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Offline llorcan

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30% of women serving in Iraq are raped
« on: April 18, 2009, 08:59:08 pm »
http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/americas/8005198.stm

Women at war face sexual violence 
 
Over 206,000 US women have served in the Middle East since March 2003

In her new book, The Lonely Soldier: The Private War of Women Serving in Iraq, Helen Benedict examines the experience of female soldiers serving in the US military in Iraq and elsewhere.

Here, in an article adapted from her book, she outlines the threat of sexual violence that women face from their fellow soldiers while on the frontline, and provides testimony from three of the women she interviewed for her book.

More American women have fought and died in Iraq than in any war since World War II.

Over 206,000 have served in the Middle East since March 2003, most of them in Iraq. Some 600 have been wounded, and 104 have died.

Yet, even as their numbers increase, women soldiers are painfully alone.

In Iraq, women still only make up one in 10 troops, and because they are not evenly distributed, they often serve in a platoon with few other women or none at all.

This isolation, along with the military's traditional and deep-seated hostility towards women, can cause problems that many female soldiers find as hard to cope with as war itself - degradation and sexual persecution by their comrades, and loneliness instead of the camaraderie that every soldier depends on for comfort and survival.

Between 2006 and 2008, some 40 women who served in the Iraq War spoke to me of their experiences at war. Twenty-eight of them had been sexually harassed, assaulted or raped while serving.

They were not exceptions. According to several studies of the US military funded by the Department of Veteran Affairs, 30% of military women are raped while serving, 71% are sexually assaulted, and 90% are sexually harassed.

The Department of Defense acknowledges the problem, estimating in its 2009 annual report on sexual assault (issued last month) that some 90% of military sexual assaults are never reported.

The department claims that since 2005, its updated rape reporting options have created a "climate of confidentiality" that allows women to report without fear of being disbelieved, blamed, or punished, but the fact remains that most of the cases I describe in my book happened after the reforms of 2005.


CHANTELLE HENNEBERRY
Army specialist Chantelle Henneberry served in Iraq from 2005-6, with the 172nd Stryker Brigade out of Alaska.

 I was the only female in my platoon of 50 to 60 men. I was also the youngest, 17.

Because I was the only female, men would forget in front of me and say these terrible derogatory things about women all the time.

I had to hear these things every day. I'd have to say 'Hey!' Then they'd look at me, all surprised, and say, 'Oh we don't mean you.'

  I was less scared of the mortar rounds that came in every day than I was of the men who shared my food

Chantelle Henneberry

One of the guys I thought was my friend tried to rape me. Two of my sergeants wouldn't stop making passes at me.

Everybody's supposed to have a battle buddy in the army, and females are supposed to have one to go to the latrines with, or to the showers - that's so you don't get raped by one of the men on your own side.

But because I was the only female there, I didn't have a battle buddy. My battle buddy was my gun and my knife.

During my first few months in Iraq, my sergeant assaulted and harassed me so much I couldn't take it any more. So I decided to report him.

But when I turned him in, they said, 'The one common factor in all these problems is you. Don't see this as a punishment, but we're going to have you transferred.'

Then that same sergeant was promoted right away. I didn't get my promotion for six months.

They transferred me from Mosul to Rawah. There were over 1,500 men in the camp and less than 18 women, so it wasn't any better there than the first platoon I was in. I was fresh meat to the hungry men there.

I was less scared of the mortar rounds that came in every day than I was of the men who shared my food.

I never would drink late in the day, even though it was so hot, because the Port-a-Johns were so far away it was dangerous.

So I'd go for 16 hours in 140-degree heat and not drink. I just ate Skittles to keep my mouth from being too dry.

I collapsed from dehydration so often I have IV track lines from all the times they had to re-hydrate me.




MICKIELA MONTOYA
Army specialist Mickiela Montoya served in Iraq for 11 months from 2005-6, with the California National Guard. She was 19 years old.

 The whole time I was in Iraq I was in a daze the whole time I was there 'cause I worked nights and I was shot at every night.

Mortars were coming in - and mortars is death! When they say only men are allowed on the front lines, that's the biggest crock of shit! I was a gunner! But when I say I was in the war, nobody listens. Nobody believes I was a soldier. And you know why? Because I'm a female.

There are only three things the guys let you be if you're a girl in the military - a bitch, a ho, or a dyke. You're a bitch if you won't sleep with them. A ho if you've even got one boyfriend. A dyke if they don't like you. So you can't win.

 
 I wasn't carrying the knife for the enemy, I was carrying it for the guys on my own side

Mickiela Montoya

A lot of the men didn't want us there. One guy told me the military sends women soldiers over to give the guys eye-candy to keep them sane.

He told me in Vietnam they had prostitutes, but they don't have those in Iraq, so they have women soldiers instead.

At the end of my shift one night, I was walking back to my trailer with this guy who was supposed to be my battle buddy when he said: 'You know, if I was to rape you right now nobody could hear you scream, nobody would see you. What would you do?'

'I'd stab you.'

'You don't have a knife,' he said to me.

'Oh yes I do.'

Actually I didn't have one, but after that, I always carried one.

I practiced how to take it out of my pocket and swing it out fast. But I wasn't carrying the knife for the enemy, I was carrying it for the guys on my own side.




MARTI RIBEIRO
Air Force Sergeant Marti Ribeiro was assaulted by a fellow serviceman while she was on duty in Afghanistan in 2006.

 It's taken me more than a year to realise that it wasn't my fault, so I didn't tell anyone about it.

The military has a way of making females believe they brought this upon themselves. That's wrong.

There's an unwritten code of silence when it comes to sexual assault in the military.

But if this happened to me and nobody knew about it, I know it's happening to other females as well.



Adapted from The Lonely Soldier: The Private War of Women Serving in Iraq by Helen Benedict, just released from Beacon Press.
 
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Offline heavyhebrew

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Re: 30% of women serving in Iraq are raped
« Reply #1 on: April 18, 2009, 09:35:07 pm »
Duty, Honor, Country. Right?
We work jobs we hate to pay for stuff we don't need to impress people we don't like. Am I the crazy one here?

Offline Dig

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Re: 30% of women serving in Iraq are raped
« Reply #2 on: April 19, 2009, 01:23:22 am »
I think the number is low. It is probably more like 40-60%. A few hundred women have dies of dehydration because they refuse to drink water and then have to go to the toilet to take a piss (where they are often raped). It is very sick and the chain of command does nothing about it. Please do not post pictures that are not relative to this discussion and that tarnishes the reputation of the brave service women fighting in Iraq. I have met many of them and they do not as a habit go out to be promiscuous and are thrown into a god forsaken hell hole because of international banking elite and the fact that we have not been responsible enough as citizens of this country.  I pray every day to find the communication skills to expose the NWO better, but I know I lack major skills for this.  When I see a story like this I realize this fight is so mong from over. It is our fault that these young dirls (17-20 mostly) are thrown into these places and we stand by.  The International Banking Elite is hell bent on making every soldier completely insane with the controlled and calculated conditions that they knew would create these situations. Just think if Vietnam had 10% women troops. Do you think it would be any different? Rather than speculating please do research on this. It is the least anyone can do for these brave women risking their lives for what they feel is defending their country from tyranny.
All eyes are opened, or opening, to the rights of man. The general spread of the light of science has already laid open to every view the palpable truth, that the mass of mankind has not been born with saddles on their backs, nor a favored few booted and spurred, ready to ride them legitimately

Offline Dig

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Re: 30% of women serving in Iraq are raped
« Reply #3 on: April 19, 2009, 01:23:39 am »
Female Iraq soldier brutally killed/raped by US ...
10 min - Jul 24, 2008 -    
Suicide or Murder? Three Years After the Death of Pfc. LaVena Johnson in Iraq, Her Parents Continue Their Call for a Congressional ...
www.youtube.com/watch?v=27d71wzg-h4
All eyes are opened, or opening, to the rights of man. The general spread of the light of science has already laid open to every view the palpable truth, that the mass of mankind has not been born with saddles on their backs, nor a favored few booted and spurred, ready to ride them legitimately

Offline Dig

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Re: 30% of women serving in Iraq are raped
« Reply #4 on: April 19, 2009, 01:25:03 am »
The private war of women soldiers
http://www.salon.com/news/feature/2007/03/07/women_in_military/print.html
By Helen Benedict Mar. 07, 2007 |


Many female soldiers say they are sexually assaulted by their male comrades and can't trust the military to protect them. "The knife wasn't for the Iraqis," says one woman. "It was for the guys on my own side."

As thousands of burned-out soldiers prepare to return to Iraq to fill President Bush's unwelcome call for at least 20,000 more troops, I can't help wondering what the women among those troops will have to face. And I don't mean only the hardships of war, the killing of civilians, the bombs and mortars, the heat and sleeplessness and fear.

I mean from their own comrades -- the men.

I have talked to more than 20 female veterans of the Iraq war in the past few months, interviewing them for up to 10 hours each for a book I am writing on the topic, and every one of them said the danger of rape by other soldiers is so widely recognized in Iraq that their officers routinely told them not to go to the latrines or showers without another woman for protection.

The female soldiers who were at Camp Arifjan in Kuwait, for example, where U.S. troops go to demobilize, told me they were warned not to go out at night alone.

"They call Camp Arifjan 'generator city' because it's so loud with generators that even if a woman screams she can't be heard," said Abbie Pickett, 24, a specialist with the 229th Combat Support Engineering Company who spent 15 months in Iraq from 2004-05. Yet, she points out, this is a base, where soldiers are supposed to be safe.

Spc. Mickiela Montoya, 21, who was in Iraq with the National Guard in 2005, took to carrying a knife with her at all times. "The knife wasn't for the Iraqis," she told me. "It was for the guys on my own side."

Comprehensive statistics on the sexual assault of female soldiers in Iraq have not been collected, but early numbers revealed a problem so bad that former Defense Secretary Donald H. Rumsfeld ordered a task force in 2004 to investigate. As a result, the Defense Department put up a Web site in 2005 designed to clarify that sexual assault is illegal and to help women report it. It also initiated required classes on sexual assault and harassment. The military's definition of sexual assault includes "rape; nonconsensual sodomy; unwanted inappropriate sexual contact or fondling; or attempts to commit these acts."

Unfortunately, with a greater number of women serving in Iraq than ever before, these measures are not keeping women safe. When you add in the high numbers of war-wrecked soldiers being redeployed, and the fact that the military is waiving criminal and violent records for more than one in 10 new Army recruits, the picture for women looks bleak indeed.

Last year, Col. Janis Karpinski caused a stir by publicly reporting that in 2003, three female soldiers had died of dehydration in Iraq, which can get up to 126 degrees in the summer, because they refused to drink liquids late in the day. They were afraid of being raped by male soldiers if they walked to the latrines after dark. The Army has called her charges unsubstantiated, but Karpinski told me she sticks by them. (Karpinski has been a figure of controversy in the military ever since she was demoted from brigadier general for her role as commander of Abu Ghraib. As the highest-ranking official to lose her job over the torture scandal, she claims she was scapegoated, and has become an outspoken critic of the military's treatment of women. In turn, the Army has accused her of sour grapes.)

"I sat right there when the doctor briefing that information said these women had died in their cots," Karpinski told me. "I also heard the deputy commander tell him not to say anything about it because that would bring attention to the problem." The latrines were far away and unlit, she explained, and male soldiers were jumping women who went to them at night, dragging them into the Port-a-Johns, and raping or abusing them. "In that heat, if you don't hydrate for as many hours as you've been out on duty, day after day, you can die." She said the deaths were reported as non-hostile fatalities, with no further explanation.

Not everyone realizes how different the Iraq war is for women than any other American war in history. More than 160,500 American female soldiers have served in Iraq, Afghanistan and the Middle East since the war began in 2003, which means one in seven soldiers is a woman. Women now make up 15 percent of active duty forces, four times more than in the 1991 Gulf War. At least 450 women have been wounded in Iraq, and 71 have died -- more female casualties and deaths than in the Korean, Vietnam and first Gulf Wars combined. And women are fighting in combat.

Officially, the Pentagon prohibits women from serving in ground combat units such as the infantry, citing their lack of upper-body strength and a reluctance to put girls and mothers in harm's way. But mention this ban to any female soldier in Iraq and she will scoff.

"Of course we were in combat!" said Laura Naylor, 25, who served with the Army Combat Military Police in Baghdad from 2003-04. "We were interchangeable with the infantry. They came to our police stations and helped pull security, and we helped them search houses and search people. That's how it is in Iraq."

Women are fighting in ground combat because there is no choice. This is a war with no front lines or safe zones, no hiding from in-flying mortars, car and roadside bombs, and not enough soldiers. As a result, women are coming home with missing limbs, mutilating wounds and severe trauma, just like the men.

All the women I interviewed held dangerous jobs in Iraq. They drove trucks along bomb-ridden roads, acted as gunners atop tanks and unarmored vehicles, raided houses, guarded prisoners, rescued the wounded in the midst of battle, and searched Iraqis at checkpoints. Some watched their best friends die, some were wounded, all saw the death and mutilation of Iraqi children and citizens.

Yet, despite the equal risks women are taking, they are still being treated as inferior soldiers and sex toys by many of their male colleagues. As Pickett told me, "It's like sending three women to live in a frat house."

Rape, sexual assault and harassment are nothing new to the military. They were a serious problem for the Women's Army Corps in Vietnam, and the rapes and sexual hounding of Navy women at Tailhook in 1991 and of Army women at Aberdeen in 1996 became national news. A 2003 survey of female veterans from Vietnam through the first Gulf War found that 30 percent said they were raped in the military. A 2004 study of veterans from Vietnam and all the wars since, who were seeking help for post-traumatic stress disorder, found that 71 percent of the women said they were sexually assaulted or raped while in the military. And in a third study, conducted in 1992-93 with female veterans of the Gulf War and earlier wars, 90 percent said they had been sexually harassed in the military, which means anything from being pressured for sex to being relentlessly teased and stared at.

"That's one of the things I hated the most," said Caryle García, 24, who, like Naylor, served with the Combat Military Police in Baghdad from 2003-04. García was wounded by a roadside bomb, which knocked her unconscious and filled her with shrapnel. "You walk into the chow hall and there's a bunch of guys who just stop eating and stare at you. Every time you bend down, somebody will say something. It got to the point where I was afraid to walk past certain people because I didn't want to hear their comments. It really gets you down."

"There are only three kinds of female the men let you be in the military: a bitch, a ho or a dyke," said Montoya, the soldier who carried a knife for protection. "This guy out there, he told me he thinks the military sends women over to give the guys eye candy to keep them sane. He said in Vietnam they had prostitutes to keep them from going crazy, but they don't have those in Iraq. So they have women soldiers instead."

Pickett heard the same attitude from her fellow soldiers. "My engineering company was in the first Gulf War, and back then it had only two females," she said. "One was labeled a whore because she had a boyfriend, and the other one was a bitch because she wouldn't sleep around. And that's how they were still referred to all these years later."

In the current Iraq war, which Pickett spent refueling and driving trucks over the bomb-ridden roads, she was one of 19 women in a 160-troop unit. She said the men imported cases of porn, and talked such filth at the women all the time that she became worn down by it. "We shouldn't have to think every day, 'How am I going to go out there and deal with being harassed?'" she said. "We should just have to think about going out and doing our job."

Pickett herself was sexually attacked when she was training in Nicaragua before being deployed to Iraq. "I was sexually assaulted by a superior officer when I was 19, but I didn't know where to turn, so I never reported it," she told me.

Jennifer Spranger, 23, who was deployed at the beginning of the war with the Military Police to build and guard Camp Bucca, a prison camp for Iraqis, had a similar experience.

"My team leader offered me up to $250 for a hand job. He would always make sure that we were out alone together at the beginning, and he wouldn't stop pressuring me for sex. If somebody did that to my daughter I'd want to kill the guy. But you can't fit in if you make waves about it. You rat somebody out, you're screwed. You're gonna be a loner until they eventually push you out."

Spranger and several other women told me the military climate is so severe on whistle-blowers that even they regarded the women who reported rape as incapable traitors. You have to handle it on your own and shut up, is how they saw it. Only on their return home, with time and distance, did they become outraged at how much sexual persecution of women goes on.

Having the courage to report a rape is difficult enough for civilians, where unsympathetic police, victim-blaming myths, and simple fear prevent 59 percent of rapes from being reported, according to the U.S. Bureau of Justice. But within the military, reporting is even more risky. Military platoons are enclosed, hierarchical societies, riddled with gossip, so any woman who reports a rape has no realistic chance of remaining anonymous. She will have to face her assailant day after day, and put up with rumors, resentment and blame from other soldiers. Furthermore, she runs the risk of being punished by her assailant if he is her superior.

These barriers to reporting are so well recognized that even the Defense Department has been scrambling to mend the situation, at least for the public eye. It won't go so far as to actually gather statistics on rape and assault in Iraq (it only counts reported rapes in raw numbers for all combat areas in the Middle East combined), but in 2006 the DOD did finally wake up to the idea that anonymous reporting might help women come forward, and updated its Web site accordingly.

The Web site looks good, although some may object that it seems to pay more attention to telling women how to avoid an assault than telling men not to commit one. It defines rape, sexual assault and harassment, and makes clear that these behaviors are illegal. The site now also explains that a soldier can report a rape anonymously to a special department, SAPR (Sexual Assault Prevention and Response), without triggering an official investigation -- a procedure called "restricted reporting." And it promises the soldier a victim's advocate and medical care.

On closer scrutiny, however, the picture is less rosy: Only active and federal duty soldiers can go to SAPR for help, which means that neither inactive reservists nor veterans are eligible; soldiers are encouraged to report rapes to a chaplain, and chaplains are not trained as rape counselors; if soldiers tell a friend about an assault, that friend is legally obliged to report it to officials; soldiers must disclose their rank, gender, age, race, service, and the date, time and/or location of the assault, which in the closed world of a military unit hardly amounts to anonymity; and, in practice, since most people in the Army are men, the soldier will likely find herself reporting her sexual assault to a man -- something rape counselors know does not work. Worse, no measures will be taken against the accused assailant unless the victim agrees to stop being anonymous.

The DOD insists on the success of its reforms, the proof being that the number of reported military sexual assaults rose by 1,700 from 2004 to a total of 2,374 in 2005. "The success of the SAPR program is in direct correlation with the increased numbers of reported sexual assaults," Cynthia Smith, a Defense Department spokeswoman, wrote to me in an e-mail.

In fact, as anyone familiar with sexual assault statistics knows, nobody can ever tell whether increases in rape rates are due to more reporting or more rapes.

My own interviewees and advocates on behalf of women veterans say these reforms are not working. They say there is a huge gap between what the military promises to do on its Web site and what it does in practice, and that the traditional view that reporting an assault betrays your fellow soldiers still prevails.

"Are soldiers who report sexual assaults in the military still seen as betraying their comrades?" I asked Smith.

"Our soldiers are being fully trained that sexual assault is the most under-reported crime," she wrote in reply. "In that training, not reporting a sexual assault is the betrayal to their comrades."

Back in real life, Pickett watched several of her friends try to report sexual harassment and assault since the 2005 reforms, and she said that none of them were sent a victim's advocate, a counselor or a chaplain. "These women are turning perpetrators in and they're not getting anyone to speak on their behalf," she told me. "There's no one sitting in that room with you, so you're feeling all alone." In the end, she added, it boils down to the woman's word vs. the man's, and he is the one with the advocate, not her.

Meanwhile, the studies I have cited, along with the other past and present studies of veterans, who feel freer to talk than soldiers because they are out of the military, show that women soldiers are suffering post-traumatic stress disorder as a consequence of military sexual abuse. All soldiers with PTSD come home to some combination of sleeplessness, nightmares, bursts of temper, flashbacks, panic attacks, fear and an inability to cope with everyday life. They often turn to drugs or alcohol for escape. Some become depressed, others commit suicide. Many are too emotionally numb to relate to their families or children. But those who have been sexually assaulted also lose their self-respect, feel they have lost control over their lives, and are particularly prone to self-destruction.

I have yet to meet an Iraq war veteran of either sex who does not suffer from some form of post-traumatic stress disorder, but officially the number of Iraq veterans with PTSD is estimated to be about 30 percent for those newly back from war, according to a 2004 study of combat veterans in the New England Journal of Medicine.

The extent and severity of PTSD in women who have had to cope with both combat and sexual assault in Iraq is still being studied, but as it is known that these are two of the highest predictors of PTSD, it is logical to assume that the combination is pretty bad. "When you are sexually assaulted by people who are your comrades, PTSD can be worse than in other circumstances," said Paula Shnurr, a research professor of psychiatry who conducted a new Veterans Administration study of therapy for women veterans with PTSD, published last week in the Journal of the American Medical Association. "You feel incompetent and helpless, like children feel when abused by the very people who are supposed to look after them," Schnurr told me. "The people you depend on have attacked you."

I am not claiming that sexual persecution is universal in the military, or that it is inevitable. Several soldiers I interviewed told me that if a commander won't tolerate the mistreatment of women, it will not happen, and studies back this up. Jennifer Hogg, 25, who was a sergeant in the Army's National Guard, said her company treated her well because she had a commander who wouldn't permit the mistreatment of women. But another National Guard soldier, Demond Mullins, 25, who served with the infantry in Iraq for a year, from 2004 to '05, told me that although there were no problems in his unit he heard from his commanders that there were rapes in other units in his camp. "One time a woman was taking a shower late, and guys went and held the door closed so she couldn't get out, while one guy went in to rape her," he said.

While commanders of some units are apparently less vigilant about policing rape, others engage in it themselves, a phenomenon known in the military as "command rape." Because the military is hierarchical, and because soldiers are trained to obey and never question their superiors, men of rank can assault their juniors with impunity. In most cases, women soldiers are the juniors, 18 to 20 years old, and are new to the military and war, thus vulnerable to bullying and exploitation.

Callie Wight, a psychosocial counselor in women veterans' health in Los Angeles, has been treating women who were sexually assaulted in the military for the past 11 years. In all that time, she told me, she has only seen a handful of cases where a woman reported an assault to her commander with any success in getting the assailant punished. "Most commanders dismiss it," she said. A nine-month study of military rape by the Denver Post in 2003 found that nearly 5,000 accused military sex offenders had avoided prosecution since 1992.

At the moment, the most shocking case of military sexual assault is that of Army Spc. Suzanne Swift, 21, who served in Iraq in 2004. Swift was coerced into sex by one commanding officer, which is legally defined as rape by the military, and harassed by two others before she finally broke rank and told. As a result, the other soldiers treated her like a traitor for months.

Unable to face returning to the assailant, she went AWOL during a leave at home, and was arrested and put in jail for desertion. At first the Army offered her a deal: It would reduce her punishment if Swift would sign a statement saying that she had never been raped. She refused, saying she wouldn't let the Army force her to lie.

The Army court-martialed Swift, and stripped her of her rank. She spent December in prison and was then sent to Fort Irwin in the Mojave Desert, far away from her family. She must stay in the Army for two more years, and may face redeployment. The men who assaulted her received nothing but reprimanding letters.

Swift's mother, Sara Rich, has set up a Web site with a petition calling for her daughter's release: More than 6,700 veterans and soldiers have signed it, and 102 of them signed their names to stories of their own sexual persecution in the military.

Swift's case, and those of her petitioners, illustrate the real attitude of the military toward women and sexual assault, the one that underlies its fancy Web site and claims that it supports soldiers who've been raped.

The real attitude is this: If you tell, you are going to get punished. The assailant, meanwhile, will go free.

Which brings up an issue that lies at the core of every soldier's heart: comradeship.

It is for their comrades that soldiers enlist and reenlist. It is for their "battle buddies" that they risk their lives and put up with all the miseries of sandstorms, polluted water, lack of sanitation, and danger. Soldiers go back to Iraq, even if they've turned against the war, so as not to let their buddies down. Comradeship is what gets men through war, and is what has always got men through war. You protect your battle buddy, and your battle buddy protects you.

As an Iraq veteran put it to me, "There's nobody you love like you love a person who's willing to take a bullet for you."

So how does this work for women? A few find buddies among the other women in their squads, but for most there are no other women, so their battle buddies are men. Some of these men are trustworthy. Many are not.

How can a man who pressures you for sex every day, who treats you like a prostitute, who threatens or punishes you if you refuse him, or who actually attacks you, be counted on to watch your back in battle?

"Battle buddy bullshit," said García from the Military Police. "I didn't trust anybody in my company after a few months. I saw so many girls get screwed over, the sexual harassment. I didn't trust anybody and I still don't."

If this is a result of the way women are treated in the military, where does it leave them when it comes to battle camaraderie? I asked soldier after soldier this, and they all gave me the same answer:

Alone.

-- By Helen Benedict
All eyes are opened, or opening, to the rights of man. The general spread of the light of science has already laid open to every view the palpable truth, that the mass of mankind has not been born with saddles on their backs, nor a favored few booted and spurred, ready to ride them legitimately

Offline Dig

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Re: 30% of women serving in Iraq are raped
« Reply #5 on: April 19, 2009, 01:26:28 am »
Rapists in the ranks
Sexual assaults are frequent, and frequently ignored, in the armed services.
http://www.latimes.com/news/opinion/commentary/la-oe-harman31mar31,0,5399612.story
By Jane Harman  March 31, 2008


The stories are shocking in their simplicity and brutality: A female military recruit is pinned down at knifepoint and raped repeatedly in her own barracks. Her attackers hid their faces but she identified them by their uniforms; they were her fellow soldiers. During a routine gynecological exam, a female soldier is attacked and raped by her military physician. Yet another young soldier, still adapting to life in a war zone, is raped by her commanding officer. Afraid for her standing in her unit, she feels she has nowhere to turn.

These are true stories, and, sadly, not isolated incidents. Women serving in the U.S. military are more likely to be raped by a fellow soldier than killed by enemy fire in Iraq.

The scope of the problem was brought into acute focus for me during a visit to the West Los Angeles VA Healthcare Center, where I met with female veterans and their doctors. My jaw dropped when the doctors told me that 41% of female veterans seen at the clinic say they were victims of sexual assault while in the military, and 29% report being raped during their military service. They spoke of their continued terror, feelings of helplessness and the downward spirals many of their lives have since taken.

Numbers reported by the Department of Defense show a sickening pattern. In 2006, 2,947 sexual assaults were reported -- 73% more than in 2004. The DOD's newest report, released this month, indicates that 2,688 reports were made in 2007, but a recent shift from calendar-year reporting to fiscal-year reporting makes comparisons with data from previous years much more difficult.

The Defense Department has made some efforts to manage this epidemic -- most notably in 2005, after the media received anonymous e-mail messages about sexual assaults at the Air Force Academy. The media scrutiny and congressional attention that followed led the DOD to create the Sexual Assault and Response Office. Since its inception, the office has initiated education and training programs, which have improved the reporting of cases of rapes and other sexual assaults. But more must be done to prevent attacks and to increase accountability.

At the heart of this crisis is an apparent inability or unwillingness to prosecute rapists in the ranks. According to DOD statistics, only 181 out of 2,212 subjects investigated for sexual assault in 2007, including 1,259 reports of rape, were referred to courts-martial, the equivalent of a criminal prosecution in the military. Another 218 were handled via nonpunitive administrative action or discharge, and 201 subjects were disciplined through "nonjudicial punishment," which means they may have been confined to quarters, assigned extra duty or received a similar slap on the wrist. In nearly half of the cases investigated, the chain of command took no action; more than a third of the time, that was because of "insufficient evidence."

This is in stark contrast to the civilian trend of prosecuting sexual assault. In California, for example, 44% of reported rapes result in arrests, and 64% of those who are arrested are prosecuted, according to the California Department of Justice.

The DOD must close this gap and remove the obstacles to effective investigation and prosecution. Failure to do so produces two harmful consequences: It deters victims from reporting, and it fails to deter offenders. The absence of rigorous prosecution perpetuates a culture tolerant of sexual assault -- an attitude that says "boys will be boys."

I have raised the issue with Defense Secretary Robert Gates. Although I believe that he is concerned, thus far, the military's response has been underwhelming -- and the apparent lack of urgency is inexcusable.

Congress is not doing much better. Although these sexual assault statistics are readily available, our oversight has failed to come to grips with the magnitude of the crisis. The abhorrent and graphic nature of the reports may make people uncomfortable, but that is no excuse for inaction. Congressional hearings are urgently needed to highlight the failure of existing policies. Most of our servicewomen and men are patriotic, courageous and hardworking people who embody the best of what it means to be an American. The failure to address military sexual assault runs counter to those ideals and shames us all.

Jane Harman (D-Venice) chairs the House Homeland Security subcommittee on intelligence.
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Re: 30% of women serving in Iraq are raped
« Reply #6 on: April 19, 2009, 01:27:20 am »
Female GIs Report Rapes in Iraq War
37 seek aid after alleging sex assaults by U.S. soldiers
http://www.commondreams.org/headlines04/0125-08.htm
by Miles Moffeit and Amy Herdy
Published on Sunday, January 25, 2004 by the Denver Post

 

Female troops serving in the Iraq war are reporting an insidious enemy in their own camps: fellow American soldiers who sexually assault them.

At least 37 female service members have sought sexual-trauma counseling and other assistance from civilian rape crisis organizations after returning from war duty in Iraq, Kuwait and other overseas stations, The Denver Post has learned. The women, ranging from enlisted soldiers to officers, have reported poor medical treatment, lack of counseling and incomplete criminal investigations by military officials. Some say they were threatened with punishment after reporting assaults.

The Pentagon did not respond to repeated requests for information about the number of sexual assault reports during the conflict. Defense officials would say only that they will not tolerate sexual assault in their ranks.

"Commanders at every level have a duty to take appropriate steps to prevent it, protect victims, and hold those who commit them accountable," according to a written statement from the Pentagon.

Members of Congress told the newspaper they are alarmed by the assault reports, confirming that they have learned of incidents as well.

Colorado Sen. Wayne Allard - a key figure in the investigation of the Air Force Academy rape scandal - said he intends to raise the issue with colleagues on the Senate Armed Services Committee. And two Pennsylvania congressmen, Rep. Joseph Pitts and Sen. Arlen Specter, intervened last month on one rape victim's behalf to bring her home. "Congressman Pitts is extremely concerned," spokesman Derek Karchner said. "We have heard that there were cases that hadn't been reported or were not being investigated."

Senate leaders pledged last year to investigate the military's handling of rape and domestic-violence cases after a Post series found widespread problems in the armed services, including flawed investigations, inadequate victim services and leniency for thousands of soldier sex offenders. Although congressional hearings were called for, none have been scheduled.

Women have served greater combat support roles in the Iraq and Afghanistan conflicts than ever before, flying fighter jets, serving on patrols and analyzing intelligence data, among other duties. According to a Department of Defense estimate, women represent 10.4 percent of the total forces who were "in theater" between October 2002 and November 2003. A total of 59,742 women have been or are currently serving in Iraq and Afghanistan. As women have returned from duty overseas in recent months, they have sought help from civilian trauma centers and advocates.

"We have significant concerns about the military's response to sexual assault in the combat zone," said Christine Hansen, executive director of the Connecticut-based Miles Foundation, which has assisted 31 women. "We have concerns that victims are not getting forensic exams. Evidence is not being collected in some cases, and they are not getting medical care and other services."

To protect the soldiers' privacy, the foundation and other victim advocacy organizations contacted by The Post declined to release details of individual cases - such as locations of the attacks or a breakdown of which branch of the military was involved - and revealed only general trends.

Disregard for the victims

Many of the victims are women of high rank. Several are officers. Most were stationed in Kuwait, a common launching point for troops occupying Iraq.

Among the most disturbing trends, say the victim advocates, is a disregard for the women's safety and medical treatment following an assault. Women are being left in the same units as their accused attackers and are not receiving sexual-trauma counseling.

"If you don't even get the victim to a level of medical accessibility, how do you get to anything else, such as evidence collection through forensic exams?" Hansen said. "There appears to be a shortage of criminal justice personnel to help them, too."

The military environment magnifies intense stress for victims, Hansen said.

"Just by virtue of the fact that they have to salute the individual who attacked them adds tremendous emotional trauma."

It could take months or years before a more definitive picture of the prevalence of sexual assault during the war takes shape. Defense Department officials have not disclosed such statistics in the past.

But some surveys have shown high rates of sexual abuse and harassment among women troops during past military conflicts.

Nearly 30 percent of 202 female Vietnam veterans surveyed in 1990 said they experienced a sexual encounter "accompanied by force or threat of force," according to the Congressional Record. And a study of troops in the 1991 Persian Gulf War by Department of Veterans Affairs researchers found that 7 percent of surveyed women reported sexual assaults, while 33 percent reported sexual harassment.

Susan Avila-Smith, a Washington state-based civilian advocate, assisted Danielle, the rape victim who received congressional help to return home. A military intelligence officer who asked that her full name not be used, Danielle was assaulted Nov. 28 while in Kuwait.

She was stationed with her Fort Lewis, Wash., unit at Camp Udairi, about 15 miles from the Iraqi border, for training before deployment to Iraq. She had just finished guard duty at 2:30 a.m. and was stepping into the latrine on the edge of camp when she was hit on the back of her head and knocked unconscious, she said.

She recalled waking to a man raping her: He had tied her hands with cord, stuffed her underwear into her mouth and wrapped cord around her head, as well. He used a knife to slice off her clothes, cutting her in the process. She was blindfolded. When she began to fight, he threatened to cut open her crotch. He then hit her with an object between the eyes, again knocking her unconscious.

When she awoke, the man, who remains unidentified, had left. Danielle said she ran, naked, bleeding and gagging, into camp. A fellow soldier cut the cords binding her hands and mouth and put his coat around her before waking her commanders.

She was driven to an aid station, where a rape examination was performed. She received no other treatment for the injuries to her head, back and knees, she says. After the exam, a commander drove her to another camp, where she was allowed to stay. She was interviewed for about three hours, she said.

For the first few days, Danielle said, a fellow woman soldier from her old camp remained with her. Then the woman had to leave to resume training, and Danielle was left alone. Requests to see the chaplain were denied, and she was not given counseling for sexual trauma.

An investigator scheduled a polygraph exam for her but never followed through. "I was hysterical," she recalled. "There I am, all bruised up and beaten, and somebody in my chain of command wanted me to take a test."

After several more days in isolation, she overdosed on anxiety medication and was hospitalized. Involvement of family and lawmakers enabled her to return to the United States.

Within days of her return, she said, her commanders at Fort Lewis told her to get back to work, even though she still suffered from migraines, blurred vision and pain from back and leg injuries from the assault. Smith, her civilian advocate, intervened, and Danielle was granted leave.

She has been told that a medical discharge could take six months. Meanwhile, she has heard nothing about her case and fears her rapist will return to Fort Lewis. She has requested to be assigned to another base, but so far her request has been refused.

The military's attitude, she said, has been to downplay her assault.

"Just because I came back with all four limbs intact, they're treating me like I'm faking," Danielle said. "I feel like my chain of command betrayed me. I gave four years to that unit, and I feel like it kicked me in the teeth when I was down."

A Fort Lewis spokesman, Jeff Young, said her case is being investigated and that she has received proper health care. "Those who deploy are served well. She received medical treatment both in theater (overseas) and here."

Maj. Shawn Phelps, one of Danielle's commanders, said he could not comment on how her case was handled in Kuwait, but said that, since her return to Fort Lewis, she has received counseling and been given a military victim advocate.

Congressional probe urged

Allard said he plans to inform his colleagues on the Senate Armed Services Committee of The Post's findings on sexual assaults in the war zone. "I have heard of one or two other cases coming forward," Allard said.

The senator also said he would probably suggest expanding planned congressional hearings to cover issues in the military as a whole, not just the Air Force Academy sexual-assault scandal. But he stressed that the decision rests with committee chairman John Warner and Saxby Chambliss, a Georgia senator who heads up the subcommittee on personnel issues.

Hansen of the Miles Foundation said the recent reports add new urgency to the need for a full-scale congressional investigation.

"There should be a sense of alarm that Congress not only needs to be aware of these cases, but what is happening under the criminal justice system" in the military, Hansen said. "Whether it's in Europe or Iraq or back home, it's incumbent upon Congress to examine these issues."

Additional sexual-assault cases could be reported to rape crisis centers as a growing number of deployed troops return home. More than 100,000 military personnel are expected to return during the next few months.

In recent days, Jennifer Bier, a Colorado Springs sexual-trauma therapist, has counseled women soldiers who have been assaulted in the recent war, but citing privacy concerns, did not divulge any information about the cases.

Emotional trauma for the women has been compounded by the war mission, Bier said, because they had no civilian safe havens to turn to after their assaults.

"Such assaults are horrifying by their nature and violate a person at a very core level - their sense of safety," Bier said. "Back home, they can find some safe solace somewhere. But you can't over there."
All eyes are opened, or opening, to the rights of man. The general spread of the light of science has already laid open to every view the palpable truth, that the mass of mankind has not been born with saddles on their backs, nor a favored few booted and spurred, ready to ride them legitimately

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Re: 30% of women serving in Iraq are raped
« Reply #7 on: April 19, 2009, 01:28:41 am »
Rape fears lead women soldiers to suicide, death
http://www.vermontguardian.com/dailies/022006/020806.shtml
posted February 8, 2006


NEW YORK — U.S. female soldiers in Iraq were assaulted or raped by male soldiers in the women’s latrines, and an alarming number committed suicide, Col. Janis Karpinski reportedly testified before an international human rights commission of inquiry last month.

“Because the women were in fear of getting up in the darkness [to go to the latrine], they were not drinking liquids after 3 or 4 in the afternoon,” Karpinski testified, according to a report on Truthout.org. “In the 100 degree heat, they were dying of dehydration in their sleep.”

Karpinski’s testimony was reported by Margorie Cohn, a professor at Thomas Jefferson School of Law and president-elect of the National Lawyers Guild who writes a weekly column for the website.

Cohn wrote that she presented Karpinski’s testimony at the International Commission of Inquiry on Crimes Against Humanity Committed by the Bush Administration, which convened Jan. 20-22 at Riverside Church.

The latrine for female soldiers at Camp Victory wasn’t located near their barracks, so they had to go outside if they needed to use the bathroom, Karpinski told retired U.S. Army Col. David Hackworth in a September 2004 interview, Cohn reported. “There were no lights near any of their facilities, so women were doubly easy targets in the dark of the night.” It was there that male soldiers assaulted and raped women soldiers.

Karpinski testified that a surgeon for the coalition’s joint task force said in a briefing that “women in fear of getting up in the hours of darkness to go out to the port-a-lets or the latrines were not drinking liquids after 3 or 4 in the afternoon, and in 120 degree heat or warmer, because there was no air-conditioning at most of the facilities, they were dying from dehydration in their sleep.”

“And rather than make everybody aware of that — because that’s shocking, and as a leader if that’s not shocking to you then you’re not much of a leader — what they told the surgeon to do is don’t brief those details anymore. And don’t say specifically that they’re women. You can provide that in a written report but don’t brief it in the open anymore.”

Karpinski said Maj. Gen. Walter Wojdakowski, the top deputy to Lt. Gen Ricardo Sanchez, the former senior U.S. military commander in Iraq, saw dehydration listed as the cause of death on the death certificate of a female master sergeant in September 2003. Under orders from Sanchez, Wojdakowski directed that the cause of death no longer be listed. The official explanation for this was to protect the women’s privacy rights, she said.

Sanchez’s attitude was: “The women asked to be here, so now let them take what comes with the territory,” Karpinski quoted him as saying. Karpinski told Cohn that Sanchez, who was her boss, was very sensitive to the political ramifications of everything he did, Cohn reported.

“It was out of control,” Karpinski told a group of students at Thomas Jefferson School of Law last October, according to the Truthout report. Although there was a toll-free number women could use to report sexual assaults, no one had a phone, and no one answered the U.S. number when it was called. Any woman who successfully connected to it would get a recording.

Even after more than 83 incidents were reported during a six-month period in Iraq and Kuwait, the 24-hour rape hot line was still answered by a machine that told callers to leave a message, Karpinski told Cohn.

Karpinski, a brigadier general, was assigned to Iraq in July 2003 to oversee 17 prison facilities including Abu Ghraib. She was demoted to colonel after news broke of the prisoner abuse at Abu Ghraib when the prison was under her command. Karpinski subsequently resigned from the military, and in October she published a book, One Woman’s Army, the Commanding General of Abu Ghraib Tells Her Story, in which she claims the prisoner abuses were carried out under orders from Defense Secretary Donald Rumsfeld.

The commission in New York heard testimony from Karpinski and others about indefinite detention, rendition for torture, destruction of the environment, attacks on public health and reproductive rights, and actions and inactions leading up to and following Hurricane Katrina, Cohn wrote.

Harry Belafonte, a participant and keynote speaker, said, “When a government fails to protect justice it is the responsibility of the people to rise up and change the guard, change the regime. Those who fail to answer that call should be charged with patriotic treason.”
All eyes are opened, or opening, to the rights of man. The general spread of the light of science has already laid open to every view the palpable truth, that the mass of mankind has not been born with saddles on their backs, nor a favored few booted and spurred, ready to ride them legitimately

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Re: 30% of women serving in Iraq are raped
« Reply #8 on: April 19, 2009, 01:30:40 am »
Military Hides Cause of Women Soldiers' Deaths
http://www.truthout.org/article/military-hides-cause-women-soldiers-deaths?print
By Marjorie Cohn Monday 30 January 2006


    In a startling revelation, the former commander of Abu Ghraib prison testified that Lt. Gen. Ricardo Sanchez, former senior US military commander in Iraq, gave orders to cover up the cause of death for some female American soldiers serving in Iraq.

    Last week, Col. Janis Karpinski told a panel of judges at the Commission of Inquiry for Crimes against Humanity Committed by the Bush Administration in New York that several women had died of dehydration because they refused to drink liquids late in the day. They were afraid of being assaulted or even raped by male soldiers if they had to use the women's latrine after dark.

    The latrine for female soldiers at Camp Victory wasn't located near their barracks, so they had to go outside if they needed to use the bathroom. "There were no lights near any of their facilities, so women were doubly easy targets in the dark of the night," Karpinski told retired US Army Col. David Hackworth in a September 2004 interview. It was there that male soldiers assaulted and raped women soldiers. So the women took matters into their own hands. They didn't drink in the late afternoon so they wouldn't have to urinate at night. They didn't get raped. But some died of dehydration in the desert heat, Karpinski said.

    Karpinski testified that a surgeon for the coalition's joint task force said in a briefing that "women in fear of getting up in the hours of darkness to go out to the port-a-lets or the latrines were not drinking liquids after 3 or 4 in the afternoon, and in 120 degree heat or warmer, because there was no air-conditioning at most of the facilities, they were dying from dehydration in their sleep."

    "And rather than make everybody aware of that - because that's shocking, and as a leader if that's not shocking to you then you're not much of a leader - what they told the surgeon to do is don't brief those details anymore. And don't say specifically that they're women. You can provide that in a written report but don't brief it in the open anymore."

    For example, Maj. Gen. Walter Wojdakowski, Sanchez's top deputy in Iraq, saw "dehydration" listed as the cause of death on the death certificate of a female master sergeant in September 2003. Under orders from Sanchez, he directed that the cause of death no longer be listed, Karpinski stated. The official explanation for this was to protect the women's privacy rights.

    Sanchez's attitude was: "The women asked to be here, so now let them take what comes with the territory," Karpinski quoted him as saying. Karpinski told me that Sanchez, who was her boss, was very sensitive to the political ramifications of everything he did. She thinks it likely that when the information about the cause of these women's deaths was passed to the Pentagon, Donald Rumsfeld ordered that the details not be released. "That's how Rumsfeld works," she said.

    "It was out of control," Karpinski told a group of students at Thomas Jefferson School of Law last October. There was an 800 number women could use to report sexual assaults. But no one had a phone, she added. And no one answered that number, which was based in the United States. Any woman who successfully connected to it would get a recording. Even after more than 83 incidents were reported during a six-month period in Iraq and Kuwait, the 24-hour rape hot line was still answered by a machine that told callers to leave a message.

    "There were countless such situations all over the theater of operations - Iraq and Kuwait - because female soldiers didn't have a voice, individually or collectively," Karpinski told Hackworth. "Even as a general I didn't have a voice with Sanchez, so I know what the soldiers were facing. Sanchez did not want to hear about female soldier requirements and/or issues."

    Karpinski was the highest officer reprimanded for the Abu Ghraib torture scandal, although the details of interrogations were carefully hidden from her. Demoted from Brigadier General to Colonel, Karpinski feels she was chosen as a scapegoat because she was a female.

    Sexual assault in the US military has become a hot topic in the last few years, "not just because of the high number of rapes and other assaults, but also because of the tendency to cover up assaults and to harass or retaliate against women who report assaults," according to Kathy Gilberd, co-chair of the National Lawyers Guild's Military Law Task Force.

    This problem has become so acute that the Army has set up its own sexual assault web site.

    In February 2004, Rumsfeld directed the Under Secretary of Defense for Personnel and Readiness to undertake a 90-day review of sexual assault policies. "Sexual assault will not be tolerated in the Department of Defense," Rumsfeld declared.

    The 99-page report was issued in April 2004. It affirmed, "The chain of command is responsible for ensuring that policies and practices regarding crime prevention and security are in place for the safety of service members." The rates of reported alleged sexual assault were 69.1 and 70.0 per 100,000 uniformed service members in 2002 and 2003. Yet those rates were not directly comparable to rates reported by the Department of Justice, due to substantial differences in the definition of sexual assault.

    Notably, the report found that low sociocultural power (i.e., age, education, race/ethnicity, marital status) and low organizational power (i.e., pay grade and years of active duty service) were associated with an increased likelihood of both sexual assault and sexual harassment.

    The Department of Defense announced a new policy on sexual assault prevention and response on January 3, 2005. It was a reaction to media reports and public outrage about sexual assaults against women in the US military in Iraq and Afghanistan, and ongoing sexual assaults and cover-ups at the Air Force Academy in Colorado, Gilberd said. As a result, Congress demanded that the military review the problem, and the Defense Authorization Act of 2005 required a new policy be put in place by January 1.

    The policy is a series of very brief "directive-type memoranda" for the Secretaries of the military services from the Under Secretary of Defense for Personnel and Readiness. "Overall, the policy emphasizes that sexual assault harms military readiness, that education about sexual assault policy needs to be increased and repeated, and that improvements in response to sexual assaults are necessary to make victims more willing to report assaults," Gilberd notes. "Unfortunately," she added "analysis of the issues is shallow, and the plans for addressing them are limited."

    Commands can reject the complaints if they decide they aren't credible, and there is limited protection against retaliation against the women who come forward, according to Gilberd. "People who report assaults still face command disbelief, illegal efforts to protect the assaulters, informal harassment from assaulters, their friends or the command itself," she said.

    But most shameful is Sanchez's cover-up of the dehydration deaths of women that occurred in Iraq. Sanchez is no stranger to outrageous military orders. He was heavily involved in the torture scandal that surfaced at Abu Ghraib. Sanchez approved the use of unmuzzled dogs and the insertion of prisoners head-first into sleeping bags after which they are tied with an electrical cord and their are mouths covered. At least one person died as the result of the sleeping bag technique. Karpinski charges that Sanchez attempted to hide the torture after the hideous photographs became public.

    Sanchez reportedly plans to retire soon, according to an article in the International Herald Tribune earlier this month. But Rumsfeld recently considered elevating the 3-star general to a 4-star. The Tribune also reported that Brig. Gen. Vincent Brooks, the Army's chief spokesman, said in an email message, "The Army leaders do have confidence in LTG Sanchez."
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Re: 30% of women serving in Iraq are raped
« Reply #9 on: April 19, 2009, 01:47:00 am »
I did leave and go Awol for a reason.... bastards, 95% of them just bastards. They talked about eating babies... :-X It was no place for me.

Please remember the conditions that created these "bastard" training centers.  The international banking cartel creates, funds, exploits war to increase national debt.  Everyone is affected, the soldiers, the sovereign citizens, and the civilians back home (us the least). Obama has broken every promise about war proving he is a puppet for these psycopathic genocidal maniacs.

They are responsible for the tens of thousands of rapes and the mental condition allowing the male soldiers to think this is acceptable.  War is hell and until it ends there will be absolutely no chance at freedom. Anyone telling you different is selling you something.
All eyes are opened, or opening, to the rights of man. The general spread of the light of science has already laid open to every view the palpable truth, that the mass of mankind has not been born with saddles on their backs, nor a favored few booted and spurred, ready to ride them legitimately

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Re: 30% of women serving in Iraq are raped
« Reply #10 on: April 19, 2009, 02:01:41 am »
To say the least;this is infuriating!

Based on the information in these articles, it seems these women are being isolated on purpose.  There is a higher percentage of servicewomen today than any other time in U.S. history.  The numbers are not adding up.  How is it these women are finding themselves alone among all these men?

I have been on several deployments and there were many women on these deployments.  I was in the Marine Corps.  There is a lower percentage of women in the Marine Corps than any other service.

During training in the SouthWest Asia Training Group pre-deployment to Saudi Arabia, we women were given additional training in hand to hand combat and personal defense.  This was specifically aimed at the "Friendlies who get too Friendly"  I did as recommended:  I carried a personal pistol and a huge Gerber Mark II.  When I got in country, I had no problems with the guys.  Why?  Because they were scared that I might stab them (it could have had something to do with the fact that I acted in such a way to let overly curious men think that I would have.)  After that when back in the States, I taught other women how to avoid sexual harrassment and these kinds a of scenarios.

I daresay any of my training would have had no effect in the situation these women are in.  These ladies are far outnumbered and overpowered.  The cover up is the most astounding thing!  I am aghast!

I want to thank those so-called womens rights organizations who made this travesty possible.  They have been insisting on having women out front in combat roles.  Where are they?  Hello N.O.W.?  Where are you?  

I will stop now as I am about to rant and spew!

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Re: 30% of women serving in Iraq are raped
« Reply #11 on: April 19, 2009, 02:33:13 am »
How about defending you from the shit storm coming when Rockefeller/Rothschild really implode the economy?

What on Earth makes you think they're going to be on our side?
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Re: 30% of women serving in Iraq are raped
« Reply #12 on: April 19, 2009, 02:41:57 am »
What on Earth makes you think they're going to be on our side?

It is pretty well an established fact that military men are not the ones who create wars, the beurocrats do.  Military men know what war is and they would wish it on no one. That is why they are slowly being removed from key areas to put in Non Government Organizations like the CFR in place where the military used to be. There are new cabinet level positions set up precisely for this like Secretary of Homeland Security, War Czar, etc.  The military is manipulated in oversea wars to kill people that do not look like them. The war machine is slowly using more unmanned vehicles and more computer assisted assessment because everybody knows that the human element is the one thing saving us from complete despotism at the moment.  They are in our community, they are our families our friends.  Believe me, they will not be the ones leading us to the camps.  It will be mercenaries, foreigners, blackwater, aegis, CACI, Kroll, and the like. In Iraq right now we have more contractors than soldiers.

I trust our military 100x more than I trust the likes of Geitner, Summers, Bernanke and their cabal.
All eyes are opened, or opening, to the rights of man. The general spread of the light of science has already laid open to every view the palpable truth, that the mass of mankind has not been born with saddles on their backs, nor a favored few booted and spurred, ready to ride them legitimately

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Re: 30% of women serving in Iraq are raped
« Reply #13 on: April 19, 2009, 02:47:42 am »
What on Earth makes you think they're going to be on our side?

Since Ron Paul got the most donations from the men and women in the military tells me that they are awake/waking up and realise that there is something wrong. I don't think most of them would just willingly go along NWO

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Re: 30% of women serving in Iraq are raped
« Reply #14 on: April 19, 2009, 02:48:24 am »
It is pretty well an established fact that military men are not the ones who create wars, the beurocrats do. 

The bureaucrats didn't enlist AFTER the bullshit wars started.  The soldiers did.

Don't get me wrong, I'm not hating on soldiers.  I was in the infantry for 10 years, until I jacked my knee up in a training accident at Ft Hood.

But your trust is perhaps a little hasty.
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Re: 30% of women serving in Iraq are raped
« Reply #15 on: April 19, 2009, 02:49:12 am »
Since Ron Paul got the most donations from the men and women in the military tells me that they are awake/waking up and realise that there is something wrong. I don't think most of them would just willingly go along NWO

I think that when the orders get issued, they'll do what they're told, generally speaking.
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Re: 30% of women serving in Iraq are raped
« Reply #16 on: April 19, 2009, 02:50:59 am »
I think that when the orders get issued, they'll do what they're told, generally speaking.

When they are ordered to police their own family and friends, do you really think they will?

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Re: 30% of women serving in Iraq are raped
« Reply #17 on: April 19, 2009, 02:51:57 am »
You are collapsing things.  Most of the military and retired military who are not serving at the moment are most likely going to be the number one defenders of the constitution.  That is why Homeland Security is targeting them and profiling them to arrest them for "thought crimes" and to take away their guns.

WAKE UP!

I call bullshit.  Most retired military guys I know (and I know more than a few) sit around the VFW and the American Legion - or just local bars - saying we ought to torture antiwar protesters right alongside the "terrorists".

Recently mustered-out vets stuffed full of hate at those who wasted them on a lie are another thing entirely.  That's why both Bush and Obama have made every effort to ensure that they can't own guns.
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Offline TGRR

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Re: 30% of women serving in Iraq are raped
« Reply #18 on: April 19, 2009, 02:53:55 am »
When they are ordered to police their own family and friends, do you really think they will?

You think the company commander will send them to their own houses to break heads?

Unless that's done - and nobody is that stupid - they will do as they are told, because if they don't, they get sent to the stockade, in route to Fort Leavenworth, and they might see their families again in, say, 20 years.
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Re: 30% of women serving in Iraq are raped
« Reply #19 on: April 19, 2009, 02:54:27 am »
The bureaucrats didn't enlist AFTER the bullshit wars started.  The soldiers did.

Don't get me wrong, I'm not hating on soldiers.  I was in the infantry for 10 years, until I jacked my knee up in a training accident at Ft Hood.

But your trust is perhaps a little hasty.

It is not trust, it is a fact. They are to be trusted much more than the beurocrats, this is common knowledge for decades. Please listen to someone in the know:

Soviet Deception: Demoralization of the West

http://video.google.com/videoplay?docid=915448763957391352

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

The facts are there that the servicemen enlist out of hardship or patriotic duty.  A minority (but increasing I will admit) join to just completely f**k with people.  The beurocrats do not get to the higher levels unless they completely remove any morals or soul. They must be devoid of any conscience whatsoever to reach the levels of Kissinger and Brzezinski.  Those are the ones that will create the bloodshed and those are the ones that require exposure.

This has gotten completely off topic as this story has to do with our 17 year old daughters, sisters, mothers, wives being raped at astronomical numbers.  It is deplorable and needs much more exposure all the way to Obama and Bush as they commited of war crimes and crimes against humanity (added to the ever increasing list).
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Re: 30% of women serving in Iraq are raped
« Reply #20 on: April 19, 2009, 02:55:58 am »
You think the company commander will send them to their own houses to break heads?

Unless that's done - and nobody is that stupid - they will do as they are told, because if they don't, they get sent to the stockade, in route to Fort Leavenworth, and they might see their families again in, say, 20 years.

Of course not. But if I were sent to someone else's home to do that. I would be thinking about the men and women sent my home. I'm sure it would pass through their minds as well. Or maybe its just blind hope. I dont know.

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Re: 30% of women serving in Iraq are raped
« Reply #21 on: April 19, 2009, 02:57:04 am »
The facts are there that the servicemen enlist out of hardship or patriotic duty. 

Remember that many Americans actually believe that it is "unpatriotic to disagree with the president in wartime".

Your idea of patriotism might be a little different...but counting on the average American to understand, for example, that dissent is a good thing, is just another case of jamming rose-colored glasses on.
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Re: 30% of women serving in Iraq are raped
« Reply #22 on: April 19, 2009, 02:59:22 am »
Of course not. But if I were sent to someone else's home to do that. I would be thinking about the men and women at my home. I'm sure it would pass through their minds as well. Or maybe its just blind hope. I dont know.

I think what you'd find is that units at the battalion level would be judged as "reliable" and "unreliable".  "Unreliable" units would go over to Afghanistan and get left there, and the "reliable" units would be used to explain the facts of life to those of us that refuse to get back into line.

It's a trick that's been used since the beginning of civilization.  And it always, always works.
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Re: 30% of women serving in Iraq are raped
« Reply #23 on: April 19, 2009, 03:02:53 am »
Also, just for accuracy:  It wasn't the bureaucrats that sent those kids to war, it was our elected officials.

In short, it was us.
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Offline Dig

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Re: 30% of women serving in Iraq are raped
« Reply #24 on: April 19, 2009, 03:04:02 am »
Remember that many Americans actually believe that it is "unpatriotic to disagree with the president in wartime".

Your idea of patriotism might be a little different...but counting on the average American to understand, for example, that dissent is a good thing, is just another case of jamming rose-colored glasses on.

Not if we did a better job.  Everything you are talking about seems to stem from an educational situation.  This is our responsibility, do you think they will get educated by the state? Blaming them for not being awake when we are awake to the importance of dissent seems counter productive.  They are in a trance and waking up exponentially. As mentioned Ron Paul (who advocated ending all wars ASAP) received the most donations. Every service member I meet knows of him and respects his understanding of domestic and foreign policy.

And concerning ...many Americans actually believe that it is "unpatriotic to disagree with the president in wartime".

Even the pro conservative and borderline neo-con friendly movie Stop-Loss mentioned loud and proud "f**k THE PRESIDENT."

The military is waking up and the police are following too. Hopefully it will not be too little too late, but we can actually make a difference in this matter. How much is up to us.
All eyes are opened, or opening, to the rights of man. The general spread of the light of science has already laid open to every view the palpable truth, that the mass of mankind has not been born with saddles on their backs, nor a favored few booted and spurred, ready to ride them legitimately

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Re: 30% of women serving in Iraq are raped
« Reply #25 on: April 19, 2009, 03:05:57 am »
I never did that, it's been your strawman the whole time.

My strawman?

You blamed them, clear as day.  I have no idea why. I assumed it was some chip on your shoulder but you got upset at that so I merely pointed it out and now you are denying it.  Whatever dude.
All eyes are opened, or opening, to the rights of man. The general spread of the light of science has already laid open to every view the palpable truth, that the mass of mankind has not been born with saddles on their backs, nor a favored few booted and spurred, ready to ride them legitimately

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Re: 30% of women serving in Iraq are raped
« Reply #26 on: April 19, 2009, 03:07:57 am »
Not if we did a better job. 

If.  That's an interesting word.  IF communism worked, the Soviets would still be in business.  IF unrestrained capitalism worked, the banks and brokers wouldn't be sniveling for handouts.  IF the political system wasn't bought and paid for, I would have a better choice than Bush v Gore, Bush v Kerry, or McCain v Obama.

But when we're talking about the reality of the here and now, the fact remains that the soldiers in the "reliable" units would do whatever it takes to stay off the "unreliable" list.
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Re: 30% of women serving in Iraq are raped
« Reply #27 on: April 19, 2009, 03:14:22 am »
If.  That's an interesting word.  IF communism worked, the Soviets would still be in business.  IF unrestrained capitalism worked, the banks and brokers wouldn't be sniveling for handouts.  IF the political system wasn't bought and paid for, I would have a better choice than Bush v Gore, Bush v Kerry, or McCain v Obama.

But when we're talking about the reality of the here and now, the fact remains that the soldiers in the "reliable" units would do whatever it takes to stay off the "unreliable" list.

Great point, and in the here and now do you think it might be a good idea to reach out to these military men and women and let them know that all people on the "reliable" list end up on the "unreliable" list and in the process the NWO wants the entire sovereignty destroyed?
All eyes are opened, or opening, to the rights of man. The general spread of the light of science has already laid open to every view the palpable truth, that the mass of mankind has not been born with saddles on their backs, nor a favored few booted and spurred, ready to ride them legitimately

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Re: 30% of women serving in Iraq are raped
« Reply #28 on: April 19, 2009, 03:18:49 am »
Great point, and in the here and now do you think it might be a good idea to reach out to these military men and women and let them know that all people on the "reliable" list end up on the "unreliable" list and in the process the NWO wants the entire sovereignty destroyed?

And if I remember the infantry correctly, they'll look at you with a blank stare, push past you, and head for the tittie bars.

 :)
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Re: 30% of women serving in Iraq are raped
« Reply #29 on: April 19, 2009, 03:20:49 am »
And if I remember the infantry correctly, they'll look at you with a blank stare, push past you, and head for the tittie bars.

 :)

Well now you have an excuse to line your wallet with $1 bills ;)
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Re: 30% of women serving in Iraq are raped
« Reply #30 on: April 19, 2009, 10:52:01 am »
I do not agree that women being raped is a certainty if there was a rule of law and the chain of command did not purposefully obstruct justice all the way up to the commander in chief.

If they aren't disciplining the soldiers (ie, trying and hanging the rapists), then the chain of command is complicit in both the rapes and the breakdown of discipline that allowed them.
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Re: 30% of women serving in Iraq are raped
« Reply #31 on: April 19, 2009, 10:58:31 am »
If they aren't disciplining the soldiers (ie, trying and hanging the rapists), then the chain of command is complicit in both the rapes and the breakdown of discipline that allowed them.

That is one of the points that I have been trying to make, thanks. Also another point that I am trying to make is that a majority of our soldiers will not be the ones inflicting the worst forms of martial law. This is why the mercenary and contractor armies are expanding which have no honor, no rules of engagement whatsoever.  Heck even those guys cannot truly be trusted for what is coming, that is why they have hundreds of insane projects like this one:

Darpa Wants Brainy Machines to Replace Bored G.I.s

http://blog.wired.com/defense/2009/04/darpa-wants-thi.html

By Noah Shachtman
April 16, 2009


With every new Darpa venture, it seems more like military machines are becoming human. Or humans are becoming military machines. Or some compu-human teamwork fusion of the two.

The latest step follows up on previous research into automaton storytellers and mind-reading computers with a call for new ways to create machines that have complex, layered thinking and reasoning abilities. You know, kind of like those of the human brain.

The agency just released a request for proposals that would further Darpa's mission to create thinking computers. These "deep learning" machines would take in, process. and interpret complicated data or sensory inputs that might overwhelm delicate human synapses. The system would be especially helpful, the agency says, in stressful war-time situations – or when military staffers get really bored. "The training of humans is both expensive and time-consuming. Human performance also varies due to individuals’ capabilities and training, fatigue, boredom, and human attentional capacity," Darpa sighs.

The military already uses so-called "shallow learning" machines, which able to recognize simple, labeled images. A horse, for instance. Darpa hopes to get a touch more sophisticated, so that a single system can not only recognize horses -- but distinguish them from cows, using inference, rather than programming. "Deeply layered methods should create richer representations that may include furry, four-legged mammals at higher levels, resulting in a head start for learning cows and thereby requiring much less labeled data when compared to a shallow method," according to the agency.

But Darpa wants machines to do more than interpret data – ideally, they’ll eventually interpret human brains, too. The agency is hosting a workshop to "pulse the computational cognitive neuroscience community" for the latest and greatest ideas on how to map the human mind. With a better understanding of cognition, Darpa could teach computers to, essentially, read our minds. This kind of brain-science has already proven efficacious: a preliminary study of humans working with help from machinated neuron tapping showed a six-fold increase in efficiency.

Darpa sets a high standard: they’re looking for presentations that will offer "revolutionary new approaches" to cognitive study. Some of the agency’s favorite partners in crime, including Lockheed Martin, have already signed on.

Mind-reading machine colleagues may still be several years down the road, but Darpa's deep learning project is already seeking prototypes. Bored military analysts take note: perk up, because you are replaceable.

-- Katie Drummond

There are plans (and completed projects) involving nmanned everything linked to risk management infrastructure to give full command and control to a few people.  All of the humanness is to be removed from armies of the future. The NWO engame involves a fighting force that uses as little human intervention as possible.  IMO, we need to reach out to the military and the police while they still are human.

Here are a few more examples of the direction the NWO is going:

Pacific Fleet Commander's Blog: Unmanned Vehicles
Feb 3, 2009 ... Unmanned vehicles continue to prove themselves in the Middle East in our war on terror. Unmanned aerial vehicles, unmanned surface vehicles, ...
http://rat-pac.blogspot.com/2009/02/unmanned-vehicles.html - 63k - Cached - Similar pages

uwnews.org | UW developing fleet of unmanned airplanes to gather ...
Aeronautical engineering researchers at the University of Washington have been awarded a $456000 grant from the Office of Naval Research to launch a fleet ...
http://uwnews.washington.edu/ni/article.asp?articleID=2758 - 26k - Cached - Similar pages

Raytheon Killer Bee UAV Photos and Specs – Navy, Military Unmanned ...
Mar 13, 2008 ... PLUS: Scouting Europe's Unmanned Fleet. • IRAQ BLOG: FA-18s Take On UAV Duties. Reader Comments. 17. RE: Killer Bee UAV First Look: Raytheon ...
www.popularmechanics.com/technology/military_law/4254321.html - 47k - Cached - Similar pages

5th Fleet Mine Hunters Test Unmanned Vehicles in Arabian Gulf
Nov 24, 2003 ... Mine countermeasure ships from the US Navy’s 5th Fleet completed the Chief of Naval Operations-directed, mine warfare.
www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=10754 - 31k - Cached - Similar pages

UW Developing Fleet Of Unmanned Airplanes To Gather Pacific Ocean ...
The fog may be lifting for Northwest weather prognosticators who struggle to make forecasts without critical data on atmospheric conditions over the Pacific ...
www.sciencedaily.com/releases/1998/04/980424032037.htm - 55k - Cached - Similar pages

S. Korea Shifts Focus to Unmanned Combat Aircraft - Defense News
Jul 14, 2008 ... "Once unmanned fighter aircraft share missions of manned aircraft, ... while manned semi-stealth fighters control the unmanned fleet in a ...
www.defensenews.com/story.php?i=3637168 - 23k - Cached - Similar pages

(WO/1997/031352) APPARATUS AND METHOD FOR FLEET CONTROL WHEN ...
An apparatus and a method for fleet control when unmanned vehicles and manned vehicles travel in mixture. When manned vehicles travel simultaneously on the ...
www.wipo.org/pctdb/en/wo.jsp?wo=1997031352 - 16k - Cached - Similar pages


~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
This one I found relatively troubling:
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~


Priority-based assignment and routing of a fleet of unmanned ...
This paper considers the strategic routing of a fleet of unmanned combat aerial vehicles (UCAVs) to service a set of predetermined targets from a prior ...
http://portal.acm.org/citation.cfm?id=1298913


This paper considers the strategic routing of a fleet of unmanned combat aerial vehicles (UCAVs) to service a set of predetermined targets from a prior surveillance mission. Targets are characterized by their priority or importance level, and minimum and maximum service levels that, respectively, represent the lower bound of munitions for destruction and upper bound of munitions to limit collateral damage. Additional constraints to be respected are the payload capacities of the (possibly heterogeneous) UCAV fleet and the range based on fuel capacity and payload transported. The vital aspect of this paper is the integrated optimal utilization of available resources-weaponry and flight time-while allocating targets to UCAVs and sequencing them to maximize service to targets based on their criticality. The complexity of the problem is addressed through a decomposition scheme with two problems: a target assignment problem (modeled as a minimum cost network flow problem) and a vehicle routing problem, which in turn splits into multiple decision traveling salesman problems, one for each UAV. A Tabu search heuristic is developed to coordinate the two problems. Using test problems we establish the applicability of this approach to solve practical-sized problems.

          [1]    Storm Shadow UCAV performance the American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics {http://www.aerospaceweb.org/design/ucav/performance.shtml}.
    [2]    Gano SE, Renaud JE. Optimized unmanned aerial vehicle with morphing for extended range and endurance. Ninth AIAA/ISSMO symposium and exhibit on multidisciplinary analysis and optimization, paper no. 2002-5668, 2002.
    [3]    Donato G, Sinopoli B, Micheli M, Koo TJ. Vision based navigation for an Unmanned Aerial Vehicle. Proceedings of the IEEE international conference on robotics and automation; 2001. p. 1757-64.
    [4]    Cunningham CT, Roberts RS. An adaptive path planning algorithm for cooperating unmanned air vehicles. Proceedings of the IEEE international conference on robotics and automation; 2001. p. 3981-86.
    [5]    Enright JJ, Frazoli E. On multiple uav routing with stochastic targets: performance bounds and algorithms. Proceedings of the AIAA conference on guidance, navigation and control; 2005.
    [6]    Alighanbari M, Bellingham JS, Tillerson M, How JP. Cooperative path planning for multiple UAVs in dynamic and uncertain environments. Proceedings of the 41st IEEE conference on decision and control; 2002. p. 2816-22.
    [7]    Lian, Z. and Deshmukh, A., Performance prediction of an unmanned airbone vehicle multi-agent system. European Journal of Operational Research. v172. 680-695.
    [8]    Chandler PR, Pachter M, Rasmussen S. UAV cooperative control. Proceedings of the American control conference, Arlington VA; 2001. p. 50-5.
    [9]    Joel L. Ryan , T. Glenn Bailey , James T. Moore , William B. Carlton, Reactive tabu search in unmanned aerial reconnaissance simulations, Proceedings of the 30th conference on Winter simulation, p.873-880, December 13-16, 1998, Washington, D.C., United States
    [10]    Flint, M., Fernandez-Gaucherand, E. and Polycarpou, M., Stochastic modeling of a cooperative autonomous UAV search problem. Military Operations Research. v8 i4. 13-32.
    [11]    Maza I, Ollero A. Multiple UAV cooperative searching operation using polygon area decomposition and efficient coverage algorithms. Proceedings of the seventh international symposium on distributed autonomous robotic systems, France, 2004.
    [12]    Minai AA, Jin Y, Polycarpou M. Cooperative real-time search and task allocation in UAV teams. Proceedings of the 42nd IEEE conference on decision and control; 2003. p. 712.
    [13]    Richards A, Bellingham J, Tillerson M, How J. Co-ordination and control of multiple UAV's. In: AIAA GNC conference; August 2002.
    [14]    Richards A, Bellingham J, Tillerson M, How J. Multi-task allocation and path planning for cooperating UAVs. In: Cooperative control: models, applications and algorithms at the conference on coordination, control and optimization; November 2001. p. 1-19.
    [15]    Richards A, How JP. Aircraft trajectory planning with collision avoidance using mixed integer linear programming. Proceedings of the American control conference, vol. 3; 2002. p. 1936-41.
    [16]    Bellingham J, Richards A, How JP. Receding horizon control of autonomous aerial vehicles. Proceedings of the American controls conference, vol. 5; 2002. p. 3741-46.
    [17]    Harder, W.R., Hill, R.R. and Moore, J.T., A Java universal vehicle router for routing unmanned aerial vehicle. International Transactions in Operational Research. v11. 259-275.
    [18]    O'Rourke KP, Bailey TG, Hill RR, Carlton WB. Dynamic routing of unmanned aerial vehicles using reactive tabu search. 67th MORSS, US Military Academy, West Point, NY, 22-24 June 1999.
    [19]    Laporte, G., Gendreau, M., Potvin, J.-Y. and Semet, F., Classical and modern heuristic for the vehicle routing problem. International Transaction in Operational Research. v7. 285-300.
    [20]    Glover, F., Tabu search-part I. ORSA Journal of Computing. v1 i3.
    [21]    Glover, F., Tabu search-part II. ORSA Journal of Computing. v2 i1.
    [22]    Paolo Toth , Daniele Vigo, The vehicle routing problem, Society for Industrial and Applied Mathematics, Philadelphia, PA, 01
    [23]    Lawler, E.L., Lenstra, J.K., Rinnooy Kan, A.H.G. and Shmoys, D.B., The traveling salesman problem. 1985. Wiley, New York.
    [24]    Proteus UAV collision-avoidance tests, Phase II, April, 2003. {www.dfrc.nasa.gov}. {http://www.scaled.com/projects/proteus/more/mission/Proteus%20Payload%20Users%20Guide.pdf}.
    [25]    Barry CL, Zimet E. UCAVs-technological, policy, and operational challenges. Defense horizons no. 3, 2001. {http://www.ndu.edu/inss/DefHor/DH3/DH3.htm}.
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Authors:
       Vijay K. Shetty     Department of Industrial and Systems Engineering and Center for Multisource Information Fusion, 438 Bell Hall, University at Buffalo (SUNY), Buffalo, NY 14260, USA
Moises Sudit     Department of Industrial and Systems Engineering and Center for Multisource Information Fusion, 438 Bell Hall, University at Buffalo (SUNY), Buffalo, NY 14260, USA
Rakesh Nagi     Department of Industrial and Systems Engineering and Center for Multisource Information Fusion, 438 Bell Hall, University at Buffalo (SUNY), Buffalo, NY 14260, USA

Publisher   Elsevier Science Ltd.  Oxford, UK, UK
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Table of Contents
   
Foreword
Rajan Batta
Pages: 1757-1758   
   
Air defense missile-target allocation models for a naval task group
Orhan Karasakal
Pages: 1759-1770   
   
An integer programming approach to support the US Air Force's air mobility network
Corbin G. Koepke, Andrew P. Armacost, Cynthia Barnhart, Stephan E. Kolitz
Pages: 1771-1788   
   
A mathematical framework to optimize ATR systems with non-declarations and sensor fusion
Trevor I. Laine, Kenneth W. Bauer, Jr.
Pages: 1789-1812   
   
Priority-based assignment and routing of a fleet of unmanned combat aerial vehicles [Get the idea, the humans will be removed from the C&C and chains of command]
Vijay K. Shetty, Moises Sudit, Rakesh Nagi
Pages: 1813-1828   
   
Scheduling United States Coast Guard helicopter deployment and maintenance at Clearwater Air Station, Florida
R. A. Hahn, Alexandra M. Newman
Pages: 1829-1843   
   
Scheduling training for a tank battalion: How to measure readiness
John F. Raffensperger, Linus E. Schrage
Pages: 1844-1864   
   
Methodology for competitive strategy development
Richard K. Bullock, Richard F. Deckro, Jeffery D. Weir
Pages: 1865-1873   
   
Optimizing counter-terror operations: Should one fight fire with "fire" or "water"?
Jonathan P. Caulkins, Dieter Grass, Gustav Feichtinger, Gernot Tragler
Pages: 1874-1885   
   
Hierarchical maximal-coverage location-allocation: Case of generalized search-and-rescue
Yupo Chan, Jean M. Mahan, James W. Chrissis, David A. Drake, Dong Wang
Pages: 1886-1904   
   
A bilevel mixed-integer program for critical infrastructure protection planning
Maria P. Scaparra, Richard L. Church
Pages: 1905-1923   
   
Government preparedness: Using simulation to prepare for a terrorist attack [9/11 War Games!!!! Ptech!!!!]
Pavel Albores, Duncan Shaw
Pages: 1924-1943   
   
Finding a moving fugitive. A game theoretic representation of search [WTF? Finding a motive using game theory?]
Guillermo Owen, Gordon H. McCormick
Pages: 1944-1962   
   
A Relax-and-Cut algorithm for the set partitioning problem
Victor F. Cavalcante, Cid C. de Souza, Abílio Lucena
Pages: 1963-1981   
   
Lower and upper bounds for a two-level hierarchical location problem in computer networks
Aníbal Alberto Vilcapoma Ignacio, Virgílio José Martins Ferreira Filho, Roberto Diéguez Galvão
Pages: 1982-1998   
   
Application of reinforcement learning to the game of Othello
Nees Jan van Eck, Michiel van Wezel
Pages: 1999-2017   
   
Heuristics for minimizing maximum lateness on a single machine with family-dependent set-up times [WTF is this?]
Reha Uzsoy, Juan Diego Velásquez
Pages: 2018-2033   
   
Heuristic and exact algorithms for the max-min optimization of the multi-scenario knapsack problem [WTF is this?]
Fumiaki Taniguchi, Takeo Yamada, Seiji Kataoka
Pages: 2034-2048   
   
Genetic local search for multicast routing with pre-processing by logarithmic simulated annealing
M. S. Zahrani, M. J. Loomes, J. A. Malcolm, A. Z. M. Dayem Ullah, K. Steinhöfel, A. A. Albrecht
Pages: 2049-2070   
   
Single machine scheduling with simple linear deterioration to minimize total absolute deviation of completion times
Daniel Oron
Pages: 2071-2078   
   
Algorithms for solving the single-sink fixed-charge transportation problem
Andreas Klose
Pages: 2079-2092   
   
Scenario relaxation algorithm for finite scenario-based min-max regret and min-max relative regret robust optimization
Tiravat Assavapokee, Matthew J. Realff, Jane C. Ammons, I-Hsuan Hong
Pages: 2093-2102   
   
Solving the variable size bin packing problem with discretized formulations
Isabel Correia, Luís Gouveia, Francisco Saldanha-da-Gama
Pages: 2103-2113   
   
An enumeration scheme to generate constrained exact checkerboard patterns
Horacio Hideki Yanasse, Daniel Massaru Katsurayama
Pages: 2114-2128   
All eyes are opened, or opening, to the rights of man. The general spread of the light of science has already laid open to every view the palpable truth, that the mass of mankind has not been born with saddles on their backs, nor a favored few booted and spurred, ready to ride them legitimately

Offline Dig

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Re: 30% of women serving in Iraq are raped
« Reply #32 on: April 19, 2009, 12:43:41 pm »
Do you not sleep? :o

Sane how did you wake up? Who brought you out of the darkness? I need to know... ;D

George Bush woke me up with Abu Graib.  Have not slept much since then then when I saw the movie "Dedicated" I really couldn't sleep (actually 10 people use this account all over the world.  You might have noticed different personalities ;) )
All eyes are opened, or opening, to the rights of man. The general spread of the light of science has already laid open to every view the palpable truth, that the mass of mankind has not been born with saddles on their backs, nor a favored few booted and spurred, ready to ride them legitimately

luckee1

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Re: 30% of women serving in Iraq are raped
« Reply #33 on: April 19, 2009, 12:46:48 pm »
Oustanding question!!

It must be an epic story. ;D

BTW Sane, I appreciate the stance You and PP have taken, on this issue. Many people in here forget that Military folks are force fed the blue pill and innoculations are required.  I am comforted that all PP members don't espouse some of the opinions I have seen in this thread.  Further, I want to apologize for losing my cool, in my previous post.  

Offline Dig

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Re: 30% of women serving in Iraq are raped
« Reply #34 on: April 19, 2009, 01:08:40 pm »
Oustanding question!!

It must be an epic story. ;D

BTW Sane, I appreciate the stance You and PP have taken, on this issue. Many people in here forget that Military folks are force fed the blue pill and innoculations are required.  I am comforted that all PP members don't espouse some of the opinions I have seen in this thread.  Further, I want to apologize for losing my cool, in my previous post.  

really I (and my 9 other clones) am just a guy(s) with a fricking keyboard. the other guys on this forum are responsible for the content and the success of the forum.  I recommend looking into threads by Anti_Illuminati, TahoeBlue, KiwiClare, EchelonMonitor, Biggs, Geolibertarian, DCUBED, sociostudent, The Scribbler, Route 24, Mr. Anderson, Revolt426, David Rothscum, lordssyndicate, nofakenews, akston, JTCoyoté, Skyfind, StemCell, agentbluescreen, Eckert Tolle, Rock, _CREATIONIST_, Monkeypox, Brocke, Jackson Holly, UK Lyn, MarkCentury, Chemicalrain, Sub-X, doktorschnabelvonrom, jesquel, aLLyOuRbAsE, Amishism, Jon Gault and about 100 others that are probably pissed because I did not mention them (sorry, you know who you are). To really get an idea of what is going on, look into many of the high level threads in these rooms:

PhD Investigative Reports (only for the hardcore)
http://forum.prisonplanet.com/index.php?board=378.0

Jay/Nick Rockefeller's Plan for a cyberterror false flag
http://forum.prisonplanet.com/index.php?board=389.0

Rockefeller/CFR'S Avian/Bird Flu False Flag Plans Exposed
http://forum.prisonplanet.com/index.php?board=348.0

All eyes are opened, or opening, to the rights of man. The general spread of the light of science has already laid open to every view the palpable truth, that the mass of mankind has not been born with saddles on their backs, nor a favored few booted and spurred, ready to ride them legitimately

luckee1

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Re: 30% of women serving in Iraq are raped
« Reply #35 on: April 19, 2009, 01:10:42 pm »
Yeah he (Sane) has that rare thing called Multiple Personality Order.  (not disorder)   :D

Abu Graib huh?  Mine really started when I started going into anaphylactic shock cause the doc gave me Plague syrum innoculations. (Wasn't plague a cured thing why were we fighting plague, I mean never heard of any country having at the time) There were a lot of other things along our life paths that has been trying to wake us up.  We do the "Wait a minute!" thing.

Offline Dig

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Re: 30% of women serving in Iraq are raped
« Reply #36 on: April 19, 2009, 01:16:53 pm »
Yeah he (Sane) has that rare thing called Multiple Personality Order.  (not disorder)   :D

Abu Graib huh?  Mine really started when I started going into anaphylactic shock cause the doc gave me Plague syrum innoculations. (Wasn't plague a cured thing why were we fighting plague, I mean never heard of any country having at the time) There were a lot of other things along our life paths that has been trying to wake us up.  We do the "Wait a minute!" thing.

Cathy O'Brien would refer to it as Dissociative Identidy Disorder :)

But in actuality we are waaaaaay O/T....

IMO, people need to wake up to the way our beurocrat puppets in all three branches of government are committing crimes against our troops from brainwashing to forces injections to DU to institutionalized rape.  All through the chain of command investigations are being obstructed all the way to the last 4 commanders in chief (at least).
All eyes are opened, or opening, to the rights of man. The general spread of the light of science has already laid open to every view the palpable truth, that the mass of mankind has not been born with saddles on their backs, nor a favored few booted and spurred, ready to ride them legitimately

luckee1

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Re: 30% of women serving in Iraq are raped
« Reply #37 on: April 19, 2009, 01:17:37 pm »
I thank God for you all.  For a long time I couldn't sleep.  I followed the link from the movie TOD, that I had viewed on Christian News from Israel site.  Knowing that I am not the only theorist (kook, crazy, gun nut, conpiracy whack job, et al.) I finally can really sleep at night.

Offline TGRR

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Re: 30% of women serving in Iraq are raped
« Reply #38 on: April 19, 2009, 01:19:35 pm »
My religion helps me with the knowledge of what is really going on, and with the knowledge that I have barely scraped the surface.

I've been looking at this shit since 1981.  It never gets any prettier, and in fact my most pessimistic rantings have turned out to be idiotically optimistic.
Every year the Jews roll away the boulder and Jesus comes out. If he sees his shadow, we have six more weeks of Hockey.

luckee1

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Re: 30% of women serving in Iraq are raped
« Reply #39 on: April 19, 2009, 01:26:07 pm »
Sane,

I know that in the MarCor, there is a action called request mast, and in the Navy I think it is called Captain Mast.  It is a system by Military Law in which one can bring forth greivances to the highest levels.  I had had to use such a system myself.  Evidently, there is a breakdown in this system I am unaware of ( I am totally out of the military and nowhere near a base, my preference).  

The womens lobbying groups have most assuredly dropped the ball on this.  I have any idea, aside calling on a Congreesionman to get this addressed.  That, I see is a futile effort as this issue is being quashed from the top , down.

Suggestions?