UHF which is what some station execs are learning the hard way.  Some stations originally in the high VHF band after the transition moved their DTV channel back down to the original supposedly for marketing purposes so that their channel logo would still make sense.   Problem was that many people who were getting DTV on the UHF frequency couldn't get it on the high VHF channel.

And of course it's all about "selling shoes" (ie shoes are often used as an analogy for selling any product) to sell you a new TV.  People like me who are into tech of course got HD sets early on (me 10 years ago).   Now they are worried people have what they need so they now want to sell 3D sets.  ;D

Offline Kilika

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The move to DTV was to bring an improved picture and sound.  Giving up the lower VHF frequencies was a good idea because DTV works better with UHF which is what some station execs are learning the hard way.  Some stations originally in the high VHF band after the transition moved their DTV channel back down to the original supposedly for marketing purposes so that their channel logo would still make sense.   Problem was that many people who were getting DTV on the UHF frequency couldn't get it on the high VHF channel.

And of course it's all about "selling shoes" (ie shoes are often used as an analogy for selling any product) to sell you a new TV.  People like me who are into tech of course got HD sets early on (me 10 years ago).   Now they are worried people have what they need so they now want to sell 3D sets.  ;D


You really believe the move to digital is because of a desire for a better picture? You interested in some slightly used real estate in South Florida? If it looks like a swamp, if it smells like a swamp, and it tastes like a swamp, then it's most likely prime condo property!

"For the love of money is the root of all evil: which while some coveted after, they have erred from the faith, and pierced themselves through with many sorrows."
1 Timothy 6:10 (KJB)

Offline CaptBebops

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Technology always improves.  High def has been around since the early 1950s when the French had an 800 line TV system albeit analog so it was abandoned so they could have more channels since a channel for 800 lines took up a lot of bandwidth.  Likewise in the 1990s it was decided to go MPEG because the analog high def system that Japan had also took up too much bandwidth.   This all just geeks playing around in the labs, no conspiracy.

What conspiracy there is I mentioned and that is of the CE corporations to sell you yet another TV.  The DTV transition took about 12 years overall and now about 2/3 of Americans have HD sets.  It took that long because folks TVs start to go bad after 10 or so years and they decide to get a new one rather than haver the old one repaired.  Now they have another set that may last 10 years or more.   Telling them their new set won't cut it because they "must have" a 3D one is like a conspiracy.  3D TVs will be like laser disc players.

Try reading Joel Brinkley's "Defining Vision" as I have and then you'll know how HDTV (DTV) came about.  It's more like the Keystone Cops than the New World Order.  ;D