PrisonPlanet Forum

Globalization and the plan for New Word Order => Sciences + Technology => Topic started by: Dok on October 07, 2008, 09:31:34 am

Title: Robots to shape wars of the future - 1/3 Unmanned Robots by 2015
Post by: Dok on October 07, 2008, 09:31:34 am
http://www.thesun.co.uk/sol/homepage/news/article1777667.ece
Title: Re: Zeitgeist robots coming soon.
Post by: Matt Hatter on October 07, 2008, 09:35:53 am
"And robotics company Cyberdyne Inc are set to start making it on a mass scale on Friday."


Holy SHIT! It's the company that makes terminator machines in the movie!

If these guys get a US military contract Im leaving this planet!
Title: Re: Zeitgeist robots coming soon.
Post by: TheGoodFight1984 on October 07, 2008, 09:44:34 am
"And robotics company Cyberdyne Inc are set to start making it on a mass scale on Friday."


Holy SHIT! It's the company that makes terminator machines in the movie!

If these guys get a US military contract Im leaving this planet!

That is the scary bit. SkyNet exists too, made by BAE systems,
Title: Re: Zeitgeist robots coming soon.
Post by: heavyhebrew on October 07, 2008, 03:06:47 pm
Mmmmm finally, the life long dream of all basement dwelling, sun fearing, 7chan posting epic fails of lulz will have their sex android.

Oh and what is a zeitgeist robot? A robot telling people to live free, experience unconditional love and reach their full potential while living in abundance?
Yeah, that shit sounds scary. Gimme that good, old time fear! OBEY or go to HELL!
Title: Re: Zeitgeist robots coming soon.
Post by: Geolibertarian on October 07, 2008, 03:28:35 pm
http://www.thesun.co.uk/sol/homepage/news/article1777667.ece

That, combined with the apparent fact that "classified" technology tends to be many years -- if not decades -- ahead of what the general public is allowed to know about, would certainly explain why the global elite are so eager to kill most of us off.

Perhaps they're planning to have programmable "replicants" do all their slave labor for them.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4lW0F1sccqk (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4lW0F1sccqk)
(http://www.freewebs.com/hill9460/BladeRunner.jpg)
"Quite an experience to live in fear, isn't it? That's what it is to be a slave."
Title: The new war machine
Post by: Letsbereal on March 12, 2009, 08:26:04 pm
The new war machine
7 March 2009,
by Stephen Cave (The Financial Times)
http://www.ft.com/cms/s/2/613860da-09dd-11de-add8-0000779fd2ac.html?ftcamp=rss

Androids are slowly taking the place of human soldiers in today’s battlefields. But who will stand at the dock if, while in combat, they commit crimes against humanity?

Moral Machines: Teaching Robots Right from Wrong

By Wendell Wallach and Colin Allen
OUP £15.99 288 pages

Wired for War: The Robotics Revolution and Conflict in the 21st Century
By PW Singer
Penguin Press $29.95 512 pages
FT Bookshop price: £15.99

War Bots: How US Military Robots Are Transforming War in Iraq Afghanistan, and the Future

By David Axe
Nimble Books $28.36 88 pages


Trooper Talon doesn’t get tired or hungry. He doesn’t get scared and he doesn’t panic under fire. He fights on even when, all around him, his comrades are falling. He never forgets his orders, never gets distracted, never even blinks. Unfortunately for the rest of his platoon, he has one flaw: after eight hours in the field, his batteries run out.

Talon is a robot. He is the future of warfare and, with more than 12,000 robotic machines already deployed in Iraq, he is also the present. These machines range from the briefcase-sized PackBot that can scope a house for potential enemies, to the 35m wingspan Global Hawk spy-plane that can survey half of Iraq in one flight. They are doing some of the difficult, dull and dangerous jobs that once cost soldiers’ lives. And since 2002, when a Predator drone assassinated al-Qaeda leader Abu Ali al-Harithi, they are also doing the killing.

While our destructive power is launching into this science-fiction future, however, our principles are stuck in the trenches. There is no precedent for an android to stand in the dock for war crimes. And the Geneva Conventions don’t tell us who to blame when an automaton makes a lethal error, such as when US Patriot missile batteries shot down two allied aircraft in Iraq in 2003, killing two Britons and one American.

We are in the midst of a revolution in the way we wage war, as profound as the discovery of gunpowder or the building of the atomic bomb. Yet most of us hardly know it’s happening – and our legal and moral frameworks are entirely unprepared. But a few people have noticed: three fascinating and timely new books detail these developments and the issues they raise.

The American invasion of Afghanistan in 2001 was the first war in which “many of the forces still rode to battle on horses, and yet robotic drones were flying above,” explains PW Singer, senior fellow at US thinktank the Brookings Institution.

Talon, an all-purpose robot that looks like a dentist’s lamp on caterpillar tracks, was first deployed there for reconnaissance missions – dangerous work that was done by allies within Afghanistan until, as one soldier told Singer: “We began to run out of Afghans.” They were soon also assigned to dispose of the roadside bombs that cost the lives of so many allied soldiers. They proved such a success that by 2008 there were 2,000 in the field, and manufacturer Foster-Miller secured a $400m contract to double that number.

Talon impressed the US Army so much that they cloned him to make his evil twin. Built on the same chassis, Swords can carry a selection of lethal weapons, from assault rifles to grenade launchers. His makers boast that in target practice, “The robot hit the bulls-eye of the target 70 out of 70 tries.” However, though sent to Iraq in 2007, Swords have not been deployed because, writes journalist David Axe in War Bots, “They had a tendency to spin out of control.” But Swords have already been upgraded: expect to see its more stable successor, Maars, in an urban war-zone near you soon.

Axe’s War Bots is a slim, introductory volume. Light on text, its primary virtue is the full-colour pictures showing the droids in action. PW Singer, on the other hand, has written what is likely to be the definitive work on this subject for some time to come. He has a record of drawing out the underlying trends in modern warfare, with previous books on child soldiers and the increasing use of mercenaries. Wired for War will confirm his reputation: it is riveting and comprehensive, encompassing every aspect of the rise of military robotics, from the historical to the ethical.

While writing it, Singer was also co-ordinating the Obama presidential campaign’s defence policy taskforce. So perhaps it is no coincidence that the new US President has already announced his intention to see “greater investment in advanced technology, ranging from the revolutionary, like Unmanned Aerial Vehicles” to “electronic warfare capabilities.” Enormous sums are being invested – $230bn in the US Army’s Future Combat Systems programme alone. Clearly the warbot business will continue to boom.

The logic of moving to unmanned systems is compelling, as Singer makes clear. First, they are saving soldiers’ lives. He describes how the robot-makers’ offices are covered with thank-you letters from soldiers with messages such as: “This little guy saved our butts.” Second, they should also save civilian lives – unlike a hot-headed human trooper, robots don’t panic, don’t get greedy, and don’t set out to avenge their dead buddies. Combined with their accuracy, they promise less collateral damage.

So why is it that the prospect of robot armies makes us nervous? Perhaps we are unduly influenced by a diet of Daleks and Terminator movies. In fact, the use of robotic systems has been growing steadily since the second world war, when the Germans’ V-2 ballistic missile and the Allies’ automated Norden bombsight first took to the skies. The latter was an analogue computer that took over the decision for when to fire and was used to drop the atomic bomb on Hiroshima.

In the intervening decades, robots have become vastly more sophisticated – but they accomplish very specific tasks. Overall, Talon, Swords and others are still less bright than the average garden snail. They may take a wrong turn or identify the wrong target, but they won’t take over the world or enslave the human race.

Robots are currently given little autonomy – even the soldiers who use them feel nervous about machine guns with ideas of their own roaming the battlefield. But the pressure is on to give them a longer leash. A robot can react far faster than a human. If a platoon is being sniped at, a robot with infrared vision can instantly see where the shot came from and fire on the attacker before he can even duck. But if a human controller has to sanction every shot, the sniper will be long gone.

There are also personnel savings. At present, every robot plane flying high over Iraq has a flesh-and-blood pilot sitting in a box in Nevada holding the joy-stick; every Talon has a soldier with a remote control. That’s an expensive package – which would be more efficient if robots could get on with their work alone. And soon, human operators simply won’t be able to keep up, explains Singer. The coming robots “will be too fast, too small, too numerous, and will create an environment too complex for humans to direct”. So the machines will have to go solo.

And that is what should worry us. No matter how clever we make them, these robots will make mistakes. As Singer points out, current Artificial Intelligence systems struggle to tell the difference between an apple and a tomato – how could they distinguish between civilian and insurgent? Yet “the law is simply silent”, he writes, on whether autonomous robots can have a licence to kill, and what should happen if they shoot the wrong man. If a human is somewhere in the decision-making loop, legal accountability can be established. When machines go it alone, accountability disappears – and with it the rule of law. Which is why philosophers Wendell Wallach and Colin Allen are asking how we can persuade robots to do the right thing. The result, in their seminal, but stodgy, book Moral Machines, makes clear just how far we have to go.

They start by exploring the science fiction writer Isaac Asimov’s famous Three Laws of Robotics: that a robot must not injure a human; must obey the orders of a human; and must protect its own existence. But Asimov himself, in his short stories on this theme, showed the contradictions and limitations of these laws. What happens, for example, if two humans give opposing orders?

So the authors turn instead to classical moral theory for help, exploring whether, for example, a robot could be programmed to be a good utilitarian and act to maximise happiness and minimise suffering. Once again they are disappointed: any system would be paralysed by the massive, open-ended calculations required – assuming we could even agree how to measure happiness and suffering. Wallach and Allen ruefully conclude that “with respect to computability ... the moral principles proposed by philosophers leave much to be desired”. The best we can do for now, they believe, is try to make sure that any super-tough, gun-toting androids are at least basically friendly.

Singer agrees: one solution, he suggests, would be to allow robots autonomous use of only non-lethal weapons. There are plenty on offer, ranging from incapacitating goo-guns, which immobilise targets, to microwave pain-rays. The robots could also be armed with more destructive weapons but for use only against the enemy’s hardware, not the people, he argues. Only with the authorisation of a flesh-and-blood – and legally accountable – soldier could lethal force be directed against a human.

These are excellent suggestions. But, with robot planes already dropping bombs on built-up areas, this would require a big shift from present-day practice. Current leaders in the field of high-tech weaponry, such as the US, may be reluctant to tie their hands with such restrictions.

But the world’s only superpower should realise that it might not lead for long. China produces three times as many engineering graduates a year as the US. And so-called “first movers” in new technologies pay heavily for initial development – those who come later can piggy-back on their research and learn from their mistakes. Also, many military robot systems are based on commercially available models – the Marcbot, for example, a small reconnaissance robot used widely by the US in Iraq, was developed from a popular remote-controlled toy car. If terrorists want to build their own droid army, they can order the parts from the internet. Regulating the robots therefore, is in the interests of the west as much as the rest of the world.

We have an ignoble history of deploying destructive new technologies before considering the consequences. Frankenstein visions of mechanical killers hunting down the last survivors of the human race are not entirely mad. But the robotics revolution is only just beginning: if we act now to update the laws of war, we can still avoid the worst-case scenarios. And, who knows, we might even dream of a day when wars will be fought entirely by machines – and the killing of a single human being would constitute a war crime.



Title: Science briefing: Wired up for micro-power
Post by: Letsbereal on April 05, 2009, 05:57:43 pm
Science briefing: Wired up for micro-power
26 March 2009,
By Alan Cane
http://www.ft.com/cms/s/0/cdabdde4-1a1f-11de-9f91-0000779fd2ac.html

A microscopic technology capable of generating electricity from human movement such as walking, waving or even blood flowing has been developed by researchers at Georgia Institute of Technology.

Reminiscent in some ways of UK inventor Trevor Baylis’ electricity-generating shoes (abandoned after terrorists used footwear to conceal explosives), the technology – described as a nanogenerator – depends on the special properties of tiny zinc oxide wires.

When subjected to mechanical stress, these wires, only one five thousandth the width of a human hair, generate an electric current.

According to Zhong Lin Wang, lead researcher, the device could be used to charge gadgets such as iPods and BlackBerrys as well as having a impact on defence technology, environmental monitoring and biomedical sciences. “This technology can be used to generate energy under any circumstances as long as there is movement,” he said.

The nanogenerator would be useful to troops far from energy sources in the field but having to use sensors or communication devices, he said.

The zinc oxide wires could be “grown” on a variety of surfaces including metals, ceramics, polymers, clothing and even tent material, where the wind could create enough movement for power generation.


Mussel poison fished out

Anyone falling ill after eating mussels – thankfully, a comparatively rare occurrence – can now blame a tiny marine alga called Azadinium spinosum.

The role of the alga in cases of shellfish poisoning has been uncovered by researchers from the Alfred Wegener Institute for Polar and Marine Research in Germany, who report their findings in the European Journal of Phycology.

The poison that Azadinium produces – azaspiracid – can cause diarrhoea, nausea, vomiting and neurotoxicological effects including paralysis and death.

The identification of the culprit should form the basis of an early warning system for mussel farms. The researchers managed to grow the previously unknown alga in culture and identify it as the producer of azaspiracid, one of a group of so-called algal toxins.

Mussels and other shellfish filter large volumes of these micro-organisms from seawater and the toxins are retained and concentrated in their flesh. Now the researchers are working to establish why the alga produces this poison and its environmental significance.


Wound healing uncovered

The mysteries of wound healing have been further clarified by research that has also found an unlikely link between diabetes and eczema. The work may lead to ways to improve wound healing in diabetics.

Carried out by scientists at the University of California, San Diego, and reported in Nature magazine, the research identifies a protein called caspase 8 that is critical to wound healing – at least, in laboratory mice. This protein is produced overabundantly in diabetics – who typically lack a normal wound response and suffer complications from minor cuts and grazes. But it is deficient in people suffering from eczema whose skin, chronically inflamed, cannot carry out its normal protective function.

The San Diego scientists think that after damage to the skin, loss of caspase 8 from surface cells releases a second protein, interleukin 1-alpha, capable of travelling deep into the skin to stimulate stem cells to produce skin cells to fill and eventually heal the wound.

Cokin Jamora, who led the research, said he hoped it would contribute to alleviating the pain and suffering of millions of people with eczema and diabetes.
Title: Japon Çocuk Robot CB2
Post by: Letsbereal on April 06, 2009, 04:27:59 pm
(http://cdn1.cnnturk.com/handlers/file.ashx?FileID=57544&Width=292&Height=0&BlackWhite=False)
Japon Çocuk Robot CB2
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bCK64zsZNNs
Title: Robot Suit HAL" is a cyborg-type robot that can expand and improve physical capa
Post by: Letsbereal on April 13, 2009, 11:02:00 am
    * Robot Suit HAL" is a cyborg-type robot that can expand and improve physical capability.

(http://tweakers.net/ext/i/1239449629.jpeg)

    * When a person attempts to move, nerve signals are sent from the brain to the muscles via motoneuron, moving the musculoskeletal system as a consequence. At this moment, very weak biosignals can be detected on the surface of the skin. "HAL" catches these signals through a sensor attached on the skin of the wearer. Based on the signals obtained, the power unit is controlled to move the joint unitedly with the wearer's muscle movement, enabling to support the wearer's daily activities. This is what we call a 'voluntary control system' that provides movement interpreting the wearer's intention from the biosignals in advance of the actual movement. Not only a 'voluntary control system' "HAL" has, but also a 'robotic autonomous control system' that provides human-like movement based on a robotic system which integrally work together with the 'autonomous control system'. "HAL" is the world's first cyborg-type robot controlled by this unique Hybrid System.
    * "HAL" is expected to be applied in various fields such as rehabilitation support and physical training support in medical field, ADL support for disabled people, heavy labour support at factories, and rescue support at disaster sites, as well as in the entertainment field.

HAL-5 Type-B Speficications

Size
wearable robot
Height 1,600mm

Weight
Full Body Type approx. 23kg
(Lower body approx. 15kg)

Power
Battery Drive
Charged battery( AC100V)

Continuous operating time
Approximately 2 hours 40 minutes

Motions
Daily Activities( standing up from a chair, walking, climbing up and down stairs)
Hold and lift heavy objects
and more...

Operation
Hybrid Control System

Working Environment
Indoor and outdoor
Title: Re: Robot Suit HAL" is a cyborg-type robot that can expand and improve physical
Post by: Libertarian Perspective on April 13, 2009, 11:10:30 am
This technology could be use in a good way to enable people with disabilities to get back long lost movement and to make a lot of robot factories therefore making human slave wages in third world nations obsolete, but who are we kidding? They will only use this technology to build he meanest baddest robot who is going to bust your home when you get accused of being a "homegrowner".
Title: Re: Robot Suit HAL" is a cyborg-type robot that can expand and improve physical
Post by: zafada on April 13, 2009, 12:27:03 pm
Yup.

There's another thread about this also.  The Japanese plan on only selling the finished suits to handicapped civilians.

It's hard to believe they're a Buddhist country when you look at the weird ass, f**ked up porn these people have.  I wouldn't know, but I heard lots of things ;)

Anyway, back to the suits.  These suits are not hard to make at all.  The only thing I don't understand about them is what kind of sensor they use to pick up the electrical impulses from the muscles.

There's another which I assume is the one above that operates by tension.  When it feels pressure on the joints it moves.  When it doesn't feel pressure, it doesn't move.

Believe it or not...the model I'm speaking of is the one that the military tested.  It looks closer to the terminator than the haloesque Japanese version up top.
Title: Army Tests Flying Robo-Sniper
Post by: Letsbereal on April 22, 2009, 05:13:56 pm
Army Tests Flying Robo-Sniper
21 April 2009
, by David Hambling (Wired)
http://blog.wired.com/defense/2009/04/army-tests-new.html

Stopping the pirates of Somalia hasn't been easy. But when the navies of the world have repelled or killed the hijackers, it's often involved three elements: helicopters, drones and trained snipers. The U.S. Army is working on a weapon which combines all three.

It's called the Autonomous Rotorcraft Sniper System. It mounts a powerful rifle onto highly stabilized turret, and fixes the package on board a Vigilante unmanned helicopter. I describe the system in this month's Popular Mechanics.

The system is intended for the urban battlefield — an eye in the sky that can stare down concrete canyons, and blink out targets with extreme precision. Attempting to return fire against the ARSS is liable to be a near-suicidal act: ARSS is described as being able to fire seven to 10 aimed shots per minute, and it's unlikely to miss.

Recent events off Somalia, however, may have suggested other uses for this technology. Last week's standoff between pirates and the U.S. Navy in the Indian Ocean ended famously with three sniper shots, as a drone watched overhead. In 2008, French special forces captured six pirates on land after ransom had been paid. "There were four helicopters involved," The Independent reported at the time. "A sniper [in a Puma helicopter] shot out the motor of the pirates' four-wheel drive vehicle. A second helicopter [a Gazelle] then landed nearby, allowing the six pirates to be arrested" — without any casualties.

The U.S. Coast Guard's Helicopter Interdiction Tactical Squadron (HITRON) uses helicopter-borne snipers to take out drug-running boats. They are accurate enough to knock out engines without harming the crew or damaging fuel tanks. "The driver just threw his hands up," concludes the description of one such action in Men's Vogue, after all three engines were disabled with three shots.

And because the Vigilante is smaller, lighter and cheaper than a manned combat helicopter, it can be supplied in greater numbers, and without the need for those elite, highly-trained snipers.

Sniping from a chopper currently takes tons of skill and training. But ARSS is literally point-and-shoot for the operator on the ground, using a videogame-type controller. The software makes all the necessary corrections, and the system should ensure first-round kills at several hundred yards. The secret is in the control system and stabilized turret (on the right in the picture above), which is currently fitted with a powerful RND Manufacturing Edge 2000 rifle specifically designed for sniping work, using the heavyweight .338 Lapua Magnum cartridge.

The stabilized turret could be fitted to a variety of other vehicles — including a a small blimp, or a fixed-wing unmanned plane, like the Predator. Compared to the Predator's array of Hellfire missiles, the ARSS' lone gun would be much less likely to hit civilians. It would also give a far deeper magazine: dozens of shots instead of a handful of missiles, and at a cost of around $4 per trigger pull rather than about $100,000 for a Hellfire. But the turret doesn't need such a big craft to carry it, as the complete turret assembly weighs less than a single Hellfire.

The name needs changing. But the Autonomous Rotorcraft Sniper System looks like it may have a big future — maybe on land, or maybe at sea.
Title: Lockheed Martin and Harris to Develop Full-Motion Video Intelligence Tools
Post by: Size10 on April 22, 2009, 11:23:39 pm
HERNDON, Va. and DENVER, April 20 /PRNewswire/ -- Lockheed Martin (NYSE: LMT) and Harris Corporation (NYSE: HRS) have signed a collaboration agreement to develop next-generation technologies for managing and analyzing full-motion video intelligence. The two companies will use their collective expertise and resources to create new video analysis solutions for defense, intelligence and commercial customers.

"Full-motion video has exceptional potential for intelligence collection and analysis," said Jim Kohlhaas, Lockheed Martin’s vice president of Spatial Solutions. "Thousands of platforms are collecting important video intelligence every day. The challenge is to collect and catalogue that huge volume of footage, and give analysts the tools they need to find, interpret and share the critical intelligence that can be gleaned from that mountain of data. We’re very pleased to be working with Harris on this important initiative."

"Harris is one of the world’s leading manufacturers and developers of commercial off-the-shelf hardware and software for the broadcast industry," said Tim Thorsteinson, president of Harris Broadcast Communications. "With decades of experience providing world-class solutions that continuously exceed the exacting demands of broadcasters worldwide, Harris is uniquely qualified to apply broadcast technology to the challenges facing the defense and intelligence markets. Leveraging Harris’s commercial broadcast technologies and expertise with Lockheed Martin’s strong base of government customers provides an excellent basis to understand and solve video analysis problems."

Lockheed Martin and Harris will pursue full-motion video technology opportunities in the U.S. and international defense and intelligence markets. The companies will also embark on joint research and development into new video technologies, focusing on automation and advanced applications for performing in-depth analysis, both in real-time and on archival footage. The companies will also work on new solutions for cataloguing, storing and securely sharing video intelligence across organizational and geographic boundaries to include bandwidth constrained users.

Both companies have extensive experience in video exploitation and management. In 2007 Harris released its Full-Motion Video Asset Management Engine, or FAME(TM), which integrates video, chat, and audio directly into the video stream. It also integrates a powerful processing and storage engine into a single digital architecture that provides the infrastructure for changing the way video is ingested and streamed to the user community. Lockheed Martin recently debuted Audacity(TM), a video analytics engine that tags, sorts and catalogues digital footage. Audacity includes integrated intelligence tools such as video mosaic creation, facial recognition, object tracking and smart auto-alerts based around geospatial areas of interest.

Harris is an international communications and information technology company serving government and commercial markets in more than 150 countries. Headquartered in Melbourne, Florida, the company has annual revenue of $5.4 billion and 16,000 employees -- including nearly 7,000 engineers and scientists. Harris is dedicated to developing best-in-class assured communications(R); products, systems, and services. Additional information about Harris Corporation is available at www.harris.com.

Headquartered in Bethesda, Md., Lockheed Martin is a global security company that employs about 146,000 people worldwide and is principally engaged in the research, design, development, manufacture, integration and sustainment of advanced technology systems, products and services. The corporation reported 2008 sales of $42.7 billion.

http://money.cnn.com/news/newsfeeds/articles/prnewswire/200904201540PR_NEWS_USPR_____PH01790.htm
Title: Killer robots and a revolution in warfare: Bernd Debusmann
Post by: Letsbereal on April 24, 2009, 01:38:26 am
COLUMN-Killer robots and a revolution in warfare: Bernd Debusmann
22 April 2009
, by columnist Bernd Debusmann, Washington (Reuters)
http://www.alertnet.org/thenews/newsdesk/LM674603.htm

WASHINGTON, April 22 (Reuters) - They have no fear, they never tire, they are not upset when the soldier next to them gets blown to pieces. Their morale doesn't suffer by having to do, again and again, the jobs known in the military as the Three Ds - dull, dirty and dangerous.

They are military robots and their rapidly increasing numbers and growing sophistication may herald the end of thousands of years of human monopoly on fighting war. "Science fiction is moving to the battlefield. The future is upon us," as Brookings scholar Peter Singer put it to a conference of experts at the U.S. Army War College in Pennsylvania this month.

Singer just published Wired For War - the Robotics Revolution and Conflict in the 21st Century, a book that traces the rise of the machines and predicts that in future wars they will not only play greater roles in executing missions but also in planning them.

Numbers reflect the explosive growth of robotic systems. The U.S. forces that stormed into Iraq in 2003 had no robots on the ground. There were none in Afghanistan either. Now those two wars are fought with the help of an estimated 12,000 ground-based robots and 7,000 unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs), the technical term for drone, or robotic aircraft.

Ground-based robots in Iraq have saved hundreds of lives in Iraq, defusing improvised explosive devices, which account for more than 40 percent of U.S. casualties. The first armed robot was deployed in Iraq in 2007 and it is as lethal as its acronym is long: Special Weapons Observation Remote Reconnaissance Direct Action System (SWORDS). Its mounted M249 machinegun can hit a target more than 3,000 feet away with pin-point precision.

From the air, the best-known UAV, the Predator, has killed dozens of insurgent leaders - as well as scores of civilians whose death has prompted protests both from Afghanistan and Pakistan.

The Predators are flown by operators sitting in front of television monitors in cubicles at Creech Air Force Base in Nevada, 8,000 miles from Afghanistan and Taliban sanctuaries on the Pakistani side of the border with Afghanistan. The cubicle pilots in Nevada run no physical risks whatever, a novelty for men engaged in war.


TECHNOLOGY RUNS AHEAD OF ETHICS

Reducing risk, and casualties, is at the heart of the drive for more and better robots. Ultimately, that means "fully autonomous engagement without human intervention," according to an Army communication to robot designers. In other words, computer programs, not a remote human operator, would decide when to open fire. What worries some experts is that technology is running ahead of deliberations of ethical and legal questions.

Robotics research and development in the U.S. received a big push from Congress in 2001, when it set two ambitious goals: by 2010, a third of the country's long-range attack aircraft should be unmanned; and by 2015 one third of America's ground combat vehicles. Neither goal is likely to be met but the deadline pushed non-technological considerations to the sidelines.

A recent study prepared for the Office of Naval Research by a team from the California Polytechnic State University said that robot ethics had not received the attention it deserved because of a "rush to market" mentality and the "common misconception" that robots will do only what they have been programmed to do.

"Unfortunately, such a belief is sorely outdated, harking back to the time when computers were simpler and their programs could be written and understood by a single person," the study says. "Now programs with millions of lines of code are written by teams of programmers, none of whom knows the entire program; hence, no individual can predict the effect of a given command with absolute certainty since portions of programs may interact in unexpected, untested ways."

That's what might have happened during an exercise in South Africa in 2007, when a robot anti-aircraft gun sprayed hundreds of rounds of cannon shell around its position, killing nine soldiers and injuring 14.

Beyond isolated accidents, there are deeper problems that have yet to be solved. How do you get a robot to tell an insurgent from an innocent? Can you program the Laws of War and the Rules of Engagement into a robot? Can you imbue a robot with his country's culture? If something goes wrong, resulting in the death of civilians, who will be held responsible?

The robot's manufacturer? The designers? Software programmers? The commanding officer in whose unit the robot operates? Or the U.S. president who in some cases authorises attacks? (Barack Obama has given the green light to a string of Predator strikes into Pakistan).

While the United States has deployed more military robots - on land, in the air and at sea - than any other country, it is not alone in building them. More than 40 countries, including potential adversaries such as China, are working on robotics technology. Which leaves one to wonder how the ability to send large numbers of robots, and fewer soldiers, to war will affect political decisions on force versus diplomacy.

You need to be an optimist to think that political leaders will opt for negotiation over war once combat casualties come home not in flag-decked coffins but in packing crates destined for the robot repair shop.


(Bernd Debusmann is a Reuters columnist. The opinions expressed are his own. You can contact the author at [email protected])
Title: Boston Dynamics Big Dog
Post by: lovealexjones on May 02, 2009, 07:53:38 am
(http://www.cnet.co.uk/i/c/blg/cat/digitalmusic/atatboombox.jpg)

kinda AT-AT ish...


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=W1czBcnX1Ww
Title: Re: Boston Dynamics Big Dog
Post by: Monkeypox on May 02, 2009, 07:27:10 pm
The noise it makes will irritate the enemy to death.

 ;D
Title: Re: Boston Dynamics Big Dog
Post by: lovealexjones on May 02, 2009, 07:28:26 pm
That's right!
Title: Re: Boston Dynamics Big Dog
Post by: xfahctor on May 02, 2009, 07:31:27 pm
 I still say the best way to deal with this thing is a good treesnare, it'll render it hanging completely useless.
Title: Re: Boston Dynamics Big Dog
Post by: Monkeypox on May 02, 2009, 09:46:19 pm
I still say the best way to deal with this thing is a good treesnare, it'll render it hanging completely useless.

"The Empire Strikes Back"  showed us what to do.

 ;D
Title: Battlefields: Robots That Kill For America
Post by: Letsbereal on May 17, 2009, 08:17:41 pm
Battlefields: Robots That Kill For America
14 May 2009
, by Quentin Hardy (Forbes)
http://www.forbes.com/2009/05/14/robots-war-military-technology-personal-tech-robots_print.html

We are surrounded by robots, from automated dogs and vacuum cleaners at home to assistants in operating rooms and on the factory floor. The most influential (and the greatest number) of these robots, however, are in a place few Americans see: the battlefield. More than anything, robots are changing the way war works.

On Saturday, thousands of Americans will go on U.S. military bases to commemorate Armed Forces Day, designated to honor current American servicemen and show off some of our state of the art weaponry. As never before, people may see flying drones, observation craft, bomb disposers, automated machine guns, independently operating submarines, even (if they see experimental devices) war bots that bounce, crawl or burrow. Some deliver sensory data to soldiers, while others carry out instructions to kill.

Robotics in war is the most important change in major human activity dating back at least 5,000 years, according to P.W. Singer, a senior fellow at the Brookings Institution think tank and the author of Wired for War: The Robotics Revolution and Conflict in the 21st Century.

In Pictures: 10 Cool And Scary Robots Of War

"Every mission [that] soldiers go out on in Iraq, there's something (automated) flying over them, maybe an unmanned vehicle scouting ahead of them," Singer says. "When they shoot, the key is what they put their laser on for a drone to fire at. ... The story of the surge is not the additional troops, it's the air strikes (by machines like Predator drones) going up by a huge amount."

The numbers illustrate this: With the U.S. military budget likely to fall, spending on robotic systems is steadily rising, even as--thanks to Moore's Law and plain old engineering--the machines are getting cheaper. In 2003, there were barely any ground-based robots in Iraq, the kind of small, treaded vehicles used to look for insurgents and disarm explosives. Today there are over 12,000.

War in the field is still highly dangerous, of course, but even when soldiers are wounded they may have a close encounter with a machine, in the form of bionic limbs that may even allow them to return to combat. Thanks to robots, however, fewer soldiers face those hazards. The predator drones used in Iraq, Afghanistan and Pakistan are "flown" by remote control from safe military bases in the U.S.

In their early stages, robots seem like a great addition to the U.S. arsenal, but problems likely will arise as the systems grow more complex. Nor is this strictly a U.S. phenomenon, Singer notes, or even one that limits war to its traditional nation-state owners. "Forty-three other countries besides the U.S. build military robots," he says. "A few weeks ago we shot down an Iranian drone over Iraq." Hezbollah used four drones to attack Israel in its recent conflict and used others as observation craft before that conflict started, Singer says.

Individuals may be next. "I talked to a researcher who told me that for $50,000 worth of robots he could shut down New York for a day. It was pretty convincing. Warfare will go open source."

Even more, it may be harder than ever to say when and where wars begin and end, given the low cost of leaving sensors and material in the field (or protecting New York), in a kind of perpetual deployment that is impossible with people.

Much remains to be worked out, including perhaps the greatest piece of the puzzle: what robots everywhere will mean for war itself. Historically, victory has meant a superiority of economy, tactics, courage or other elements that defined the winning nation's identity. Germany fell decisively in WWII because fascism was seen as hollow.

"With machines, it will be less and less about why we go--they don't need motivation psychology, the shifts that turned many great battles," says Singer. "War meant committing to an act of violence that could put your nation's survival at stake. It may not mean that now."

In Pictures: 10 Cool And Scary Robots Of War

See Also:

Household Robots:
http://www.forbes.com/2008/10/24/robots-home-consumers-tech-personal-cx_cm_ag_1024robots.html

Dear Diary, I Love My Robot
http://www.yankodesign.com/2009/05/14/dear-diary-i-love-my-robot/

In Pictures: Making A Robot:
http://www.forbes.com/2009/03/12/robots-dean-kamen-technology-breathroughs-robots_slide_2.html?thisspeed=25000

Real World Robots:
http://video.forbes.com/fvn/boost/mf_byb121608

Fema's new toy
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=r0aa8__GZNQ
Title: Pentagon Plans New Cyberspace War Command: Report
Post by: ChristSavage on May 29, 2009, 12:16:54 am
Pentagon Plans New Cyberspace War Command: Report

http://news.yahoo.com/s/nm/20090529/pl_nm/us_security_cyberspace (http://news.yahoo.com/s/nm/20090529/pl_nm/us_security_cyberspace)

5 mins ago
WASHINGTON (Reuters) – The Pentagon plans to create a new military command for cyberspace, stepping up preparations by the armed forces to conduct both offensive and defensive computer warfare, the New York Times said on Friday.

The military command will complement a civilian effort President Barack Obama plans to announce on Friday that will overhaul the way the United States safeguards its computer networks, the newspaper said on its website.

Citing Obama administration sources, the Times said the president will detail on Friday the creation of a White House office that will coordinate a multi-billion-dollar effort to restrict access to government computers, protect systems that run U.S. stock exchanges, clear global banking transactions and manage the air traffic control system.

The Times said the civilian office would be responsible for coordinating private sector and government defenses against thousands of cyber-attacks mounted every day against the United States, largely by hackers but sometimes by foreign governments.

Administration sources said the president would not discuss the Pentagon plan on Friday. But Obama is expected to sign a classified order in the coming weeks that will create the military cyber-command.

The need for improved U.S. cyber-security was driven home in April when the Wall Street Journal reported that cyber-spies had penetrated the U.S. electrical grid and left behind software programs that could be used to disrupt the system.

The Times said the United States already has a growing number of computer weapons in its arsenal and must prepare strategies for their use as a deterrent or alongside conventional weapons in a wide variety of possible future conflicts.

Reuters has reported that companies in the cyber-security market range from security-software makers Symantec Corp and McAfee Inc, to traditional defense contractors such as Northrop Grumman Corp and Lockheed Martin Corp, to information technology companies such as CACI International.

The Pentagon had been working on a cyberspace strategy for several months. It was completed weeks ago, but was delayed because of ongoing arguments over the authority of the White House office and budgets for the entire effort, the report said.

(Reporting by World Desk Americas; Editing by Valerie Lee)

Title: US University Shows Radio-controlled Live Beetle
Post by: Letsbereal on May 29, 2009, 08:29:25 am
US University Shows Radio-controlled Live Beetle
28 Jan 2009
, by Tsuneyuki Miyake (Nikkei Microdevices del.icio.us)
http://techon.nikkeibp.co.jp/english/NEWS_EN/20090128/164717/
(http://tweakers.net/ext/i/1233155363.jpeg)

(http://techon.nikkeibp.co.jp/english/NEWS_EN/20090128/164717/thumb_230_z1.jpg)

The flight experiment

The University of California, Berkeley succeeded in the experiment of controlling a live rhinoceros beetle by radio and disclosed the video of the experiment at the MEMS 2009 academic conference taking place in Sorrento, Italy.

Researchers at the university controlled the movement of beetle wings and some other parts using radio signals sent to the six electrodes on its brain and muscles. They equipped the beetle with a module incorporating a circuit to send signals to the electrodes, wireless circuit, microcontroller and battery. The university has so far succeeded in several experiments of electrically controlling insects, but it used a radio control system this time.

The researchers used rhinoceros beetles in this experiment because they can carry a weight of up to 3g. They can fly carrying the module weighing about 1.3g on their backs. And another reason is that they look cool, according to the university.

For military surveillance?

For what purpose does the university conduct such a research? Considering the fact that the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) of the US is funding the research, it may be intended for military purposes.

Commenting on this point, the university said that the technology can be utilized for peaceful purposes as well. In fact, the radio-controlled beetle can be useful in places that are too narrow or dangerous for a human to enter and for many other purposes.

For that use, the university is planning to mount sensors including a camera on a beetle in the future. With the sensors, rhinoceros beetles will be able to work as surveillance robots in place of humans. As they can carry a weight of 3g, 1.7g of sensors, in addition to the 1.3g of the current module, can be mounted.

However, the ultimate goal of this research goes beyond just incorporating sensors. Beetles are already equipped with "sensors," such as their own eyes. In addition, they have a system to derive energy from food. So, the university is aiming to make the most of insects' own sensors while using their energy system as batteries.

Setting aside the question of whether it is morally right or wrong to use a living creature for such a purpose, we must think about the "production efficiency" to create "cyborgs" that are beneficial to mankind. Commenting on this, the university said it can produce the cyborg in a short period of time because the positions of the electrodes worn by a beetle need not be so precise.


US University Shows Radio-controlled Live Beetle http://tinyurl.com/btn77n
Title: Exo-Skeloton Robots
Post by: vCFy7W3SFb on June 20, 2009, 01:04:02 am
I can't wait to get one of those exo-skeloton robots like they had in that 'reboot' animated programme though...
(http://www.toyarchive.com/STAForSale/NEW2001+/Reboot/ExoSkeletonMIB1a.jpg)
(http://images4.wikia.nocookie.net/reboot/images/0/00/Infectd1197r.jpg)

http://reboot.wikia.com/wiki/Exoskeleton_Suit

I think I would donate my kidney to have one of these, full size bad-boys
Title: Sarah Connor Has Failed — the British Just Built Skynet
Post by: Letsbereal on July 14, 2009, 10:59:27 am
Sarah Connor Has Failed — the British Just Built Skynet
13 June 2008
, by Ed Grabianowski (Military Tech)
http://io9.com/5016092/sarah-connor-has-failed-++-the-british-just-built-skynet

With the launch of a new communications satellite, the British military has completed a highly advanced network that will allow robotic military units to be controlled at long range. Sound vaguely familiar? They actually named the thing Skynet. When the T-1000s come knocking, keep an eye out for the "Made in UK" sticker.

Skynet 5 is the latest iteration of a global communications system deployed by the British Armed Forces. The final satellite in the system was launched this week, and will allow high-bandwidth telecommunications between British forces located anywhere in the world. In addition to voice communications, it will allow data transfer and the remote control of robot airplanes, one of which is called "The Reaper." One of the manufacturers was quoted by BBC News as saying:

Photo: So, computers can talk directly to computers

Are you terrified yet? It gets better. The system is actually privately owned and developed - the British Armed Forces are only promised a portion of the bandwidth as part of the contract. The one reassuring aspect is that the company is not called Cyberdyne.
Seriously, what the hell? Is it British humor to name something like this Skynet, or bureaucratic idiocy? Might as well get to work on the self-awareness chip and the "really angry at humans" algorithm. Image by: BBC News.


Final Skynet satellite launched
12 June 2008
, by Jonathan Amos Science reporter (BBC News)
http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/science/nature/7451867.stm

Video: The rocket carrying the Skynet satellite lifts off

An advanced satellite that will improve greatly the ability of UK military forces to communicate around the globe has been launched into space.

The Skynet 5C platform rode into orbit atop an Ariane 5 rocket from the Kourou spaceport in French Guiana.

It joins the 5A and 5B satellites lofted successfully last year and which are already handling secure traffic for UK forces in Iraq and Afghanistan.

The £3.6bn Skynet project represents the UK's single biggest space venture.

Skynet 5C (Arianespace)

Photo: Skynet 5C during fuelling in Kourou's integration complex

The investment includes replacing and updating control centres, and the major antennas and terminals used by military ships, land vehicles and planes to communicate through the satellites.

The 5C spacecraft - the last in the Skynet series - left the launch pad in Kourou at 1905 local time (2205 GMT).

Skynet 5 allows the British Army, Royal Navy and Royal Air Force (RAF) to pass much more data, faster between command centres.

The bandwidth capacity easily surpasses the current satellite constellation, Skynet 4, whose spacecraft are coming to the end of their design lives.

"Skynet 5 is about two-and-a-half-times more capable than the previous system, and it also gives us the ability to use not just voice communication but also data communication," explains Patrick Wood from spacecraft manufacturer EADS Astrium.

"So, computers can talk directly to computers, as well giving us pictures and real-time video images."

See how the Skynet 5 system is being deployed: http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/science/nature/7451867.stm#map

This extra capability can already be seen in Afghanistan, where the RAF is using a robot surveillance plane called Reaper to hunt down Taleban forces.

Although flying in the skies over Asia, Reaper is actually controlled by RAF personnel sitting in the US behind a computer screen.

Video: An exclusive look at the reaper control centre in Nevada

Commands are sent over Skynet 5's high-bandwidth connections, directing the robot's every move. This includes firing missiles at enemy targets.

The new Skynet platforms look much like any of the other modern commercial telecommunications spacecraft launched from Kourou, but the 5s incorporate technologies that are specially prepared for military use.

Four steerable antennas give them the ability to focus bandwidth onto particular locations where it is most needed - where British forces are engaged in operations.

The spacecraft have also been "hardened" to withstand any interference - attempts to disable or take control of the satellites - and any efforts to eavesdrop on their sensitive communications.

Classified receive-antenna technology enables the 5s to "go deaf" to signals that try to "jam" them whilst still continuing to listen to operational traffic.

Video: Patrick Wood explains how the UK's latest military satellite works

Security was tight in Kourou in the lead-up to 5C's launch. Sentries had been posted outside the spaceport's giant integration complex during the final phases of the launch campaign. No unofficial photography was permitted.

The new Skynet infrastructure is not owned by the UK Ministry of Defence (MoD) but rather by a private company called Paradigm Secure Communications.

The firm won a contract to supply satellite services to the military and has obtained City money to help fund the new-build. Its deal with the MoD runs until 2020 and guarantees UK forces a proportion of the satellites' bandwidth.

Paradigm hopes to earn money for itself by selling spare capacity to Nato countries and other "friendly" forces.
A330-200

Photo: The deal with the AirTanker consortium is one of the biggest deals of its kind

"Skynet 5C is actually our self-insurance," said Paradigm Managing Director Malcolm Peto.

"When we committed to this programme we always promised to give the MoD a certain level of capability; and space, as we all know, is a variable environment for this type of technology. So, the importance of our third satellite is that we have an in-orbit spare should anything go wrong."

Skynet 5 is the largest Private Finance Initiative (PFI) yet delivered to the MoD. The procurement model has now been copied for an even bigger project - the £13bn PFI signed with an EADS-led consortium to provide mid-air refuelling services.

This will offer brand new tankers based on the Airbus A330-200, to replace the ageing fleet of VC-10 and Tristar aircraft.

Skynet 5C was launched along with a commercial "co-passenger" - Turksat 3A, which will beam TV and other telecommunication services to Turkey, Europe and Central Asia.

(http://newsimg.bbc.co.uk/media/images/44689000/gif/_44689042_skynet4_inf466.gif)
Photo: Skynet 5 system (BBC)

1. Skynet 5 overhauls satellite communications for UK forces
2. The largely autonomous satellites talk to two UK ground stations
3. Skynet 5 supports high-bandwidth applications, such as UAV video
4. Antennas and terminals are upgraded to make best use of Skynet
5. New battlefield networks, such as Cormorant, feed into the system
6. System gives commanders access to more information, faster

(http://newsimg.bbc.co.uk/media/images/44689000/gif/_44689043_sky6_inf466.gif)
Photo: Skynet 5 system (BBC)

1. Improved technologies, including a solar 'sail', lengthen the platforms' operational lives to at least 15 years
2. The satellites are 'hardened' against interference. A special receive antenna can resist attempts at jamming
3. Each spacecraft has four steerable antennas that can concentrate bandwidth onto particular regions
4. The system gives near-global coverage, providing 2.5 times the capacity afforded by the previous system
5. Each spacecraft is a 3x4x4.5m box and weighs just under 5 tonnes; the solar wings once unfurled measure 34m tip to tip
Title: Upcoming Military Robot Could Feed on Dead Bodies
Post by: Letsbereal on July 14, 2009, 01:27:54 pm
Upcoming Military Robot Could Feed on Dead Bodies
14 July 2009
, (Fox News)
http://www.foxnews.com/story/0,2933,532492,00.html

It could be a combination of 19th-century mechanics, 21st-century technology — and a 20th-century horror movie.

A Maryland company under contract to the Pentagon is working on a steam-powered robot that would fuel itself by gobbling up whatever organic material it can find — grass, wood, old furniture, even dead bodies.

Robotic Technology Inc.'s Energetically Autonomous Tactical Robot — that's right, "EATR" — "can find, ingest, and extract energy from biomass in the environment (and other organically-based energy sources), as well as use conventional and alternative fuels (such as gasoline, heavy fuel, kerosene, diesel, propane, coal, cooking oil, and solar) when suitable," reads the company's Web site.

That "biomass" and "other organically-based energy sources" wouldn't necessarily be limited to plant material — animal and human corpses contain plenty of energy, and they'd be plentiful in a war zone.

EATR will be powered by the Waste Heat Engine developed by Cyclone Power Technology of Pompano Beach, Fla., which uses an "external combustion chamber" burning up fuel to heat up water in a closed loop, generating electricity.

The advantages to the military are that the robot would be extremely flexible in fuel sources and could roam on its own for months, even years, without having to be refueled or serviced.

Upon the EATR platform, the Pentagon could build all sorts of things — a transport, an ambulance, a communications center, even a mobile gunship.

In press materials, Robotic Technology presents EATR as an essentially benign artificial creature that fills its belly through "foraging," despite the obvious military purpose.

• Click here for a brief description of EATR at the Robotic Technology Web site: http://www.robotictechnologyinc.com/index.php/EATR

• Click here for a much longer overview of the project in PDF format: http://www.robotictechnologyinc.com/images/upload/file/Presentation%20EATR%20Brief%20Overview%206%20April%2009.pdf

• Click here to read about the Cyclone Waste Heat Engine: http://www.cyclonepower.com/works.html

• Click here for FOXNews.com's Patents and Innovation Center: http://www.foxnews.com/scitech/innovation/


Energetically Autonomous Tactical Robot (EATR) Project

We originated the concept of the EATR in 2003 and the project was sponsored as a Phase II Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) project by an agency of the Department of Defense..

The purpose of the Energetically Autonomous Tactical Robot (EATR)™ (patent pending) project is to develop and demonstrate an autonomous robotic platform able to perform long-range, long-endurance missions without the need for manual or conventional re-fueling, which would otherwise preclude the ability of the robot to perform such missions. The system obtains its energy by foraging – engaging in biologically-inspired, organism-like, energy-harvesting behavior which is the equivalent of eating. It can find, ingest, and extract energy from biomass in the environment (and other organically-based energy sources), as well as use conventional and alternative fuels (such as gasoline, heavy fuel, kerosene, diesel, propane, coal, cooking oil, and solar) when suitable.

This demonstration project can lead to three potential Phase III commercialization projects: (1) the development of prototype and operational EATR™ systems for military and civil applications; (2) new civil and military applications for the autonomous intelligent control system; and (3) development of the hybrid external combustion engine system for civil and military automotive applications, whether for manned or unmanned vehicles.

Please click here for an Overview Presentation of EATR: http://www.robotictechnologyinc.com/images/upload/file/Presentation%20EATR%20Brief%20Overview%206%20April%2009.pdf

Please click here for an EATR Overview: http://www.robotictechnologyinc.com/images/upload/file/Overview%20Of%20EATR%20Project%20Brief%206%20April%2009.pdf


How It Works

(http://www.cyclonepower.com/images/cyclone_engine.jpg)

The Cyclone Engine is a Rankine Cycle heat regenerative external combustion engine, otherwise known as a “Schoell Cycle” engine.   It creates mechanical energy by heating and cooling water in a closed-loop, piston-based engine system.  The process looks like this:

HEAT PROCESS
1. Fuel is atomized and injected into the patented centrifugal combustion chamber (shown as lifted off the engine block for better viewing), where a spark ignites the fuel-air mixture into a flame that spins around the heat coils. Thermocouples (not pictured) control the duration of combustion to keep the heat in the combustion chamber at a constant temperature.         

2. Water contained in the coils becomes super-heated steam (up to 1200°F)  in as little as 5 seconds from start up which is (a) piped to the cylinders, (b) where it enters through a patent-pending valve system (not pictured).  Note, valve timing mechanisms regulate how much steam enters the cylinders – the longer the cut-off the greater the torque and acceleration.

MECHANICAL PROCESS
3. Steam enters the six radial-configured cylinders under pressures up to 3200 psi to push the pistons down in sequence.  Note, no motor oil is used – water is both the working fluid and engine lubricant. Also, because of the valve design, the engine starts without the need of a starter motor.

4. The rotating action of the pistons connected through a patent-pending spider bearing (not pictured) turns the crank shaft.  Note, because the greatest amount of torque occurs at the first rotation, the shaft can be directly connected to a drive train without a transmission.

COOLING PROCESS
5. Steam escapes the cylinders through exhaust ports and (a) enters the patent-pending condensing unit where it turns back into water, and (b) collects in a sealed pan at the bottom of the condenser. Note, this is a closed-loop system – the water does not need to be replaced or topped-off.

6. Blowers spin fresh air around the condenser to speed the cooling process.

REGENERATIVE PROCESS
7. (a) Air which has been pre-heated from the condensing unit, (b) continues up to a second heat exchanger located in the exhaust port of the combustion chamber, further pre-heating the air used for combustion while also cooling the exhaust fumes (to about 320°F).

8.  A high pressure pump (not pictured) pipes water from the collecting pan to the heat coils (a) via heat exchangers surrounding each of the cylinders (only one pictured), and then (b) to the center of the coils to start the heat cycle again.

For more technical info about the Cyclone Engine, including photos and video, click here: http://www.cyclonepower.com/technical_information.html


Technical Information

(http://www.cyclonepower.com/images/MarkV.jpg)
Profile cross-section of the Mark V automotive engine

(http://www.cyclonepower.com/images/MarkVbottom.jpg)
Bottom view of Mark V Engine detailing the pistons, spider bearing, variable speed timing, and blower.

(http://www.cyclonepower.com/images/MarkVtop.jpg)
Top view of Mark V Engine also showing valve mechanisms
Title: Dutch Dwarf Drones sniffs out cannabis plantations
Post by: Letsbereal on July 20, 2009, 02:59:51 pm
Dutch Dwarf Drones sniffs out cannabis plantations
1 May 2009
, by John Sinteur (The Daily Irrelevant)
http://weblog.sinteur.com/category/nederland-is-gek

(http://www.verhagenx2.com/Resources/minihelicoptermea.jpeg)

 Police in the northeastern Achterhoek region have begun using an unmanned miniature helicopter to track down the illegal cultivation of cannabis, which often takes place indoors. The so-called “canna-chopper” is fitted with cameras and a sniffer to take air samples out of ventilator shafts and chimneys. A dedicated gas analyser is able to recognise traces of weed smell in the air samples.

    Police say they are not breaking the law because the samples can be taken without entering the building. The unmanned dwarf helicopter can stay airborne for a maximum of eight hours. It was designed and built by Dutch police engineers.

This is probably confusing to all foreign readers who think cannabis is entirely legal over here. It isn’t. The Dutch have made a decision not to prosecute small time offenders. This means, a blind eye is turned to possession when the amount is very low (personal use amounts). They also grant licenses to owners of ‘coffee-shops’ to sell cannabis with some fairly tight regulations. I believe the idea behind this is that, as has been discovered in basically every other country on earth, people want to smoke a joint from time to time, and it is better they get it from a regulated (and more importantly, taxed!) business, rather than some guy on the street who will almost certainly try to push the more addictive stuff on to the customer for higher (tax free!) profits.

However, what is not tolerated, is massive scale, cannabis farming which is then sold on for huge profits (without tax being paid, are you spotting a theme here?).

Cannabis sniffer Cannachopper - weed - drugs
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SAlOPGd8WOE

CANNABIS SNIFFER HELICOPTER
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lgCqGC6iIhc
Title: Biomass EATR Robot: A closer look at a robot that will consume organic matter
Post by: infowarrior_039 on July 22, 2009, 03:24:33 pm
Recently, on last Fridays Alex Jones show, Jason Bermas covered an update to a story first covered in January 2009. The website "Robot Living" carried the first article on the EATR Robot.

http://www.robotliving.com/2009/01/29/eatr-robot-hunts-for-food/

Quote
EATR Robot Hunts For Food

    A new robot called EATR or the Energetically Autonomous Tactical Robot is being developed by RTI and being funded DARPA.

    The goal of this project is to create a robot for long range missions without the need for conventional refueling.  The robot will be able to get ‘food’ on it’s own.  RTI states the robot will be able to:

    Identify suitable biomass sources of energy and distinguish those sources from unsuitable materials (e.g., wood, grass, or paper from rocks, metal, or glass)
    Spatially locate and manipulate the sources of energy (e.g., cut or shred to size, grasp, lift, and ingest); and
    Convert the biomass to sufficient electrical energy to power power the EATR subsystems .

The robot will have four main systems, with the heart of the robot being  a
biomass engine provided by Cyclone Power.

    1. Robotic mobility platform
    2. Autonomous control system/sensors
    3. Robotic arms and end effectors
    4. External combustion engine

This is the first step to robot autonomy and the inevitable robot uprising.

This article tells us that DARPA (the DoD) is funding a robot that can distinguish, cut to size, and consume organic matter. So far, it seems that this new robot can only eat plant material. Lets move on to the next part of this story.

Two days later, a Renewable Energy blog comments on this story, providing some more information:


http://mattgoesgreen.com/2009/01/new-military-eatr-robot-will-find-harvest-and-ingest-biomass-to-power-itself-welcome-to-skynet/


Quote
New military Autonomous “EATR” robot will SELECT, HARVEST and EAT biological material to power itself. Welcome to Skynet.

Companies developing biomass robot engine
By Anna Austin



Robotic Technologies Inc. has contracted with Cyclone Power
Technologies Inc. to develop a biomass engine system to power the
company’s Energetically Autonomous Tactical Robot—a vehicle which will
be capable of self-obtaining and ingesting biomass to produce energy to
power itself.


The project is funded by Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency, a U.S. Department of Defense research organization.

RTI President Robert Finkelstein describes the patent-pending
system as a biologically-inspired, organism-like robotic vehicle which
finds and processes biomass in a manner similar to eating. Therefore,
it will not need conventional refueling, but is capable of running on
convention fuels when needed.

The contract with Cyclone will consist of two phases. In the first
phase, within six months Cyclone will build and deliver an engine
containing a biomass combustion chamber for demonstration purposes. In
phase two, the company will build and deliver the biomass trimmer,
gatherer and feeder system to work with its engine power source.

Through the duration of the project, the EATR will be tested to
demonstrate its ability to identify suitable biomass sources of
energy—such as wood, grass or paper—and distinguish them from
unsuitable materials such as rocks, metal or glass. Its ability to
spatially locate and manipulate sources of energy—cutting, shredding to
size, grasping, lifting and ingesting—will also be tested, as well as
its ability to convert the biomass to sufficient electrical energy.

The EATR will contain an autonomous intelligent control system with
sensors allowing the vehicle to find and recognize energy sources,
manipulate the material with robotic arms which contain and gripper and
a shredder, and divert the biomass into the combustion chamber. The
robot may generate 1 kilowatt hour of electricity for every three to 12
pounds of dry vegetation, which translates to two to eight miles of
driving or more than 80 hours of standby. According to Finkelstein, 150
pounds of vegetation could provide sufficient energy for 100 miles of
driving.


The electricity produced will provide an electric current to a
battery pack, which will power the sensors, processors and controls, as
well as the robotic arm.

“Our contract with DARPA requires an initial demonstration by April
2010,” Finkelstein said. “We expect to have a prototype autonomous
intelligent EATR vehicle by April 2011. An operational system could be
available by 2012
-2013.”

Finkelstein said that in addition to military missions, the EATR
may be applicable to civil applications, such as agricultural vehicles
(robotic or manned) that could use the biomass waste gleaned from the
fields as a source of energy, as well as forestry and homeland security
applications.


BRIEF PROJECT OVERVIEW EATR: ENERGETICALLY AUTONOMOUS TACTICAL ROBOT DARPA Contract W31P4Q-08-C-0292 PURPOSE

The purpose of the Energetically Autonomous Tactical Robot (EATR) ™ project is to develop and demonstrate an autonomous robotic platform able to perform long-range, long-endurance missions without the need for manual or conventional re-fueling, which would otherwise preclude the ability of the robot to perform such missions.

The system obtains its energy by foraging – engaging in biologically-inspired, organism-like, energy-harvesting behavior which is the equivalent of eating. It can find, ingest, and extract energy from biomass in the environment (and other organically-based energy sources), as well as use conventional and alternative fuels (such as gasoline, heavy fuel, kerosene, diesel, propane, coal, cooking oil, and solar) when suitable. For example, about 150 lbs of vegetation could provide sufficient energy for 100 miles of driving, depending on circumstances.

The EATR ™ system consists of four main subsystems:

(1) an autonomous intelligent control system and sensors;

(2) a manipulator system consisting of a robotic arm and end effectors;

(3) a hybrid engine system consisting of a biomass combustion chamber, a Stirling (i.e., external combustion) engine, and a multi-cell rechargeable battery; and

(4) a platform system consisting of a robotically-modified High Mobility Multi-Wheeled Vehicle (HMMWV). The initial proof-of-concept demonstration, a Phase II Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) project sponsored by the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA), will focus on the ability of the EATR to recognize biomass sources of energy from non-energy materials, properly manipulate and ingest the biomass materials into the engine system, and generate electrical power to operate the various subsystems.


This demonstration project can lead to three potential Phase III commercialization projects:

(1) the development of prototype and operational EATR™ systems for military and civil applications;

(2) new civil and military applications for the 4D/RCS autonomous intelligent control system for robotic vehicles and ubiquitous intelligence; and

(3) development of the Stirling engine system for civil and military automotive applications, whether for manned or unmanned vehicles.

BACKGROUND

Unmanned Air Vehicles (UAVs) are being developed to perform long-range, long-endurance missions (such as DARPA’s Vulture Program to develop a UAV capable of remaining on-station uninterrupted for over five years to perform intelligence, surveillance, reconnaissance (ISR), and communication missions over an area of interest). Likewise, there is a need for Unmanned Ground Vehicles (UGVs) to perform long-range, long-endurance missions without manual or conventional refueling (however, unlike for UAVs, solar energy alone is insufficient for most UGV energy requirements). A robotic vehicle’s inherent advantage is its ability to engage in long-endurance, tedious, and hazardous tasks, such as Reconnaissance, Surveillance, and Target Acquisition (RSTA) under difficult conditions, without fatigue or stress.

This advantage can be severely reduced by the need for the robotic platform to replenish its fuel supply. Example long-range, long-endurance missions for robotic ground vehicles include: RSTA missions in the mountains and caves of Afghanistan and Pakistan; search missions for nuclear facilities and underground bunkers in rogue nations; special operations and counter-insurgency; patrolling remote borders; homeland security; serving as nodes in distributed and remote command, control, communications, and intelligence (C3I) networks; and serving as remote, mobile sensor and target tracking platforms in ballistic missile defense systems. Either strategically or tactically, long-range, long-endurance UGVs can work cooperatively with – and complement – long-range, long-endurance UAVs, such as the DARPA Vulture project to develop a heavier-than-air craft that can keep a 1,000-pound payload aloft for five years.

TECHNICAL OBJECTIVES
The initial objective is to develop and demonstrate a proof-of-concept system. Demonstration of a full operational prototype is the objective for a Phase III commercialization project. The project will demonstrate the ability of the EATR™ to:

(1) identify suitable biomass sources of energy and distinguish those sources from unsuitable materials (e.g., wood, grass, or paper from rocks, metal, or glass);

(2) spatially locate and manipulate the sources of energy (e.g., cut or shred to size, grasp, lift, and ingest); and

(3) convert the biomass to sufficient electrical energy to power the EATR™ subsystems. The EATR™ system has four major subsystems: a robotic mobility platform subsystem; an autonomous, intelligent control and sensor subsystem; a robotic arm and end effectors subsystem; and a hybrid external combustion (Stirling-cycle) engine subsystem. Robotic Mobility Platform The autonomous robotic mobility platform may consist of any suitable automotive vehicle, such as a robotically-modified High Mobility Multi-Wheeled Vehicle (HMMWV), or a purely robotic vehicle. The platform provides mobility for the mission and mission payload, and, for our proof-of-concept purposes, accommodation for the EATR™ subsystems.

The robotic mobility platform is not the focus of this project, nor is it essential for the EATR™ proof-of-concept demonstration. However, it will be included to provide a more realistic system context than a laboratory “breadboard” type demonstration of the EATR™ subsystems. The vehicle may, in fact, be either an autonomous or telerobotic HMMWV, although its movement (including cross-country path planning and obstacle avoidance) will be an optional part of the proof-of-concept demonstration.

The subsystems, for example, might be mounted on a trailer attached to the vehicle. Autonomous Intelligent Control The autonomous intelligent control subsystem will consist of the 4D/RCS (three dimensions of space, one dimension of time, Real-time Control System) architecture, with new software modules which we will create for the EATR™. The 4D/RCS has been under development by the Intelligent Systems Division of the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST), an agency of the U.S. Department of Commerce, for more than three decades with an investment exceeding $125 million. The NIST 4D/RCS has been demonstrated successfully in various autonomous intelligent vehicles, and a variation of the 4D/RCS serves as the Autonomous Navigation System (ANS) mandated for all robotic vehicles in the Army’s Future Combat System (an additional investment of $250 million). NIST is providing assistance in transferring the 4D/RCS technology for the EATR™.

The control subsystem will also include the sensors needed for the demonstration (e.g., optical, ladar, infrared, and acoustic). While the NIST 4D/RCS architecture is capable of autonomous vehicle mobility, it will be used in this project to: control the movement and operation of the sensors, process sensor data to provide situational awareness such that the EATR™ is able to identify and locate suitable biomass for energy production; control the movement and operation of the robotic arm and end effector to manipulate the biomass and ingest it into the combustion chamber; and control the operation of the hybrid Stirling engine to provide suitable power for the required functions. The 4D/RCS is a framework in which sensors, sensor processing, databases, computer models, and machine controls may be linked and operated such that the system behaves as if it were intelligent.

It can provide a system with several types of intelligence (where intelligence is the ability to make an appropriate choice or decision):

(1) Reactive intelligence based on an autonomic sense-act modality which is the ability of the system to make an appropriate choice in response to an immediate environmental stimulus (i.e., a threat or opportunity). Example: the vehicle moves toward a vegetation sensed by optical image processing.
(2) Deliberative intelligence, which includes prediction and learning, which is based on world models, memory, planning, and task decomposition, and includes the ability to make appropriate choices for events that have not yet occurred but which are based on prior events. Example: the vehicle moves downhill in a dry area to search for wetter terrain which would increase the probability of finding biomass for energy. (3) Creative intelligence, which is based on learning and the ability to cognitively model and simulate and it is the ability to make appropriate choices about events which have not yet been experienced. Example: from a chance encounter with a dumpster, the vehicle learns that such entities are repositories of paper, cardboard, and other combustible materials, and develops tactics to exploit them as energy-rich sources of fuel. Robotic Arm and End Effector The robotic arm and end effector will be attached to the robotic mobility platform, either directly or affixed to a platform towed behind the HMMWV. It will have sufficient degrees-of-freedom, extend sufficiently from the platform, and have a sufficient payload to reach and lift appropriate materials in its vicinity. The end effector will consist of a multi-fingered (e.g., three-fingered or two-thumb, one-finger) hand with sufficient degrees-of-freedom to grasp and operate a cutting tool (e.g., a circular saw) to demonstrate an ability to prepare biomass for ingestion, and to grasp and manipulate biomass for ingestion. Hybrid External Combustion Engine The source of power for EATR™: new hybrid external combustion engine system from Cyclone Power Technology Inc. It is integrated with a biomass combustion chamber to provide heat energy for the engine (EATR can also carry supplemental fuel, such as propane). The engine will provide electric current for a rechargeable battery pack, which will power the sensors, processors and controls, and the robotic arm/end effector (a rechargeable battery pack ensures continuous energy output despite intermittent biomass energy intake). The hybrid external combustion engine is very quiet, reliable, efficient, and fuel-flexible compared with the internal combustion engine. The engine will not provide mobility power for vehicle for the proof-of-concept, but it will for the EATR prototype COMMERCIALIZATION Our vision is that this demonstration project will lead to three potential Phase III commercialization projects:

(1) the development of prototype and operational EATR™ systems for military and civil applications;

(2) new civil and military applications for the autonomous intelligent control system; and

(3) development of the Stirling engine system for civil and military automotive applications, whether for manned or unmanned vehicles.

EATR™ In Phase III, EATR™ will be commercialized for long-range, long-endurance military missions, but it also has civil applications as well – wherever vehicles must function in wilderness areas for extended periods of time, such as for forestry, exploration, natural resource monitoring, fire protection, and border patrol. Agriculture, for example, is a particularly promising application, where energy-intensive vehicles such as tractors and harvesters could glean their energy directly from waste biomass in the field. AUTONOMOUS INTELLIGENT CONTROL: 4D/RCS The Phase III commercialization of the 4D/RCS autonomous intelligent control system promises to be the most significant opportunity.

In addition to its potential for achieving a high level of performance – and ultimately cognition – in various kinds of robots, it will serve as the basis for ubiquitous intelligence: the ability to insert intelligence into entities and facilities of all kinds. With sensors and voice interaction, we will be able to converse with our walls without having lost our sanity. The 4D/RCS can serve as the basis as a decision tool for managing complex systems of systems, whether for the military (as for the Future Combat System (FCS) where it could provide an overarching decision framework for ground and air robotic and manned platforms, or civil applications such as for traffic control or management of large organizations. In a corporation, for example, historical and real-time data can flow into the system concerning sales, competition, investors, geopolitics, environmental conditions, etc. (instead of data from sensors for robotic control) and the processed data can flow through the world model and task decomposition modules to provide suggested courses of action to decision makers (or be allowed to act autonomously for some decisions).

Large interactive displays can show the system’s real-time interaction embodying the corporation’s classic SWOT analysis: Strengths, Opportunities, Weaknesses, and Threats. HYBRID STERLING ENGINE Unlike internal combustion engines, the Cyclone engine, which is a type of Rankine cycle steam engine, uses an external combustion chamber to heat a separate working fluid (de-ionized water) which expands to create mechanical energy by moving pistons or a turbine. Combustion is external so the engine is extremely fuel-flexible and can run on any fuel (solid, liquid, or gaseous), including: biomass, agricultural waste, coal, municipal trash, kerosene, ethanol, diesel, gasoline, heavy fuel, chicken fat, palm oil, cottonseed oil, algae oil, hydrogen, propane, etc. – individually or in combination. A 100 Hp prototype engine for vehicles has been developed.


The Cyclone engine is environmentally friendly because combustion is continuous and more easily regulated for temperature, oxidizers, and fuel amount. Lower combustion temperatures and pressures create less toxic and exotic exhaust gases. A uniquely configured combustion chamber creates a rotating flow that facilitates complete air and fuel mixing, and complete combustion, so there are virtually no emissions. Less waste heat is released (hundreds of degrees lower than internal combustion exhaust). The engine does not need: a catalytic converter, radiator, transmission, oil pump or lubricating oil (because it is water lubricated). The decreased engine size and weight provides increased efficiency and reliability.

This story elaborates on the DoD project. It outlines the goal of having working machines rolled out by 2012. (Hmmm) It also once again highlights how the machine will consume organic material. I will elaborate on the details of the EATR robot shortly, but lets continue the news trail.

On the 9th of July, "The Register". a Brittish news site reported on the EATR Robot:

http://www.theregister.co.uk/2009/07/09/eatr_beta/

Quote
Robot land-steamers to consume all life on Earth as fuel
Autonom-nom-nom-nomous technology

By Lewis Page
Posted in Science, 9th July 2009 12:06 GMT

News has emerged of a milestone reached on the road towards a potentially world-changing piece of technology. We speak, of course, of US military plans to introduce roving steam-powered robots which would fuel themselves by harvesting everything alive and cramming it into their insatiable blazing furnaces.

The scheme is officially referred to as Energetically Autonomous Tactical Robot (EATR™) by those behind it. It will come as no surprise to Reg readers that the funding is from DARPA, the famous Pentagon warboffinry bureau. If you're a hammer, all the problems start to look like nails: if you're DARPA, all the solutions start to look like robots.

The idea of EATR is ostensibly that military reconnaissance droids far behind enemy lines would be able to forage for fuel. Robotic Technology Inc, lead contractor on the EATR, puts it thus:

    EATR is an autonomous robotic platform able to perform long-range, long-endurance military missions without the need for manual or conventional re-fueling. The patent pending robotic system can find, ingest and extract energy from biomass in the environment, as well as use conventional and alternative fuels (such as gasoline, diesel, propane and solar) when suitable.

The machine runs on a "biomass furnace" which powers a steam generator driving a "waste heat engine" from Cyclone Power Technologies. These pieces of kit will now be mated together within 90 days, according to RTI.

The robot steamers are envisaged as being equipped with powerful articulated arms in order to rip trees or bushes out of the earth and stuff them into their glowing maws. By way of a treat, it seems that the machines will also be able to loot or forage more conventional fuel supplies from the petrol tanks of cars, domestic gas cylinders and so on. Cyclone says that their engine can also run happily on old apple cores, banana peel and other kitchen garbage gleaned from bins.

Hapless drivers or householders will be in no position to object to such robotic plundering: military reconnaissance vehicles are typically heavily armed, and doubtless the EATR will be no exception. It might also be fitted with DARPA's SELF tech, enabling it to construct copies of itself and modify its own design.

Even more disturbingly, it seems clear that the EATRs could run on various other kinds of organic matter, for instance bodies. No doubt things would start small, with roving EATRs scooping roadkill, stray cats and such into their fireboxes and reaping fresh energy from their rich, blazing dripping.

From there it would be only a small step to the inevitable harvesting of every living thing on Earth. Trees, crops, garbage, cattle, the very human race itself - all would go to feed the hungry roaring furnaces and drive the clanking, puffing, smoke-belching mechanical locusts onward until the sooty corpse-pall from their engines covered the entire Earth. An Earth which would be home in time to nothing but slowly powering-down EATRs, prowling across endless ashy plains of their own droppings.

There's a more upbeat perspective from RTI here (pdf). ®

Lets see what that attached PDF has to say

http://www.cyclonepower.com/press/07-07-09.pdf

Quote

PRESS RELEASE
 
Cyclone Power Successfully Completes
First Stage of Robotic Technology Project 

 
POMPANO  BEACH,  FL,  July  7,  2009.  Cyclone  Power  Technologies  Inc.  (Pink  Sheets:  CYPW)
announced today that  it has completed the first stage of  its project with Robotic Technology  Inc.
(RTI), of Potomac, MD, to develop a beta biomass engine system used to power RTI’s Energetically
Autonomous  Tactical  Robot  (EATR™).  This  is  a  Phase  II  SBIR  project  sponsored  by  the  Defense
Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA), Defense Sciences Office.

 
In  this  first  stage  Cyclone  successfully  coupled  its  proprietary  steam  generator with  a  compact
biomass  furnace  to be used with  the  prototype  EATR,  and  produced  sufficient  steam  to power
Cyclone’s six-cylinder, 16HP Waste Heat Engine (WHE). With the completion of this stage, RTI has
paid Cyclone a  total of $50,000  in development  fees. Cyclone will now proceed  to attaching  the
WHE to this heat source and commence system performance testing with the goal of delivering a
complete beta system to RTI in the next 90 days.     
 
RTI’s EATR is an autonomous robotic platform able to perform long-range, long-endurance military
missions  without  the  need  for  manual  or  conventional  re-fueling.  The  patent  pending  robotic
system  can  find,  ingest  and  extract  energy  from  biomass  in  the  environment,  as  well  as  use
conventional and alternative fuels (such as gasoline, diesel, propane and solar) when suitable.
 
“We are excited and encouraged by Cyclone’s progress,” stated Dr. Robert Finkelstein, President
of  RTI.  “Cyclone’s  technology  is  ideal  for  our  robotic  vehicle  to  perform  a wide  range  of  either
military  or  civilian  tasks.  The  potential  commercial  applications  are  enormous  for  biomass-
powered equipment and vehicles.”
 
CORPORATE PROFILE

Cyclone  Power  Technologies  is  the  developer  of  the  award-winning  Cyclone  Engine  –  an  eco-friendly  external
combustion  engine with  the  power  and  versatility  to  run  everything  from  portable  electric  generators  and  garden
equipment  to  cars,  trucks  and  locomotives.  Invented  by  company  founder  and  CEO  Harry  Schoell,  the  patented
Cyclone  Engine  is  a modern  day  steam engine,  ingeniously designed  to  achieve high  thermal  efficiencies  through  a
compact  heat-regenerative  process,  and  to  run  on  virtually  any  fuel  -  including  bio-diesels,  syngas  or  solar  - while
emitting fewer greenhouse gases and irritating pollutants into the air.  Currently in its late stages of development, the
Cyclone Engine was recognized by Popular Science Magazine as the Invention of the Year for 2008, and was presented
with  the  Society  of  Automotive  Engineers’  AEI  Tech  Award  in  2006  and  2008.    Additionally,  Cyclone was  recently
named Environmental Business of the Year by the Broward County Environmental Protection Department.  For more
information, visit www.cyclonepower.com.
 
Media Contact
Will Wellons
407-462-2718
[email protected] 
 
 
Company Contact:
Frankie Fruge
954-943-8721
[email protected]
 
Robotic  Technology  Incorporated  (RTI),  a Maryland,  U.S.A.  corporation  chartered  in  1985,  provides  systems  and
services  in  the  fields  of  intelligent  systems,  robotic  vehicles  (including  unmanned  ground,  air,  and  sea  vehicles),
robotics and automation, weapons systems, intelligent control systems, intelligent transportation systems, intelligent
manufacturing,  and  other  advanced  technology  for  government,  industry,  and  not-for-profit  clients.  Please  visit
www.robotictechnologyinc.com for more information.
 
Contact:
Dr. Robert Finkelstein
Robotic Technology Inc.
[email protected]
301-983-4194

That PDF explains the system in much the same manner as the other two articles.  Now lets catch up with this story. On the 17th, Jason Bermas covers this story on the Alex Jones Friday show. On Tuesday the 21st, London News company "The Gaurdian" posted this article:

http://www.guardian.co.uk/technology/2009/jul/20/flesh-eating-robot-vegetarian

Quote
Flesh-eating robots turn vegetarian

It sounded like something pulled straight from a grisly scene in Terminator: an unstoppable military robot that powered itself by devouring everything in its path – including trees, grass and even, according to reports, dead bodies.

But after a string of headlines that labelled the machine a "corpse eater", the robot's creators have gone on a public relations offensive to extinguish the rumour that their invention will feed on human or animal flesh.

The machine's inventors say the Energetically Autonomous Tactical Robot – known as Eatr for short – does indeed power its "biomass engine" by digesting organic material, but that it is not intended to chomp its way through battlefields of fallen soldiers.

"We completely understand the public's concern about futuristic robots feeding on the human population, but that is not our mission," said Harry Schoell, the chief executive of Cyclone Power Technologies, one of the companies behind the machine.

"We are focused on demonstrating that our engines can create usable, green power from plentiful, renewable plant matter. The commercial applications alone for this earth-friendly energy solution are enormous."

The publicity drive is in reaction to the buzz the project created when it emerged that it was already in the testing phase, thanks to funding from the Pentagon.

The concept was originally put forward in 2003, and has been pushed forward with money from the US military's Defence Advanced Research Projects Agency (Darpa), a successor to the organisation that funded early development of the internet.

US officials hope the steam-powered engine can be used by the military to create a self-sufficient robot that could survive on its own for months at a time.

The early version of Eatr runs on twigs, wood chips and other plant-based material. This is fed into an engine that burns it and uses it to create propulsion.

Another of the robot's inventors, Dr Robert Finkelstein of Robotic Technology Inc (RTI), said that Eatr had built-in systems that would help it determine whether material that it ingested was animal, vegetable or mineral.

"If it's not on the menu, it's not going to eat it," Finkelstein told Fox News.

Eatr can also use more conventional fuels, such as petrol, diesel or cooking oil, to keep going. But the group reiterated that it would be illegal to create a robot that used dead bodies for energy.

This report, however, was only the News followup to this official PDF posted on the EATR website:

http://www.robotictechnologyinc.com/index.php/EATR

pdf: http://www.robotictechnologyinc.com/images/upload/file/Cyclone%20Power%20Press%20Release%20EATR%20Rumors%20Final%2016%20July%2009.pdf

Lets see what that PDF says:

Quote

PRESS RELEASE
 
Cyclone Power Technologies Responds to 
Rumors about “Flesh Eating” Military Robot


POMPANO BEACH, FL, July 16, 2009. In response to rumors circulating the internet on sites such
as  FoxNews.com,  FastCompany.com  and  CNET  News  about  a  “flesh  eating”  robot  project, 
Cyclone Power Technologies Inc. (Pink Sheets: CYPW) and Robotic Technology Inc. (RTI) would
like to set the record straight: This robot is strictly vegetarian.   
 
On  July  7,  Cyclone  announced  that  it  had  completed  the  first  stage  of  development  for  a  beta
biomass engine system used to power RTI’s Energetically Autonomous Tactical Robot (EATR™),
a Phase II SBIR project sponsored by the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA),
Defense  Sciences Office. RTI’s EATR  is  an  autonomous  robotic  platform  able  to  perform  long-
range, long-endurance missions without the need for manual or conventional re-fueling. 
 
RTI’s patent pending robotic system will be able to find, ingest and extract energy from biomass in
the environment. Despite the far-reaching reports that this includes “human bodies,” the public can
be assured that the engine Cyclone has developed to power the EATR runs on fuel no scarier than
twigs,  grass  clippings  and  wood  chips  –  small,  plant-based  items  for  which  RTI’s  robotic
technology  is designed  to  forage. Desecration of  the dead  is  a war  crime under Article 15 of  the
Geneva Conventions
, and is certainly not something sanctioned by DARPA, Cyclone or RTI.   
 
“We  completely  understand  the  public’s  concern  about  futuristic  robots  feeding  on  the  human
population, but that is not our mission,” stated Harry Schoell, Cyclone’s CEO. “We are focused on
demonstrating  that  our  engines  can  create  usable,  green  power  from  plentiful,  renewable  plant
matter. The commercial applications alone for this earth-friendly energy solution are enormous.”   
 
CORPORATE PROFILE

Cyclone  Power  Technologies  is  the  developer  of  the  award-winning  Cyclone  Engine  –  an  eco-friendly  external
combustion  engine  with  the  power  and  versatility  to  run  everything  from  portable  electric  generators  and  garden
equipment to cars, trucks and locomotives. Invented by company founder and CEO Harry Schoell, the patented Cyclone
Engine  is  a modern  day  steam  engine,  ingeniously  designed  to  achieve  high  thermal  efficiencies  through  a  compact
heat-regenerative process, and to run on virtually any fuel - including bio-diesels, syngas or solar - while emitting fewer
greenhouse gases and irritating pollutants into the air.   Currently in its late  stages of development, the Cyclone Engine
was  recognized  by  Popular  Science Magazine  as  the  Invention  of  the Year  for  2008,  and was  presented with  the
Society of Automotive Engineers’ AEI Tech Award  in 2006  and 2008.   Additionally, Cyclone was  recently  named
Environmental  Business  of  the  Year  by  the  Broward  County  Environmental  Protection  Department.    For  more
information, visit www.cyclonepower.com.
 
Robotic Technology  Incorporated  (RTI),  a Maryland, U.S.A.  corporation  chartered  in 1985, provides  systems  and
services  in  the  fields  of  intelligent  systems,  robotic  vehicles  (including  unmanned  ground,  air,  and  sea  vehicles),
robotics  and  automation,  weapons  systems,  intelligent  control  systems,  intelligent  transportation  systems,  intelligent
manufacturing,  and  other  advanced  technology  for  government,  industry,  and  not-for-profit  clients.  Please  visit
www.robotictechnologyinc.com for more information.
 
Media Contact
Will Wellons: 407-462-2718
[email protected]
 
Cyclone Contact:
Frankie Fruge: 954-943-8721
[email protected]
 
 
RTI Contact:
Dr. Robert Finkelstein: 301-983-4194
[email protected]

Now, to continue on this news story, we will have to go back up to our first story, where this comment was made on the 20th of July:

Quote
Comment by F Govers:
Monday, July 20th 2009 at 9:47 pm |

Hi! I’m one of the engineers working on EATR, and just wanted to let you know that EATR has no ability to deal with protiens – meat – at all. It can only “digest” or process plant material, and it prefers dried out leaves, twigs, and branches-in other words, dead plants. We don’t have any way to convert animal parts into energy. You can see more at my blog, http://mrrobot0.blogspot.com. We do appreciate that you found our project interesting.

Lets see what he posted on his blog

http://mrrobot0.blogspot.com/

Quote
/19/2009
The Truth about EATR

It is always gratifying when something I'm involved in gets a wide reception around the Internet. In the case of EATR (see post, below) there has been a lot of speculation and just wild rumors about what we are trying to do with the Energetically Autonomous Tactical Robot. For example

Bot Junkie: Robot runs on Soylent Green
The Register: Robot to consume all life on earth as fuel
DARPA Funds Flesh Eating Robot

Which stories basically took the concept of a robot that finds its own food, and then wildly speculated on what that food might be, because in the press releases we just said "biomass" without specifying what that might include.

I'm one of the principles involved in EATR, as my company is one of the commercial investors in this project.

THE TRUTH ABOUT EATR

EATR was always conceived as identifying, selecting, and consuming vegetable matter (leaves, twigs, branches, grass) as its energy source. In particular, the easiest vegetable matter to grab from the robot's perspective, is what is already lying on the ground - dead leaves, dropped branches, etc. That material is gathered up and then ground into small bits that can be easily dropped into the burner. EATR IS A VEGETARIAN.

This employee is also putting forth the official line about EATR.


Now; Lets overview the story from a logical and reasonable point of reality:

The DoD (under DARPA) is part of the MILLITARY. They are funding a robot that can convert biomass as fuel, as explained above.
Their company that they contract to build and design the robot endorses the MILLITARY and civilian uses of the EATR robot.
Then that company says its ONLY a VEGITARIAN, its for the EARTH and it is Sooooo loving. (and sooo Liberal)

Clearly this robot can cut, grind, and consume anything that is within its capabilites. Are we to REALLY believe this robot can not be programmed to ignore a set of EAT THIS and DONT EAT THIS as software limitations for MILITARY use? Im not buying it. And yes, of course anything public and civilian will use a Firmware that has a set of eating limitiations, but we know what happens then... (3 laws of Robotics and IROBOT - which, is a real company that makes robots for your house, and for the ARMY)

so this DoD MILLITARY funded robot called the EAT-eR can consume BIOMASS as it SEES FIT and it is only going to be LOVING and FOR THE EARTH !  I am not buying your LIES DARPA! And of course the DoD can hide behind these public corpartions to build and design these robots, cause theses public corporations would never do anything evil. All you employees building these robots... DO YOU REALLY THINK THE DoD COULDNT MAKE THIS THEMSELVES IF THEY WANTED TO? DO YOU REALLY THINK THE DoD DOESNT HAVE THEIR OWN EXPERTS AND GENISUES WHO COULD MODIFY THIS ROBOT AS THEY SEE FIT IN THE FUTURE.

Well. I forsee DoD EATR robots cleaning up the bodies and remains of WWIII in 2012, at this rate. 


IF THE PUBLIC HAS ANY SENSE, THEY SHOULD FORCE THE DoD TO TESTIFY UNDER LAW THAT THEY WOULD NEVER MODIFY THIS TECHNOLOGY FOR THEIR OWN PURPOSES TO BYPASS ETHICAL LIMITATIONS.

Needless to say, I am sure the Millitary Industrial Complex has technology far beyond this project, but if they dont have a robot like this, are you as the public not going to take the Millitary Industrial Complex and the DoD to task and have them testify to never commit WAR CRIMES ?!

Becasue seriously, if this technology goes unrestrained or is put in the wrong hands, we better watch out.




Title: Re: Biomass EATR Robot: A closer look at a robot that will consume organic matter
Post by: infowarrior_039 on July 22, 2009, 03:40:00 pm
As Alex has said before, this also ties into The Matrix storyline and a Pentagon plan to have everyone in a tank by a certain date. if anyone can provide some good info on that, that would be great.

I actually found the article:

http://www.prisonplanet.com/jones_report_052303_matrix.html

Quote
The Matrix Reloaded: Revelation of the Method

Alex Jones May 23 2003

The first "Matrix" was obviously new age in its overall presentation: that you've got to believe in yourself and then you can change the
parameters of reality from within. And it had the overall message that there is another reality, that we are in a false reality. It covered and explained denial, how some people want to remain inside the lie and don't want to know the truth, don't want to remember the truth, want to be reinserted into the fraud at the cost of their sovereignty, their liberty, their freedom, their creativity.

And it had, of course, a lot of violence in it but it was a fight against machines so it wasn't real human beings that were dying. And there were a lot of young people who were affected by the powerful and dark overtones of the film - and were obviously already unstable. Whether it was because of government programming or the general culture and (they) went out and shot people inside of the film.

And so I was ambiguous. I am certainly a Christian and didn't follow the New Age, Hindu or Buddhist line but I was still overall not sure if the film was a production of the globalists. Well, now I am sure that The Matrix I and The Matrix II: "Matrix Reloaded," are in the most pure sense Illuminati productions.

The film begins obviously with a group of trailers and there is a wide screen shot that has been squeezed down and distorted as an authority figure-type man in black sits behind a table with flickering subliminals being splashed on the screen, talking about power-aid. This is before the film begins. And he talks down to you and says you are not even going to understand what I'm saying to you - you pathetic mindless, hive-minded units. You are units that power the Matrix. Drink your power-aid. Do as you are ordered to do.

So that's how the film begins. And then it launches into the world of the Matrix - that is the real physical world of the underground base of Zion. Yes, Zion. And you have the marauding forces that surface through the wrecked cities above and transmit the minds or the souls in a type of digital, astral projection into the machine world or the Matrix. And you are told that both of these are reality because perception is reality. And the whole film is basically Illuminati characters - dark masonic overtones with a dark occult leader. And he says that we are the occult, we're the vampires, we're the werewolves, we're the demons, telling them that ... And, of course, he called them Merovingian or the Merovingian bloodline. This is what the Satanists, based in France, believe that they are descendants of Jesus and his brothers, with Satan. This is deep occult, Illuminati stuff. And he tells them how pathetic and little they are and how they are controlled by their instincts, how he manipulates those. It's kind of like the speech you see Al Pacino give in "Devil's Advocate" and how they can't control these impulses. And how they really need the Illuminati. And he, of course, stays in a French castle.

By the way, our royal leaders just met in a French castle in the very countryside they represent in the movie. Of course, the Merovingian is French. And, again, I'm just telling you about small tidbits of this. I've got to go back and take notes, which I will do. I've never seen a more powerful, overtly soul-twisting, mind-control film.

There is lesbian and homosexual scenes in the film - mass orgies, similar to what the Greeks engaged in. There also is - everyone has chip implants and chip plug-ins - and this is a good thing. They have a little speech in there where if the machines aren't bad, we can fight them with all of this. So it is making the new fashion statement. Probably one of the strongest cultural movements we've seen in modern history is "The Matrix." The video games and the cartoons now and the bunch of spin-off cartoons for the big screen and DVD. They are conditioning the children that it's normal to have plug-ins into your mind - wireheads, as they were called decades ago. It's fashionable to have in-plant points all over your body.

Also, it gets into the Satanic view of 'Do as thou wilt.' You have people within the Matrix, different programs, fighting with each other for control and domination but at the end of it, you are face-to-face with the architect. And again, this is the masonic, 33 degree and above view that they are shaping our world and even if the Matrix is defeated, it still wins because it replicates itself. It is in time and space. It can go back in time and restart itself.

And the architect is old man Sigmund Freud, Obe Won Kenobe- archtype who sits there and tells Neo that they have allowed people to leave the Matrix. That they discovered that suppressing an exodus from the Matrix actually causes a shutdown and a degradation of the 99% that remain inside their exoluthal (sp) tanks as human batteries for the power grid. And, again, you find out that basically the computers are disembodied spirits or angels or devils and have all the same carnal desires as humans but with an added viciousness, like Greek Gods.

It is an Illuminati film through and through. They tell you we are the Illuminati, we are throwing this in your face. They look right at you on the screen and say we are taking over. There is no way to defeat us. We are going to dominate you. We are going to bring you into the evermind - the hive mind.

And it's not just Wired Magazine and Silicon Weekly and many other publications, including Salon Today, that are warning you of the takeover. Last year a new Army War College report, in 2000, came out and said within 25 years we will all be in a hive mind, that the Pentagon will oversee the insertion of the public into a control grid. That we will all be mounted in our homes, wired into a global government mind-control computer. It actually said this. The Sunday Morning Herald got the federal document. We called the head(garbled). The head scientist, a woman, said how did you learn of this, and freaked out and hung the phone up. These idiots, of course, release this stuff and don't even know what they are up to - or perhaps that was an act, we're not sure.

Three years ago in 2000, the Army War College said the army's main job will be, through peer pressure, convincing the public to take brain chips by 2024, the same year number in the new report last year. They are preparing you for your journey into the real matrix.

Now if you are shocked by this, I've been warning you long before "The Matrix" came out that this was their plan. The elite, of course, will not be implanted. And most of you are going to be killed after they release mass plagues. This is if they get you herded into the larger cities. And yesterday, I read from Wired News, out of the newest DARPA document where they say everything you do will be tracked and traced and you will be plugged into that system. I'm sure you saw all the newscasts in same exact words, in the same order, showing implantation of members of the public. I have promotionals where the family that took the chips is called "wonderous, genius, cool", "everybody wants it." "Everybody is going to get it." As the Pentagon says, they are going to use hype to drive and push this.

This is real. Truth is stranger than fiction. And to have the Illuminati shout at me for two hours was very, very painful. I was nauseated during the first 30 minutes of the film. I will have to, of course, when it's on DVD get a copy and try to free frame it. There was a continual flickering through the screen which they admit is for hypnosis. There are subliminals in the film both overtly in the tapestry in the buildings, in the background in what the people say. And, also just like with the "The Exorcist," which they now admit was written by the former deputy director of the CIA, they put flash frames, a primitive form of subliminal, in that film, which is now admitted - blood and guts and then Satan. There were other subliminals here. I'm not sure exactly what the covert sublimanals were but they were definitely there in the front of the film at higher levels and then saturated in emotional scenes when your conscious mind is diverted. In the primitive combat function, mammalian activity structure. So this is what we are facing.

I recommend that you do not see the film. I know with the reverse psychology, you will probably see it. Curiosity killed the cat. I felt like walking out of the film. It was the most gripping experience of overt mind control I have ever experienced. You can see what the new science of film is going to be.

So this is a warning to everyone. Definitely do not let your children see it. It is a preparation to go into the literal matrix being built by the Pentagon. In fact, just in case you are doubting me, let me re-read from Wired News yesterday, "A Spy Machine of DARPA's Dreams." This is not a spy machine. This is a cashless society control grid. Once you are buying and selling on the system, they will then launch attacks that are one-thousand times larger than 9/11, at least. You will then be herded into cities, tracked and traced with cameras in your homes. Your children, who have already been conditioned, the Washington Post admitted, to body modification and piercing, to condition them to accept implantation. The films that are flooding out are conditioning them as well. The children's shows in Canada, like Spy TV, and the movies here, like Spy Kids, are all part of this preparation. It will be made a status symbol to be implanted and this is what the Pentagon says.

So this is a tracking matrix grid that's being built by Sun Microsystems and Oracle and others. Oracle, got to go see the oracle. Yes, the Delphi technique.

"A Spy Machine of DARPA's Dreams - http://www.wired.com/news/print/0,1294,58909,00.html (http://www.wired.com/news/print/0,1294,58909,00.html):  "It's a memory aid! A robotic assistant! An epidemic detector! An all-seeing, ultra-intrusive spying program!"

"The Pentagon is about to embark on a stunningly ambitious research project"

Okay, DARPA had microphones in Austin by the hundreds, five years ago. They announced it after it was already in place.

"The Pentagon is about to embark on a stunningly ambitious research project designed to gather every conceivable bit of information about a person's life, index" it and "and make it searchable"

"What national security experts and civil libertarians want to know is, why would the Defense Department want to do such a thing?"

"The embryonic LifeLog program would dump everything an individual does into a giant database: every e-mail sent or received, every picture taken, every Web page surfed, every phone call made, every TV show watched, every magazine read."

"All of this -- and more -- would combine with information gleaned from a variety of sources: a GPS transmitter to keep tabs on where that person went, audio-visual sensors to capture what he or she sees or says, and biomedical monitors to keep track of the individual's health."

"This gigantic amalgamation of personal information could then be used to "trace the 'threads' of an individual's life," to see exactly how a relationship or events developed, according to a briefing from the Defense Advanced Projects Research Agency, LifeLog's sponsor."

That's total information awareness now changed to LifeLog. And they meant to call it LifeLog all along, my friends. They already have these systems set up. Bill Clinton gave speeches about homeland security in 1993. I've seen policy papers from twenty years ago calling it homeland security. Lifelog is a life log of everything you've done in your life, a recording of it and a digital psychological algorithm to be set up to tailor advertising the brainwashing systems.

It's very serious. This is the end of the species if Satan wins. We must resist. But just be informed that "The Matrix" is a military industrial complex production in every way and as you go deeper down the rabbit hole, each trip until you are in a brain-scrambled position, not even able to resist the New World Order. Of course, the Tavistock Institute and other mind-control facilities have published studies and we have talked about them on air, where if you terrorize a mammal for a certain period, it will become docile and accepting. And they tell you in the film and explain the matrix to you and the New World Order and the Illuminati, so you can be more accepting of it. That you need that choice. That it is something they've got to do due to the rules of God's programming that they are converting and manipulating with their counterfeits.

The oldest form of mind control is superstition. The witch doctor knew when the solar or lunar eclipse was coming and he was generally part of a hereditary guild, or kind of your first masonic lodge. And he didn't know why there was an eclipse but he knew when it was coming. And it happened so infrequently that people would forget about it. And he would use that knowledge to shock and amaze members of the tribe - and then get special favors: the best hut, the best women, the best food. And then later, you've got strong men over larger tribes that settled in agrarian societies, that is farming societies. The kings would learn how to have top witch doctors to manipulate and control the public. And
that's what you have happening.

The globalists know that you are waking up to the fact that there is a New World Order. So they are playing up the psychics and the new age and all these other religions - the establishment Christians, as well. All putting out their propaganda. All putting out their false doctrines. And when you see a society in decline, the empires always use superstition and gladiatorial diversions to divert and distract them. And that is exactly what I saw in "The Matrix." And overall, the globalists in your face submitting its revelation of the method, Illuminati terms, homosexual orgies, and much, much more. This is a corrupting film. And if you tell your kids they can't go because they are too young or the
movie is too cool for them, you ought to explain to them that it is something that can degradate them and to suck them into fad system and to control them. It is, my friends, overtly a mind control film. I can authoritatively say that to you here today. And that's all I'm going to say about it.

You see we can defeat the New World Order on the basis of the information, on the basis of hard facts with God's help and direction. If they get us off into la-la land and get us off into delusional stuff, we are never going anywhere, my friends.

Title: Re: Biomass EATR Robot: A closer look at a robot that will consume organic matter
Post by: infowarrior_039 on July 24, 2009, 04:55:41 pm
This is baisically the article Alex mentioned yesterday that he said was pulled from the internet, allthough I think the one Alex was reading was from Fox News, however its essentially the same article:

On the 9th of July, "The Register". a Brittish news site reported on the EATR Robot:

http://www.theregister.co.uk/2009/07/09/eatr_beta/

Quote
Robot land-steamers to consume all life on Earth as fuel
Autonom-nom-nom-nomous technology

By Lewis Page
Posted in Science, 9th July 2009 12:06 GMT

News has emerged of a milestone reached on the road towards a potentially world-changing piece of technology. We speak, of course, of US military plans to introduce roving steam-powered robots which would fuel themselves by harvesting everything alive and cramming it into their insatiable blazing furnaces.

The scheme is officially referred to as Energetically Autonomous Tactical Robot (EATR™) by those behind it. It will come as no surprise to Reg readers that the funding is from DARPA, the famous Pentagon warboffinry bureau. If you're a hammer, all the problems start to look like nails: if you're DARPA, all the solutions start to look like robots.

The idea of EATR is ostensibly that military reconnaissance droids far behind enemy lines would be able to forage for fuel. Robotic Technology Inc, lead contractor on the EATR, puts it thus:

    EATR is an autonomous robotic platform able to perform long-range, long-endurance military missions without the need for manual or conventional re-fueling. The patent pending robotic system can find, ingest and extract energy from biomass in the environment, as well as use conventional and alternative fuels (such as gasoline, diesel, propane and solar) when suitable.

The machine runs on a "biomass furnace" which powers a steam generator driving a "waste heat engine" from Cyclone Power Technologies. These pieces of kit will now be mated together within 90 days, according to RTI.

The robot steamers are envisaged as being equipped with powerful articulated arms in order to rip trees or bushes out of the earth and stuff them into their glowing maws. By way of a treat, it seems that the machines will also be able to loot or forage more conventional fuel supplies from the petrol tanks of cars, domestic gas cylinders and so on. Cyclone says that their engine can also run happily on old apple cores, banana peel and other kitchen garbage gleaned from bins.

Hapless drivers or householders will be in no position to object to such robotic plundering: military reconnaissance vehicles are typically heavily armed, and doubtless the EATR will be no exception. It might also be fitted with DARPA's SELF tech, enabling it to construct copies of itself and modify its own design.

Even more disturbingly, it seems clear that the EATRs could run on various other kinds of organic matter, for instance bodies. No doubt things would start small, with roving EATRs scooping roadkill, stray cats and such into their fireboxes and reaping fresh energy from their rich, blazing dripping.

From there it would be only a small step to the inevitable harvesting of every living thing on Earth. Trees, crops, garbage, cattle, the very human race itself - all would go to feed the hungry roaring furnaces and drive the clanking, puffing, smoke-belching mechanical locusts onward until the sooty corpse-pall from their engines covered the entire Earth. An Earth which would be home in time to nothing but slowly powering-down EATRs, prowling across endless ashy plains of their own droppings.

There's a more upbeat perspective from RTI here (pdf). ®

The question is, what would stop this robot from eating flesh? The only thing that would prevent this is the firmware that the robot uses. It is is physically capable of consuming ANYTHING. It cuts it up, and puts in its internal furnace engine. Do they think were stupid to tell us this machine cant handle protien? The furncace biomass converter will convert ANY matter that it can cut up.
Title: Scientists Worry Machines May Outsmart Man
Post by: Letsbereal on July 25, 2009, 08:18:36 pm
Scientists Worry Machines May Outsmart Man
26 July 2009
, by John Markoff (The New York Times)
http://www.nytimes.com/2009/07/26/science/26robot.html?_r=2&partner=rss&emc=rss

A robot that can open doors and find electrical outlets to recharge itself. Computer viruses that no one can stop. Predator drones http://topics.nytimes.com/top/reference/timestopics/subjects/u/unmanned_aerial_vehicles/index.html?inline=nyt-classifier , which, though still controlled remotely by humans, come close to a machine that can kill

Impressed and alarmed by advances in artificial intelligence, a group of computer scientists is debating whether there should be limits on research that might lead to loss of human control over computer-based systems that carry a growing share of society’s workload, from waging war to chatting with customers on the phone.

Their concern is that further advances could create profound social disruptions and even have dangerous consequences.

As examples, the scientists pointed to a number of technologies as diverse as experimental medical systems that interact with patients to simulate empathy, and computer worms and viruses that defy extermination and could thus be said to have reached a “cockroach” stage of machine intelligence.

While the computer scientists agreed that we are a long way from Hal, the computer that took over the spaceship in “2001: A Space Odyssey,” they said there was legitimate concern that technological progress would transform the work force by destroying a widening range of jobs, as well as force humans to learn to live with machines that increasingly copy human behaviors.

The researchers — leading computer scientists, artificial intelligence researchers and roboticists who met at the Asilomar Conference Grounds on Monterey Bay in California — generally discounted the possibility of highly centralized superintelligences and the idea that intelligence might spring spontaneously from the Internet. But they agreed that robots that can kill autonomously are either already here or will be soon.

They focused particular attention on the specter that criminals could exploit artificial intelligence systems as soon as they were developed. What could a criminal do with a speech synthesis system that could masquerade as a human being? What happens if artificial intelligence technology is used to mine personal information from smart phones?

The researchers also discussed possible threats to human jobs, like self-driving cars, software-based personal assistants and service robots in the home. Just last month, a service robot developed by Willow Garage in Silicon Valley proved it could navigate the real world http://www.nytimes.com/2009/06/09/science/09robot.html?_r=1 .

A report from the conference, which took place in private on Feb. 25, is to be issued later this year http://research.microsoft.com/en-us/um/people/horvitz/AAAI_Presidential_Panel_2008-2009.htm . Some attendees discussed the meeting for the first time with other scientists this month and in interviews.

The conference was organized by the Association for the Advancement of Artificial Intelligence http://www.aaai.org/AITopics/pmwiki/pmwiki.php/AITopics/Ethics , and in choosing Asilomar for the discussions, the group purposefully evoked a landmark event in the history of science. In 1975, the world’s leading biologists also met at Asilomar http://profiles.nlm.nih.gov/CD/Views/Exhibit/narrative/dna.html  to discuss the new ability to reshape life by swapping genetic material among organisms. Concerned about possible biohazards and ethical questions, scientists had halted certain experiments. The conference led to guidelines for recombinant DNA research, enabling experimentation to continue.

The meeting on the future of artificial intelligence was organized by Eric Horvitz, a Microsoft researcher who is now president of the association.

Dr. Horvitz said he believed computer scientists must respond to the notions of superintelligent machines and artificial intelligence systems run amok.

The idea of an “intelligence explosion” in which smart machines would design even more intelligent machines was proposed by the mathematician I. J. Good in 1965. Later, in lectures and science fiction novels, the computer scientist Vernor Vinge popularized the notion of a moment when humans will create smarter-than-human machines, causing such rapid change that the “human era will be ended.” He called this shift the Singularity http://www-rohan.sdsu.edu/faculty/vinge/misc/singularity.html .

This vision, embraced in movies and literature, is seen as plausible and unnerving by some scientists like William Joy, co-founder of Sun Microsystems http://topics.nytimes.com/top/news/business/companies/sun_microsystems_inc/index.html?inline=nyt-org . Other technologists, notably Raymond Kurzweil, have extolled the coming of ultrasmart machines, saying they will offer huge advances in life extension and wealth creation.

“Something new has taken place in the past five to eight years,” Dr. Horvitz said. “Technologists are replacing religion, and their ideas are resonating in some ways with the same idea of the Rapture.”

The Kurzweil version of technological utopia has captured imaginations in Silicon Valley. This summer an organization called the Singularity University began offering courses to prepare a “cadre” to shape the advances and help society cope with the ramifications.

“My sense was that sooner or later we would have to make some sort of statement or assessment, given the rising voice of the technorati and people very concerned about the rise of intelligent machines,” Dr. Horvitz said.

The A.A.A.I. report will try to assess the possibility of “the loss of human control of computer-based intelligences.” It will also grapple, Dr. Horvitz said, with socioeconomic, legal and ethical issues, as well as probable changes in human-computer relationships. How would it be, for example, to relate to a machine that is as intelligent as your spouse?

Dr. Horvitz said the panel was looking for ways to guide research so that technology improved society rather than moved it toward a technological catastrophe. Some research might, for instance, be conducted in a high-security laboratory.

The meeting on artificial intelligence could be pivotal to the future of the field. Paul Berg, who was the organizer of the 1975 Asilomar meeting and received a Nobel Prize http://topics.nytimes.com/top/news/science/topics/nobel_prizes/index.html?inline=nyt-classifier for chemistry in 1980, said it was important for scientific communities to engage the public before alarm and opposition becomes unshakable.

“If you wait too long and the sides become entrenched like with G.M.O.,” he said, referring to genetically modified foods, “then it is very difficult. It’s too complex, and people talk right past each other.”

Tom Mitchell, a professor of artificial intelligence and machine learning at Carnegie Mellon University http://topics.nytimes.com/top/reference/timestopics/organizations/c/carnegie_mellon_university/index.html?inline=nyt-org , said the February meeting had changed his thinking. “I went in very optimistic about the future of A.I. and thinking that Bill Joy and Ray Kurzweil were far off in their predictions,” he said. But, he added, “The meeting made me want to be more outspoken about these issues and in particular be outspoken about the vast amounts of data collected about our personal lives.”

Despite his concerns, Dr. Horvitz said he was hopeful that artificial intelligence research would benefit humans, and perhaps even compensate for human failings. He recently demonstrated a voice-based system http://research.microsoft.com/~horvitz/Medical_Bayesian_Kiosk.wmv  that he designed to ask patients about their symptoms and to respond with empathy. When a mother said her child was having diarrhea, the face on the screen said, “Oh no, sorry to hear that.”

A physician told him afterward that it was wonderful that the system responded to human emotion. “That’s a great idea,” Dr. Horvitz said he was told. “I have no time for that.”


Ken Conley/Willow Garage

For all aditional photos and Links: http://www.nytimes.com/2009/07/26/science/26robot.html?_r=2&partner=rss&emc=rss

Scientists Worry Machines May Outsmart Man - The New York Times  http://tinyurl.com/n67ftl
Title: Robot attacked Swedish factory worker
Post by: Letsbereal on July 28, 2009, 09:56:38 pm
Robot attacked Swedish factory worker
28 April 2009
, (The Local - Swedens News in English)
http://www.thelocal.se/19120/20090428/

A Swedish company has been fined 25,000 kronor ($3,000) after a malfunctioning robot attacked and almost killed one of its workers at a factory north of Stockholm.

Public prosecutor Leif Johansson mulled pressing charges against the firm but eventually opted to settle for a fine.

"I've never heard of a robot attacking somebody like this," he told news agency TT.

The incident took place in June 2007 at a factory in Bålsta, north of Stockholm, when the industrial worker was trying to carry out maintenance on a defective machine generally used to lift heavy rocks. Thinking he had cut off the power supply, the man approached the robot with no sense of trepidation.

But the robot suddenly came to life and grabbed a tight hold of the victim's head. The man succeeded in defending himself but not before suffering serious injuries.

"The man was very lucky. He broke four ribs and came close to losing his life," said Leif Johansson.

The matter was subject to an investigation by both the Swedish Work Environment Authority (Arbetsmiljöverket) and the police.

Prosecutor Johansson chastised the company for its inadequate safety procedures but he also placed part of the blame on the injured worker.

TT/The Local ([email protected]/08 656 6518)
Title: Expert Warns Of 'Terminator' Robot Threat
Post by: Letsbereal on August 04, 2009, 08:35:12 pm
Expert Warns Of 'Terminator' Robot Threat
4 August 2009
,  (SkyNews)
http://uk.news.yahoo.com/5/20090804/twl-expert-warns-of-terminator-robot-thr-3fd0ae9.html

Wars will be fought more often and civilians face extreme danger if the development of killer robots goes unchecked, a British expert has warned.

Professor Noel Sharkey said the technology to create Terminator-style machines already exists and international discussion about its military applications is desperately needed.

The University of Sheffield's professor of artificial intelligence and robotics said action must be taken to limit the development of robots that think for themselves.

"The nub of it is that robots do not have the necessary discriminatory ability. They can't distinguish between combatants and civilians," he said.

"People talk about programming the 'laws of war' into a computer to give robots a conscience, so that if the target is a civilian you don't shoot.

"But for a robot to recognise a civilian you need an exact specification, and one of the problems is there's no specific definition of a civilian.

"Soldiers have to rely on common sense."

Robot weapons, such as the Predator and Reaper drones, have already been used in Iraq and Afghanistan.

The pilotless aircrafts armed with bombs and missiles are used against insurgents - but civilians are often also among those killed.

These machines are controlled by humans, but Prof Sharkey said the rapid progress of "autonomous" robots is concerning.

"The military have a strange view of artificial intelligence based on science fiction," he said.

"The next thing that's coming, and this is what really scares me, are armed autonomous robots. The robot will do the killing itself.

"This will make decision-making faster and allow one person to control many robots.

"A single soldier could initiate a large scale attack from the air and the ground."

While Prof Sharkey suggested that scenario was still a long way off, he said robot arms control was an important debate that needed attention.
Title: First steps into the robotics boom
Post by: Letsbereal on August 09, 2009, 02:32:57 pm
First steps into the robotics boom
9 August 2009
, by Robin Harding in Tokyo (The Financial Times)
http://www.ft.com/cms/s/0/67702488-8502-11de-9a64-00144feabdc0.html

(http://media.ft.com/cms/943af5da-850f-11de-9a64-00144feabdc0.jpg)

An hour’s drive east of Tokyo, in a cavernous new building in Tsukuba Science City, a company called Cyberdyne is working on a robot called Hal.

Rest easy. Cyberdyne Systems may have been the fictional corporation responsible for the Terminator, a cyborg assassin in the film, and HAL-9000 the computer from 2001: A Space Odyssey, but the goal of Yoshiyuki Sankai, the company’s science-fiction-loving founder, is to make robots that help people rather than exterminate them.

In its work on “assistance robots”, Cyberdyne is at the forefront of what Japan’s government hopes will be a vast new industry and a way to address health and economic issues raised by the dramatic ageing of Japan’s population.

Rather than accept economic decline or allow large-scale immigration to supplement the decreasing population, Japan imagines an army of robot workers.

The strategy is spelt out in a science and technology white paper published by the government this year.

“By 2025, over 30 per cent of Japan’s population is expected to be over 65 . . . At the same time, the number of children will continue to fall, leading to shortages in labour to care for elderly and disabled people, and an increased burden on each care worker,” the white paper says.

It concludes: “In this environment, robots that support people’s independence and cars that are easy to use . . . will be essential.”

This potential has led many of Japan’s largest companies to invest in robotics.

Toyota and Honda have well-funded programmes to build humanoid assistance robots. Trading company Sumitomo and Fuji Heavy Industries, which makes cars under the Subaru brand, are trying to sell cleaning robots.

And Panasonic is launching a robotic drug dispensary in Japan this year and sees robotics as an attractive future market.

“The development of robots as a business is going to make considerable progress,” said Fumio Ohtsubo, president of Panasonic, in a recent interview with the Financial Times.

“The characteristic precision and attention to detail of Japanese people and companies will be well suited to developing safe robots.”

Cyberdyne differs in that it is building not a free-standing robot but an exoskeleton, which attaches to and amplifies the human body.

Hal – which at Cyberdyne stands for hybrid assisted limb – is a series of white plastic plates, with a motor at each joint such as the hip and elbow, which strap on to the outside of the arms and legs to provide additional power.

“Basically, you can pick up something weighing 40kg like this,” says Mitsuhiro Sakamoto, Cyberdyne’s chief operating officer, taking his pen from the desk.

That is only the physical part of the HAL, however. “Our core technology is to detect bioelectric signals and then co-ordinate that with the movement of the suit,” Mr Sakamoto says.

Through sensors attached to the skin, Hal detects and interprets electrical signals from the brain telling the arm or leg to move, and activates the exoskeleton simultaneously.

Cyberdyne is aiming for three main areas of application, Mr Sakamoto says. First, in rehabilitation, where a Hal suit or limb can help someone who is recovering after an accident to walk.

Second, in helping those who cannot walk to do so, including the possibility of completely artificial limbs that detect weak electrical signals from elsewhere in the body.

The third application is in support for heavy work, such as moving patients between beds in a nursing home.

Mr Sakamoto showed video of elderly patients using Hal to walk – somewhat jerkily – and the FT was able to move a robot forearm by means of a sensor attached to the skin.

Hal went into commercial use last month, although the technology is still far from perfect.

The average price is Y170,000 ($1,750) a month for a five-year rental. A single limb costs Y150,000, while a full “passenger suit” is Y220,000. Hal is being used in three hospitals in Japan, Mr Sakamoto says, and Cyberdyne is working with a partner in Denmark to bring the product to Europe.

If the company turns a profit next year, as Mr Sakamoto hopes, that will have been made possible by the extensive research and development grants it receives from the Japanese government.

Four rounds of venture capital have raised Y4bn to fund commercial development. Daiwa House has been the biggest external investor.

Prof Sankai retains 90 per cent voting control, however, because of his determination to see that Hal is never used in its obvious military applications.

If Hal fulfils its promise, Japan will be a nation of pensioners in powered suits hurling boulders like snowballs. Let us hope they never hear the words of Hal in 2001, when they go to open the front door: “I’m sorry, Dave, I’m afraid I can’t do that.”


First steps into the robotics boom: In its work on "assistance robots", Cyberdyne is at the forefront of what Ja.. http://bit.ly/T3Hfi
Title: Robots Trained To Fire On People
Post by: Letsbereal on August 12, 2009, 12:35:36 pm
Robots Trained To Fire On People
By David Mantey, Editor, PD&D
http://www.pddnet.com/column-robots-trained-to-fire-on-people-081209/

It’s a Star Wars dream or nightmare depending on whom you side with. Personally, I’m going to have to side against anything proihuman annihilation. But it seems like the dark side always has the more advanced weaponry.

Among the many *calls for action by the panel of industry experts August 5 at NIWeek in Austin, TX, a few tidbits of info caught my attention and caused spastic Terminator-esque doomsday scenarios in my mind.
*calls for action http://www.pddnet.com/column-the-great-american-lie-081109/

I can’t be held responsible, the panel brought up the subject. Apparently, one question that Dr. David Barrett, director of the Senior Capstone Program in Engineering (SCOPE) at Olin College often fields, relates to human vs. droid futuristic scenarios that don’t stray far from the basic plot behind the Terminator franchise.

The subject sprang up as a result of a question from the audience that boiled down to the ethical debate in innovation. How do we know if/when we’ve gone too far? Would we know or would it be too late?

Essentially, the panelists stated that technology is a tool, and like any tool, it comes with great responsibility. Hearing the Yoda bubble to the top? Luckily, the panel brought it back down to earth by adding … but don’t be naïve.

As long as we have innovators striving towards the utopian greater good, we cannot refute the fact that others are working just as hard – if not harder – to counteract any good we try and add to this planet in our 80-odd years on board.

The crowd was coming to terms with the current cloud lurking over our sunshine and lollipop naivety when Ellen Purdy, enterprise director of joint ground robotics for the U.S. Department of Defense (DoD), appropriately added that the autonomous weapon is coming.

While Purdy stated that the DoD didn’t have a hand in financing or developing the project, she was aware of “robots trained [programmed] to fire on people.” Suddenly, I don’t feel nearly as qualified to battle a droid army as I did when my brothers and I pushed a battalion back into my father’s field and successfully defended the Eagle’s Nest with canes, bats and two sticks tied to the ends of a broken swing that served as a custom nunchuck.

The implications of the evil genius. I suppose that if we’re equipping kids with programming software along with their LEGO sets, it’s not too far of a reach to discuss a hobbyist who builds a robotic guard dog that snipes trespassers.

Specifics weren’t given, but the sometimes grim undeniable candor from the panel was chilling. Then again, are we not just as foolish when we turn a blind eye? When new ground in robotics, or any new technology, is broken, it’s ludicrous to sit back and say, “You know what? I have a good feeling about this vision system – I’m sure nobody would try to program it to recognize and annihilate a human.”

We have a divide when it comes to thinking whether or not we should when we’re gripped with the excitement of challenging ourselves to see whether or not we could.

When asked her opinion on the subject, Jeanne Dietsch, CEO and cofounder of MobileRobots, was concise. “Do we have anything to worry about?” The question echoed through the ballroom as we awaited her reply. She answered, “Yes.”   
Title: US military embraces robot 'revolution'
Post by: Letsbereal on August 13, 2009, 11:26:57 am
US military embraces robot 'revolution'
13 August 2009
, by Dan De Luce
http://www.physorg.com/news169378206.html

(http://www.physorg.com/newman/gfx/news/hires/aprototypeof.jpg)

A prototype of the X-47B Navy Unmannded Combat Air System (UCAS) sits
on diplay at Naval Air Station Pax River Webster Field Annex in St. Inigoes,
Maryland, on August 10. The X-47B, made by Northrop Grumman
Corporation, is to demonstrate the first-ever carrier-based autonomous
launches and recoveries.


Robots in the sky and on the ground are transforming warfare, and the US military is rushing to recruit the new warriors that never sleep and never bleed.

The latest robotics were on display at an industry show this week at a naval airfield in Maryland, with a pilotless helicopter buzzing overhead and a "Wall-E" look-alike robot on the ground craning its neck to peer into a window.

The chopper, the MQ-8B Fire Scout, is no tentative experiment and later this year will be operating from a naval frigate, the USS McInerney, to help track drug traffickers in the eastern Pacific Ocean, Navy officers said.

The rugged little robot searching an enemy building is called a Pakbot, which can climb over rocks with tank treads, pick up an explosive with its mechanical arm and dismantle it while a soldier directs the machine from a safe distance.

There are already 2,500 of them on the ground in Iraq and Afghanistan, and a lighter version weighing six kilograms (14 pounds) has arrived that can be carried in a backpack, according to iRobot, the same company that sells a robot vaccum to civilians, the Roomba.

Monday's demonstration of robotic wonders was organized by defense contractors and the US Navy, which says it wants to lead the American military into a new age where tedious or high-risk jobs are handed over to robots.

"I think we're at the beginning of an unmanned revolution," Gary Kessler, who oversees unmanned aviation programs for the US Navy and Marines, told AFP.

"We're spending billions of dollars on unmanned systems."

Kessler and other Pentagon officials compare the robots to the introduction of the aircraft or the tank, a new technology that dramatically changes strategy and tactics.

Robots or "unmanned systems" are now deployed by the thousands in Iraq and Afghanistan, spying from the sky for hours on end, searching for booby-traps and firing lethal missiles without putting US soldiers at risk.

The use of robotics in the military has exploded in the past several years as technology has advanced while Washington faced a new kind of enemy that required patient, precise surveillance.

In 2003, the US military had almost no robots in its arsenal but now has 7,000 unmanned aircraft and at least 10,000 ground vehicles.

The US Air Force, which initially resisted the idea of pilotless planes, said it trains more operators for unmanned aircraft than pilots for its fighter jets and bombers.

Peter Singer, author of "Wired for War," writes that future wars may see tens of thousands of unmanned vehicles in action, possibly facing off against fleets of enemy robots.

Unlike expensive weapons from the Cold War-era, robotic vehicles are not off-limits to countries with modest defense budgets and dozens of governments are investing in unmanned programs.

At the trade show, military officers from the United States, Chile, Australia, Saudi Arabia and India listened to defense contractors promote their robotic vehicles, including a tiny helicopter about two-feet long and L3's Mobius -- a nimble medium-sized drone that reaches speeds of up to 215 knots.

The technology may sometimes resemble something out of "Star Wars" or a toy shop, but the robots determine matters of life and death on the battlefront.

In the fight against Al-Qaeda, drones are Washington's favored weapon.

Predator and Reaper aircraft, armed with precision-guided bombs and Hellfire missiles, regularly carry out strikes in Pakistan's northwest tribal area, causing an unknown number of civilian casualties.

Last week, a drone strike is believed to have have killed the Pakistani Taliban leader Baitullah Mehsud.

The unmanned aircraft in the US military's inventory range from small Ravens, that can be tossed into the air to see over the next hill, to the giant Global Hawk, a 44-foot-long spy plane that can fly at high altitude for up to 35 hours.

The drones and ground vehicles are often operated using joysticks or consoles familiar to a younger generation raised on video games.

"Soldiers these days have a lot of experience playing video games when they're growing up, and they're really familiar with these controls. So this really reduces the training time on these types of unmanned vehicles," said Charlie Vaida of iRobot, which makes a game console for the Pakbot.

Amid plans for unmanned bomber jets for aircraft carriers, the onslaught of drones could eventually render fighter aces a relic of history.

Military officers insist the robots are a complement and not a substitute for traditional aircraft, and pose no threat to the careers of their fellow pilots.

"I think they understand we're not going to replace them," said Captain Tim Dunnigan, a navy chopper pilot. "This is going to augment them."
Title: Re: US military embraces robot 'revolution'
Post by: nustada on August 13, 2009, 11:36:29 am
There is a military base and training range near where I live.

The other day I was driving some back roads, and I saw a "jet" fly by. However it looked way smaller than a conventional fighter, and had no discernible cockpit, it looked like a giant toy.

However I do not think it was someones model plane, due to its high speed (I was going about 70 mph, and it was easily going 5x as fast as me) due to the proximity of the training range, and the fact that it went over a steep high cliff one that think a normal radio controlled model would loose a connection, and it did a barrel roll about 15ft from the ground as it crossed the top of the hill , I do not think it was someone model plane.

I am pretty certain I saw a fighter "robot".
Title: iRobot Corp. receives $35.3M US Army contract
Post by: Letsbereal on September 01, 2009, 02:12:16 pm
iRobot Corp. receives $35.3M US Army contract
1 September 2009
, (The Associated Press)
http://www.pddnet.com/news-ap-irobot-corp-receives-353m-us-army-contract-090109/

BEDFORD, Mass. (AP) — iRobot Corp. said Tuesday that it has received a $35.3 million order from the U.S. Army to deliver robots designed for military combat situations.

The U.S. Army TACOM Contracting Center in Warren, Mich. ordered 486 iRobot PackBot 510 with FasTac Kit robots — machines that sport long mechanical arms and run on treads — for delivery before March 31.

These 53-pound robots are used to assess dangerous situations and clear a path for soldiers. For instance, it is used in Iraq and Afghanistan to investigate suspicious-looking packages by the road side that might be improvised bombs.

The robots can run as fast as 5.8 miles per hour and last four hours per charge. They are controlled by a laptop with a game-style controller.

The current order is the largest received as yet from the Army's $286 million Indefinite Delivery/Indefinite Quantity xBot, or IDIQ, contract with iRobot, which was announced in December 2007. The Army can order up to that amount but there's no guarantee, the company said.

Thus far, iRobot has received $125 million in orders under the IDIQ contract. It has shipped more than 2,500 PackBot robots under this and other contracts.

Shares of Bedford, Mass.-based iRobot fell 45 cents, or 3.9 percent, to $11.02 in midday trading on Tuesday.


iRobot receives a $35.3 mill order from the US Army to deliver robots designed for military combat situations http://bit.ly/3iwCu
Title: PETMAN Prototype (From the makers of BigDog
Post by: Unintelligable Name on November 02, 2009, 08:37:30 pm
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=67CUudkjEG4

BigDog if you haven't seen it: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=k-AGWq0k_Mo

They'll call us Neo-Luddites...  but that doesn't change the fact that some idiot watched Terminator and said "Damn, that's a good idea."
Title: Re: PETMAN Prototype (From the makers of BigDog
Post by: kermitthefrayer on November 02, 2009, 09:09:16 pm
f**king!!!!n Creepy the terminators are coming for sure!
Title: Robots to shape wars of the future
Post by: Monkeypox on December 28, 2009, 09:36:51 pm
http://www.usatoday.com/tech/science/2009-12-28-robot-weapons-guilt_N.htm?csp=YahooModule_Tech

By Kathleen Curthoys and Matthew Cox, Army Times

Robots may one day be more effective than human soldiers on the battlefield and they may have a sense of ethics — even a sense of guilt, says a robotics expert who has done a study with the support of the Army's research office.

Ethical robots that can use lethal force on the battlefield would adhere to international law and rules of engagement, Ronald C. Arkin told Army Times on Dec. 15. Arkin describes how this could work in his 2009 book "Governing Lethal Behavior in Autonomous Robots." He is with the Mobile Robot Laboratory at the Georgia Institute of Technology.

Here's what the future of robots may hold: Human soldiers eventually may not be up to speed compared to "humane-oids" in the battle space, Arkin says. Future developments may lead to robotic sensors better equipped than soldiers to maintain situational awareness and process information quickly about situations in which lethal force might be used.

Mr. Spock can relate to certain advantages of having robots in the combat zone: They are free of human emotion, which can distort judgment, and they don't express anger or frustration. But Arkin envisions robots designed with some capabilities — if not exactly feelings — that would be constructive: Remorse, compassion, and yes, guilt.

Robots designed to have guilt operate this way, according to a research paper co-written by Arkin and colleague Patrick Ulam: The robots would be designed with an "ethical adaptor," while each weapon system they carry would be grouped according to its destructive power and each group of weapons associated with a specific guilt threshold.

Highly destructive weapons would have lower thresholds for guilt than less destructive weapons. When the guilt level exceeds the threshold for a weapon, the weapon system is deactivated, with the intent to reduce collateral damage. Arkin's example: An unmanned aerial vehicle has three systems: GBU precision-guided bombs, Hellfire missiles and a chain gun. The UAV engages the enemy with the GBU and finds the attack resulted in civilian casualties.

Then the ethical adaptor determines the guilt level should be raised and the GBU is deactivated. Next, the UAV uses a Hellfire, and there is more collateral damage so the guilt level is raised again. This time, the resulting level of guilt reaches the maximum allowed and all weapons systems are deactivated, according to the paper. There is a loophole — the operator can override the guilt sub-system.

Robots in combat might even snitch on soldiers. When working on a team with humans, the robots may have the potential to objectively monitor "ethical behavior in the battlefield by all parties" and report infractions, Arkin said.

The technology may be ready for ethical, autonomous robots to be fielded for certain types of combat operations within 10 to 20 years, provided there is sufficient study and funding, Arkin said. Further study is needed on the ethical component and the capability of discriminating between the enemy and noncombatants, he said. The Army hasn't announced whether it plans to use such robots.

Title: Re: Robots to shape wars of the future
Post by: jeremystalked1 on December 28, 2009, 09:41:47 pm
Plus, if an autonomous robot massacres a group of dissidents, you can blame it on a 'glitch'.

 :D

Or 'hackers', that always works.

:D :D
Title: Re: Robots to shape wars of the future
Post by: Monkeypox on December 28, 2009, 09:44:37 pm
Plus, if an autonomous robot massacres a group of dissidents, you can blame it on a 'glitch'.

 :D

Or 'hackers', that always works.

:D :D

But, at least the robot would feel guilty about it.

 :D
Title: Re: Robots to shape wars of the future
Post by: trailhound on December 28, 2009, 10:06:26 pm
But, at least the robot would feel guilty about it.

 :D

 :D

http://www.usatoday.com/tech/science/2009-12-28-robot-weapons-guilt_N.htm?csp=YahooModule_Tech

By Kathleen Curthoys and Matthew Cox, Army Times

Robots may one day be more effective than human soldiers on the battlefield and they may have a sense of ethics — even a sense of guilt, says a robotics expert who has done a study with the support of the Army's research office.


 This is part of what AI has been talking about, TPTB pushing the idea that machines should run everything because people are more error prone. I suspect that road ends badly :-\

Title: Re: Robots to shape wars of the future
Post by: Monkeypox on December 29, 2009, 04:49:46 pm
:D

http://www.usatoday.com/tech/science/2009-12-28-robot-weapons-guilt_N.htm?csp=YahooModule_Tech

By Kathleen Curthoys and Matthew Cox, Army Times

Robots may one day be more effective than human soldiers on the battlefield and they may have a sense of ethics — even a sense of guilt, says a robotics expert who has done a study with the support of the Army's research office.


 This is part of what AI has been talking about, TPTB pushing the idea that machines should run everything because people are more error prone. I suspect that road ends badly :-\



Yeah, I also suspect it would end badly:

(http://www.iwatchstuff.com/2007/05/10/terminator-trilogy.jpg)

(http://www.cyberpunkreview.com/images/matrix04.jpg)
Title: Re: Robots to shape wars of the future
Post by: jeremystalked1 on December 29, 2009, 06:09:53 pm
I'd like to see an updated Terminator series where the AI's are deliberately unleashed on 99.9999% of humanity to protect the financial elite from an awakened populace.  All of Earth is turned into a shitpile except for the designated elite hidey-holes.
Title: Re: Robots to shape wars of the future
Post by: Monkeypox on December 30, 2009, 01:34:41 pm
I'd like to see an updated Terminator series where the AI's are deliberately unleashed on 99.9999% of humanity to protect the financial elite from an awakened populace.  All of Earth is turned into a shitpile except for the designated elite hidey-holes.

Who needs a movie?  Just wait a few years and you can live it.

 :D
Title: DARPA announced plans for a program called ‘Transparent Earth’
Post by: bigbrothertech on March 09, 2010, 12:12:37 am
They’re spending $4 million this year on preliminary plans for a digital, 3D map that would display “the physical, chemical and dynamic properties of the earth down to 5 kilometer depth.  ???” http://www.bigbrothertech.com/news/GoogleUnderground.html (http://www.bigbrothertech.com/news/GoogleUnderground.html)
Title: Boeing's robo-copter flexes its muscle
Post by: Hardware 952 on March 15, 2010, 04:20:04 pm
http://news.cnet.com/8301-13639_3-20000488-42.html?part=rss&subj=news&tag=2547-1_3-0-20



March 15, 2010 1:17 PM PDT
Boeing's robo-copter flexes its muscle
by Jonathan Skillings



The pack mule of the 21st century could well be a robot. Don't be surprised to see it in flight.

Boeing on Monday said that its autonomous, unmanned A160T Hummingbird made quick work of a resupply test last week at the U.S. Army's Dugway Proving Ground in Utah. During the demonstration, the cargo copter carried out seven test flights.

Two of those flights were round trips spanning 150 nautical miles, with the Hummingbird toting 1,250-pound sling loads in a simulated mission between forward operating bases. The aircraft completed the mission in less than the required 6 hours and, being a robo-copter and all, did so while operating autonomously (though preprogrammed-ly.) Autonomous deliveries by the A160T, Boeing said without offering specifics, were "extremely accurate."

The Hummingbird also showed that it could perform a 2-minute hover at 12,000 feet with the 1,250-pound sling load and a nighttime delivery to a simulated forward operating base.

The Dugway demonstration was done in conjunction with a $500,000 contract from the U.S. Marines Corps. The Marines are looking to technologies like the Hummingbird as a way to resupply frontline troops hunkered down in rugged terrain.

In earlier tests, the A160T has flown as fast as 140 knots and for more than 18 hours without refueling. It measures 35 long and has a rotor diameter of 36 feet. The unmanned aerial vehicle can also be used for surveillance and reconnaissance missions.


Boeing's not alone in working on unmanned rotorcraft. Northrop Grumman, for instance, has been showing off the ability of its MQ-8B Fire Scout UAV to carry gear into combat zones, offering this description of the aircraft's maneuvering during the Army's recent Expeditionary Warrior Experiment (AEWE) at Fort Benning, Ga.:


During the AEWE, Fire Scout flew to a named area of interest, surveyed the area to ensure it was clear, and landed autonomously within its pre-planned landing point. When Fire Scout's on-board skid sensors detected contact with the ground, a command was sent to release the unmanned ground vehicle. Seconds later, Fire Scout ascended and then loitered at a higher altitude to observe and provide a relay for commands between the UGV and its controller.
Title: Re: Boeing's robo-copter flexes its muscle
Post by: Nailer on March 15, 2010, 04:29:25 pm
skynet? automated  vehicles/drones ?    they must have  watched the Terminator way too many times.

So when do we see the actual Terminator/ robotic soldiers?   I know china uses a robot sentry at certain areas of its border that are armed  and very accurate from what I have read.
Title: Re: Boeing's robo-copter flexes its muscle
Post by: Hardware 952 on March 15, 2010, 04:57:02 pm
Experts Warn of 'Terminator'-Style Military-Robot Rebellion


Autonomous Military Robotics:
Risk, Ethics, and Design
http://ethics.calpoly.edu/ONR_report.pdf



Military’s killer robots must learn warrior code

From The Times February 16, 2009
http://technology.timesonline.co.uk/tol/news/tech_and_web/article5741334.ece

Autonomous military robots that will fight future wars must be programmed to live by a strict warrior code or the world risks untold atrocities at their steely hands.

The stark warning – which includes discussion of a Terminator-style scenario in which robots turn on their human masters – is issued in a hefty report funded by and prepared for the US Navy’s high-tech and secretive Office of Naval Research .

The report, the first serious work of its kind on military robot ethics, envisages a fast-approaching era where robots are smart enough to make battlefield decisions that are at present the preserve of humans. Eventually, it notes, robots could come to display significant cognitive advantages over Homo sapiens soldiers.

“There is a common misconception that robots will do only what we have programmed them to do,” Patrick Lin, the chief compiler of the report, said. “Unfortunately, such a belief is sorely outdated, harking back to a time when . . . programs could be written and understood by a single person.” The reality, Dr Lin said, was that modern programs included millions of lines of code and were written by teams of programmers, none of whom knew the entire program: accordingly, no individual could accurately predict how the various portions of large programs would interact without extensive testing in the field – an option that may either be unavailable or deliberately sidestepped by the designers of fighting robots.

The solution, he suggests, is to mix rules-based programming with a period of “learning” the rights and wrongs of warfare.

A rich variety of scenarios outlining the ethical, legal, social and political issues posed as robot technology improves are covered in the report. How do we protect our robot armies against terrorist hackers or software malfunction? Who is to blame if a robot goes berserk in a crowd of civilians – the robot, its programmer or the US president? Should the robots have a “suicide switch” and should they be programmed to preserve their lives?

The report, compiled by the Ethics and Emerging Technology department of California State Polytechnic University and obtained by The Times, strongly warns the US military against complacency or shortcuts as military robot designers engage in the “rush to market” and the pace of advances in artificial intelligence is increased.

Any sense of haste among designers may have been heightened by a US congressional mandate that by 2010 a third of all operational “deep-strike” aircraft must be unmanned, and that by 2015 one third of all ground combat vehicles must be unmanned.

“A rush to market increases the risk for inadequate design or programming. Worse, without a sustained and significant effort to build in ethical controls in autonomous systems . . . there is little hope that the early generations of such systems and robots will be adequate, making mistakes that may cost human lives,” the report noted.

A simple ethical code along the lines of the “Three Laws of Robotics” postulated in 1950 by Isaac Asimov, the science fiction writer, will not be sufficient to ensure the ethical behaviour of autonomous military machines.

“We are going to need a code,” Dr Lin said. “These things are military, and they can’t be pacifists, so we have to think in terms of battlefield ethics. We are going to need a warrior code.”

Isaac Asimov’s three laws of robotics

1 A robot may not injure a human being or, through inaction, allow a human being to come to harm

2 A robot must obey orders given to it by human beings, except where such orders would conflict with the First Law

3 A robot must protect its own existence as long as such protection does not conflict with the First or Second Law

Introduced in his 1942 short story Runaround




Experts Warn of 'Terminator'-Style Military-Robot Rebellion

http://www.foxnews.com/story/0,2933,496309,00.html

Autonomous military robots that will fight future wars must be programmed to live by a strict warrior code, or the world risks untold atrocities at their steely hands.

The stark warning — which includes discussion of a "Terminator"-style scenario in which robots turn on their human masters — is part of a hefty report funded by and prepared for the U.S. Navy's high-tech and secretive Office of Naval Research.

The report, the first serious work of its kind on military robot ethics, envisages a fast-approaching era where robots are smart enough to make battlefield decisions that are at present the preserve of humans.

Eventually, it notes, robots could come to display significant cognitive advantages over Homo sapiens soldiers.

"There is a common misconception that robots will do only what we have programmed them to do," Patrick Lin, the chief compiler of the report, said. "Unfortunately, such a belief is sorely outdated, harking back to a time when ... programs could be written and understood by a single person."

The reality, Dr. Lin said, was that modern programs included millions of lines of code and were written by teams of programmers, none of whom knew the entire program.

Accordingly, no individual could accurately predict how the various portions of large programs would interact without extensive testing in the field — an option that may either be unavailable or deliberately sidestepped by the designers of fighting robots.
Title: Global Hawk=Int'l Eye in the Sky Program passed as climate change monitor
Post by: flaming_red_pill on March 31, 2010, 11:53:25 am
These RC planes as featured on Yahoo News today (3/31/10) are supposedly for monitoring weather (i.e. "climate change"/manmade global warming).
The European version, however, is fitted for high tech surveillance including RFID monitoring, lol/cry? And some of the articles I found here suggest that the version to be deployed here were used in an offensive capacity in Afghanistan against 'terrorists'.
Yahoo was trying to pass off this bird as some sort of innocent meteorologist tool; if these are deployed over U.S. soil it is to monitor personnel movements, not weather systems, am I wrong????

Also lol at NASA investigating the TOYOTA scandal; what are they now, TEAM AMERICA WORLD POLICE? Sorry if I am overreacting, but I don't believe that these things are flying to solve the "problem" of global warming on behalf of the common man... I believe that communications and surveillance problems were the #1 obstacle for something like an an Allied Union or Project Blue Beam decades ago. These along with orbiting supercomputers and the like provide the dear guv with incredible, real-time persistent surveillance capabilities if I am not mistaken.

Scurry stuff.




http://findarticles.com/p/articles/mi_m0IBO/is_4_28/ai_n14700022/pg_15/

21st century logistics: future UAV pilots: are contractors the solution? RFID Technology: is the capability a boon or a burden for DoD?

http://noolmusic.com/twitter/global_hawk.php



http://nosint.blogspot.com/2009/10/first-international-version-of-combat.html?utm_source=feedburner&utm_medium=feed&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+blogspot%2Ffqzx+%28Naval+Open+Source+INTelligence%29

Quote
First International Version of the Combat-Proven RQ-4 Global Hawk Aircraft Will be the New European Eyes in Skies

Northrop Grumman Corporation and EADS Defence & Security (DS) introduced the first Euro Hawk® unmanned aircraft system (UAS) in an unveiling ceremony today at Northrop Grumman's Palmdale, Calif., facility.

The Euro Hawk® marks the first international configuration of the RQ-4 Global Hawk high-altitude, long-endurance (HALE) UAS, and solidifies Northrop Grumman's first transatlantic cooperation with Germany and DS.

More than 300 employees from Northrop Grumman and DS and officials from the German Air Force and Ministry of Defence (MoD) gathered today for the ceremony, which concluded in a dramatic curtain drop revealing the distinctively different aircraft that will be equipped with German sensors.








http://blog.taragana.com/pr/hypertronics-connectors-provide-signal-integrity-for-northrop-grummans-global-hawk-unmanned-aircraft-system-5026/

Quote
Hypertronics Connectors Provide Signal Integrity for Northrop Grumman’s Global Hawk Unmanned Aircraft System
Prne
August 18th, 2009

HUDSON, Massachusetts -

Hypertronics Corporation (www.hypertronics.com/), a Smiths Interconnect business and world-leading provider of high performance interconnect solutions for the most demanding applications; today announced that their KA electrical connectors were selected for use on Northrop Grumman Corporation’s (NYSE: NOC) Global Hawk unmanned aircraft system (UAS). Used in the braking and master flight control computer systems, the KA connectors were selected due to their reliability and robustness under harsh environments, shock and vibration.

Global Hawk can fly at altitudes of more than 60,000 feet for more than 32 hours, and has many potential Earth science and weather monitoring applications, in addition to overseas contingency operations support. The MIL-DTL-55302 Qualified Parts List Hypertronics KA printed circuit board contact system is able to perform at the high heat and elevations required for UAS. The KA’s are available in over 2,500 model configurations. The robust system uses 0.60 diameter pins/sockets that are rated at 4 amps with an insertion/extraction force of 1 ounce and for ultimate conductivity are 50 micro inches of gold (min) over nickel. They are made from corrosion resistant materials that meet the increasing technological demands of the UAS industry where continuous operation in extreme environments is required.

The Hypertronics Hypertac system is a unique contact design characterized by a wire basket technology which encapsulates a male pin and guarantees continuous signal integrity especially critical in space and military applications where a robust contact is required that can withstand high levels of shock and vibration. The wire basket design creates a 360 degree point of contact which ensures signal reliability, eliminates electrical intermittencies and fretting which can be an issue with many other connectors.

The Global Hawk is used for diverse missions that vary from combat operations on land and sea to supporting civil authorities in disaster relief operations or global climate monitoring. NASA recently announced that the agency will use Global Hawks for environmental science research, providing valuable information to help understand global climate change. These Global Hawks are based at the Dryden Flight Research Center, NASA’s primary installation for atmospheric flight research.

Source: Hypertronics Corporation

Deborah West, Public Relations of Hypertronics Corporation, +1-978-568-2780, debbie.west at hypertronics.com


http://www.examiner.com/x-2430-Science-Examiner~y2009m1d15-Unmanned-eye-in-the-sky-revealed-by-NASA

Quote
Unmanned eye in the sky revealed by NASA
January 15, 5:48 PMScience ExaminerTrina Hoaks
Previous Next
Comment Subscribe
Subscribe

Get alerts when there is a new article from the Science Examiner. Read Examiner.com's terms of use.
Email Address


  Include other special offers from Examiner.com
Terms of Use    
ShareThis
Global Hawk

Earlier today, NASA revealed two planes that will be used to gather information for atmospheric research. One of the unmanned planes, Global Hawks, as they’re called, will be decked out with scientific instrumentation later this year so that it will be ready for its first mission scheduled for June.

The Global Hawk is larger than its predecessors and Is able to maintain flight for longer than those that came before it.

According to an Associated Press report, project scientist, Paul A. Newman:
 

    "It's a whole new ballgame for us."





http://www.spacewar.com/reports/Global_Hawk_Marks_10_Year_Anniversary_999.html

Quote
UAV NEWS
Global Hawk Marks 10-Year Anniversary

"The Global Hawk provides a persistent 'eye in the sky' that saves Soldiers, Sailors, Marines and Airmen's lives, and helps them take the fight to our enemies," Colonel Thurling said.
by Staff Writers
Edwards AFB CA (SPX) Mar 07, 2008
A Global Hawk unmanned aerial vehicle landed after an eight-hour mission Feb. 28 that marked 10 years since base officials witnessed its first flight at Edwards Air Force Base. On that first flight, the aircraft flew for one hour at an altitude of 32,000 feet, and now the Global Hawk has logged more than 20,000 flight hours including 15,000 hours flown in support of the war on terrorism.

The high-altitude, long-endurance unmanned aerial reconnaissance system is designed to provide commanders with real-time imagery of large geographic areas. The Global Hawk can reach an altitude up to 65,000 feet and loiter for more than 30 hours.

The Global Hawk performed its first flight here because of the Air Force Flight Test Center's proximity to Northrop Grumman facility in San Diego and its easy access to restricted airspace.

During its first flight, Tom Bryson, the 452nd Flight Test Squadron deputy manager for engineering support, was a safety chase driver and had the opportunity to see the UAV and it capabilities.

"I had a front-row seat of this amazing aircraft," Mr. Bryson said. "I was totally amazed to see its capabilities."

The development of the Global Hawk has been phenomenal in the short amount of time they have had it here, Mr. Bryson said.

"The significance of 10 years to this point in time is just amazing because we went from an unproven UAV to a very successful first flight here," Mr. Bryson said.

Though still in the developmental stage, the Global Hawk was deployed in Afghanistan in 2001 to support of the war on terrorism.

"None of us anticipated Sept. 11, 2001, and during that time, the Global Hawk was at a critical stage in its development," Mr. Bryson said. "But the Global Hawk did what it was built to do, and on its first night it saved several lives."

The Global Hawk system is providing vital intelligence to the warfighter, said Lt. Col. Andy Thurling, the 452nd Flight Test Squadron commander.

"The Global Hawk provides a persistent 'eye in the sky' that saves Soldiers, Sailors, Marines and Airmen's lives, and helps them take the fight to our enemies," Colonel Thurling said.

Tom Wayne, 452nd Flight Test Squadron Northrop Grumman deputy flight test manager and Global Hawk pilot, said he was impressed with the aircraft's performance during its first flight and foresees great things for the UAV in the next 10 years.

"At first, I had mixed feelings as a Global Hawk pilot since we are flying the aircraft on the ground as the UAV is up in the sky, but after seeing its capabilities during the first flight here, I was amazed," Mr. Wayne said. "Being a Global Hawk pilot does have its satisfaction because we are breaking new grounds here. I am doing something new in aviation."

Mr. Bryson said Edwards AFB officials have the pleasure of seeing Global Hawk's first, second and third generation, and he is looking forward to see what's in store in the years to come.

"Not only will we still be providing support for the (war on terrorism), but we will also be providing new capabilities for the military," he said. "The future for unmanned vehicles is unlimited."

Community
Email This Article
Comment On This Article

Related Links
UAV News - Suppliers and Technology
In other words, they can sic dogs of the state on the family farm with lightning precision,  :D




Now imagine UAVs equipped with, say, this:
Quote
MILTECH
US, Chinese researchers engineer invisible cloak: study

by Staff Writers
Washington (AFP) Jan 15, 2009
In a breakthrough that could signal a new era for human technology, US and Chinese researchers announced Thursday they are a step closer to creating an invisibility shield.

In a development made possible by advances in complex mathematical algorithms, engineers at Duke University, North Carolina were able to create what they call "metamaterials."

These materials can "guide electromagnetic waves around an object, only to have them emerge on the other side as if they had passed through an empty volume of space," according to the team, whose work was published in the January 16 edition of the journal Science.

The cloaking phenomenon is similar to mirages seen at a distance on a hot day, according to senior researcher David R. Smith.

"You see what looks like water hovering over the road, but it is in reality a reflection from the sky," Smith said.

"In that example, the mirage you see is cloaking the road below. In effect, we are creating an engineered mirage with this latest cloak design."

The team, who were backed by the US Air Force Office of Scientific Research and the National Science Foundation of China among others, worked off their 2006 prototype that proved the project's feasibility.

But Smith said their latest cloak is far superior to the original design, Smith said.

"The new device can cloak a much wider spectrum of waves -- nearly limitless -- and will scale far more easily to infrared and visible light," he said.

"The approach we used should help us expand and improve our abilities to cloak different types of waves."

The breakthrough has the potential of advancing numerous technologies that already exist, and ideas that have yet to be devised.

"By eliminating the effects of obstructions, cloaking devices could improve wireless communications, or acoustic cloaks could serve as protective shields, preventing the penetration of vibrations, sound or seismic waves," said the team.

The cloak, measuring 20 inches (50.8 centimeters) by four inches (10 centimeters) and less than an inch (2.5 centimeter) high, is constructed with 10,000 fiberglass pieces arranged in parallel rows, 6,000 of which are unique.

The unique algorithms that can affect electromagnetic waves determined the shape and placement of each piece, the team indicated.

http://www.spacewar.com/reports/US_Chinese_researchers_engineer_invisible_cloak_study_999.html


We're working with China on this one by the way, isn't that sweet?  :-[
Title: Re: Global Hawk=Int'l Eye in the Sky Program passed as climate change monitor
Post by: Monkeypox on March 31, 2010, 05:46:03 pm
"The Global Hawk provides a persistent 'eye in the sky' that saves Soldiers, Sailors, Marines and Airmen's lives"

In other words, they no longer have to risk injury or death to themselves to kill.

Honor has completely left the battlefield.
Title: Re: Global Hawk=Int'l Eye in the Sky Program passed as climate change monitor
Post by: chrisfromchi on March 31, 2010, 05:49:18 pm
"The Global Hawk provides a persistent 'eye in the sky' that saves Soldiers, Sailors, Marines and Airmen's lives"

In other words, they no longer have to risk injury or death to themselves to kill.

Honor has completely left the battlefield.

Really its more they changed the "radar on" option in the call of duty global warfare options menu of the game.
Title: Re: Global Hawk=Int'l Eye in the Sky Program passed as climate change monitor
Post by: flaming_red_pill on March 31, 2010, 08:59:40 pm
(http://www.emporia.edu/earthsci/student/graves1/GHWK3.jpg)

http://www.emporia.edu/earthsci/student/graves1/project.html

(http://www.flightglobal.com/airspace/media/militaryaviation1946-2006cutaways/images/14167/northrop-grumman-rq-4a-global-hawk-block-10.jpg)

(http://www.eol.ucar.edu/development/avaps-iii/images/global-hawk-1)

(http://www.u2sr71patches.co.uk/images/aug0512thrsdes.jpg) (http://www.u2sr71patches.co.uk/images/nov091strshawktamer_small.jpg) (http://www.u2sr71patches.co.uk/images/temp1_small.jpg)

http://www.wired.com/dangerroom/2010/01/pentagon-shares-earthquake-images-from-high-flying-spy-drone/

(http://www.wired.com/images_blogs/dangerroom/2010/01/global-hawk-cathedral-660x439.jpg)

(http://www.bredow-web.de/ILA_2004/Jagdflugzeuge/Global_Hawk/Global_Hawk-.JPG)

Quote
In Germany, the contracting authorities have a requirement for an airborne wide-area surveillance and reconnaissance capability. The solution favoured here is based on Northrop Grumman's Global Hawk, a HALE (High Altitude Long Endurance) type unmanned air vehicle that is to be modified for the installation of German and/or European mission systems and requires certification for Europe as the Euro Hawk system.


EADS Military Aircraft covers an important part of this field, Unmanned Combat Aerial Vehicles (UCAVs), and has already been working on the required specific technologies for many years. Investigations are being conducted together with the German Aerospace Center (DLR) in order to prove the feasibility of remote control technologies. In Ottobrunn, engineers are working on voice control, automatic target identification, automatic guidance and other topics.
All these separate technologies need to be integrated into an overall system. Here, too, the focal points are aerodynamic design of the airframe, flight control, signature footprint, simulation and test, state-of-the-art materials and production methods. But system integration is gaining in significance all the time. Here, the Business Unit is building on the experience it has acquired in programmes such as Tornado, Eurofighter or the X-31. This knowledge is utilised both in the unit's own studies and, for example, as a contribution to the European Technology Acquisition Programme (ETAP).


EADS Military Aircraft is filling this market gap by offering the Mako, a family concept for an advanced trainer and light combat aircraft. Mako is being developed around the concept of a family consisting of the Mako HEAT and a Light Combat Aircraft (LCA). This family concept is well-balanced because it is based on a common platform and provides technical, logistic and commercial advantages. The Mako family concept enables technology and equipment to be used equally for the Mako HEAT and for the LCA, which opens up growth potentials for the coming decades.

http://www.irandefence.net/showthread.php?t=95

(http://www.aviationandmarineusa.com/900_cvrs/05192008/900/ED07-0244-052.jpg)

(http://i42.tinypic.com/e199xi.jpg)

(http://www.blackbirds.net/uav/images/news/061103-F-7039A-001-copy.jpg)

(http://2.bp.blogspot.com/_8SXp1WHXhuI/Skyx_EcL2AI/AAAAAAAAAFM/kzCWxuG2D4s/s320/Northrop+Grumman++Logo.jpg)

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

http://www.as.northropgrumman.com/products/globalhawk/

Global Hawk

RQ-4 Global Hawk Enterprise
High-Altitude, Long-Endurance Unmanned Aircraft Systems

Mission
The family of high-flying Global Hawks builds on the common RQ-4 high-altitude, long-endurance (HALE) unmanned aircraft system (UAS). When equipped with a variety of available mission-specific sensors, they provide intelligence, surveillance and reconnaissance (ISR) information over a vast geographic area without putting anyone in harm’s way. Global Hawk missions are to provide a broad spectrum of ISR collection capability to support joint combatant forces in worldwide peacetime, contingency and wartime operations. The systems can also be used for various civil and commercial missions such as border patrol, port surveillance, hurricane monitoring, disaster relief support, and high-altitude scientific research. The systems complement manned and space reconnaissance systems by providing near-real-time coverage using imagery intelligence (IMINT) sensors, signals intelligence (SIGINT), and communications relay capability.

Current RQ-4 Programs:

Global Hawk (U.S. Air Force)
A combat-proven HALE UAS with extraordinary ISR capabilities, providing near-real-time high resolution imagery of large geographical areas all day and night in all types of weather. During its trials with the Air Force's 31st Test and Evaluation Squadron and during its first deployment in Operation Enduring Freedom, the Global Hawk system was shown to be flexible and dynamically re-taskable. Global Hawk media gallery.

GHMD (U.S. Navy)
The U.S. Navy procured two Block 10 Global Hawks for the Global Hawk Maritime Demonstration (GHMD) program from the U.S. Air Force, and is using them to help define concept of operations for maritime surveillance, as well as for sensor technology experimentation and fleet orientation exercises. GHMD media gallery.

Euro Hawk® (Germany)
First international version of the Global Hawk UAS for the German Ministry of Defence. The Euro Hawk® is a derivative of the Block 20 Global Hawk, equipped with new SIGINT mission system developed by EADS. The SIGINT system provides stand-off capability to detect electronic intelligence (ELINT) and communications intelligence (COMINT) radar emitters. EADS will also provide the ground stations that will receive and analyze the data from Euro Hawk® as part of an integrated system solution.

NASA Global Hawk (NASA Dryden)
Partnership between NASA Dryden and Northrop Grumman to demonstrate HALE capability for future customers and experiments for the environmental science community to include NOAA, NASA, Department of Energy, and universities. Northrop Grumman will share in use of the aircraft to conduct its own flight demonstrations for expanded markets, missions and airborne capabilities, including UAS integration into national airspace.

NATO AGS (U.S. and allied nations)
After many years exploring options for a NATO owned and operated airborne ground surveillance capability, the North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO) has agreed to a program of record based on the Block 40 Global Hawk with an MP-RTIP sensor. In September 2007, nations agreed to move forward with a UAS-only solution based on an off-the-shelf Block 40. Northrop Grumman will be the prime contractor for the NATO AGS program, supported by industries in the 15 participating nations. NATO AGS media gallery.

Background
Global Hawk has its origins in the 1995 High-Altitude Endurance Unmanned Aerial Vehicle Advanced Concept Technology Demonstration (HAE UAV ACTD) program initiated by the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) and Defense Airborne Reconnaissance Office (DARO). The Global Hawk effort succeeded because it focused on the design and construction of a practical air vehicle that was developmentally mature enough to be transitioned into an operational weapons system. While still a developmental system, the Global Hawk system began supporting overseas contingency operations only two months after the Sept. 11, 2001 attacks, with thousands of combat hours and missions completed thus far.

Distinctions
Global Hawk has achieved several distinctions and awards, including setting an endurance record for a full-scale, operational unmanned aircraft on March 22, 2008, when it completed a flight of 33.1 hours at altitudes up to 60,000 feet over Edwards Air Force Base, Calif. It also set another aviation record on April 23, 2001, when it landed in Australia at 8:40 p.m. local time after a 23-hour, 20-minute trip across the Pacific Ocean. This nonstop flight from Edwards Air Force Base, Calif., marks the first time that an unmanned, powered aircraft crossed the world's largest ocean.

In 2001, Northrop Grumman along with key government and industry partners received the coveted Robert J. Collier Trophy for designing, building, testing, and operating Global Hawk. In addition, Global Hawk is the first UAS to achieve a military airworthiness certification, which along with the certificate of authorization from the Federal Aviation Administration, recognizes Global Hawk's ability to routinely fly within national airspace.

Features
The Global Hawk system consists of the RQ-4 aircraft, mission control element (MCE), launch and recovery element (LRE), sensors, communication links, support element, and trained personnel. They offer a wide variety of employment options. Cruising at extremely high altitudes above 60,000 feet for more than 32 hours at a time, the aircraft can survey large geographic areas with pinpoint accuracy, giving military decision-makers near-real-time information regarding enemy location, resources, and personnel.

The Block 10 configurations carry the IMINT sensors, which include synthetic aperture radar, electro-optical and medium-wave infrared sensors. The Block 20 versions carry an enhanced integrated sensor suite similar to the Block 10 but provides longer range and better resolution. The Block 30 carries the Block 20 imagery sensors as well as the airborne signals intelligence payload, while the newest version, Block 40, carries the Multi-Platform Radar Technology Insertion Program (MP-RTIP) active electronically scanned array radar.

The MCE serves as the RQ-4 cockpit during the operational portion of the mission with a pilot and sensor operator crew. Command and control data links provide RQ-4 crews complete dynamic control of the aircraft. The pilot workstations in the MCE and LRE act as the cockpit on the ground for the pilot to control and display platform status transmitted from the aircraft via the command and control link (health and status of the aircraft, sensors, navigational systems, and communication links). From this station, the pilot communicates with outside entities to coordinate the mission (air traffic control, airborne controllers, ground controllers, other ISR assets, etc.). When necessary the pilot can land the aircraft at any location provided in the aircraft mission plan. The sensor operator workstation manually provides the capability to dynamically update the collection plan, monitor sensor status, initiate sensor calibration and process, distribute, and store data. The sensor operator provides quality control of images on selected targets of high interest (ad hoc, dynamic targets, etc.).

Unlike all other unmanned aircraft, Global Hawk is flown autonomously by flight control software under the direct supervision of a pilot. The pilot does not physically manipulate the control surfaces in flight but instead, he commands the computer to take action when needed, or the system can be left alone and fly a complete preprogrammed mission. Takeoff and landing are software controlled and poor weather is not a limiting factor for operation like it is for other unmanned systems. The pilot and crew can focus on executing the national security intelligence collection mission, collecting thousands of pixels full of critical security intelligence, while the aircraft is flown by the sophisticated flight control computer.

Specifications
The Block 20/30/40 version represents a significant increase in capability over the Block 10 configuration. The larger Block 20/30/40 aircraft can carry up to 3,000 pounds of internal payload and operates with two-and-a-half times the power of its predecessor. Its open system architecture, a so-called "plug-and-play" environment, can accommodate new sensors and communication systems as they are developed to help military customers quickly evaluate and adopt new technologies.

When fully fueled for flight, the Block 20/30/40 weighs approximately 32,250 pounds. More than half the system's components are constructed of lightweight, high-strength composite materials, including its wings, wing fairings, empennage, engine cover, nacelles, and three radomes. Its main fuselage is standard aluminum, semi-monocoque construction.

Block 10
Wingspan: 116.2 ft (35.4 m)
Length: 44.4 ft (13.5 m)
Height: 14.6 ft (4.2 m)
Gross Takeoff Weight: 26,700 lbs (12,110.9 kg)
Maximum Altitude: 65,000 ft (19.8 km)
Payload: 2,000 lbs (907.2 kg)
Ferry Range: 12,000 nm (22,236 km)
Loiter Velocity: 343 knots TAS (True Air Speed)
On-Station Endurance at 1,200 nm: 24 hours
Maximum Endurance: 32+ hours

Block 20/30/40
Wingspan: 130.9 ft (39.9 m)
Length: 47.6 ft (14.5m)
Height: 15.4 ft (4.7 m)
Gross Takeoff Weight: 32,250 lbs (14,628 kg)
Maximum Altitude: 60,000 ft (18.3 km)
Payload: 3,000 lbs (1,360 kg)
Ferry Range: 12,300 nm (22,780 km)
Loiter Velocity: 310 knots TAS (True Air Speed)
On-Station Endurance at 1,200 nm: 24 hours
Maximum Endurance: 32+ hours
Title: Re: Global Hawk=Int'l Eye in the Sky Program passed as climate change monitor
Post by: trailhound on March 31, 2010, 09:03:19 pm
See 'Global Skin' as well, also billed as climate monitor primarily but has plenty ability to monitor alot of other things as well.

Im sure the dukes wouldnt use it to corner the orange juice market or anything like that. (sarc)
Title: Re: Global Hawk=Int'l Eye in the Sky Program passed as climate change monitor
Post by: flaming_red_pill on March 31, 2010, 09:25:09 pm
Thank you! I will!

Also,

NATO AGS program

http://www.nato.int/issues/ags/index.html
http://www.defenseindustrydaily.com/nato-signs-initial-26m-contract-for-ags-eye-in-the-sky-0450/
http://murray.senate.gov/news.cfm?id=222814  Largest Nato Contract in History
http://www.spyflight.co.uk/ags.htm
http://www.deagel.com/news/NATO-AGS-Program-Moves-Forward_n000000506.aspx
http://blog.taragana.com/pr/northrop-grumman-welcomes-milestone-achievements-in-nato-alliance-ground-surveillance-program-6568/
http://www.defensedaily.com/articles/dt/2005/dt12080503.htm December 8, 2005 NATO Agency Awards RFID Upgrade Work
http://www.rfida.com/2007/12/rfid-microchips-for-military-personnel.htm

http://www.youtube.com/v/FWFMBlIvylY&color1=0xb1b1b1&color2=0xcfcfcf&hl=en_US&feature=player_embedded&fs=1


Blue Force Tracking
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Blue_Force_Tracking
Title: Re: Global Hawk=Int'l Eye in the Sky Program passed as climate change monitor
Post by: flaming_red_pill on May 04, 2010, 07:14:11 pm
http://www.cnn.com/2010/WORLD/asiapcf/05/04/pakistan.drone.attacks/index.html?hpt=T3

(http://i.cdn.turner.com/cnn/2010/WORLD/asiapcf/05/04/pakistan.drone.attacks/story.pakistan.drone.gi.jpg)

May 4, 2010 6:00 p.m. EDT
Drones are just one tool in a larger counterterrorism strategy, one expert says.
Drones are just one tool in a larger counterterrorism strategy, one expert says.
STORY HIGHLIGHTS

    * Plan is now to attack broader terrorist targets beyond al Qaeda leaders
    * Wider target set approved by Bush White House, stepped up by Obama
    * It is seen as key strategy to protect U.S. forces in Afghanistan
    * Administration sensitive to claims of civilian deaths

RELATED TOPICS

    * Pakistan
    * Taliban Movement of Pakistan
    * Al Qaeda

Washington (CNN) -- When the latest apparent U.S. drone strike was conducted this week against militants in Pakistan, the obvious question appeared to be: Did the United States get a "big fish" in the Taliban or al Qaeda organizations?

But a U.S. counterterrorism official says that's now the wrong question to ask, and chances are those hit were not major players. He wouldn't discuss the specifics of the latest strike, but with the official backing of his bosses, he sought to explain how U.S. strategy has changed in the crucial effort to attack targets inside Pakistan with missiles fired from drones.

The plan now is to attack a broader set of terrorist targets far beyond the original effort to strike and kill top al Qaeda leaders, the official said.

The strategy originated not with President Obama but with the previous administration, he said.

Although the United States is the only country in the region known to have the ability to launch missiles from drones, which are controlled remotely, U.S. officials normally do not comment on suspected drone strikes.

The more expansive target set was approved in the final months of the Bush administration in late 2008 but has been stepped up under the Obama White House, the official said. It is seen as a key strategy to help protect the growing number of U.S. forces in neighboring Afghanistan from insurgents operating in Pakistan's border region.

Drone-launched missiles are now hitting lower-level al Qaeda and Taliban personnel, camps, training areas, bomb makers, buildings and other targets in the remote region.

"You've had an expanded target set for time now, and given the danger these groups pose and their relative inaccessibility, these kinds of strikes -- precise and effective -- have become almost like the cannon fire of this war. They're no longer extraordinary or even unusual," the official said.

"The enemy, to be sure, has lost commanders, operational planners, weapons specialists, facilitators and more. But they've also lost fighters and trainers, the kinds of people who have killed American and allied forces in Afghanistan," he said. "Just because they're not big names doesn't mean they don't kill. They do. Their facilities -- where they prepare, rest and ready weapons -- are legitimate targets, too."

Success in using the drones depends on larger intelligence efforts, said Frances Fragos Townsend, a former homeland security adviser to President George W. Bush and now a CNN intelligence analyst. Drones are just one tool in larger strategy, she said.

It requires other tools -- intelligence, military and diplomatic -- to support it, she said.

The administration has been sensitive to accusations that a large number of civilians have been killed since the stepped-up raids began. Statistics kept by the New America Foundation indicate that 30 percent of those who died in drone strikes in Pakistan since 2004 were not militants.

The U.S. counterterrorism official disputed that, saying, "We believe the number of non-combatant casualties since this campaign intensified is under 30 -- those being people who were near terrorist targets, often by choice -- while the total for militants taken off the battlefield exceeds 500."

The official said those figures are based not only on intelligence but also on visual observations before and after strikes.

"The terrorists, who have a real incentive to spread stories of atrocities from the air, haven't done so because they can't do so," the official said. "They'd have to produce names, dates, photos and witnesses, the kinds of things you see almost instantly if the coalition makes a mistake in Afghanistan. But you just don't see that sort of thing coming out of the tribal areas. Instead, even press accounts from the area speak of militants cordoning off places that have been struck and of local and foreign fighters being hit."
Title: Re: Global Hawk=Int'l Eye in the Sky Program passed as climate change monitor
Post by: flaming_red_pill on May 08, 2010, 11:23:22 pm
Quote
http://www.cnn.com/2010/TECH/05/07/wired.terrorist.drone.strikes/index.html

(http://i.cdn.turner.com/cnn/2010/TECH/05/07/wired.terrorist.drone.strikes/t1larg.drone.attack.afp.gi.jpg)

No-name terrorists now CIA drone targets
By Noah Shachtman
May 8, 2010 2:55 p.m. EDT
The CIA gets approval to attack a wider range of suspected militants, even those whose identity is not known.
The CIA gets approval to attack a wider range of suspected militants, even those whose identity is not known.
STORY HIGHLIGHTS

    * Once-limited program to off senior terrorist leaders has turned into full-scale, if undeclared, war in Pakistan
    * National security law experts debate whether the remotely piloted attacks are legal
    * Starting in the Bush administration, drone pilots have become more free to launch weapons
    * In Afghanistan, dropping a bomb from above is now a tactic of last resort

RELATED TOPICS

    * Pakistan
    * Armed Forces
    * Terrorism
    * Afghanistan War

(WIRED ) -- Once upon a time, the CIA had to know a militant's name before putting him up for a robotic targeted killing. Now, if the guy acts like a guerrilla, it's enough to call in a drone strike.

It's another sign of that a once-limited, once-covert program to off senior terrorist leaders has morphed into a full-scale -- if undeclared -- war in Pakistan. And in a war, you don't need to know the name of someone on the other side before you take a shot.

Across the border, in Afghanistan, the rules for launching an airstrike have become tighter than a balled fist. Dropping a bomb from above is now a tactic of last resort; even when U.S. troops are under fire, commanders are reluctant to authorize air strikes.

In Pakistan, however, the opposite has happened. Starting in the latter days of the Bush administration, and accelerating under the Obama presidency, drone pilots have become more and more free to launch their weapons.

"You've had an expanded target set for [some] time now and, given the danger these groups pose and their relative inaccessibility, these kinds of strikes -- precise and effective -- have become almost like the cannon fire of this war. They're no longer extraordinary or even unusual," one American official tells CNN.

This official -- like many other officials -- insists that the drone strikes have torn up the ranks of militants.

"The enemy has lost not just operational leaders and facilitators -- people whose names we know -- but formations of fighters and other terrorists," the official tells the Los Angeles Times. "We might not always have their names, but ... these are people whose actions over time have made it obvious that they are a threat."

National security law experts, inside the government and out, are in the middle of an intense debate over whether the remotely piloted attacks are legal. One leading law professor told Congress last week that the drone operators could be tried for "war crimes," under certain circumstances.

The State Department's top lawyer counters that the drone attacks are a legitimate act of self-defense.

The connection between the robotic strikes over there and our safety here appears to be growing, The Pakistani Taliban, who have claimed credit for the botched Times Square bombing, say the car bomb was in retaliation for drone strikes.

But the robotic aircraft are only one component in the war in Pakistan. American troops are on the ground there, and getting into firefights. American contractors are operating a fleet of helicopters above. Higher in the sky are the American drones, flown by the U.S. Air Force and the CIA.

Subscribe to WIRED magazine for less than $1 an issue and get a FREE GIFT! Click here!

Copyright 2010 Wired.com.








Quote
http://www.wired.com/dangerroom/2010/04/state-department-flies-mercenary-air-force-over-pakistan/?cnn=yes

(http://www.wired.com/images_blogs/dangerroom/2010/04/huey-ii.jpg)

State Department Flies Mercenary Air Force Over Pakistan

    * By Nathan Hodge Email Author
    * April 30, 2010  |
    * 3:43 pm  |
    * Categories: Af/Pak
    *

huey-iiThe airspace along the Afghanistan/Pakistan border is pretty crowded these days: Along with U.S., Afghan and Pakistani military missions, the CIA is running its own covert drone ops. Less well known, but perhaps equally controversial, is the State Department’s counter-narcotics air force, staffed by mercenaries.

A recently released State Department Inspector General report, however, gave an unusually detailed look at the size and scope of these operations. The report fills in more details about America’s growing and undeclared war in Pakistan.

The State Department’s Bureau of International Narcotics and Law Enforcement Affairs (known by the abbreviation INL) operates an air wing of around 14 aircraft in Afghanistan and another 17 in Pakistan. The aircraft help monitor the border, fly crop-eradication and interdiction missions, and move equipment and personnel around the region.

These kinds of missions aren’t new: The State Department has similar Air Wing programs in Bolivia, Colombia, Guatemala, and Peru. Perhaps more importantly, the State Department has outsourced much of this mission. The INL’s air wing in Afghanistan and Pakistan is operated by private military company DynCorp, and the presence of U.S. contractors in Pakistan has proven extremely controversial (the released IG report, not surprisingly, was originally marked “sensitive but unclassified”).

For instance, when it was disclosed earlier this month that the U.S. government was seeking land for an aircraft maintenance base DynCorp, the Pakistani press had a field day. Pakistani Interior Minister Rehman Malik had repeatedly denied the presence of U.S. private security contractors on Pakistani soil, but here was the U.S. government, asking for a maintenance base for its contracted air wing. “This is worth recalling here that Interior Minister Rehman Malik had told the National Assembly in February this year, ‘Neither Blackwater nor any other security agency with such name is operating in Pakistan,’” Pakistan’s The Nation newspaper snarkily noted.

In fairness, the State Department hasn’t really been too secretive about this: INL’s winter newsletter featured a news announcement about the delivery to Pakistan of more Huey II helicopters, similar to the rotorcraft pictured here. More interesting is what the recent Inspector General report hints at the extent to which the Pakistani government relies on this air wing for domestic policing and security operations. “In Pakistan, the Air Wing program, funded at $32 million to date, has been generally effective in providing critical air support for activities along the Pakistan-Afghanistan border, including a variety of missions for the Pakistan Government,” the report states.

Inevitably, the report also notes some shortcomings. DynCorp, the IG found, “had problems meeting some of the contract terms, particularly flying hour goals. The inability to meet the required aircraft readiness rate is directly related to low levels of maintenance personnel and, according to INL/A, is also affected by issues with staff from Pakistan’s Ministry of Interior.”

In addition, the IG also found the Pakistani government was less than forthcoming about how it was using State’s aircraft. The government of Pakistan, the report said, “continues its reticence in providing information on flights.”

Incidentally, the inspector general also alluded to another contracted air force, called “Kabul 40.” That air wing provides passenger and cargo movement for diplomatic staff in Afghanistan.

[PHOTO: U.S. Department of Defense]

Read More http://www.wired.com/dangerroom/2010/04/state-department-flies-mercenary-air-force-over-pakistan/?cnn=yes#ixzz0nP2NNEAv


Title: Re: Global Hawk=Int'l Eye in the Sky Program passed as climate change monitor
Post by: freedom_commonsense on May 09, 2010, 04:21:24 pm
The problem is, how do you deal with this kind of spying, short of shooting down the offending object? I can't see regulating space working out too well...
Title: Re: Global Hawk=Int'l Eye in the Sky Program passed as climate change monitor
Post by: flaming_red_pill on May 10, 2010, 11:12:46 am
Quote
Monday, March 8, 2010  |  Modified: Tuesday, March 9, 2010
Boeing develops Phantom Eye surveillance aircraft
Puget Sound Business Journal (Seattle) - by Steve Wilhelm

Read more: Boeing develops Phantom Eye surveillance aircraft - Puget Sound Business Journal (Seattle):




Boeing is working to broaden the offerings of its Unmanned Airborne Systems division through development of a surveillance aircraft — powered by a hydrogen-fueled Ford compact truck engine — that will be able to loiter at high altitudes for up to four days.

The Phantom Eye prototype, now being assembled by Boeing Phantom Works in St. Louis in collaboration with the Kent-based Unmanned Airborne Systems unit, is to fly in early 2011, said Phantom Works spokesman Chris Haddox.

“We worked closely with the UAS division,” Haddox said.“The idea with the UAS division and UAV (unmanned aerial vehicle) portfolio is to create this family of UAVs to serve various missions.”

A key to the aircraft is power from the modified 2.3 liter Ford engine, which is adapted to give the aircraft the greatest possible range for the weight of engine and fuel. The hydrogen fuel will provide three times as much power as gasoline for the same weight of fuel, Haddox said.

The project is internally funded, and is part of an effort by Boeing to catch up in the unmanned aircraft market, currently dominated by Northrop Grumman and General Atomics. Development of the power system is led by Boeing with Mahle Powertrain and Ford as technology partners.

The alliance with Ford has nothing to do with the fact that former Boeing Commercial Airplanes CEO Alan Mulally now is CEO of Ford, Haddox said. He said work with Ford on use of hydrogen as a fuel had been underway before Mulally left Boeing in 2006.

The demonstrator will have a 150-foot wingspan, and will carry a payload of as much as 450 pounds up to 65,000 feet in altitude. No such aircraft now exists, Haddox said.

Boeing Co. (NYSE: BA) also is developing Phantom Ray, an unmanned fighter that is scheduled to fly in late 2010.

“We believe Phantom Eye and Phantom Ray represent two areas where the unmanned aerial vehicle market is heading,” said Dave Koopersmith, Advanced Boeing Military Aircraft vice president.

Read more: Boeing develops Phantom Eye surveillance aircraft - Puget Sound Business Journal (Seattle):



(http://planetagadget.com/wp-content/uploads/2008/11/x48b-1.jpg)
Title: Re: Global Hawk=Int'l Eye in the Sky Program passed as climate change monitor
Post by: Shroom! on May 10, 2010, 02:52:50 pm
It's almost 1984.
Title: Re: Global Hawk=Int'l Eye in the Sky Program passed as climate change monitor
Post by: flaming_red_pill on May 15, 2010, 10:35:03 pm
Yes it is!!!

http://www.dfrc.nasa.gov/Gallery/Photo/Global_Hawk/HTML/ED07-0244-78.html

Here is some BS straight from the horse's mouth, lol

Quote
Project
Description:    Two Northrop Grumman Global Hawk Advanced Concept Technology Demonstration aircraft have been transferred from the U.S. Air Force to NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center to support NASA’s Airborne Science Program research missions. The ability of the unmanned Global Hawk aircraft to autonomously fly long distances and remain aloft for extended periods of time brings a new capability to the science community for measuring, monitoring and observing remote locations of the Earth. The two Global Hawks were the first and sixth aircraft built under the original development program sponsored by the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency, and were made available to NASA when the Air Force had no further need for them.

There are threads on this forum about us losing over in Afghanistan, and these planes were made available to NASA "because the Air Force didn't need them". I know that they lost at least two Hawks due to errors or something, so that was like, who knows how many hundred mil down the toilet. BULLSHIT they didn't need them... big brother did, lol
Title: Re: Global Hawk=Int'l Eye in the Sky Program passed as climate change monitor
Post by: Pierce2378 on May 16, 2010, 01:00:10 am
the global hawks were employed in the war on terror and still are to the best of my knowledge.
Title: Re: Global Hawk=Int'l Eye in the Sky Program passed as climate change monitor
Post by: flaming_red_pill on May 16, 2010, 06:16:08 am
the global hawks were employed in the war on terror and still are to the best of my knowledge.
Exactly, which says to me that USA shouldn't have 2 Hawks to spare for NASA until we have brought our troops home. America lost two in crashes in the desert/mountains and were still able to give NASA 2. :P
Title: Re: Global Hawk=Int'l Eye in the Sky Program passed as climate change monitor
Post by: flaming_red_pill on May 17, 2010, 07:17:49 pm
Exactly, which says to me that USA shouldn't have 2 Hawks to spare for NASA until we have brought our troops home. America lost two in crashes in the desert/mountains and were still able to give NASA 2. :P

More huge funding to a "mars" program , NASA

Quote
http://commerce.senate.gov/public/index.cfm?p=PressReleases&ContentRecord_id=759fbbb7-3853-4f30-8d6c-edf52cdcd16c&ContentType_id=77eb43da-aa94-497d-a73f-5c951ff72372&Group_id=8aedf6d9-27a7-4360-a09f-8a52dc758066

Recent Press Releases
IN CASE YOU MISSED IT – NASA's Constellation gets big boost in Senate
Joe Brenckle - Republican Press Office 202-224-3991
May 14 2010

Hutchison PortraitIN CASE YOU MISSED IT – Houston Chronicle

NASA's Constellation gets big boost in Senate

“Backers of NASA's Constellation program scored a significant victory Thursday by winning the Senate Appropriations Committee's support to block the Obama administration from terminating any part of the $108 billion back-to-the-moon program before October.  The maneuver was pushed by Sen. Kay Bailey Hutchison of Dallas and proposed by Sen. Robert Bennett, R-Utah.” May 14, 2010

Houston Chronicle -- NASA's Constellation gets big boost in SenateOrder keeping it alive is added to must-pass bill funding the war

By STEWART M. POWELL
WASHINGTON BUREAU

WASHINGTON — Backers of NASA's Constellation program scored a significant victory Thursday by winning the Senate Appropriations Committee's support to block the Obama administration from terminating any part of the $108 billion back-to-the-moon program before October.

And they did it by piggy-backing the restriction onto a must-pass wartime supplemental budget package involving combat dollars for Afghanistan.

Up until Thursday, the battle over NASA has largely been a political war of words — and this is the first time that a congressional committee has responded directly to President Barack Obama's NASA proposal since February, when the president declared the Constellation program should be shelved.

The maneuver was pushed by Sen. Kay Bailey Hutchison of Dallas and proposed by Sen. Robert Bennett, R-Utah.

By including the language in a $58.8 billion budget supplemental to underwrite the costs of combat, Hutchison and her allies virtually assured that the restriction will be adopted by the full Senate and House and signed by Obama — because the costs of the Afghanistan war must be funded.

The language declares that NASA funds “shall be available to fund continued performance of Constellation contracts, and performance of such Constellation contracts may not be terminated for convenience by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration in Fiscal Year 2010.”

Unanimous approval

The amendment sailed through unanimously.

“The administration's proposals have not been approved by Congress and probably will not be, and it was premature for them to begin terminating procedures,” added Hutchison, a member of the 30-member panel.

“In the supplemental bill, we were able to stop the administration from terminating contracts for work on the Constellation program,” she added.

Until now, Houston-area lawmakers have relied on a public relations campaign to save the moon program — or at least extend the life of the space shuttle — through letter writing and lobbying to build support in Congress. The Constellation program is managed by Houston's Johnson Space Center, home of NASA mission control for manned operations.

“This is the strongest indication yet that Congress is still not convinced that the president's proposed change of direction to cancel Constellation is the direction that the nation should take if we want to maintain American leadership in human spaceflight,' said Rep. Pete Olson, R-Sugar Land. “This action in the Senate will galvanize the House.”

Culberson has a bill

The spending package could be the only major budget measure to clear Congress before the mid-term congressional elections in November.

Rep. John Culberson, R-Houston is pushing a similar effort in the House Appropriations Committee to “help save America's manned space program.”

“I will continue to use every resource at my disposal to ensure that America maintains its competitive edge in space,” he said.

Obama wants to kill the program and shift the money to extending the life of the International Space Station, fostering a fledgling commercial spacecraft industry and putting greater emphasis on earth science missions.

Congress members have been diligently questioning space agency officials about the future of contractors and employees currently working on Constellation projects. In a hearing just this week, NASA administrator Charles Bolden was grilled repeatedly about alleged efforts by NASA to begin terminating or adjusting contracts with aerospace firms working on the Constellation program.

#  #  #
Bookmark and Share


Browse by:

    *
      05/17/10 -
      Hutchison Statement on Administration’s Intent to Nominate John S. Pistole to Lead TSA
    *
      05/17/10 -
      Chairman Rockefeller's Statement on the Nomination of John S. Pistole to Lead TSA
    *
      05/17/10 -
      Senate Approves Rockefeller-Hutchison Amendment to Preserve FTC's Core Consumer Protection
    *
      05/14/10 -
      Chairman Rockefeller's Statement on Senate Passage of the NTSB Bill
    *
      05/14/10 -
      Current record
    *
      05/13/10 -
      Rockefeller Sends Results of Debt Settlement Industry Investigation to 56 Attorneys General
    *
      05/12/10 -
      Hearing Summary: The Future of U.S. Human Space Flight
    *
      05/12/10 -
      Hutchison: “America Demands More From President’s NASA Plan”
    *
      05/12/10 -
      Chairman Rockefeller Remarks on the Future of U.S. Human Space Flight
    *
      05/10/10 -
      Rockefeller: Consumers' Health Insurance Premium Dollars Should Pay for Care, Not Maximize Insurer Profits
    *
      05/07/10 -
      Rockefeller & Hutchison Applaud Senate Passage of Coast Guard Authorization Act
    *
      05/06/10 -
      Hutchison Profoundly Disappointed with FCC Chairman’s Efforts to Reclassify Broadband Services
    *
      05/06/10 -
      Hearing Summary - America Wins When America COMPETES: Building a High-Tech Workforce
    *
      05/06/10 -
      Hutchison Plans Legislation to Promote Innovative Texas Program to Prepare Math and Science Teachers
    *
      05/06/10 -
      Chairman Rockefeller Remarks on America Wins When America COMPETES: Building a High-Tech Workforce
    *
      05/05/10 -
      Chairmen Rockefeller & Waxman Urge FCC to Protect Broadband Consumers and Implement the Broad Objectives of the National Broadband Plan
    *
      05/05/10 -
      Rockefeller Rallies for STB
    *
      05/05/10 -
      IN CASE YOU MISSED IT – The Hill - Hutchison and Kosmas: Bipartisanship Key for the Future of Space Program
    *
      05/04/10 -
      Chairman Rockefeller and Commerce Committee Members Unveil Auto Safety Legislation
    *
      05/04/10 -
      Chairman Rockefeller Rallies for STB Reform
    *
      05/04/10 -
      Chairman Rockefeller Statement on Oil Spill
    *
      05/03/10 -
      Chairman Rockefeller Statement on Proposed United-Continental Merger
    *
      05/03/10 -
      Hutchison Statement on United Airlines and Continental Airlines Merger

Quote
http://www.chron.com/disp/story.mpl/nation/7004353.html

NASA's Constellation gets big boost in Senate
Order keeping it alive is added to must-pass bill funding the war
By STEWART M. POWELL
WASHINGTON BUREAU
May 13, 2010, 11:38PM
Share
iconDel.icio.us
iconDigg
iconTwitter
Yahoo! Buzz
iconFacebook
iconStumbleUpon

WASHINGTON — Backers of NASA's Constellation program scored a significant victory Thursday by winning the Senate Appropriations Committee's support to block the Obama administration from terminating any part of the $108 billion back-to-the-moon program before October.

And they did it by piggy-backing the restriction onto a must-pass wartime supplemental budget package involving combat dollars for Afghanistan.

Up until Thursday, the battle over NASA has largely been a political war of words — and this is the first time that a congressional committee has responded directly to President Barack Obama's NASA proposal since February, when the president declared the Constellation program should be shelved.

The maneuver was pushed by Sen. Kay Bailey Hutchison of Dallas and proposed by Sen. Robert Bennett, R-Utah.

By including the language in a $58.8 billion budget supplemental to underwrite the costs of combat, Hutchison and her allies virtually assured that the restriction will be adopted by the full Senate and House and signed by Obama — because the costs of the Afghanistan war must be funded.

The language declares that NASA funds “shall be available to fund continued performance of Constellation contracts, and performance of such Constellation contracts may not be terminated for convenience by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration in Fiscal Year 2010.”
Unanimous approval

The amendment sailed through unanimously.

“The administration's proposals have not been approved by Congress and probably will not be, and it was premature for them to begin terminating procedures,” added Hutchison, a member of the 30-member panel.

“In the supplemental bill, we were able to stop the administration from terminating contracts for work on the Constellation program,” she added.

Until now, Houston-area lawmakers have relied on a public relations campaign to save the moon program — or at least extend the life of the space shuttle — through letter writing and lobbying to build support in Congress. The Constellation program is managed by Houston's Johnson Space Center, home of NASA mission control for manned operations.

“This is the strongest indication yet that Congress is still not convinced that the president's proposed change of direction to cancel Constellation is the direction that the nation should take if we want to maintain American leadership in human spaceflight,' said Rep. Pete Olson, R-Sugar Land. “This action in the Senate will galvanize the House.”
Culberson has a bill

The spending package could be the only major budget measure to clear Congress before the mid-term congressional elections in November.

Rep. John Culberson, R-Houston is pushing a similar effort in the House Appropriations Committee to “help save America's manned space program.”

“I will continue to use every resource at my disposal to ensure that America maintains its competitive edge in space,” he said.

Obama wants to kill the program and shift the money to extending the life of the International Space Station, fostering a fledgling commercial spacecraft industry and putting greater emphasis on earth science missions.

Congress members have been diligently questioning space agency officials about the future of contractors and employees currently working on Constellation projects. In a hearing just this week, NASA administrator Charles Bolden was grilled repeatedly about alleged efforts by NASA to begin terminating or adjusting contracts with aerospace firms working on the Constellation program.

[email protected]
Title: Re: Global Hawk=Int'l Eye in the Sky Program passed as climate change monitor
Post by: flaming_red_pill on May 17, 2010, 07:24:21 pm
"THE HONORABLE" GEORGE W. BUSH KNEW HE HAD TO START HIS UAV WAR BEFORE THE MACHINES THEMSELVES DEVELOPED MORE CONSCIENCE THAN HE HAS!!!!!!



Quote
[Opinion]

http://www.nowpublic.com/tech-biz/moral-code-predator-uav  Moral Code for Predator UAV
Share: Email Story Twitter Facebook Stumbleupon Add to Any
by peder.sande | June 30, 2009 at 04:28 pm
455 views | 2 Recommendations | 0 comments
Photos
Selex Galileo UAV
Selex Galileo UAV

see larger image

    * Selex Galileo UAV
    * 'Valkyrie' UAV
    * 'Valkyrie' UAV | Photo 02
    * Predator UAV
    * Predator UAV | Photo 02
    * UAV IAI
    * UAV SAGEM
    * UAV IAI | Photo 02
    * UAV | Photo 02
    * UAV Dassault
    * UAV Dassault | Photo 02

Videos
Illah Nourbakhsh Lecture: Ethics in Robotics

see larger video

sourced by peder.sande

Ron Arkin, at the Georgia Institute of Technology, has created software which could be the start of a moral code for military robots. The code stops UAV predator drones from firing at enemies within cemetery lines, allows the UAV predator drones to exhibit guilt when they create collateral dammage and to be more wary of targets in civilian areas.

    A robotics engineer at the Georgia Institute of Technology has developed an "ethical governor," which could be used to program military robots to act ethically when deciding when, and whom, to shoot or bomb.

Source: news.cnet.com

The increased development of UAVs and other intelligent systems have begun to spur a philosophical debate between their creators. UAV predator drones do not feel empathy or remorse and are capable of creating mass violence against humanity. It would seem illogical to charge these machines with war crimes or other criminal suits, in the truest sense these machines would 'just be following orders' yet what if no direct order was given, just there background programming. Who would be responsible? The programmers, the machines, the keepers?

Luckily a human element is built into all UAVs at the moment, but the question will one day need to be addressed and researchers like Ron Arbik and Illah Nourbakhsh are at the forefront trying to answer these questions.

    Fortunately, the developer, Israel Aerospace Industries (IAI), has thoughtfully included a Man in the Loop feature that enables the missile to be controlled in real time in case an attack needs aborting to avoid collateral damage.

Source: news.cnet.com
Title: "Send in the Spiders"
Post by: H0llyw00d on June 22, 2010, 06:25:11 pm
Remember those spider like small retinal scanner robots from the movie Minority report? BAE Systems is getting $38 million from the US Army Research Lab to fund the Micro Autonomous Systems and Technology (MAST) consortium; a team of scientists and researchers hell-bent on developing an "autonomous, multifunctional collection of miniature intelligence-gathering robots that can operate in places too inaccessible or dangerous for humans."
Well, if you do manage to fall in a narrow ditch at least you know that some crawly little robots going to keep a watch on you.

(http://i48.tinypic.com/2ew37l0.jpg)

Do you enjoy gangs of tiny, spider-like robot insectoids swarming all over your house, car, or personage? If you answered "yes," you're going to love what BAE Systems is cooking up. The company recently received an infusion of $38 million from the US Army Research Lab to fund the Micro Autonomous Systems and Technology (MAST) consortium; a team of scientists and researchers hell-bent on developing an "autonomous, multifunctional collection of miniature intelligence-gathering robots that can operate in places too inaccessible or dangerous for humans." Sure, that description (and accompanying photos, straight from BAE) does give you the impression that whoever came up with this really liked Minority Report, but won't it make you feel safer at night knowing a swarm of metallic spiders are looking out for you? No? Huh, weird.


Not brought to you by these guys ;)
http://www.baesystems.com/
Title: Re: "Send in the Spiders"
Post by: phosphene on June 22, 2010, 06:57:57 pm
http://video.adultswim.com/aqua-teen-hunger-force/send-the-phone-spiders.html
Title: Re: "Send in the Spiders"
Post by: d0rn on June 22, 2010, 07:33:02 pm
It's interesting how we quote movies when something like this appears. It's scary how movies have predicted these things. Could it be some kind of unconscious hive mind thing? How come we're moving in the direction many movies depict? It's very interesting. The more humanity imagines itself through entertainment, the more it's leaning towards that reality. Maybe we need to imagine other scenarios for this earth to "get on track" with the better things, whatever that is. If we keep imagining doomsday scenarios and killing, naturally, that will follow in the future. Just sift through many movies that are of Sci-Fi genre, and you'll notice how we're moving towards that future. I recommend 'Equilibrium'.

Very interesting indeed.
Title: MICRO UAV`s - should we be worried?
Post by: phasma on September 05, 2010, 03:40:12 pm
They are working on making these things as small as possible - this paper explains how!

http://www.naun.org/journals/mechanics/m-12.pdf

:( Great - just what we need ! More tiny eyes in the skies !
Title: Re: MICRO UAV`s - should we be worried?
Post by: EvadingGrid on September 05, 2010, 03:42:09 pm
Gosh...

its one thing to see these sorta things in movies, but another to see a consise white paper on the topic.
Title: Re: MICRO UAV`s - should we be worried?
Post by: EvadingGrid on September 05, 2010, 03:42:53 pm
Here is the missing sound track Phasma :

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NzlG28B-R8Y
Title: Re: MICRO UAV`s - should we be worried?
Post by: phasma on September 05, 2010, 03:44:34 pm
yep - couple of years old too unfortunately.

I dont like this at all because many of these things are virtually silent - they could creep up to yuour windows and you`d likely not notice them !

:S

And thanks for that EG!
Title: Re: MICRO UAV`s - should we be worried?
Post by: EvadingGrid on September 05, 2010, 03:45:33 pm
Did you notice the country of the white papers authors ?

 ;D  ;D  ;D  ;D
Title: Re: MICRO UAV`s - should we be worried?
Post by: Femacamper on September 05, 2010, 03:46:14 pm
Arrrrggggh!
Title: Re: MICRO UAV`s - should we be worried?
Post by: phasma on September 05, 2010, 03:48:25 pm
Yeah that didnt slip past me  ;)
Title: Re: MICRO UAV`s - should we be worried?
Post by: phasma on September 05, 2010, 03:51:21 pm
erm . . . and then there are these!
(And these are worse some how!)

http://baesystems.com/Newsroom/NewsReleases/autoGen_10832814523.html

(http://baesystems.com/static/bae_cimg_eis_mast_latestReleased_bae_cimg_eis_mast_Web.jpg)

Like them creepy things in minority report!

See, movies let us know what is coming!
Title: Re: MICRO UAV`s - should we be worried?
Post by: EvadingGrid on September 05, 2010, 03:51:35 pm
Yeah that didnt slip past me  ;)

Must confess it is tempting to build one !

Rules are 15cm width (about 6") and 90g weight limit.

Title: Re: MICRO UAV`s - should we be worried?
Post by: phasma on September 05, 2010, 03:52:26 pm
well the blue prints are there EG give it a go !

see what you can get up to . . .

fly one inside big ben !
Title: Re: MICRO UAV`s - should we be worried?
Post by: EvadingGrid on September 05, 2010, 03:53:13 pm
Must get a directional EMF blaster for those vermin.

/me  wonders if they flog'em on e-bay yet
Title: Re: MICRO UAV`s - should we be worried?
Post by: Optimus on September 05, 2010, 03:56:19 pm
Micro UAV System "CROW" (day and night mission)
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=h9TOAqo_ra0

Skylark I-LE UAV by Elbit Systems
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dRr4AVZgr0Q&NR=1

Honeywell micro air vehicle
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rMWduRNU_60
Title: Re: MICRO UAV`s - should we be worried?
Post by: EvadingGrid on September 05, 2010, 04:03:15 pm
Micro UAV System "CROW" (day and night mission)
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=h9TOAqo_ra0

Skylark I-LE UAV by Elbit Systems
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dRr4AVZgr0Q&NR=1

Honeywell micro air vehicle
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rMWduRNU_60

That last one is like something out of Terminator IV.


Nice to know our taxes are going to big corps and scientists who can not change a fuse, to what is in essence playing with Radio Controlled Toy Aircraft.

Title: Hexacopter that detects motion and breathing
Post by: g1rlg0ne on March 26, 2011, 01:07:33 pm
http://www.suasnews.com/2011/03/4720/hexacopter-that-detects-motion-and-breathing/

NEWPORT BEACH, Calif., March 21, 2011 — TiaLinx, Inc., a developer of remotely controlled mini-unmanned aerial and ground vehicles integrated with mm-wave miniaturized radars, today announced the launch of the Phoenix40-A. The mini-UAV system is capable of performing dual functions as a motion detector as well as probing for breathing of a hiding person in a compound. The mini-UAV can be remotely controlled at long standoff distances from ground or an airborne asset.

The lightweight and agile mini-UAV with programmability to fly to or land at multiple waypoints has been integrated with TiaLinx’s fine beam ultra-wideband (UWB), multi-Gigahertz radio frequency (RF) sensor array. The system provides long standoff surveillance of a premise to track movement as well as to detect motionless live objects. TiaLinx’s real-time UWB RF Imaging development was sponsored by a SBIR Phase II from the Army’s PEO AMMO, PM-CCS.

Through a software-controlled interface which is integrated into a laptop or joystick controller unit, Phoenix40-A can be remotely guided from long distances to perform mission critical tasks. In addition to the programmed GPS guided multi-waypoint visits, the integrated video cameras allow for day and night landing and monitoring of a premise under surveillance for enhanced situational awareness. Capability to probe a compound at standoff keeps the operator and the Phoenix40-A out of harm’s way.

The RF Scanner is mounted on a lightweight mini-UAV and transmits wideband signals that are highly directional and can penetrate reinforced concrete wall at an extended range. In the receiver, a signal detector circuit is employed to capture the reflections from targets. Amplitude and delay information are then processed in an integrated signal processor.

“Phoenix40-A’s introduction is intended to provide another breakthrough in miniaturization of advanced life detection sensors that provide the capability to sense-through-the-wall (STTW) remotely. Like its sister product Cougar20-H that was launched last month, Phoenix40-A can also be remotely programmed to survey a compound at multiple way points. It can scan a multi-story building and provide its layout. It is also capable of scanning in-road and off-road horizontally to detect buried unexploded ordnance (UXO),” commented Dr. Fred Mohamadi, Founder and CEO of TiaLinx. “TiaLinx is constantly miniaturizing and upscaling its UWB RF imaging core competence to enable standoff sensing of a premise for enhanced situational awareness, to assist rescue operations in hard-to-reach terrains such as collapsed buildings after an earthquake, and to eradicate land mines to save lives.”

 
Title: THE REAL TERMINATOR - Vid
Post by: Letsbereal on November 01, 2011, 05:11:39 am
THE REAL TERMINATOR http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mclbVTIYG8E
Title: Re: THE REAL TERMINATOR - Vid
Post by: ekimdrachir on November 01, 2011, 05:20:51 am
Did they finally build it?
Title: Re: THE REAL TERMINATOR - Vid
Post by: Constitutionary on November 01, 2011, 04:38:25 pm
Getting pretty close !!!   :o :o :o
Title: Re: THE REAL TERMINATOR - Vid
Post by: tritonman on November 01, 2011, 05:42:21 pm
Getting very close indeed. :o
Title: Re: THE REAL TERMINATOR - Vid
Post by: ekimdrachir on November 01, 2011, 07:51:39 pm
(http://www.scifimoviepage.com/upcoming/photos/terminator4/terminator4-2.jpg)
Title: Re: THE REAL TERMINATOR - Vid
Post by: Freeski on November 01, 2011, 08:16:16 pm
Wow. Put a skin on that!

I was hoping the robot would punch the guy when he shoved him.
Title: 1/3 Unmanned Robots by 2015
Post by: TahoeBlue on January 31, 2012, 03:20:30 pm
the Floyd D. Spence National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2001

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Floyd_Spence
Spence died on August 16, 2001, at the age of 73 from complications following brain surgery.

http://www.kairosautonomi.com/downloads/One_Third%20Unmanned%20by%202015.pdf
1/3 Unmanned by 2015 Congressional Mandates

PUBLIC LAW 106–398—OCT. 30, 2000, NATIONAL DEFENSE AUTHORIZATION ACT FOR FISCAL YEAR 2001
SEC. 220. UNMANNED ADVANCED CAPABILITY COMBAT AIRCRAFT AND GROUND COMBAT VEHICLES.

(a) GOAL.—It shall be a goal of the Armed Forces to achieve the fielding of unmanned, remotely controlled technology such that—
(1) by 2010, one-third of the aircraft in the operational deep strike force aircraft fleet are unmanned; and
(2) by 2015, one-third of the operational ground combat vehicles are unmanned.


PUBLIC LAW 109–163—JAN. 6, 2006, NATIONAL DEFENSE AUTHORIZATION ACT FOR FISCAL YEAR 2006
SEC. 261. REPORT ON DEVELOPMENT AND USE OF ROBOTICS AND UNMANNED GROUND VEHICLE SYSTEMS.

(a) REPORT REQUIRED.—Not later than nine months after the date of the enactment of this Act, the Under Secretary of Defense for Acquisition, Technology, and Logistics shall submit to the congressional defense committees a report on the development and utilization of robotics and unmanned ground vehicle systems by the Department of Defense.
(b) ELEMENTS.—The report required by subsection (a) shall include the following:
(9) An assessment of the progress being made to achieve the goal established by section 220(a)(2) of the Floyd D. Spence National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2001 (as enacted into law by Public Law 106–398; 114 Stat. 1654A–38) that, by 2015, one-third of operational ground combat vehicles be unmanned.

PUBLIC LAW 109–364—OCT. 17, 2006 120 STAT. 2365, JOHN WARNER NATIONAL DEFENSE AUTHORIZATION ACT FOR FISCAL YEAR 2007
SEC. 941. DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE POLICY ON UNMANNED SYSTEMS.
(d) REPORT.—Not later than 120 days after the date of the enactment of this Act, the Secretary shall submit to the congressional defense committees a report containing—
(2) an implementation plan for the policy that includes—
(C) an assessment of progress towards meeting the goals identified for the subset of unmanned air and ground systems established in section 220 of the Floyd D. Spence National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2001 (as enacted into law by Public Law 106–398; 114 Stat. 1654A–38).
Title: Re: 1/3 Unmanned robots by 2015
Post by: TahoeBlue on January 31, 2012, 03:26:51 pm
http://science.howstuffworks.com/robot-armies.htm
How Robot Armies Will Work
by Jonathan Strickland
...
In fact, in 2001, the Floyd D. Spence National Defense Authorization Act set a goal for the U.S. Armed Forces -- create an unmanned combat vehicle force that would account for one third of all vehicles in operation. So far, the robot designs don't resemble the Terminator, but they can be just as lethal.

The U.S. Army's Future Combat Systems (FCS) plan is a comprehensive strategy to upgrade the nation's military systems across all branches of the Armed Forces. The plan calls for an integrated battle system -- a fleet of different vehicles that will use up to 80 percent of the same parts, new unattended sensors designed to collect intelligence in the field, and unmanned launch systems that can fire missiles at enemies outside the line of sight and several robots.

The robots are divided into four categories:

    Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAV) designed for surveillance and reconnaissance missions

    Small Unmanned Ground Vehicles (UGV) that can enter hazardous areas and gather information without risking the lives of soldiers

    Multifunctional Utility/Logistics and Equipment (MULE) vehicles designed to provide combat support in conflict situations

    Armed Robotic Vehicles (ARV) that weigh 9.3 tons and can either carry powerful weapons platforms or sophisticated surveillance equipment
Title: Re: 1/3 Unmanned Robots by 2015
Post by: Geolibertarian on January 31, 2012, 03:49:29 pm
(http://images.wikia.com/terminator/images/e/e4/T1.jpg)

(http://images1.wikia.nocookie.net/__cb20090331191943/terminator/images/thumb/f/fe/Hunterkiller.playmates.jpg/763px-Hunterkiller.playmates.jpg)
Title: Re: 1/3 Unmanned Robots by 2015
Post by: kerrymti on January 31, 2012, 03:56:53 pm
So from this are we to assume they are already building an army?
Title: Re: 1/3 Unmanned Robots by 2015
Post by: TahoeBlue on January 31, 2012, 04:25:07 pm
http://www.betabeat.com/2012/01/09/us-military-drones-01092011/
The Robot Military is Here: One-Third of All U.S. Military Aircraft? Drones.
By Foster Kamer 1/09/12 9:12pm
...
Wired/Danger Room notes that almost a third of our military’s air power is being carried out by drones. In other words: robots. 31% of our airborne military is robot-controlled.  http://www.wired.com/dangerroom/2012/01/drone-report/

By the numbers, via Wired:

In 2005, only five percent of military aircraft were robots, a report by the Congressional Research Service notes. Barely seven years later, the military has 7,494 drones. Total number of old school, manned aircraft: 10,767 planes.

The New Blue Jay Drone Army...
(http://birdsite.org/media_files/1/1456_page_4577385025.jpg)
Title: Re: 1/3 Unmanned Robots by 2015
Post by: TahoeBlue on February 02, 2012, 11:45:34 am
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Future_Combat_Systems

Future Combat Systems (FCS) was the United States Army's principal modernization program from 2003 to early 2009.[1] Formally launched in 2003, FCS was envisioned to create new brigades equipped with new manned and unmanned vehicles linked by an unprecedented fast and flexible battlefield network. In April and May 2009, Pentagon and Army officials announced that the FCS vehicle-development effort would be cancelled. The rest of the FCS effort would be swept into a new, pan-Army program called the Army Brigade Combat Team Modernization Program
...

The Boeing Company and Science Applications International Corporation (SAIC) worked together as the lead systems integrator, coordinating more than 550 contractors and subcontractors in 41 states


http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/BCT_Modernization
Title: Re: 1/3 Unmanned Robots by 2015
Post by: John_Back_From_The_Club_O on February 02, 2012, 05:03:54 pm
SHUT UP!!!! THESE DON'T EXIST!!!!
(http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/d/dd/Big_dog_military_robots.jpg)
(http://img.dailymail.co.uk/i/pix/2008/02_04/MilitaryRobot_468x296.jpg)
(http://www.norobotwar.org/wp-content/uploads/2011/11/rigaud-5robots.jpg)
(http://4.bp.blogspot.com/_VyTCyizqrHs/SbFlMI7Y8BI/AAAAAAAADBE/9bnqIrVbPCQ/s400/novelair.jpg)
(http://www.darkgovernment.com/news/wp-content/uploads/2009/01/robot-tank.jpg)
(http://www.futuretimeline.net/21stcentury/images/maars_robot_large.jpg)
(http://digitaljournal.com/img/8/7/8/i/4/8/5/o/usafdrone.jpg)
(http://lh4.ggpht.com/_S1Gu2hX9S6c/Ss3JGiwQjXI/AAAAAAAAOdU/y4zflblvgMs/foster-miller-inc-robot.jpg)
(http://www.70news.com/wp-content/uploads/2010/12/military-robot-crab-robot.jpg)
(http://mb-assets.s3.amazonaws.com/post_images/assets/000/004/218/drone_pic_large.jpeg)

... and as Chris Jones would say... "YOU DON'T KNOW THE HALF OF IT".  These are, most likely, JUST the tinker toys.
Title: Re: 1/3 Unmanned Robots by 2015
Post by: TahoeBlue on February 03, 2012, 11:36:07 am
When you got robots you don't need troops...

http://www.defense.gov/news/newsarticle.aspx?id=64428
Obama Announces Troop Reductions...
By Jim Garamone
American Forces Press Service
WASHINGTON, June 22, 2011

By 2014, this process of transition will be complete...

http://www.cbc.ca/news/world/story/2012/01/05/obama-military-us.html
Obama unveils leaner U.S. defence strategy
Spending to be cut by at least $489 billion over 10 years

Posted: Jan 5, 2012 9:39 AM ET

U.S. President Barack Obama insisted Thursday that the United States will maintain what he calls the best-equipped military in the country's history despite deep and looming defence budget cuts, but Pentagon leaders acknowledged the changes carry additional risk.
 
"Our military will be leaner, but the world must know the United States is going to maintain our military superiority," Obama said in a rare appearance in the Pentagon briefing room.

...
Reshaping the military

The president announced that the military will be reshaped over time with an emphasis on countering terrorism, maintaining a nuclear deterrent, protecting the U.S. homeland, and "deterring and defeating aggression by any potential adversary."
...
Viability of two wars

Obama also wants the new strategy to represent a pivot point in his stewardship of defence policy, which has been burdened throughout his presidency by the wars he inherited and their drag on resources.
 
The new strategy moves the U.S. further from its longstanding goal of being able to successfully fight two major regional wars — like the 1991 Gulf War to evict Iraqi forces from Kuwait or a prospective ground war in Korea — at the same time.
Title: Blade mQX Quad-Copter with FPV video Camera and flight tests
Post by: Letsbereal on February 04, 2012, 04:59:48 am
Blade mQX Quad-Copter with FPV video Camera and flight tests http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1vPkBuDrOeA
Title: Re: Blade mQX Quad-Copter with FPV video Camera and flight tests
Post by: Letsbereal on February 04, 2012, 05:51:04 am
For the peeps out there who've seen the movie Blue Thunder (1983) http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0085255/

This is the same guy (NightFlyyer/Dave Herbert) who flew the model F-16's which were blown up in the mov.

The making of Blue Thunder the movie. By: Dave Herbert http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Md5iZxgtL5k

"In 1981, I was asked to fly my Byron F-16 in the Movie Blue Thunder.

John Simone was the National Helicopter Champion then and owned and operated the company called Impact Effects, Inc.

They blew up models in the movies.

I had plenty of experience with my F-16, and Frank Johnson devised a set of retracts for it, thus making it perfect for the movie, so I was hired.

John Simone also owned and operated the first RC helicopter manufacturing plant in the USA, called American RC helicopters. They made the Mantis and the Eagle.

He was the first known person to attempt and successfully loop a RC helicopter.

Only a couple of full size, specialized helis could do that, as it was not a practical maneuver for helicopters, and still isn't.

He also taught me to fly helicopters, for which I am grateful.

Now we have RC Helicopters that will hover upside down.

We have come a long way since 1981. Hope you enjoy this and are enlightened.

Now days it is all done with computers."

Still one of his most interesting Vids I think: Ancient Mayan "Space Vehicle" Reverse Engineered http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7-C7XO-QH-s
Title: Re: 1/3 Unmanned Robots by 2015
Post by: Optimus on February 04, 2012, 10:07:24 am
Congress Calls for Accelerated Use of Drones in U.S.

February 3rd, 2012 by Steven Aftergood

A House-Senate conference report this week called on the Administration to accelerate the use of civilian unmanned aerial systems (UAS), or “drones,” in U.S. airspace.

The pending authorization bill for the Federal Aviation Administration directs the Secretary of Transporation to develop within nine months “a comprehensive plan to safely accelerate the integration of civil unmanned aircraft systems into the national airspace system.”

“The plan… shall provide for the safe integration of civil unmanned aircraft systems into the national airspace system as soon as practicable, but not later than September 30, 2015.”

The conference bill, which still awaits final passage, also calls for establishment of UAS test ranges in cooperation with NASA and the Department of Defense, expanded use of UAS in the Arctic region, development of guidance for the operation of public unmanned aircraft systems, and new safety research to assess the risk of “catastrophic failure of the unmanned aircraft that would endanger other aircraft in the national airspace system.”

More: http://www.fas.org/blog/secrecy/2012/02/faa_drones.html
Title: Re: 1/3 Unmanned Robots by 2015
Post by: TahoeBlue on February 05, 2012, 05:34:22 pm
Every day another article....

http://www.myfoxchicago.com/dpps/news/us-skies-could-see-more-drones-dpgonc-km-20120204_17657209
US Skies Could See More Drones
Updated: Saturday, 04 Feb 2012,

Wall Street Journal) - Unmanned planes could soon become a more common presence in US skies.

A broad funding bill for the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) -- released this week and expected to win final approval before the middle of February -- for the first time establishes specific deadlines designed to speed up the widespread use of unmanned planes, or drones, across the US.

On Friday, the House passed the package in a 248-169 vote.

The bill calls for integrating a wide range of so-called unmanned aerial vehicles --
operated by both governmental and corporate entities -- with commercial and general aviation traffic across the nation's skies by September 2015
.
...
 But under the FAA bill, proponents envision huge fleets of drones operated nationwide by states, local governments and companies.
...
The four-year, $63 billion FAA bill, which was approved by House and Senate negotiators earlier this week, caps five years of disputes and nearly two dozen stopgap FAA funding bills.
...
The funding package also mandates that within five years, planes taking off and landing at the 35 busiest US airports fly routes based on satellite navigation.
Title: Re: 1/3 Unmanned Robots by 2015
Post by: Dok on February 07, 2012, 10:05:12 am
Congress Passes FAA Bill That Speeds Switch to GPS

A bill to speed the nation's switch from radar to an air traffic control system based on GPS technology, and to open U.S. skies to unmanned drone flights within four years, received final congressional approval Monday.

The bill passed the Senate 75-20, despite labor opposition to a deal cut between the Democratic-controlled Senate and the Republican-controlled House on rules governing union organizing elections at airlines and railroads. The House had passed the bill last week, and it now goes to President Barack Obama for his signature.

http://abcnews.go.com/Travel/wireStory/congress-passes-faa-bill-speeds-switch-gps-15529366
Title: Re: 1/3 Unmanned Robots by 2015
Post by: Dok on February 08, 2012, 10:24:21 am
Drones over U.S. get OK by Congress

Look! Up in the sky! Is it a bird? Is it a plane? It’s … a drone, and it’s watching you. That’s what privacy advocates fear from a bill Congress passed this week to make it easier for the government to fly unmanned spy planes in U.S. airspace.

The FAA Reauthorization Act, which President Obama is expected to sign, also orders the Federal Aviation Administration to develop regulations for the testing and licensing of commercial drones by 2015.

Privacy advocates say the measure will lead to widespread use of drones for electronic surveillance by police agencies across the country and eventually by private companies as well.

REST: http://www.washingtontimes.com/news/2012/feb/7/coming-to-a-sky-near-you/
Title: Re: 1/3 Unmanned Robots by 2015
Post by: TahoeBlue on February 08, 2012, 11:56:22 am
Drones over U.S. get OK by Congress
...
Privacy advocates say the measure will lead to widespread use of drones for electronic surveillance by police agencies across the country and eventually by private companies as well.

REST: http://www.washingtontimes.com/news/2012/feb/7/coming-to-a-sky-near-you/

Already:

http://www.washingtontimes.com/news/2012/feb/7/coming-to-a-sky-near-you/?page=2

Homeland Security has deployed drones to support disaster relief operations
...
The FAA has issued hundreds of certificates to police and other government agencies, and a handful to research institutions to allow them to fly drones of various kinds over the United States for particular missions.

The agency said it issued 313 certificates in 2011 and 295 of them were still active at the end of the year, but the FAA refuses to disclose which agencies have the certificates and what their purposes are.
...
Currently, the only barrier to the routine use of drones for persistent surveillance are the procedural requirements imposed by the FAA for the issuance of certificates,” said Amie Stepanovich, national security counsel for the Electronic Privacy Information Center, a research center in Washington.
Title: Re: 1/3 Unmanned Robots by 2015
Post by: TahoeBlue on February 08, 2012, 12:04:10 pm
http://www.homelandsecuritynewswire.com/topics/uavs-satellites-blimps

...

Underwater drones help police keep harbors safe

Growing attention to underwater security along U.S. coasts has resulted in an increasing reliance on a relatively new tactical weapon for the police: an unmanned submersible drone, often referred to as a remote-operated vehicle, or ROV. The NYPD has six of these underwater drones, similar to those in use by the United States military and by oil companies with offshore operations.
...
Drones set to become ubiquitous in U.S. airspace

Unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) could soon become commonplace in U.S. civilian airspace with farmers using them to spray crops, police deploying drones to gather intelligence ,and utility companies using them to monitor oil, gas, and water pipelines; next January the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) is set to release new regulations on the use of small drones in the United States

Now isn't this great we need drones to protect us from the drones:

Advances in drone technology pose threat to U.S.

Advances in UAV technology, in combination with innovations in drone airframe and propulsion system design, are now making it possible to build very small, inexpensive drones, and to control them using interfaces as simple as a touch screen, computer mouse, or joystick.

These UAVs can be ideal terrorist weapons.

Proliferation of drones raises alarms

Security analysts fear that with the increasing proliferation of unmanned aerial drone technology, terrorists could eventually begin using them to drop explosives or even biological weapons

U.S. Army to deploy “kamikaze” drones

The U.S. Army is getting ready to add a "kamikaze drone" to its arsenal; the new drone is designed to hover quietly in the sky before it dive-bombs directly into a human target

U.A. Navy sees blimp come-back

In 1962, after forty-seven years, the U.S. Navy effectively terminated Lighter-Than-Air (LTA) operations; but the blimp is making a come-back, and on 26 October, the Naval Air Warfare Center Aircraft Division and the U.S. Naval Research Laboratory unveiled the MZ-3A airship; for now, it is the only manned airship in the U.S. Navy's inventory

Ogden, Utah police first-in-nation to use surveillance blimp

A patrol car fitted with all of the police extras cost $40,000; a surveillance blimp will cost well below that -- possibly as low as $15,000; after that, it is $100 a week to keep it filled with helium and charge its electric batteries; the police in Ogden, Utah, decides this is a good deal

...
Air Force to deploy supercomputer aboard a superblimp

The U.S. Air Force is developing a massive blimp to gather and process all intelligence feeds from Afghanistan; the air ship will be longer than a football field and seven times the size of the Goodyear Blimp and will be able to stay afloat for nearly a week at nearly four miles up; the key feature of the ship will be its sophisticated supercomputer which can process 300 terabytes of data an hour; this computer will help limit data overload as surveillance sensors become increasingly complex; it currently takes fourteen analysts to monitor a single feed from a predator and the next generation drones will have ninety-six cameras; the blimp's first test flight is scheduled for 15 October
Title: Re: 1/3 Unmanned Robots by 2015
Post by: Dok on February 08, 2012, 12:10:48 pm
Quote
Underwater drones help police keep harbors safe


That one NEVER crossed my mind.  :o
Title: Re: 1/3 Unmanned Robots by 2015
Post by: TahoeBlue on February 08, 2012, 12:31:16 pm
That one NEVER crossed my mind.  :o

http://www.ciponline.org/research/entry/drones-are-coming-to-a-theater-near-you
Research: Commentary

Drones are Coming to a Theater Near You
CounterPunch, December 8, 2011 | Article
 By Tom Barry

“The UAVs, Unmanned Aerial Vehicles, are coming.”  So says Candice Miller, the Republican congresswoman from northern Michigan borderlands.
...
One reason for the proliferation of DHS oversight committees is interest by congressional representatives like Miller in increasing DHS operations – and associated federal pork – in their districts. Another is the widespread and eminently bipartisan desire by politicians to demonstrate their commitment to border security, immigration enforcement, and counterterrorism
...
Pentagon Filling Capacity Gaps at Home
 
Miller, who frequently displays her familiarity with military jargon, advocates the increased use of military technology for border and homeland security. She points to the increasing and allegedly successful use of the grimly baptized Predator and Reaper drones by DHS as an example of how military technology “used in theater in Iraq and Afghanistan” can be easily adopted to “fill capacity gaps at home.”

On November 15 Miller presided over a congressional hearing to explore how DHS can find technological solutions to homeland and border security in the military technology that is “coming back from theater.”
...
The Pentagon is also playing a major role in the planning to open more U.S. airspace for drone testing and deployment for national defense and homeland security, while U.S. military and National Guard bases are hosting DHS drones.
 
Another major player, of course, is the UAV industry, which is eager to open up not only U.S. airspace but also the international market for public and private drone operations.
 
Drone undoubtedly will play an increasing role in military, homeland security, border security, and law enforcement operations. Miller is certainly right that drones are coming.
 
Escalation Without Review
 
But as drones start coming to a theater near you, there is little reason to believe that government has exercised the due diligence and proper oversight when reviewing drone deployment plans.
...
At home, drone deployment is marching ahead without any cost-benefit evaluations, impact studies, or even any assessments about which UAVs might best meet DHS perceived needs. With respect to homeland security, Customs and Border Protection (CBP) is simply purchasing the hugely expensive unarmed versions of the Predator and Reaper UAVs (manufactured by General Atomics) that are currently deployed in overseas wars and interventions.
 
Neither the Obama administration nor Congress has insisted that CBP provide documentation to support its repeated assertions that UAV’s function as “force multiplier” for the Border Patrol and that drone patrols have substantially improved “border security.” What is more, CBP has failed to demonstrate that it has sufficient skilled personnel and the required logistical capability to operate UAVs successfully.
..
Title: Micro FPV Camera on mQX Quad-Copter. 2nd attempt outside
Post by: Letsbereal on February 17, 2012, 05:26:33 pm
Micro FPV Camera on mQX Quad-Copter. 2nd attempt outside http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8WZ2NWq96y8

Maybe airplanes would be easier than hovering, but it still seems that folks with the very best and expensive FPV equipment still have issues, as seen in the video FPV Warning. Hey, what could go wrong?

( http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iYvi0mk0b5k ) See the ending comments.

As I am still experimenting to see if I want to spent the big bucks, I have made a few Quad-Copter videos while still experimenting with the inexpensive Tiny FPV (First Person View) video Camera I got from HobbyPartz.com.

It only cost $27.50 and works well enough to see if I like this type of flying well enough to spend the money, get the FCC licenses, and a spotter..
Title: Re: 1/3 Unmanned Robots by 2015
Post by: John_Back_From_The_Club_O on February 18, 2012, 08:55:33 pm
Recently-Completed CSOIS Projects
Shape-shifting robot (funded by VPI through a DARPA SBIR)
http://inside.mines.edu/~kmoore/csois-robotics.pdf

Title: Re: 1/3 Unmanned Robots by 2015
Post by: chris jones on February 19, 2012, 01:57:54 pm
 The MIC is rocking $$$.
Title: Re: 1/3 Unmanned Robots by 2015
Post by: Effie Trinket on February 19, 2012, 02:14:50 pm
http://forum.prisonplanet.com/index.php?topic=176293.msg1046764#msg1046764
Title: Re: 1/3 Unmanned Robots by 2015
Post by: John_Back_From_The_Club_O on February 19, 2012, 02:58:52 pm
http://forum.prisonplanet.com/index.php?topic=176293.msg1046764#msg1046764

It's not just a 'military' / automated police state everything right down to farming by big agro is going autopilot.
Title: Re: 1/3 Unmanned Robots by 2015
Post by: chris jones on February 19, 2012, 05:17:25 pm
It's not just a 'military' / automated police state everything right down to farming by big agro is going autopilot.
What kind of America is being prepared for the young ones, God help us all.
I was raised to be proud of my country, the short of I was and so was every other kid I knew. Then out of the FK blue Nam was rocking, the 3K's got slaughtered, the cold war was a pretence to keep the people in line and in fear.. Point-These bags of waste calling the shots have been around for a long time folks the only difference is they are now exposing their their bull shiiit and hell bent on total controll, the end game is in our faces.
 Robots and drones in this country keeping us penned in, WTF. This is surreal, raw evil.
 The one thing I learned in this life, if a guy has a position politically, a tad of power and a SOUL, he is a threat to these rats and a dead man walking.The only reason Ron Paul wasn't wacked is they have taken for granted due to his age and their manipulations, he won't get nominated.
Title: Re: 1/3 Unmanned Robots by 2015
Post by: John_Back_From_The_Club_O on February 19, 2012, 11:06:01 pm
What kind of America is being prepared for the young ones

An America that has NO 'young ones'.
Title: Re: 1/3 Unmanned Robots by 2015
Post by: TahoeBlue on February 20, 2012, 12:21:39 am
Why is 2015 Sooo special?????  

see: Final destination Iran? (Bunker Busters)  (http://forum.prisonplanet.com/index.php?topic=163504.0)

 CINCPAC Command History 1973 - vol 1 -  declassified (http://ir.lib.u-ryukyu.ac.jp/bitstream/123456789/446/5/gabe_04.pdf)

Pew Trusts - Sunoco - Seagrams - HSBC - Business Connections

By Hook or by Crook....
Interesting see: the Joint UK/US expansion of Diego Garcia started back in 1974 (http://forum.prisonplanet.com/index.php?topic=163504.0)

Quote
http://www.dmzhawaii.org/?p=4386
http://www.democracynow.org/2009/10/9/forcibly_exiled_for_nearly_40_years

The military analyst John Pike recently described Diego Garcia as the most important facility the US has.
According to Pike, the military’s goal is to be able to run the planet from Guam and Diego Garcia by 2015.


Military goal: “to be able to run the planet from Guam and Diego Garcia by 2015″

Title: Re: 1/3 Unmanned Robots by 2015
Post by: Ambriel on February 20, 2012, 12:23:51 am
Remember the census workers GPSing everyone's house?

Now Drones over the US.   HMMMMMM.

You better do as the goobermunt says or we will Kaboom you.

may want to check this out as well.


Replicating Robots
http://www.geekologie.com/2011/10/replicting-robot-builds-friends-out-of-f.php


Cornell researchers build a robot that can reproduce
http://www.news.cornell.edu/stories/may05/selfrep.ws.html
Title: Re: 1/3 Unmanned Robots by 2015
Post by: John_Back_From_The_Club_O on February 20, 2012, 01:19:40 pm
(http://uploads.notempire.com/images/uploads/Untitled-6-64.jpg)
(http://wordlesstech.com/wp-content/uploads/2012/02/Robo-Insects-of-the-Future-2.jpg)
(http://www.documentingreality.com/forum/attachments/f181/338882d1329469107-new-mass-production-technique-robotic-insects-spring-life-image_large.jpg)
(http://asset1.cbsistatic.com/cnwk.1d/i/tim/2012/02/16/harvard_mems_610x430.JPG)


Harvard: Robotic insects spring to life with new mass-production technique. (Videos)
http://www.electrictv.com/?p=14687

Production method inspired by children’s pop-up books enables rapid fabrication of tiny, complex devices

“Cambridge, Mass. – February 15, 2012 – A new technique inspired by elegant pop-up books and origami will soon allow clones of robotic insects to be mass-produced by the sheet.

Devised by engineers at Harvard, the ingenious layering and folding process enables the rapid fabrication of not just microrobots, but a broad range of electromechanical devices.

In prototypes, 18 layers of carbon fiber, Kapton (a plastic film), titanium, brass, ceramic, and adhesive sheets have been laminated together in a complex, laser-cut design. The structure incorporates flexible hinges that allow the three-dimensional product—just 2.4 millimeters tall—to assemble in one movement, like a pop-up book.”

In new mass-production technique, robotic insects spring to life
more info @ http://www.seas.harvard.edu/news-events/press-releases/pop-up-flying-robots

February 15, 2012

Production method inspired by children's pop-up books enables rapid fabrication of tiny, complex devices

CONTACT: Caroline Perry, (617) 496-1351

Cambridge, Mass. - February 15, 2012 - A new technique inspired by elegant pop-up books and origami will soon allow clones of robotic insects to be mass-produced by the sheet.

Devised by engineers at Harvard, the ingenious layering and folding process enables the rapid fabrication of not just microrobots, but a broad range of electromechanical devices.

In prototypes, 18 layers of carbon fiber, Kapton (a plastic film), titanium, brass, ceramic, and adhesive sheets have been laminated together in a complex, laser-cut design. The structure incorporates flexible hinges that allow the three-dimensional product—just 2.4 millimeters tall—to assemble in one movement, like a pop-up book.

The entire product is approximately the size of a U.S. quarter, and dozens of these microrobots could be fabricated in parallel on a single sheet.

"This takes what is a craft, an artisanal process, and transforms it for automated mass production," says Pratheev Sreetharan (A.B. '06, S.M. '10), who co-developed the technique with J. Peter Whitney. Both are doctoral candidates at the Harvard School of Engineering and Applied Sciences (SEAS).

Sreetharan, Whitney, and their colleagues in the Harvard Microrobotics Laboratory at SEAS have been working for years to build bio-inspired, bee-sized robots that can fly and behave autonomously as a colony. Appropriate materials, hardware, control systems, and fabrication techniques did not exist prior to the RoboBees project, so each must be invented, developed, and integrated by a diverse team of researchers.

Less than a year ago, the group was using a painstaking and error-prone method to fold, align, and secure each of the minuscule parts and joints.

"You'd take a very fine tungsten wire and dip it in a little bit of superglue," explains Sreetharan. "Then, with that tiny ball of glue, you'd go in under a microscope like an arthroscopic surgeon and try to stick it in the right place."

"Until recently, the manual assembly process was the state of the art in this field," Sreetharan adds.

The same result can now be achieved—without human error—through locking mechanisms and dip soldering. The new process also enables the use of cured carbon fiber, which is rigid and easy to align, rather than uncured carbon fiber, which Sreetharan compares to "wet tissue paper."

"Our new techniques allow us to use any material including polymers, metals, ceramics, and composites," says principal investigator Rob Wood, an Associate Professor of Electrical Engineering at SEAS and a Core Faculty Member at the Wyss Institute for Biologically Inspired Engineering at Harvard.

"The ability to incorporate any type and number of material layers, along with integrated electronics, means that we can generate full systems in any three-dimensional shape," Wood says. "We've also demonstrated that we can create self-assembling devices by including pre-stressed materials."

The implications of this novel fabrication strategy go far beyond these micro-air vehicles. The same mass-production technique could be used for high-power switching, optical systems, and other tightly integrated electromechanical devices that have parts on the scale of micrometers to centimeters.

Moreover, the layering process builds on the manufacturing process currently used to make printed circuit boards, which means that the tools for creating large sheets of pop-up devices are common and abundant. It also means that the integration of electrical components is a natural extension of the fabrication process—particularly important for the size- and weight-constrained RoboBees project.

"In a larger device, you can take a robot leg, for example, open it up, and just bolt in circuit boards. We're so small that we don't get to do that. I can't put a structural mechanism in here and have it serve no electrical function."

Pointing to the carbon-fiber box truss that constitutes the pop-up bee's body frame, Sreetharan says, "Now, I can put chips all over that. I can build in sensors and control actuators."

A small portion of the CAD design for the Harvard Monolithic Bee illustrates the complexity of folds and joints necessary for its assembly. Using the old, manual process, every one of those parts would have to be cut, folded, assembled, and glued by hand. The bottom image illustrates the 18 layers of laser-cut materials that create the pop-up structure. Images courtesy of Pratheev Sreetharan.

Essentially, tiny robots can now be built by slightly bigger robots. Designing how all of the layers will fit together and fold, however, is still a very human task, requiring creativity and expertise. Standard computer-aided design (CAD) tools, typically intended for either flat, layered circuit boards or 3D objects, do not yet support devices that combine both.

Once the design is complete, though, fabrication can be fully automated, with accuracy and precision limited only by the machining tools and materials.

"The alignment is now better than we can currently measure," says Sreetharan. "I've verified it to better than 5 microns everywhere, and we've gone from a 15% yield to—well, I don't think I've ever had a failure."

The full fabrication process will be described in the March issue of the Journal of Micromechanics and Microengineering. Co-authors and collaborators, beside Whitney, Sreetharan, and Wood, include Kevin Ma, a graduate student at SEAS; and Marc Strauss, a research assistant in Wood's lab.

The Harvard Office of Technology Development is now developing a strategy to commercialize this technology. As part of this effort, they have filed patent applications on this work and are engaging with entrepreneurs, venture capitalists, and companies to identify disruptive applications in a range of industries.

The work was supported by the U.S. Army Research Laboratory, the National Science Foundation (through the Expeditions in Computing program), and the Wyss Institute.

 
Title: Re: 1/3 Unmanned Robots by 2015
Post by: John_Back_From_The_Club_O on February 20, 2012, 01:25:09 pm
Cyborg Moth Flies! (Video) & The Pentagon's battle bugs

Don't believe that scientists can really create cyborg insects? Watch this video, created by New Scientist. It's clearly still at the beginning stages, but scientists supported by the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency appear to be making some progress in this fascinating area of research.
http://www.redicecreations.com/article.php?id=3313

Also with full article.
Title: Re: 1/3 Unmanned Robots by 2015
Post by: John_Back_From_The_Club_O on February 20, 2012, 01:32:56 pm
DARPA's Micro Air Vehices
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Micro_air_vehicle

NOTE WIKIPEDIA'S DOWN PLAYING THE "PRACTICAL USES" OF THESE MACHINES
Title: Re: 1/3 Unmanned Robots by 2015
Post by: John_Back_From_The_Club_O on February 20, 2012, 01:36:50 pm
DARPA Wants Real-Life Avatars for Soldiers
http://www.slashgear.com/darpa-wants-real-life-avatars-for-soldiers-20214360/

(http://cdn.slashgear.com/wp-content/uploads/2012/02/avatar-darpa-580x362.jpg)

DARPA isn’t looking for giant Kevlar skinned blue aliens, but rather robots it seems. DARPA wants those that participate in the program to make “key advancements in telepresence in remote operation of the ground system” but those key advancements aren’t specified. DARPA is specifically looking for “semi-autonomous bi-pedal machines” so it doesn’t seem any of the tracked or wheeled variety of robots the military has today will do the trick.

It sounds more than a little like DARPA wants human controlled Terminator robots. That would make sense, that way we can keep Skynet from taking over. How awesome is this project? I love that DARPA can get funding and put out descriptions of projects that sound like pure science fiction with a straight face and many times actually pull the projects off.
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Come join our team (DARPA) and help us kill you!

Title: Re: 1/3 Unmanned Robots by 2015
Post by: TahoeBlue on February 24, 2012, 03:24:00 pm
Here's the 2015 date again:

http://blogs.wsj.com/chinarealtime/2012/02/14/chinas-military-spending-to-double-by-2015-report/
February 14, 2012, 3:14 PM HKT
.
China’s Military Spending to Double by 2015 – Report

China’s defense budget will double by 2015, making it more than the rest of the Asia Pacific region’s combined, according to a report from IHS Jane’s, a global think tank specializing in security issues.
 
Beijing’s military spending will reach $238.2 billion in 2015, compared with $232.5 billion for rest of the region, according to the report. That would also be almost four times the expected defense budget of Japan, the next biggest in the region, in 2015, the report said.
...
“China’s investment will race ahead at an eye watering 18.75 percent, leaving Japan and India far behind,” said Paul Burton, senior principal analyst of IHS Jane’s Defence Budgets.
...
Rajiv Biswas, chief Asia Pacific economist for IHS Global Insight, was quoted saying: “Beijing has been able to devote an increasingly large portion of its overall budget towards defence and has been steadily building up its military capabilities for more than two decades.” ...
Title: Re: 1/3 Unmanned Robots by 2015
Post by: Dok on February 27, 2012, 04:12:41 am
U.S. opening up airspace to use of drones
Privacy is a concern as FAA sets rules to take flights out of just military purview


After more than 40 years of development and extensive use by the military, the United States has set the date when the nation’s airspace will be open for drones. Should you be scared?

Short answer: No, but like any new technology, unmanned aerial vehicles have their dark side.

Legislation passed by Congress last week gives the Federal Aviation Administration until Sept. 30, 2015, to open the nation’s skies to drones.

The first step comes in 90 days when police, firefighters and other civilian first-response agencies can start flying UAVs weighing no more than 4.4 pounds, provided they meet still-to-be-determined requirements, such as having an operator on the ground within line-of-sight of the drone and flying it at least 400 feet above ground.

Currently, UAVs can only fly in restricted airspace zones controlled by the U.S. military.

By May 2013, the next class of drones, those weighing less than 55 pounds, can fly the nation’s skies, according to provisions of the FAA bill passed by Congress and signed by President Barack Obama last week.

The deadline for full integration of drones into U.S. airspace is Sept. 30, 2015.

Rules about where and when drones can fly and who can operate them are still under development. And there are still technical hurdles, such as setting up the bandwidth for secure UAV radio communications and refining collision avoidance systems, said NASA program manager Chuck Johnson of the Dryden Flight Research Center at Edwards, Calif.

But the most pressing issues are privacy concerns and public perceptions.

rest: http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/46499162/ns/technology_and_science-science/#.T0tV5Xkv66V
Title: Re: 1/3 Unmanned Robots by 2015
Post by: Dok on February 27, 2012, 09:45:52 am
Pressure builds for civilian drone flights at home

Heads up: Drones are going mainstream. Civilian cousins of the unmanned military aircraft that have tracked and killed terrorists in the Middle East and Asia are in demand by police departments, border patrols, power companies, news organizations and others wanting a bird's-eye view that's too impractical or dangerous for conventional planes or helicopters to get.

Along with the enthusiasm, there are qualms.

Drones overhead could invade people's privacy. The government worries they could collide with passenger planes or come crashing down to the ground, concerns that have slowed more widespread adoption of the technology.

Despite that, pressure is building to give drones the same access as manned aircraft to the sky at home.

"It's going to be the next big revolution in aviation. It's coming," says Dan Elwell, the Aerospace Industries Association's vice president for civil aviation.

Some impetus comes from the military, which will bring home drones from Afghanistan and wants room to test and use them. In December, Congress gave the Federal Aviation Administration six months to pick half a dozen sites around the country where the military and others can fly unmanned aircraft in the vicinity of regular air traffic, with the aim of demonstrating they're safe.

The Defense Department says the demand for drones and their expanding missions requires routine and unfettered access to domestic airspace, including around airports and cities. In a report last October, the Pentagon called for flights first by small drones both solo and in groups, day and night, expanding over several years. Flights by large and medium-sized drones would follow in the latter half of this decade.

Other government agencies want to fly drones, too, but they've been hobbled by an FAA ban unless they first receive case-by-case permission. Fewer than 300 waivers were in use at the end of 2011, and they often include restrictions that severely limit the usefulness of the flights. Businesses that want to put drones to work are out of luck; waivers are only for government agencies.

But that's changing.

Congress has told the FAA that the agency must allow civilian and military drones to fly in civilian airspace by September 2015. This spring, the FAA is set to take a first step by proposing rules that would allow limited commercial use of small drones for the first time.

Until recently, agency officials were saying there were too many unresolved safety issues to give drones greater access. Even now FAA officials are cautious about describing their plans and they avoid discussion of deadlines.

"The thing we care about is doing that in an orderly and safe way and finding the appropriate ... balance of all the users in the system," Michael Huerta, FAA's acting administrator, told a recent industry luncheon in Washington. "Let's develop these six sites — and we will be doing that — where we can develop further data, further testing and more history on how these things actually operate."

Drones come in all sizes, from the high-flying Global Hawk with its 116-foot wingspan to a hummingbird-like drone that weighs less than an AA battery and can perch on a window ledge to record sound and video. Lockheed Martin has developed a fake maple leaf seed, or "whirly bird," equipped with imaging sensors, that weighs less than an ounce.

Potential civilian users are as varied as the drones themselves.

Power companies want them to monitor transmission lines. Farmers want to fly them over fields to detect which crops need water. Ranchers want them to count cows.

Journalists are exploring drones' newsgathering potential. The FAA is investigating whether The Daily, a digital publication of Rupert Murdoch's News Corp., used drones without permission to capture aerial footage of floodwaters in North Dakota and Mississippi last year. At the University of Nebraska, journalism professor Matt Waite has started a lab for students to experiment with using a small, remote-controlled helicopter.

"Can you cover news with a drone? I think the answer is yes," Waite said.

The aerospace industry forecasts a worldwide deployment of almost 30,000 drones by 2018, with the United States accounting for half of them.

"The potential ... civil market for these systems could dwarf the military market in the coming years if we can get access to the airspace," said Ben Gielow, government relations manager for the Association for Unmanned Vehicle Systems International, an industry trade group.

The hungriest market is the nation's 19,000 law enforcement agencies.

Customs and Border Patrol has nine Predator drones mostly in use on the U.S.-Mexico border, and plans to expand to 24 by 2016. Officials say the unmanned aircraft have helped in the seizure of more than 20 tons of illegal drugs and the arrest of 7,500 people since border patrols began six years ago.

Several police departments are experimenting with smaller drones to photograph crime scenes, aid searches and scan the ground ahead of SWAT teams. The Justice Department has four drones it loans to police agencies.

"We look at this as a low-cost alternative to buying a helicopter or fixed-wing plane," said Michael O'Shea, the department's aviation technology program manager. A small drone can cost less than $50,000, about the price of a patrol car with standard police gear.

Like other agencies, police departments must get FAA waivers and follow much the same rules as model airplane hobbyists: Drones must weigh less than 55 pounds, stay below an altitude of 400 feet, keep away from airports and always stay within sight of the operator. The restrictions are meant to prevent collisions with manned aircraft.

Even a small drone can be "a huge threat" to a larger plane, said Dale Wright, head of the National Air Traffic Controllers Association's safety and technology department. "If an airliner sucks it up in an engine, it's probably going to take the engine out," he said. "If it hits a small plane, it could bring it down."

Controllers want drone operators to be required to have instrument-rated pilot licenses — a step above a basic private pilot license. "We don't want the Microsoft pilot who has never really flown an airplane and doesn't know the rules of how to fly," Wright said.

Military drones designed for battlefields haven't had to meet the kind of rigorous safety standards required of commercial aircraft.

"If you are going to design these things to operate in the (civilian) airspace you need to start upping the ante," said Tom Haueter, director of the National Transportation Safety Board's aviation safety office. "It's one thing to operate down low. It's another thing to operate where other airplanes are, especially over populated areas."

Even with FAA restrictions, drones are proving useful in the field.

Deputies with the Mesa County Sheriff's Office in Colorado can launch a 2-pound Draganflyer X6 helicopter from the back of a patrol car. The drone's bird's-eye view cut the manpower needed for a search of a creek bed for a missing person from 10 people to two, said Ben Miller, who runs the drone program. The craft also enabled deputies to alert fire officials to a potential roof collapse in time for the evacuation of firefighters from the building, he said.

The drone could do more if it were not for the FAA's line-of-sight restriction, Miller said. "I don't think (the restriction) provides any extra safety," he said.

The Montgomery County Sheriff's Office, north of Houston, used a Department of Homeland Security grant to buy a $300,000, 50-pound ShadowHawk helicopter drone for its SWAT team. The drone has a high-powered video camera and an infrared camera that can spot a person's thermal image in the dark.

"Public-safety agencies are beginning to see this as an invaluable tool for them, just as the car was an improvement over the horse and the single-shot pistol was improved upon by the six-shooter," said Chief Deputy Randy McDaniel, who runs the Montgomery drone program.

The ShadowHawk can be equipped with a 40 mm grenade launcher and a 12-guage shotgun, according to its maker, Vanguard Defense Industries of Conroe, Texas. The company doesn't sell the armed version in the United States, although "we have had interest from law-enforcement entities for deployment of nonlethal munitions from the aircraft," Vanguard CEO Michael Buscher said.

The possibility of armed police drones someday patrolling the sky disturbs Terri Burke, executive director of the Texas chapter of the American Civil Liberties Union.

"The Constitution is taking a back seat so that boys can play with their toys," Burke said. "It's kind of scary that they can use a laptop computer to zap people from the air."

A recent ACLU report said allowing drones greater access takes the country "a large step closer to a surveillance society in which our every move is monitored, tracked, recorded, and scrutinized by the authorities."

The Electronic Frontier Foundation, which focuses on civil liberties threats involving new technologies, sued the FAA recently, seeking disclosure of which agencies have been given permission to use drones. FAA officials declined to answer questions from The Associated Press about the lawsuit.

Industry officials said privacy concerns are overblown.

"Today anybody— the paparazzi, anybody — can hire a helicopter or a (small plane) to circle around something that they're interested in and shoot away with high-powered cameras all they want," said Elwell, the aerospace industry spokesman. "I don't understand all the comments about the Big Brother thing."

http://cnsnews.com/news/article/pressure-builds-civilian-drone-flights-home-0
Title: Re: 1/3 Unmanned Robots by 2015
Post by: TahoeBlue on February 28, 2012, 03:13:43 pm
2015 again....

http://en.rian.ru/mlitary_news/20100524/159135253.html
Share of modern weaponry in Russian military must be 30% by 2015 - Medvedev
16:07 24/05/2010

The share of modern weaponry in the Russian Armed Forces must be brought up to at least 30% by 2015, Russian President Dmitry Medvedev said on Monday.
 
"By 2015 the share of advanced weaponry in permanent readiness units must reach at least 30%," Medvedev said at a meeting on the budget for Russian military and security agencies.
 
"We must make investments in the modernization of the Armed Forces a priority," he added.
 
The president said that if forecasts that Russia's gross domestic product (GDP) will grow 3-6% annually from 2011 hold true, the government could allocate a set percentage of GDP every year to finance the development of the military.
 
Medvedev said the imbalance between spending on maintenance of old equipment and spending on new purchases (currently about 50/50) must be addressed.
 
"In the future, the ratio must be 30% to 70%, respectively," he said.

In line with ongoing military reforms, the Russian Armed Forces will be downsized to 1 million personnel by 2016, enlisting 150,000 officers and about 745,000 soldiers.
 
The organizational structure of the military will be streamlined to meet the standards of modern warfare, based on mobility and the use of advanced weaponry.

http://www.brahmand.com/news/Russia-plans-complete-military-space-defence-capabilities-by-2015/3542/1/14.html
Russia plans complete military-space defence capabilities by 2015

Apr 03, 2010
MOSCOW (BNS): Russia will have complete array of military-space defence capabilities by 2015, according to a leading missile manufacturer.

"By 2015, we will have Morfei short-range air-defense complexes, Vityaz, Favorit and S-500 medium-range systems, and something else," said Igor Ashurbeili, general director of the Almaz-Antei concern's design bureau.

Russian news agency Ria Novosti quoting him said, the 2015 deadline was linked to the fact that by that time S-300 PS antiaircraft complexes, the first in the S-300 series, would have been taken out of service.
...
The advanced version of the S-300 missile system, called S-300PMU1 (SA-20 Gargoyle), has a range of over 150 kilometers (over 93 miles) and can intercept ballistic missiles and aircraft at low and high altitudes, making the system an effective tool for warding off possible airstrikes.

First deployed by the Soviet Union in 1979, the S-300 is still considered to be one of the most potent antiaircraft missile systems available. It can simultaneously track up to 100 targets and engage up to 12.
Title: Re: 1/3 Unmanned Robots by 2015
Post by: TahoeBlue on February 28, 2012, 03:35:35 pm
We've already lost the war of 2015...

http://www.fpri.org/orbis/5401/kraska.navalwar2015.pdf

How the United States Lost the Naval War of 2015
by James Kraska

James Kraska is a guest investigator at the Marine Policy Center, Woods Hole Oceanographic
Institution and the former Oceans Policy Adviser for the Director of Strategic Plans & Policy,
Joint Chiefs of Staff.


The views presented are those of the author and do not reflect the official
position of the Department of Defense. He may be reached at [email protected]

Abstract:

Years of strategic missteps in oceans policy, naval strategy and a force structure in decline set the stage for U.S. defeat at sea in 2015. After decades of double-digit budget increases, the People’s Liberation Army (Navy) was
operating some of the most impressive systems in the world, including a  medium-range ballistic missile that could hit a moving aircraft carrier and a super-quiet diesel electric submarine that was stealthier than U.S. nuclear
submarines. Coupling this new asymmetric naval force to visionary maritime strategy and oceans policy, China ensured that all elements of national power promoted its goal of dominating the East China Sea. The United States, in
contrast, had a declining naval force structured around 10 aircraft carriers spread thinly throughout the globe. With a maritime strategy focused on lower order partnerships, and anational oceans policy thatdevaluedstrategic interests
in freedom of navigation, the stage was set for defeat at sea.

This article recounts how China destroyed the USS George Washington in the East China Sea in 2015.

The political fallout from the disaster ended 75 years of U.S. dominance in the Pacific Ocean and cemented China’s position as the Asian hegemon.
Title: Re: 1/3 Unmanned Robots by 2015
Post by: TahoeBlue on February 28, 2012, 03:41:53 pm
http://sindhitech-st.blogspot.com/2011/05/pakistan-military-robots.html

Pakistan Working On Military Robots - 2009

Robots will fight the wars of the future, a prominent military expert told an audience of luminaries Wednesday.
 
"We are at a point of revolution in war, like the invention of the atomic bomb," writer and Brookings Institution fellow Peter W. Singer said during his address at the TED (Technology, Entertainment and Design) conference meeting this week in Long Beach, Calif., according to Agence France-Presse.

Drawing on material from his just-published book "Wired for War: The Robotics Revolution and Conflict in the 21st Century," Singer said the rapid development of military robots, already used as drones and bomb defusers, might mean that U.S. combat units would be half human, half machine by 2015.

Unfortunately, he added, we wouldn't have much of a head start.

"In technology there is no such thing as a permanent advantage," Singer, recently a defense-policy adviser to the Obama presidential campaign, told the audience. "You have Russia, China, Pakistan and Iran working on military robots."
 
He also fears that machine will be more ruthless killers than soft-hearted humans.
 
Pakistan Among Countries Working On Military Robots

Pakistan is among the countries working on the development of military robots as robots will be armies of the future in a case of science fact catching up to fiction, a researcher told an elite TED gathering on Wednesday.

“The United States is ahead in military robots, but in technology there is no such thing as a permanent advantage,” Peter Singer, who has authored books on the military said.

“You have Russia, China, Pakistan and Iran working on military robots.” Singer warned that while using robots for battle saves lives of military personnel, the move has the potential to exacerbate warfare by having heartless machines do the dirty work. “We are at a point of revolution in war,” Singer said. Singer predicted US military units will be half machine, half human by 2015.
Title: Re: 1/3 Unmanned Robots by 2015
Post by: TahoeBlue on February 29, 2012, 12:13:58 pm
2015 robots again....

http://robotland.blogspot.com/2011/11/11-million-euro-for-safe-robots-in-2015.html
Wednesday, November 02, 2011
11 Million Euro for Safe Robots in 2015

2015 may be the year when European robots will be safe enough to leave their labs in search for new jobs in manufacturing, hospitals and home care.


Safety is one of the most critical issues in human-robot interaction. As long as there is a risk that an industrial or household robot action can hurt or even kill a human, robots may not be released to act in public or private environments. To find out what is needed to overcome these saftey proplem leading researchers from France, Germany and Italy have started the four year European Collaborative Project FP7, SAPHARI, funded by the EU with 8 million Euro, to develope robots that will become safe and autonomous in physical interaction with humans. The researchers plan to equip robots with capabilities to react to human actions or even take the initiative to interact in a situation‐dependent manner relying on sensor based decisions and background knowledge.


The project will focuse on two industrial use cases that explicitly contain deliberate physical interaction between a human and a robot co‐worker, as well as on professional service scenarios in hospitals, in which medical staff and an assisting robot interact closely during daily work. These prototypical applications will pave the way towards new and emerging markets, not only in industry and professional services, but possibly also in household robots, advanced prostheses and rehabilitation devices, teleoperation, and robotic surgery. Generally, results of this project are expected to strongly impact all applications where interactive robots can assist humans and release them from dangerous or routine tasks.


Robotic Paradigm Shift
The project is aimed to perform a fundamental paradigm shift in robot development in the sense that the human will be placed at the centre of the entire design. The project will take a big step further along the human-centered roadmap by addressing all essential aspects of safe, intuitive physical interaction between humans and complex, human-like robotic systems in a strongly interconnected manner. Additional information can be found in the project web site http://www.saphari.eu.
Title: Swarm of robot helicopters performs James Bond tune - Vid
Post by: Letsbereal on March 01, 2012, 09:51:20 am
Swarm of robot helicopters performs James Bond tune http://bcove.me/5livpgqo
Title: Re: 1/3 Unmanned Robots by 2015
Post by: TahoeBlue on March 09, 2012, 02:14:12 pm
A lot of these 2015 events seems to be tied to the " UN  Millennium Declaration "

Quote
We resolve • To halve, by the year 2015, the proportion of the world’s people whose income is less than one dollar a day and the proportion of people who suffer from hunger and, by the same date, to halve the proportion of people who are unable to reach or to afford safe drinking water.
http://www.un.org/en/development/desa/usg/statements/post-2015-development-agenda.html
Briefing on the Report hosted by the President of the General Assembly on advancing the United Nations development agenda beyond 2015
 
Opening Remarks by Mr. Sha Zukang, Under-Secretary-General for Economic and Social Affairs, Secretary-General of
the 2012 UN Conference on Sustainable Development
4 November 2011, New York

Accelerating Progress towards the Millennium Development Goals: options for sustained and inclusive growth and issues for advancing the United Nations development agenda beyond 2015 (A/66/126).
...

The third area of the report is on the post-2015 development agenda. On this topic, the Report conveys four main messages:
 
i)    The discussion of the post-2015 development agenda should start with a thorough evaluation of the MDGs. This will assess what has worked and what needs improvement;
ii)    Sustainable development must be at the centre of any post-2015 UN development agenda.
iii)    There are new development challenges that need further reflection: issues such as inequality, climate change, food and energy security, environmental degradation, demographic trends, peace and security, respect for human rights and good governance.
iv)    The new challenges could be addressed by more fully by operationalizing the values and principles contained in the Millennium Declaration, which remain as relevant as ever.
 
The Report makes a recommendation to initiate an inclusive, open and transparent process of deliberation regarding the post 2015 development framework.


| - - - - -
Oh yeah, the UN has no power!  ::) (the UN Security Council is the dictator body)

U.N. Millennium Declaration At Rio 1992 Global, Governance - Communitarianism - Obama ok
http://z4.invisionfree.com/The_Great_Deception/index.php?showtopic=4125

UN EARTH CHARTER:
http://www.earthcharterinaction.org/invent/images/uploads/echarter_english.pdf
http://z4.invisionfree.com/The_Great_Deception/index.php?showtopic=5359&st=0


Oh, and didn't Obama say he just obeyed a UN resolution to strike Libya, even though they are not a threat to the USA? Is that not power? Why is the USA taking orders from an unpowerful institution?
http://z4.invisionfree.com/The_Great_Deception/index.php?showtopic=9076&view=getnewpost

 ::)

Read more about the unpowerful UN:
http://z4.invisionfree.com/The_Great_Deception/index.php?showforum=55  

Well if you genocide half the people earning less then a dollar a day, you have reached the 2015 goal....

Quote
The conference was postponed from June 1-3 and will now take place June 24-26 at the U.N. in New York. While the "outcome document" has been watered down somewhat from the previous version, it still reaffirms attainment of the U.N.'s Millennium Development Goals, which would require the payment of $845 billion from U.S. taxpayers. A commitment to the MDGs was a stated objective of the Global Poverty Act, which Barack Obama had introduced as a U.S. senator. It requires the U.S. to devote 0.7 percent of Gross National Income to foreign aid.

Quote
19. We resolve further:

• To halve, by the year 2015, the proportion of the world’s people whose income is less than one dollar a day and the proportion of people who suffer from hunger and, by the same date, to halve the proportion of people who are unable to reach or to afford safe drinking water.

• By the same date, to have reduced maternal mortality by three quarters, and under-five child mortality by two thirds, of their current rates.
...

The New World Order Has Arrived (Doubters)

http://www.usaid.gov/about_usaid/mdg/
...
The United States is a strong and consistent supporter of the goals of the Millennium Declaration of the United Nations. The adoption of the Millennium Declaration in 2000 by the international community reflects a shared sense of the urgency of development as well as increased confidence in our collective ability to help dramatically improve the lives of the poor around the world. This is a noble endeavor that in our shrinking world affects the destinies of everyone.

We now stand at the half way point since our Declaration to the 2015 date of achieving the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs). It is therefore fitting that we pause to assess progress on our collective endeavor to address poverty, disease, famine, conflict, and other obstacles to development through a partnership between developing and developed countries.

...

http://www.un.org/millennium/declaration/ares552e.htm
55/2. United Nations Millennium Declaration

The General Assembly

Adopts the following Declaration:

United Nations Millennium Declaration

I. Values and principles

1. We, heads of State and Government, have gathered at United Nations Headquarters in New York from 6 to 8 September 2000, at the dawn of a new millennium, to reaffirm our faith in the Organization and its Charter as indispensable foundations of a more peaceful, prosperous and just world.

2. We recognize that, in addition to our separate responsibilities to our individual societies, we have a collective responsibility to uphold the principles of human dignity, equality and equity at the global level. As leaders we have a duty therefore to all the world’s people, especially the most vulnerable and, in particular, the children of the world, to whom the future belongs.

3. We reaffirm our commitment to the purposes and principles of the Charter of the United Nations, which have proved timeless and universal. Indeed, their relevance and capacity to inspire have increased, as nations and peoples have become increasingly interconnected and interdependent.

4. We are determined to establish a just and lasting peace all over the world in accordance with the purposes and principles of the Charter. We rededicate ourselves to support all efforts to uphold the sovereign equality of all States, respect for their territorial integrity and political independence, resolution of disputes by peaceful means and in conformity with the principles of justice and international law, the right to self-determination of peoples which remain under colonial domination and foreign occupation, non-interference in the internal affairs of States, respect for human rights and fundamental freedoms, respect for the equal rights of all without distinction as to race, sex, language or religion and international cooperation in solving international problems of an economic, social, cultural or humanitarian character.

5. We believe that the central challenge we face today is to ensure that globalization becomes a positive force for all the world’s people. For while globalization offers great opportunities, at present its benefits are very unevenly shared, while its costs are unevenly distributed. We recognize that developing countries and countries with economies in transition face special difficulties in responding to this central challenge. Thus, only through broad and sustained efforts to create a shared future, based upon our common humanity in all its diversity, can globalization be made fully inclusive and equitable. These efforts must include policies and measures, at the global level, which correspond to the needs of developing countries and economies in transition and are formulated and implemented with their effective participation.

6. We consider certain fundamental values to be essential to international relations in the twenty-first century. These include:

• Freedom. Men and women have the right to live their lives and raise their children in dignity, free from hunger and from the fear of violence, oppression or injustice. Democratic and participatory governance based on the will of the people best assures these rights.

•. Equality. No individual and no nation must be denied the opportunity to benefit from development. The equal rights and opportunities of women and men must be assured.

• Solidarity. Global challenges must be managed in a way that distributes the costs and burdens fairly in accordance with basic principles of equity and social justice. Those who suffer or who benefit least deserve help from those who benefit most.

• Tolerance. Human beings must respect one other, in all their diversity of belief, culture and language. Differences within and between societies should be neither feared nor repressed, but cherished as a precious asset of humanity. A culture of peace and dialogue among all civilizations should be actively promoted.

• Respect for nature. Prudence must be shown in the management of all living species and natural resources, in accordance with the precepts of sustainable development. Only in this way can the immeasurable riches provided to us by nature be preserved and passed on to our descendants. The current unsustainable patterns of production and consumption must be changed in the interest of our future welfare and that of our descendants.

• Shared responsibility. Responsibility for managing worldwide economic and social development, as well as threats to international peace and security, must be shared among the nations of the world and should be exercised multilaterally. As the most universal and most representative organization in the world, the United Nations must play the central role.

7. In order to translate these shared values into actions, we have identified key objectives to which we assign special significance.

II. Peace, security and disarmament

8. We will spare no effort to free our peoples from the scourge of war, whether within or between States, which has claimed more than 5 million lives in the past decade. We will also seek to eliminate the dangers posed by weapons of mass destruction.

9. We resolve therefore:

• To strengthen respect for the rule of law in international as in national affairs and, in particular, to ensure compliance by Member States with the decisions of the International Court of Justice, in compliance with the Charter of the United Nations, in cases to which they are parties.

• To make the United Nations more effective in maintaining peace and security by giving it the resources and tools it needs for conflict prevention, peaceful resolution of disputes, peacekeeping, post-conflict peace-building and reconstruction. In this context, we take note of the report of the Panel on United Nations Peace Operations and request the General Assembly to consider its recommendations expeditiously.

• To strengthen cooperation between the United Nations and regional organizations, in accordance with the provisions of Chapter VIII of the Charter.

• To ensure the implementation, by States Parties, of treaties in areas such as arms control and disarmament and of international humanitarian law and human rights law, and call upon all States to consider signing and ratifying the Rome Statute of the International Criminal Court.

• To take concerted action against international terrorism, and to accede as soon as possible to all the relevant international conventions.

• To redouble our efforts to implement our commitment to counter the world drug problem.

• To intensify our efforts to fight transnational crime in all its dimensions, including trafficking as well as smuggling in human beings and money laundering.

• To minimize the adverse effects of United Nations economic sanctions on innocent populations, to subject such sanctions regimes to regular reviews and to eliminate the adverse effects of sanctions on third parties.

• To strive for the elimination of weapons of mass destruction, particularly nuclear weapons, and to keep all options open for achieving this aim, including the possibility of convening an international conference to identify ways of eliminating nuclear dangers.

• To take concerted action to end illicit traffic in small arms and light weapons, especially by making arms transfers more transparent and supporting regional disarmament measures, taking account of all the recommendations of the forthcoming United Nations Conference on Illicit Trade in Small Arms and Light Weapons.

• To call on all States to consider acceding to the Convention on the Prohibition of the Use, Stockpiling, Production and Transfer of Anti-personnel Mines and on Their Destruction, as well as the amended mines protocol to the Convention on conventional weapons.

10. We urge Member States to observe the Olympic Truce, individually and collectively, now and in the future, and to support the International Olympic Committee in its efforts to promote peace and human understanding through sport and the Olympic Ideal.

III. Development and poverty eradication

11. We will spare no effort to free our fellow men, women and children from the abject and dehumanizing conditions of extreme poverty, to which more than a billion of them are currently subjected. We are committed to making the right to development a reality for everyone and to freeing the entire human race from want.

12. We resolve therefore to create an environment – at the national and global levels alike – which is conducive to development and to the elimination of poverty.

13. Success in meeting these objectives depends, inter alia, on good governance within each country. It also depends on good governance at the international level and on transparency in the financial, monetary and trading systems. We are committed to an open, equitable, rule-based, predictable and non-discriminatory multilateral trading and financial system.

14. We are concerned about the obstacles developing countries face in mobilizing the resources needed to finance their sustained development. We will therefore make every effort to ensure the success of the High-level International and Intergovernmental Event on Financing for Development, to be held in 2001.

15. We also undertake to address the special needs of the least developed countries. In this context, we welcome the Third United Nations Conference on the Least Developed Countries to be held in May 2001 and will endeavour to ensure its success. We call on the industrialized countries:

• To adopt, preferably by the time of that Conference, a policy of duty- and quota-free access for essentially all exports from the least developed countries;

• To implement the enhanced programme of debt relief for the heavily indebted poor countries without further delay and to agree to cancel all official bilateral debts of those countries in return for their making demonstrable commitments to poverty reduction; and

• To grant more generous development assistance, especially to countries that are genuinely making an effort to apply their resources to poverty reduction.

16. We are also determined to deal comprehensively and effectively with the debt problems of low- and middle-income developing countries, through various national and international measures designed to make their debt sustainable in the long term.

17. We also resolve to address the special needs of small island developing States, by implementing the Barbados Programme of Action and the outcome of the twenty-second special session of the General Assembly rapidly and in full. We urge the international community to ensure that, in the development of a vulnerability index, the special needs of small island developing States are taken into account.

18. We recognize the special needs and problems of the landlocked developing countries, and urge both bilateral and multilateral donors to increase financial and technical assistance to this group of countries to meet their special development needs and to help them overcome the impediments of geography by improving their transit transport systems.

19. We resolve further:

• To halve, by the year 2015, the proportion of the world’s people whose income is less than one dollar a day and the proportion of people who suffer from hunger and, by the same date, to halve the proportion of people who are unable to reach or to afford safe drinking water.

• To ensure that, by the same date, children everywhere, boys and girls alike, will be able to complete a full course of primary schooling and that girls and boys will have equal access to all levels of education.

• By the same date, to have reduced maternal mortality by three quarters, and under-five child mortality by two thirds, of their current rates.

• To have, by then, halted, and begun to reverse, the spread of HIV/AIDS, the scourge of malaria and other major diseases that afflict humanity.

• To provide special assistance to children orphaned by HIV/AIDS.

• By 2020, to have achieved a significant improvement in the lives of at least 100 million slum dwellers as proposed in the "Cities Without Slums" initiative.

20. We also resolve:

• To promote gender equality and the empowerment of women as effective ways to combat poverty, hunger and disease and to stimulate development that is truly sustainable.

• To develop and implement strategies that give young people everywhere a real chance to find decent and productive work.

• To encourage the pharmaceutical industry to make essential drugs more widely available and affordable by all who need them in developing countries.

• To develop strong partnerships with the private sector and with civil society organizations in pursuit of development and poverty eradication.

• To ensure that the benefits of new technologies, especially information and communication technologies, in conformity with recommendations contained in the ECOSOC 2000 Ministerial Declaration, are available to all.

IV. Protecting our common environment

21. We must spare no effort to free all of humanity, and above all our children and grandchildren, from the threat of living on a planet irredeemably spoilt by human activities, and whose resources would no longer be sufficient for their needs.

22. We reaffirm our support for the principles of sustainable development, including those set out in Agenda 21, agreed upon at the United Nations Conference on Environment and Development.

23. We resolve therefore to adopt in all our environmental actions a new ethic of conservation and stewardship and, as first steps, we resolve:

• To make every effort to ensure the entry into force of the Kyoto Protocol, preferably by the tenth anniversary of the United Nations Conference on Environment and Development in 2002, and to embark on the required reduction in emissions of greenhouse gases.

• To intensify our collective efforts for the management, conservation and sustainable development of all types of forests.

• To press for the full implementation of the Convention on Biological Diversity and the Convention to Combat Desertification in those Countries Experiencing Serious Drought and/or Desertification, particularly in Africa.

• To stop the unsustainable exploitation of water resources by developing water management strategies at the regional, national and local levels, which promote both equitable access and adequate supplies.

• To intensify cooperation to reduce the number and effects of natural and man-made disasters.

• To ensure free access to information on the human genome sequence.

V. Human rights, democracy and good governance

24. We will spare no effort to promote democracy and strengthen the rule of law, as well as respect for all internationally recognized human rights and fundamental freedoms, including the right to development.

25. We resolve therefore:

• To respect fully and uphold the Universal Declaration of Human Rights.

• To strive for the full protection and promotion in all our countries of civil, political, economic, social and cultural rights for all.

• To strengthen the capacity of all our countries to implement the principles and practices of democracy and respect for human rights, including minority rights.

• To combat all forms of violence against women and to implement the Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Discrimination against Women.

• To take measures to ensure respect for and protection of the human rights of migrants, migrant workers and their families, to eliminate the increasing acts of racism and xenophobia in many societies and to promote greater harmony and tolerance in all societies.

• To work collectively for more inclusive political processes, allowing genuine participation by all citizens in all our countries.

• To ensure the freedom of the media to perform their essential role and the right of the public to have access to information.

VI. Protecting the vulnerable

26. We will spare no effort to ensure that children and all civilian populations that suffer disproportionately the consequences of natural disasters, genocide, armed conflicts and other humanitarian emergencies are given every assistance and protection so that they can resume normal life as soon as possible.

We resolve therefore:

• To expand and strengthen the protection of civilians in complex emergencies, in conformity with international humanitarian law.

• To strengthen international cooperation, including burden sharing in, and the coordination of humanitarian assistance to, countries hosting refugees and to help all refugees and displaced persons to return voluntarily to their homes, in safety and dignity and to be smoothly reintegrated into their societies.

• To encourage the ratification and full implementation of the Convention on the Rights of the Child and its optional protocols on the involvement of children in armed conflict and on the sale of children, child prostitution and child pornography.

VII. Meeting the special needs of Africa

27. We will support the consolidation of democracy in Africa and assist Africans in their struggle for lasting peace, poverty eradication and sustainable development, thereby bringing Africa into the mainstream of the world economy.

28. We resolve therefore:

• To give full support to the political and institutional structures of emerging democracies in Africa.

• To encourage and sustain regional and subregional mechanisms for preventing conflict and promoting political stability, and to ensure a reliable flow of resources for peacekeeping operations on the continent.

• To take special measures to address the challenges of poverty eradication and sustainable development in Africa, including debt cancellation, improved market access, enhanced Official Development Assistance and increased flows of Foreign Direct Investment, as well as transfers of technology.

• To help Africa build up its capacity to tackle the spread of the HIV/AIDS pandemic and other infectious diseases.

VIII. Strengthening the United Nations

29. We will spare no effort to make the United Nations a more effective instrument for pursuing all of these priorities: the fight for development for all the peoples of the world, the fight against poverty, ignorance and disease; the fight against injustice; the fight against violence, terror and crime; and the fight against the degradation and destruction of our common home.

30. We resolve therefore:

• To reaffirm the central position of the General Assembly as the chief deliberative, policy-making and representative organ of the United Nations, and to enable it to play that role effectively.

• To intensify our efforts to achieve a comprehensive reform of the Security Council in all its aspects.

• To strengthen further the Economic and Social Council, building on its recent achievements, to help it fulfil the role ascribed to it in the Charter.

• To strengthen the International Court of Justice, in order to ensure justice and the rule of law in international affairs.

• To encourage regular consultations and coordination among the principal organs of the United Nations in pursuit of their functions.

• To ensure that the Organization is provided on a timely and predictable basis with the resources it needs to carry out its mandates.

• To urge the Secretariat to make the best use of those resources, in accordance with clear rules and procedures agreed by the General Assembly, in the interests of all Member States, by adopting the best management practices and technologies available and by concentrating on those tasks that reflect the agreed priorities of Member States.

• To promote adherence to the Convention on the Safety of United Nations and Associated Personnel.

• To ensure greater policy coherence and better cooperation between the United Nations, its agencies, the Bretton Woods Institutions and the World Trade Organization, as well as other multilateral bodies, with a view to achieving a fully coordinated approach to the problems of peace and development.

• To strengthen further cooperation between the United Nations and national parliaments through their world organization, the Inter-Parliamentary Union, in various fields, including peace and security, economic and social development, international law and human rights and democracy and gender issues.

• To give greater opportunities to the private sector, non-governmental organizations and civil society, in general, to contribute to the realization of the Organization’s goals and programmes.

31. We request the General Assembly to review on a regular basis the progress made in implementing the provisions of this Declaration, and ask the Secretary-General to issue periodic reports for consideration by the General Assembly and as a basis for further action.

32. We solemnly reaffirm, on this historic occasion, that the United Nations is the indispensable common house of the entire human family, through which we will seek to realize our universal aspirations for peace, cooperation and development. We therefore pledge our unstinting support for these common objectives and our determination to achieve them.

http://cesr.org/article.php?id=1145
MDG failures prove need for a new rights-based development agenda


MADRID/NEW YORK, July 14, 2011—The slow pace of progress towards the Millennium Development Goals – revealed in a newly-released United Nations report – demonstrates the need for a more ambitious and rights-based agenda to end global poverty. The 2011 Millennium Development Goals (MDG) Report, launched by the UN Secretary General on 7 July, is testament to the inadequacy of the international community’s efforts to meet commitments made a decade ago to fight poverty and other forms of deprivation such as hunger, disease and gender inequality.

With only four years remaining before the 2015 deadline, the latest update from the UN makes for disappointing reading. Although areas of significant progress are highlighted – such as a decline in global rates of extreme poverty and improvements in access to clean drinking water – the report’s affirmation that “the world has cause to celebrate” rings hollow in the face of the facts.

For example, what progress has been made in poverty reduction is largely thanks to pre-existing growth patterns in China and India, rather than policy efforts flowing from the MDGs per se. The statistics on extreme poverty – based on 2005 data– do not capture the full impact of the global economic crisis, estimated by the World Bank to have plunged an additional 64 million people into extreme poverty since 2007.
...
Most alarming of all is the failure to meet development targets even in areas considered an immediate human rights priority, such as achieving universal primary education. There has been no progress over the last decade in reducing the proportion of people in developing countries who are undernourished.

Indeed the number of people who go hungry worldwide has risen to a historic high of one billion since the recent food crisis. The goal of reducing maternal mortality also remains a distant aspiration. In sub-Saharan Africa, the region with by far the highest maternal death rates, progress in increasing access to reproductive health care over the last two decades has been minimal.
...
blablabla
...
Humanity cannot afford another decade of unfulfilled promises.

http://www.communistrobot.com/index.php?page=&nav=1&article=1
...
Luckily for the rich, capitalism insures by design a margin of financial disproportion. This institutionalized economic disparity is known as the Pareto distribution or the 80–20 rule, which implies that a small fraction of the wealthiest people always possess a lions share of a countries riches. In the US, something approaching 80% of the wealth is held by 20% of the people, and the numbers are similar in Chile, Bolivia, Japan, South Africa and the nations of Western Europe.

The margin of disparity is evident upon inspection of the United Nations 2005 Human Development Report which states that
 “The world’s richest 500 individuals have a combined income greater than that of the poorest 416 million.

Beyond these extremes, the 2.5 billion people living on less than $2 a day—40% of the world’s population
—account for 5% of global income.

The richest 10%, almost all of whom live in high-income countries, account for 54%.”

http://www.wired.com/underwire/2009/07/military-researchers-develop-corpse-eating-robots/
Military Researchers Develop Corpse-Eating Robots
 By John Scott Lewinski
 July 15, 2009

The Defense Department is funding research into battlefield robots that power themselves by eating human corpses. What could possibly go wrong?

http://www.guardian.co.uk/technology/2009/jul/19/robots-research

The machine's inventors say that the Energetically Autonomous Tactical Robot – known as EATR for short – does indeed power its "biomass engine" by digesting organic material, but that it is not intended to chomp its way through battlefields of fallen soldiers.

"We completely understand the public's concern about futuristic robots feeding on the human population, but that is not our mission," said Harry Schoell, the chief executive of Cyclone Power Technologies, one of the companies behind the machine.
Title: Re: 1/3 Unmanned Robots by 2015
Post by: TahoeBlue on March 09, 2012, 02:50:03 pm
http://www.theworld.org/2011/07/video-a-begging-robot-draws-attention-to-the-poor-in-wealthy-luxembourg/

A Begging Robot Draws Attention to Poor in Wealthy Luxembourg

(http://www.theworld.org/wp-content/uploads/Begging-Bot-post.jpg)

The International Monetary Fund lists Luxembourg as one of the richest countries in the world. The tiny European country, a Grand Duchy, has transformed itself into a banking and insurance giant in the years since World War II.

But that doesn’t mean poverty does not exist in Luxembourg, and a new exhibit at City Museum of Luxembourg is drawing attention to the reality of poverty with the help of a begging robot.
...
As you approach, sensors trigger an automated recording in French, German and English. “Dear visitor,” the robot intones, “I am an electronic beggar for the materially deprived.”
...
Visitors to the museum are giving. Officials say by the time the “Poor Luxembourg?” exhibit is over in 2012, the bot will have collected close to $8,000. All of the money collected will be split among groups that help the poor in Luxembourg.
Title: Re: 1/3 Unmanned Robots by 2015
Post by: TahoeBlue on March 27, 2012, 08:40:19 pm
Beware of FOUNDATION OPERATIVES in "liberal" or "progressive" clothing!

http://www.guardian.co.uk/world/2010/nov/25/us-plan-disarm-rebels-central-africa
US reveals plan to disarm LRA fighters

Barack Obama presents strategy to combat Lord's Resistance Army rebels and their leader Joseph Kony in central Africa
Xan Rice in Nairobi
guardian.co.uk, Thursday 25 November 2010 08.12 EST

The US government yesterday revealed a plan to disarm Lord's Resistance Army fighters in central Africa and capture or kill their leader, Joseph Kony.

Barack Obama presented a strategy document to Congress designed to "mitigate and eliminate" the threat to civilians posed by one of the world's longest-running and most brutal insurgencies.

While they are unlikely to result in US troops being directly involved in combat operations, the proposed measures should strengthen local military efforts against the LRA. Several international human rights groups welcomed the move, although some relief agencies working in the affected areas warned the plan could prove counterproductive
...
The strategy document said the US had spent more than $23m (£14.5m) on support for the Ugandan military since then, but added that more money was needed
...
"You are not going to see marines on the ground fighting Kony," Cakaj said. "But you are going to see more US troops and contractors on the ground facilitating regional efforts to stop the rebels. It's not a radical move, but it is certainly a positive step."

However, Chris Bain, head of UK aid agency Cafod, said that while the US commitment to tackling the LRA problem was encouraging, the military approach is a "dangerous one if it doesn't ensure the protection of innocent civilians" - as has happened in the past.

http://www.africa-eu-partnership.org/successstories/co-operating-disarm
Co-operating to disarm

The first Pan-African action against trafficking of small arms and light weapons (SALW) was officially launched in early 2010 with support from the EU. The three-year initiative will support peace and security in the region by actively fighting against the proliferation of firearms and explosive materials in Africa.

The first Pan-African action against trafficking of small arms and light weapons (SALW) is being funded by the EU through the Instrument for Stability (IfS). It will provide some €3.3 million to the Regional Centre on Small Arms (RECSA) (www.recsasec.org/) in order to reinforce coordinated action for the elimination of SALW trafficking.
...
Civilians hold 79% of all weapons circulating in Africa,
which seriously undermines the attainment of the Millennium Development Goals, (http://forum.prisonplanet.com/index.php?topic=227627.msg1347237#msg1347237)
helps support illegitimate nodes of power and instability, and undermines governance. It also threatens the success of development aid, the safety of development workers and raises the costs of delivering and sustaining such aid.


 Contractors to the Congo - 01 December 2011  (http://www.isn.ethz.ch/isn/Current-Affairs/ISN-Insights/Detail?lng=en&id=134437&contextid734=134437&contextid735=134435&tabid=134435&dynrel=4888caa0-b3db-1461-98b9-e20e7b9c13d4,0c54e3b3-1e9c-be1e-2c24-a6a8c7060233)

While security and defense contracting in Africa is nothing new, the awarding of another multi-million dollar contract by the US State Department to a controversial private security operation is perhaps indicative of just how thinly stretched the US military is becoming. This does not bode well for either oversight or accountability.

 By Jody Ray Bennett for ISN Insights
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

From the outsourcing of security functions to widespread mercenary activity, contracting on the African continent is nothing new. For decades the continent has been a playground for private third parties involved in everything from the training of militaries to the toppling of governments, to the legitimate and illicit arms trades. That an impressive volume of literature and documentary evidence exists on the private involvement of individuals and companies in the shaping of the African security economy speaks to this.

DynCorp’s contract

And so it follows: last June, DynCorp International - one of the “Big Three” armed security contractors that arrived in Iraq back in 2003 alongside Blackwater/Xe and Triple Canopy - announced that it had been awarded a State Department contract to provide training to the military of the Democratic Republic of the Congo. While the details of the mission remain purposely ambiguous, the contract does specify that the task order was issued by the State Department’s Bureau of African Affairs, has a base time limit of one year with two additional option years and will focus on training junior to mid-level military personnel in functional areas such as communications, logistics and engineering.

“This is consistent with the recent political history of Africa. Private security contractors have been active in the rebuilding of Liberia since the removal of Charles Taylor. They have also had a role in training AMISOM (the African Union Mission in Somalia) peacekeepers as well. Traditionally, training on this level has been offered only by those [US military personnel] currently serving on active duty. But this contract reveals just how thinly spread the US Military is around the world,” Scott A Morgan, an analyst of US policy in Africa, told ISN Insights.
...
In a recent article discussing the use of private contractors on the African continent, Johnnie Carson, the top official for African affairs in Obama’s State Department put it bluntly: “We do not want an American footprint or boot on the ground.”

The issue of oversight and accountability of private firms acting on behalf of the US Departments of State or Defense has long been the Achilles’ heel of the private military and security industry. That a private company financed by taxpayers’ money will be representing US strategic goals in a place like the DRC indicates the issue is far from resolved. While the expansion of the market has yet to be realized by the industry, time will tell if Africa provides the next boom for private military and security providers. Until then, DynCorp is leading the way into the jungle.

http://www.nytimes.com/2011/08/11/world/africa/11somalia.html?pagewanted=all
U.S. Relies on Contractors in Somalia Conflict

By JEFFREY GETTLEMAN, MARK MAZZETTI and ERIC SCHMITT
Published: August 10, 2011
...
Now Mr. Rouget works for Bancroft Global Development, an American private security company that the State Department has indirectly financed to train African troops who have fought a pitched urban battle in the ruins of this city against the Shabab, the Somali militant group allied with Al Qaeda.

The company plays a vital part in the conflict now raging inside Somalia, a country that has been effectively ungoverned and mired in chaos for years. The fight against the Shabab, a group that United States officials fear could someday carry out strikes against the West, has mostly been outsourced to African soldiers and private companies out of reluctance to send American troops back into a country they hastily exited nearly two decades ago.

“We do not want an American footprint or boot on the ground,” said Johnnie Carson, the Obama administration’s top State Department official for Africa.
...
Still, over the past year, the United States has quietly stepped up operations inside Somalia, American officials acknowledge.

The Central Intelligence Agency, which largely finances the country’s spy agency, has covertly trained Somali intelligence operatives, helped build a large base at Mogadishu’s airport — Somalis call it “the Pink House” for the reddish hue of its buildings or “Guantánamo” for its ties to the United States — and carried out joint interrogations of suspected terrorists with their counterparts in a ramshackle Somali prison.

The Pentagon has turned to strikes by armed drone aircraft to kill Shabab militants and recently approved $45 million in arms shipments to African troops fighting in Somalia.
...

Several United Nations and African Union officials credit the work of Bancroft with improving the fighting skills of the African troops in Somalia, who this past weekend forced Shabab militants to withdraw from Mogadishu, the capital, for the first time in years.
...
Some American Congressional officials investigating the money being spent for operations in Somalia said that opaque arrangements like those for Bancroft — where money is passed through foreign governments — made it difficult to properly track how the funds were spent.
...
Mr. Stock, Bancroft’s president, said that bickering in Washington about how to contain the Shabab threat had made the American government even more dependent on companies like his.

As he put it, “We’re the only game in town.”

Title: U.S. Military Creating Robot Warriors - Vid
Post by: Letsbereal on April 17, 2012, 03:14:40 pm
U.S. Military Creating Robot Warriors http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QduroZLMHjo


Biological Robots are the real future. This all a distraction in my opinion.

These robots won't work under nuke radiation conditions.
Title: Re: U.S. Military Creating Robot Warriors - Vid
Post by: Constitutionary on April 17, 2012, 04:08:39 pm
...and you thought the terminator quadology was all fictional ?

HASTA LA VISTA BABY !!!!!!!!!!!!!!!    8)
Title: Re: First steps into the robotics boom
Post by: Constitutionary on May 16, 2012, 04:26:04 pm
First steps into the robotics boom
9 August 2009
, by Robin Harding in Tokyo (The Financial Times)
http://www.ft.com/cms/s/0/67702488-8502-11de-9a64-00144feabdc0.html

(http://media.ft.com/cms/943af5da-850f-11de-9a64-00144feabdc0.jpg)

An hour’s drive east of Tokyo, in a cavernous new building in Tsukuba Science City, a company called Cyberdyne is working on a robot called Hal.

Rest easy. Cyberdyne Systems may have been the fictional corporation responsible for the Terminator, a cyborg assassin in the film, and HAL-9000 the computer from 2001: A Space Odyssey, but the goal of Yoshiyuki Sankai, the company’s science-fiction-loving founder, is to make robots that help people rather than exterminate them.

In its work on “assistance robots”, Cyberdyne is at the forefront of what Japan’s government hopes will be a vast new industry and a way to address health and economic issues raised by the dramatic ageing of Japan’s population.

Rather than accept economic decline or allow large-scale immigration to supplement the decreasing population, Japan imagines an army of robot workers.

The strategy is spelt out in a science and technology white paper published by the government this year.

“By 2025, over 30 per cent of Japan’s population is expected to be over 65 . . . At the same time, the number of children will continue to fall, leading to shortages in labour to care for elderly and disabled people, and an increased burden on each care worker,” the white paper says.

It concludes: “In this environment, robots that support people’s independence and cars that are easy to use . . . will be essential.”

This potential has led many of Japan’s largest companies to invest in robotics.

Toyota and Honda have well-funded programmes to build humanoid assistance robots. Trading company Sumitomo and Fuji Heavy Industries, which makes cars under the Subaru brand, are trying to sell cleaning robots.

And Panasonic is launching a robotic drug dispensary in Japan this year and sees robotics as an attractive future market.

“The development of robots as a business is going to make considerable progress,” said Fumio Ohtsubo, president of Panasonic, in a recent interview with the Financial Times.

“The characteristic precision and attention to detail of Japanese people and companies will be well suited to developing safe robots.”

Cyberdyne differs in that it is building not a free-standing robot but an exoskeleton, which attaches to and amplifies the human body.

Hal – which at Cyberdyne stands for hybrid assisted limb – is a series of white plastic plates, with a motor at each joint such as the hip and elbow, which strap on to the outside of the arms and legs to provide additional power.

“Basically, you can pick up something weighing 40kg like this,” says Mitsuhiro Sakamoto, Cyberdyne’s chief operating officer, taking his pen from the desk.

That is only the physical part of the HAL, however. “Our core technology is to detect bioelectric signals and then co-ordinate that with the movement of the suit,” Mr Sakamoto says.

Through sensors attached to the skin, Hal detects and interprets electrical signals from the brain telling the arm or leg to move, and activates the exoskeleton simultaneously.

Cyberdyne is aiming for three main areas of application, Mr Sakamoto says. First, in rehabilitation, where a Hal suit or limb can help someone who is recovering after an accident to walk.

Second, in helping those who cannot walk to do so, including the possibility of completely artificial limbs that detect weak electrical signals from elsewhere in the body.

The third application is in support for heavy work, such as moving patients between beds in a nursing home.

Mr Sakamoto showed video of elderly patients using Hal to walk – somewhat jerkily – and the FT was able to move a robot forearm by means of a sensor attached to the skin.

Hal went into commercial use last month, although the technology is still far from perfect.

The average price is Y170,000 ($1,750) a month for a five-year rental. A single limb costs Y150,000, while a full “passenger suit” is Y220,000. Hal is being used in three hospitals in Japan, Mr Sakamoto says, and Cyberdyne is working with a partner in Denmark to bring the product to Europe.

If the company turns a profit next year, as Mr Sakamoto hopes, that will have been made possible by the extensive research and development grants it receives from the Japanese government.

Four rounds of venture capital have raised Y4bn to fund commercial development. Daiwa House has been the biggest external investor.

Prof Sankai retains 90 per cent voting control, however, because of his determination to see that Hal is never used in its obvious military applications.

If Hal fulfils its promise, Japan will be a nation of pensioners in powered suits hurling boulders like snowballs. Let us hope they never hear the words of Hal in 2001, when they go to open the front door: “I’m sorry, Dave, I’m afraid I can’t do that.”


First steps into the robotics boom: In its work on "assistance robots", Cyberdyne is at the forefront of what Ja.. http://bit.ly/T3Hfi

To get the joke behind HAL go one letter beyond what is written...   ibm   ;)
Title: Re: First steps into the robotics boom
Post by: Letsbereal on May 16, 2012, 05:02:00 pm
To get the joke behind HAL go one letter beyond what is written...   ibm   ;)

Talkin about IBM,

IBM and the Holocaust http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=J7DkmUxzTRI

Saillant detail: 'Fanta Orange' the Nazi drink. The drink Coca Cola invented especially for the Nazi's.
Title: Re: 1/3 Unmanned Robots by 2015
Post by: TahoeBlue on May 24, 2012, 11:59:37 am
http://www.theatlantic.com/national/archive/2012/05/congress-should-ban-armed-drones-before-cops-in-texas-deploy-one/257616/
Congress Should Ban Armed Drones Before Cops in Texas Deploy One
By Conor Friedersdorf
May 24 2012, 9:45 AM

A deputy in the Montgomery County Sheriff's Department says his agency is thinking of adding tear gas or rubber bullets to the aircraft it already owns.
...
Title: The Future Of Spy Drones
Post by: KD7ONE on May 24, 2012, 08:01:07 pm
http://info.publicintelligence.net/JPDO-NextGenUAS.pdf
Title: Re: The Future Of Spy Drones
Post by: WHAT HAPPENED on May 24, 2012, 09:39:15 pm

(http://www.slashfilm.com/wp/wp-content/images/zz620734ff.jpg)
Title: Re: 1/3 Unmanned Robots by 2015
Post by: TahoeBlue on August 07, 2012, 12:46:07 pm
bump for robotic drone submarines

(http://regmedia.co.uk/2012/07/14/sea_fox.png)

http://www.guardian.co.uk/technology/video/2012/aug/01/nato-robot-submarine-challenge-video
Nato's robot-submarine engineering challenge - video

Nato's centre for maritime research and experimentation hosts a robo-sub competition in La Spezia, Italy, where 15 university teams put their autonomous underwater vehicles to the test. The challenge is for the team to prove that their robot submarine can identify an underwater gateway

http://articles.latimes.com/2012/feb/09/business/la-fi-mo-auvsi-robot-submarine-20120209
Navy says autonomy is key to robotic submarines
February 09, 2012

Reporting from Washington — Achieving complete autonomy in robotic submarines is crucial to the Navy's plans to use the technology for the future.

This was the message of several speakers at the Assn. for Unmanned Vehicle Systems International’s robotic conference at the Omni Shoreham Hotel who said that submarine drones could be useful in a variety of roles in science and national security.


http://www.theregister.co.uk/2012/07/14/us_robot_mine_detectors/
US deploys robot submarine armada against Iranian mines
Kamikaze Sea Fox craft ready to rumble

By Iain Thomson in San Francisco
 Posted in Hardware, 14th July 2012 00:29 GMT

The US is deploying a fleet of robotic submarine mine clearers to the Middle East to counter threats by Iran that it will close off the Strait of Hormuz, through which a fifth of world oil supplies travel.

The Sea Fox submersibles, manufactured by German firm Atlas Electronik, come equipped with a TV camera and sonar and are deployed from minesweepers or helicopters. Once in the water they can be controlled via a fiber optic link and are designed to locate mines and explode them using a shaped charge that was originally designed to destroy tanks.

The units are 1.3 meters long and weigh about 43kg, with an operating depth of 300 meters. They are quite sluggish, with a top speed of just six knots, but since mines are usually static or simply drifting this is enough to get them into position for detonation. Some models are unarmed and used solely for scouting out new targets.
...

The US has refitted one of their older warships, USS Ponce, to act as an Afloat Forward Staging Base (AFSB) for the Sea Fox fleet and it has joined eight minesweepers and a fleet of MH-53 Sea Dragon helicopters in the Gulf. The US now has several carrier groups in the region and dispatched a squadron of F-22 stealthy fighters there in April.
...
Title: Soft robots go for color, camouflage - Inspired by nature, Harvard researchers b
Post by: Letsbereal on August 18, 2012, 10:19:09 am
Soft robots go for color, camouflage - Inspired by nature, Harvard researchers break new ground
16 August 2012
, by Peter Reuell, Harvard Staff Writer (Harvard Gazette)
http://news.harvard.edu/gazette/story/2012/08/soft-robots-go-for-color-camouflage/

Last year, a team of researchers led by George Whitesides, the Woodford L. and Ann A. Flowers University Professor, broke new engineering ground when they developed soft, silicone-based robots inspired by creatures like starfish and squid.

Now, they’re working to give those robots the ability to disguise themselves.

As demonstrated in an Aug. 16 paper published in Science, researchers have developed a system — again, inspired by nature — that allows the soft robots to either camouflage themselves against a background, or to make bold color displays. Such a “dynamic coloration” system could one day have a host of uses, ranging from helping doctors plan complex surgeries to acting as a visual marker to help search crews following a disaster, said Stephen Morin, a postdoctoral fellow in the Department of Chemistry and Chemical Biology and first author of the paper.

“When we began working on soft robots, we were inspired by soft organisms, including octopi and squid,” Morin said. “One of the fascinating characteristics of these animals is their ability to control their appearance, and that inspired us to take this idea further and explore dynamic coloration. I think the important thing we’ve shown in this paper is that even when using simple systems — in this case we have simple, open-ended micro-channels — you can achieve a great deal in terms of your ability to camouflage an object, or to display where an object is.”

“One of the most interesting questions in science is, ‘Why do animals have the shape and color and capabilities that they do?’ ” said Whitesides. “Evolution might lead to a particular form, but why? One function of our work on robotics is to give us, and others interested in this kind of question, systems that we can use to test ideas. Here the question might be: ‘How does a small crawling organism most efficiently disguise (or advertise) itself in leaves?’ These robots are test-beds for ideas about form and color and movement.”

Just as with the soft robots, the “color layers” used in the camouflage start as molds created using 3-D printers. Silicone is then poured into the molds to create micro-channels, which are topped with another layer of silicone. The layers can be created as a separate sheet that sits atop the soft robots, or incorporated directly into their structure. Once created, researchers can pump colored liquids into the channels, causing the robot to mimic the colors and patterns of its environment.

The system’s camouflage capabilities aren’t limited to visible colors though.

By pumping heated or cooled liquids into the channels, researchers can camouflage the robots thermally (infrared color). Other tests described in the Science paper used fluorescent liquids that allowed the color layers to literally glow in the dark.

“There is an enormous amount of spectral control we can exert with this system,” Morin said. “We can design color layers with multiple channels, which can be activated independently. We’ve only begun to scratch the surface, I think, of what’s possible.”

The uses for the color-layer technology, however, don’t end at camouflage.

Just as animals use color change to communicate, Morin envisions robots using the system as a way to signal their position, both to other robots, and to the public. As an example, he cited the possible use of the soft machines during search and rescue operations following a disaster. In dimly lit conditions, he said, a robot that stands out from its surroundings (or even glows in the dark) could be useful in leading rescue crews trying to locate survivors.

Going forward, Morin said, he hopes to explore more complex systems that use multiple color layers to achieve finer control over camouflage and display colors, as well as ways to create systems — using valves and other controls — that would allow the robots to operate autonomously.

“There are a number of directions this technology could go in,” he said. “Some of them are similar to the course we have taken thus far, but I think there are other aspects to explore – such as how the robots interact with their environment — that are related to what soft robots may be doing in the future.

“What we hope is that this work can inspire other researchers to think about these problems and approach them from different angles,” he continued. “There are many biologists who are studying animal behavior as it relates to camouflage, and they use different models to do that. We think something like this might enable them to explore new questions, and that will be valuable.”

Also see:

Whitesides Group Research
Soft Robotics

http://gmwgroup.harvard.edu/research/index.php?page=23

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=csFR52Z3T0I
Title: Re: Soft robots go for color, camouflage - Inspired by nature, Harvard researche
Post by: Constitutionary on August 18, 2012, 12:30:50 pm
They can build all the robots they want.

All it is going to take is just the right rainstorm or low temperature to screw them up.

Look at a typical automobile !!!  Look how much maintenance goes into that.

Taking a big rock and throwing these things off balance is not going to be a hard thing to do.
Title: Re: Soft robots go for color, camouflage - Inspired by nature, Harvard researche
Post by: Letsbereal on August 18, 2012, 02:40:10 pm
They can build all the robots they want.

All it is going to take is just the right rainstorm or low temperature to screw them up.

Look at a typical automobile !!!  Look how much maintenance goes into that.

Taking a big rock and throwing these things off balance is not going to be a hard thing to do.

That's a good point and that's why I think the future won't be in the very 19th century nuts and bolts metalic robot as so often portrait in media.

That's just there to keep us distracted from the real deal. No the future will be in biological robots.

I've studied the Roswell case extensively and almost everything is known about this incident due to the many witnesses.

What they've found inside the wing shaped vehicle were EBE's (Extraterrestrial Biological Entities or Humanoid Robots) with two separate brains and no genitals or any outlet holes like we have.

See: The Day After Roswell - CHAPTER 7 - The EBE http://www.bibliotecapleyades.net/sociopolitica/dayafterroswell/dayafter07.htm
Title: Re: 1/3 Unmanned Robots by 2015
Post by: TahoeBlue on August 21, 2012, 12:38:04 pm
http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/47008018/ns/technology_and_science-innovation/t/us-military-offers-millions-first-humanoid-robot/
US military offers millions for the first humanoid robot
It won't be easy — it needs to walk on two legs, handle power tools and even drive vehicles
updated 4/10/2012

Uncle Sam wants you to make a military robot capable of walking on two legs, handling power tools and even driving vehicles. Luckily, the U.S. military's new robotics challenge aims to save lives rather than hunt down human warriors, Terminator-style, on the battlefields of tomorrow.

The $2 million challenge by the U.S. Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency appeared in an official online solicitation Tuesday. DARPA wants a humanoid robot to replace humans doing dangerous work in the aftermath of terrorist attacks, industrial accidents or natural disasters — or a combination of disaster scenarios such as the meltdown at Japan's Fukushima nuclear facility after the tsunami.
...
For its challenge, DARPA plans to hold a "Virtual Disaster Response Challenge" to test robot software in a virtual simulation, as well two "Disaster Response Challenges" set in a real-world training grounds.


Teams without their own robots can test out their software on a robot expected to be provided by Boston Dynamics — a robotics company already working on a robotic mule and a fast-running robotic cheetah for the military. That humanoid robot will resemble Boston Dynamics' pre-existing humanoid robot models, known as Atlas and PETMAN.

Companies can apply for five contracts worth $3 million if they plan on making both robotic hardware and software, or can apply for 12 contracts worth $375,000 if they  plan on only trying out software. DARPA has also made room to accept up to 100 teams with no funding that can compete with funded teams for later contracts worth $750,000 and $1 million in the later stages of the challenge.

Competitors with deep pockets can also go on their own without military funding and still try to win the final $2 million prize. But given the steep challenges ahead, they'll need all the money and confidence they can get.

The challenge is expected to begin on Oct. 1, 2012, and last until about Dec. 31, 2014.

...
Title: Merging tissue and electronics
Post by: Letsbereal on August 28, 2012, 09:39:29 am
Merging tissue and electronics
27 August 2012
, by Anne Trafton (MIT News)
http://web.mit.edu/newsoffice/2012/nanoelectronics-and-tissues-0827.html

New tissue scaffold could be used for drug development and implantable therapeutic devices.

(http://web.mit.edu/newsoffice/images/nanoelectric-scaffold.jpg) A 3-D reconstructed confocal fluorescence micrograph of a tissue scaffold.
Image: Charles M. Lieber and Daniel S. Kohane.

To control the three-dimensional shape of engineered tissue, researchers grow cells on tiny, sponge-like scaffolds. These devices can be implanted into patients or used in the lab to study tissue responses to potential drugs.

A team of researchers from MIT, Harvard University and Boston Children’s Hospital has now added a new element to tissue scaffolds: electronic sensors. These sensors, made of silicon nanowires, could be used to monitor electrical activity in the tissue surrounding the scaffold, control drug release or screen drug candidates for their effects on the beating of heart tissue.

The research, published online Aug. 26 in Nature Materials, could also pave the way for development of tissue-engineered hearts, says Robert Langer, the David H. Koch Institute Professor at MIT and a senior author of the paper.

“We are very excited about this study,” Langer says. “It brings us one step closer to someday creating a tissue-engineered heart, and it shows how novel nanomaterials can play a role in this field.”

Lead authors of the paper are Bozhi Tian, a former postdoc at MIT and Children’s Hospital; Jia Liu, a Harvard graduate student; and Tal Dvir, a former MIT postdoc. Other senior authors are Daniel Kohane, director of the Laboratory for Biomaterials and Drug Delivery at Children’s Hospital, and Charles Lieber, a Harvard professor of chemistry.

A 3-D system

Until now, the only cellular platforms that incorporated electronic sensors consisted of flat layers of cells grown on planar metal electrodes or transistors. Those two-dimensional systems do not accurately replicate natural tissue, so the research team set out to design a 3-D scaffold that could monitor electrical activity, allowing them to see how cells inside the structure would respond to specific drugs.

The researchers built their new scaffold out of epoxy, a nontoxic material that can take on a porous, 3-D structure. Silicon nanowires embedded in the scaffold carry electrical signals to and from cells grown within the structure.

“The scaffold is not just a mechanical support for cells, it contains multiple sensors. We seed cells into the scaffold and eventually it becomes a 3-D engineered tissue,” Tian says.

The team chose silicon nanowires for electronic sensors because they are small, stable, can be safely implanted into living tissue and are more electrically sensitive than metal electrodes. The nanowires, which range in diameter from 30 to 80 nanometers (about 1,000 times smaller than a human hair), can detect less than one-thousandth of a watt, which is the level of electricity that might be seen in a cell.

Monitoring cell behavior

In the Nature Materials study, the researchers used their scaffolds to grow cardiac, neural and muscle tissue. Using the engineered cardiac tissue, the researchers were able to monitor cells’ response to noradrenalin, a stimulant that typically increases heart rate.

Gordana Vunjak-Novakovic, a professor of biomedical engineering at Columbia University, says the work could help address a great need to engineer cells that respond to electrical stimuli, which may advance the treatment of cardiac and neurological disease.

“This is a beautiful example of how nanoelectronics can be combined with tissue engineering to monitor the behavior of cells,” says Vunjak-Novakovic, who was not part of the research team.

The team also grew blood vessels with embedded electronic sensors and showed that they could be used to measure pH changes within and outside the vessels. Such implantable devices could allow doctors to monitor inflammation or other biochemical events in patients who receive the implants. Ultimately, the researchers would like to engineer tissues that can not only sense an electrical or chemical event, but also respond to it appropriately — for example, by releasing a drug.

“It could be a closed feedback loop, much as our autonomic nervous system is,” Kohane says. “The nervous system senses changes in some part of the body and sends a message to the central nervous system, which then sends a message back to take corrective action.”

The team is now further studying the mechanical properties of the scaffolds and making plans to test them in animals.

The research was funded by the National Institutes of Health, the McKnight Foundation and Boston Children’s Hospital.
Title: Re: Merging tissue and electronics
Post by: Letsbereal on August 28, 2012, 10:15:16 am
Dr. Leir - Alien Implants Tested http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pA9H2xVe5rQ

'Alien' cause these could also be implanted by the rogue shadow government conducting testsing in order to enslave us completely trough chip implants.
Title: Re: Merging tissue and electronics
Post by: Letsbereal on August 28, 2012, 02:01:43 pm
Merging tissue and electronics
27 August 2012
, by Anne Trafton (MIT News)
http://web.mit.edu/newsoffice/2012/nanoelectronics-and-tissues-0827.html

Article just mentioned on AJS.
Title: Coast To Coast AM - DARPA's Futuristic Projects
Post by: Letsbereal on August 30, 2012, 05:06:49 pm
Coast To Coast AM - DARPA's Futuristic Projects - Open Lines http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Y1iP245IJWE

Bionic 'Power Knee' unveiled http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8_5ZauGrtjo
Title: Think hard to fly: Chinese scientists unveil mind-controlled drone
Post by: Letsbereal on September 03, 2012, 10:25:22 am
Think hard to fly: Chinese scientists unveil mind-controlled drone
2 September 2012
, (RT)
http://rt.com/news/mind-controlled-drone-china-157/

Chinese researchers have unveiled a system that allows users to control drones with their thoughts.

(http://rt.com/files/news/mind-controlled-drone-china-157/thoughts-researchers-unveiled-allows-904.n.jpg)

The technology was designed to help handicapped people, but could have ample applications in other fields as well.
(http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JH96O5niEnI&feature=youtu.be)

A video posted to YouTube by researchers at Zhejiang University shows how the system, called Flybuddy2, works. And it appears that you don’t have to be a nuclear scientist to build one. All you need is an EEG headset with a Bluetooth connection to a laptop – plus a quadrotor Parrot AR Drone linked to the computer.

“The computer can receive EEG signals via Bluetooth and convert them to specific commands to control the AR drones through WiFi,” a presenter explains.

To get the drone to raise or to land, a user would need to “think left” hard. “Think left lightly” if you want to rotate clockwise and “right” if you want it to lurch forward. Give it a lift in the air by thinking “push.” And imagine clenching it if you want to bring it back down to earth. 

But moving around is not the only task it can do. Remember how they tell you to avoid blinking when taking photos? Well here it’s the opposite: blinking is the command that tells the drone to photograph its environs.

The video shows a man in a wheelchair using the technology to get a closer view of flowers, to take pictures and even to guide his drone through a battle with another quadrotor controlled through a handheld remote control. Needless to say, mind triumphs over matter and the hand-managed drone is hustled off the mat by its thought-controlled analog.

The students hope their technology will be able to help disabled people become more interactive with the world around them, and are slated to present their invention at the ACM International Conference on Ubiquitous Computing (Ubicomp), which will be held next week in Pittsburg.

While handicap assistance and gaming is one potential application for the system, only the imagination can limit the potential uses mind-controlled drones could have in the future, both for civilian and other purposes.
Title: Re: 1/3 Unmanned Robots by 2015
Post by: TahoeBlue on September 07, 2012, 07:52:30 pm
http://www.informationweek.com/government/mobile/darpa-cheetah-robot-sets-world-speed-rec/240006952
DARPA Cheetah Robot Sets World Speed Record
DARPA bot sets new world record that's faster than Usain Bolt's human record.
By Patience WaitInformationWeek
 September 07, 2012 03:47 PM

A robot has outpaced the world's fastest man, six-time Olympic gold medalist Usain Bolt.
 The four-legged robot, dubbed Cheetah and developed by Boston Dynamics on behalf of the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency, set a speed record of 28.3 miles per hour over 20 meters. Bolt, who won three gold medals in the 2012 Olympics in London, set a human record in 2009 with a top speed of 27.78 mph for 20 meters during a 100-meter sprint.
...
 
Cheetah was developed as part of DARPA's Maximum Mobility and Manipulation (M3) program. Legged robots would be useful in rough terrain because they can step over obstacles or ditches. Yet, because it's difficult to coordinate leg movement, legged robots have sacrificed speed for balance and mobility.
 
Cheetah's movements are based on the way fast animals run in nature, by flexing and straightening its back on each step, for example. DARPA is attempting to build robots with "core capabilities that living organisms have refined over millennia of evolution: efficient locomotion, manipulation of objects, and adaptability to environments," said M3 program manager Gill Pratt in a statement on Cheetah's achievement.

 
 Its built be Boston Dynamics - Notice that it looks to be running in reverse:  
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=d2D71CveQwo
Title: People & Power: Attack of the Drones - Vid
Post by: Letsbereal on October 13, 2012, 09:03:23 am
People & Power: Attack of the Drones http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SdQvF5xmKL4
Title: Re: 1/3 Unmanned Robots by 2015
Post by: TahoeBlue on October 15, 2012, 12:39:11 pm
UAV - unmanned aircraft carrier UAV's ....

http://www.reuters.com/video/2012/10/08/fifteen-dead-in-sudanese-plane-crash?videoChannel=2602&videoId=236006568

The X-47B is the first drone designed to operate from an aircraft carrier at sea and carry out pre-programmed missions autonomously to a range of 1500 nautical miles. Take-off, landing, inflight refuelling and the deployment of weapons is controlled by computer. Flight testing began at Edwards Air Force Base in February, last year. Northrop Grumman says that during multiple flights since then, the X-47B reached altitudes exceeding 15,000 feet and demonstrated multiple manoeuvers relevant to carrier operations, including extending and retracting a tail hook and completing an autonomous "touch-and-go" landing - an aviation first.

Engineers hope to begin carrier testing of the X-47B in 2013. Rob Muir, Reuters.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Northrop_Grumman_X-47B

http://defense.aol.com/2012/08/01/navy-teaches-robot-top-gun-to-fly-off-aircraft-carriers/
Navy Teaches Robot Top Gun, X-47, To Fly From Aircraft Carriers

(http://www.mygen.com/images/x47ffpaxweb01.jpg)

NAVAL AIR STATION PATUXENT RIVER: Landing a jet plane on an aircraft carrier is one of the hardest and most dangerous things a human being can do, with pilots' stress levels spiking higher than in combat. Now the Navy is trying to teach a robot how to do it: The X-47B Unmanned Combat Air System, the UCAS.
...
Title: Re: 1/3 Unmanned Robots by 2015
Post by: chris jones on October 15, 2012, 01:17:11 pm
 Money$$, our money and our debt and the elites controll the show.
 The neighborhood mafias get a peice of a shop owners profit, for protection they say.
 Our Federal syndicate gets a piece of our money, taxes, they do as they so desire with this portion of our hard earned bucks , we  dont pay our IRS we get jail time, fines,or in debt.
 How much was $$ made with this insanity and will it stop, nope, not untill the citizens are broke, busted and disqusted, up against the wall  with their eyes open, abruptly woken up to the truth.
 
Title: Re: 1/3 Unmanned Robots by 2015
Post by: TahoeBlue on January 27, 2013, 08:30:23 pm
bump for 2013 - two more years...
Title: Re: 1/3 Unmanned Robots by 2015
Post by: TahoeBlue on January 28, 2013, 12:29:16 pm
BAE Systems Mantis - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
en.wikipedia.org/wiki/BAE_Systems_Mantis

The BAE Systems Mantis Unmanned Autonomous System Advanced Concept Technology Demonstrator is a British demonstrator programme for Unmanned ...

BAE Systems HERTI - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
en.wikipedia.org/wiki/BAE_Systems_HERTI

The BAE Systems HERTI is an unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) developed by the British company BAE Systems. HERTI stands for "High Endurance Rapid ...

BAE Systems Silver Fox - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
en.wikipedia.org/wiki/BAE_Systems_Silver_Fox

The BAE Systems Silver Fox UAV is an Unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) that can conduct autonomous aerial surveillance imaging. The Silver Fox UAV is ...

BAE Systems Taranis - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
en.wikipedia.org/wiki/BAE_Systems_Taranis

The BAE Systems Taranis is a British demonstrator programme for Unmanned Combat Air Vehicle (UCAV) technology. A semi-autonomous unmanned ...


http://www.bizjournals.com/boston/blog/mass-high-tech/2012/09/former-bae-exec-tapped-to-lead-irobots.html
Sep 26, 2012, 8:17am EDT
Former BAE exec tapped to lead iRobot's defense unit

Julie Donnelly, Boston Business Journal
iRobot Corp. (NASDAQ: IRBT), has announced that Frank Wilson, a former executive at defense giant BAE systems, will lead the robotics firm’s Defense & Security business unit.
 
Wilson most recently served as sector vice president of business development and mission applications for Electronic Systems at BAE Systems, a unit which had revenues of $4.2 billion in 2011.
 
Tim Trainer, the previous acting interim general manager, will continue on as vice president of programs.
 
Wilson takes over the role at a time when Defense Department budgets are expected to stagnate or even decline, and iRobot has reduced its investment in the segment. IRobot’s military unit is best known for developing the SUGV and PackBot robots, which help prevent troop casualties by performing dangerous tasks like disarming improvised explosive devices
...
Frank has a wealth of experience leading a business, driving business development and transforming organizations in both favorable and declining defense budget environments. We look forward to his contributions and leadership as iRobot develops new technologies to address the growing role robots have in special operations and infantry missions.”
 
iRobot recently celebrated shipping its 5,000th military robot.
Title: Re: 1/3 Unmanned Robots by 2015
Post by: TahoeBlue on February 24, 2013, 10:49:59 am
http://www.guardian.co.uk/technology/2013/feb/23/stop-killer-robots
Killer robots must be stopped, say campaigners

'Autonomous weapons', which could be ready within a decade, pose grave risk to international law, claim activists

Tracy McVeigh
The Observer, Saturday 23 February 2013 16.52 EST

A new global campaign to persuade nations to ban "killer robots" before they reach the production stage is to be launched in the UK by a group of academics, pressure groups and Nobel peace prize laureates.

Robot warfare and autonomous weapons, the next step from unmanned drones, are already being worked on by scientists and will be available within the decade, said Dr Noel Sharkey, a leading robotics and artificial intelligence expert and professor at Sheffield University. He believes that development of the weapons is taking place in an effectively unregulated environment, with little attention being paid to moral implications and international law.

The Stop the Killer Robots campaign will be launched in April at the House of Commons and includes many of the groups that successfully campaigned to have international action taken against cluster bombs and landmines. They hope to get a similar global treaty against autonomous weapons.

"These things are not science fiction; they are well into development," said Sharkey. "The research wing of the Pentagon in the US is working on the X47B [unmanned plane] which has supersonic twists and turns with a G-force that no human being could manage, a craft which would take autonomous armed combat anywhere in the planet.

"In America they are already training more drone pilots than real aircraft pilots, looking for young men who are very good at computer games. They are looking at swarms of robots, with perhaps one person watching what they do."

Sharkey insists he is not anti-war but deeply concerned about how quickly science is moving ahead of the presumptions underlying the Geneva convention and the international laws of war.

"There are a lot of people very excited about this technology, in the US, at BAE Systems, in China, Israel and Russia, very excited at what is set to become a multibillion-dollar industry. This is going to be big, big money. But actually there is no transparency, no legal process. The laws of war allow for rights of surrender, for prisoner of war rights, for a human face to take judgments on collateral damage. Humans are thinking, sentient beings. If a robot goes wrong, who is accountable? Certainly not the robot."

He disputes the justification that deploying robot soldiers would potentially save lives of real soldiers. "Autonomous robotic weapons won't get tired, they won't seek revenge if their colleague is killed, but neither will my washing machine. No one on your side might get killed, but what effect will you be having on the other side, not just in lives but in attitudes and anger?

"The public is not being invited to have a view on the morals of all of this. We won't hear about it until China has sold theirs to Iran. That's why we are forming this campaign to look at a pre-emptive ban.

"The idea is that it's a machine that will find a target, decide if it is the right target and then kill it. No human involvement. Article 36 in the Geneva Convention says that any new weapon has to take into account whether it can distinguish and discriminate between combatant and civilian, but the problem here is that an autonomous robot is not a weapon until you clip on the gun."

At present, Sharkey says, there is no mechanism in a robot's "mind" to distinguish between a child holding up a sweet and an adult pointing a gun. "We are struggling to get them to distinguish between a human being and a car. We have already seen utter incompetence in the use of drones, operators making a lot of mistakes and not being properly supervised."

Last November the international campaign group Human Rights Watch produced a 50-page report, Losing Humanity: the Case Against Killer Robots, outlining concerns about fully autonomous weapons.

http://www.hrw.org/reports/2012/11/19/losing-humanity-0

"Giving machines the power to decide who lives and dies on the battlefield would take technology too far," said Steve Goose, arms division director at Human Rights Watch. "Human control of robotic warfare is essential to minimising civilian deaths and injuries."
...

http://www.aarongifford.com/vfj/index.html
(http://www.aarongifford.com/vfj/img/killerrobots.jpg)
Tuesday, 29 Mar. 2005:
 
Beware of the Killer Robots! They've been spotted chasing terrified students. If you spot one, be sure to tell me. I can help. I've dealt with thousands of killer robots in my lifetime. I can save you, I can stop the killer robots.

Be sure to check out the cool campaign posters my sister made for me. Photos of some of them are online: just click on the "Campaign Posters" menu up in the green navigation bar


http://www.stickycomics.com/killerrobots_sm/
http://www.stickycomics.com/wp-content/uploads/killerrobots_sm.jpg
Attack of the regular sized killer robots
Wednesday, October 31, 2007
Title: Re: 1/3 Unmanned Robots by 2015
Post by: decemberfellow on February 24, 2013, 10:57:35 am
KILLER ROBOTS OR KILLER BUGS

U.S. Air Force Developing Terrifying Swarms of Tiny Unmanned Drones That Can Hover, Crawl and Even Kill Targets

Quote
The U.S. Air Force is developing tiny unmanned drones that will fly in swarms, hover like bees, crawl like spiders and even sneak up on unsuspecting targets and execute them with lethal precision.


The Air Vehicles Directorate, a research arm of the Air Force, has released a computer-animated video outlining the the future capabilities of Micro Air Vehicles (MAVs). The project promises to revolutionize war by down-sizing the combatants.


'MAVs will become a vital element in the ever-changing war-fighting environment and will help ensure success on the battlefield of the future,' the narrator intones.


'Unobtrusive, pervasive, lethal – Micro Air Vehicles, enhancing the capabilities of the future war fighter.'


http://lewrockwell.com/spl5/usaf-drone-swarms.html (http://lewrockwell.com/spl5/usaf-drone-swarms.html)
Title: Re: 1/3 Unmanned Robots by 2015
Post by: TahoeBlue on February 24, 2013, 11:27:37 am
U.S. troops, drones sent to Niger
Update - Notice how there was NO MSM media pickup on this story!!!

http://www.foxnews.com/politics/2013/02/23/us-troops-in-niger-to-set-up-drone-base/
US deploys troops to Niger to set up drone base
 Published February 23, 2013

WASHINGTON –  President Barack Obama said Friday that about 100 American troops have been deployed to the African nation of Niger. Two U.S. defense officials said the troops would be setting up a base for unarmed drones to conduct surveillance.
 
Obama announced the deployment in a letter to Congress, saying that the forces "will provide support for intelligence collection and will also facilitate intelligence sharing with French forces conducting operations in Mali, and with other partners in the region."
 
The move marks a deepening of U.S. efforts to stem the spread of Al Qaeda and its affiliates in the volatile region. It also underscores Obama's desire to fight extremism without involving large numbers of U.S. ground forces.

The drone base will allow the U.S. to give France more intelligence on the militants its forces have been fighting in Mali, which neighbors Niger. Over time, it could extend the reach not only of American intelligence-gathering but also U.S. special operations missions to strengthen Niger's own security forces.


One of the two U.S. defense officials who discussed the development confirmed the American troops would fly drones and other surveillance platforms from Niger military airstrips, tracking militant and refugee movement inside Mali and around the border. The U.S. will share that intelligence with Niger's military, the official said.
 
Both officials spoke on the condition of anonymity because they were not authorized to publicly discuss the project.
...

http://updatednews.ca/2013/02/22/u-s-troops-drones-sent-to-niger/
U.S. troops, drones sent to Niger
Published On: Fri, Feb 22nd, 2013
 
U.S. troops were deployed to Niger to assist intelligence collection for  French forces fighting in Mali, President Barack Obama told  congressional leaders.
 
“This deployment will provide support for intelligence collection and will  also facilitate intelligence sharing with French forces conducting operations in  Mali, and with other partners in the region,” Obama said in a letter sent Friday  to House Speaker John  Boehner, R-Ohio, and Sen. Patrick  Leahy, D-Vt., president pro tem of the Senate.
 
Tuareg rebels seized control in the north of Mali, in the chaotic aftermath  of a military coup. Islamic extremists gained control of key towns and pushed  southward toward the capital.
 
France intervened last month, first with airstrikes and later with a  deployment of about 4,000 ground troops.
 
Pentagon officials told NBC News drone aircraft were sent to Niger to support  France’s support counter-terrorism mission in Mali.
 
Defense Department officials said the first wave of unmanned aircraft  included two Raptor surveillance drones.
 
The Pentagon said 250 to 300 military personnel, including remote pilots and  security and maintenance crews, would eventually be deployed.
 
Besides helping the French in Mali, the drones could be used to provide  intelligence on the Islamic militant threat in northern and eastern Africa,  Pentagon officials said.

Title: Re: 1/3 Unmanned Robots by 2015
Post by: TahoeBlue on April 11, 2013, 07:14:58 pm
http://www.infowars.com/pentagon-to-build-robots-with-real-brains/
Pentagon to Build Robots With ‘Real’ Brains
Technology would make robots “truly autonomous”

Paul Joseph Watson
 Infowars.com
April 11, 2013
...
Researchers for DARPA (Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency) have created a device that “looks and ‘thinks’ like a human brain,” James K. Gimzewski, professor of chemistry at the University of California, Los Angeles, told National Defense Magazine.

The program is called “physical intelligence” and is capable, “without being programmed like a traditional robot, of performing actions similar to humans,” making it the first incarnation of a robot that can perform “truly autonomously” without human input.
 
“What sets this new device apart from any others is that it has nano-scale interconnected wires that perform billions of connections like a human brain, and is capable of remembering information,” writes Sandra I. Erwin. “Each connection is a synthetic synapse. A synapse is what allows a neuron to pass an electric or chemical signal to another cell. Because its structure is so complex, most artificial intelligence projects so far have been unable to replicate it.”

...

Noel Sharkey, professor of artificial intelligence and robotics at the University of Sheffield, has repeatedly warned that the robots currently being developed under the auspices of DARPA will eventually be used to kill.
 
“Of course if it’s used for combat, it would be killing civilians as well as it’s not going to be able to discriminate between civilians and soldiers,” said Sharkey
 [ not without tagging - which most likely that would be used.  ]
...
Title: Re: 1/3 Unmanned Robots by 2015
Post by: chris jones on April 11, 2013, 08:16:28 pm
 MIC, they would create anything that makes $$$$$$$$$.
 Does it offend anyone knowing why we are paying for this horse shiite.
Title: New Skynet Battle Stations
Post by: LoudMcCloud on April 12, 2013, 04:03:00 am
There is a reason why the government has said, "there is no drone
program."  When killing a bunch of woman and children without remorse,
your gonna try to hide it.  Now the government is building the first major
Skynet Battle Station on naval ships.


Read more at:
http://the-resistance-report.blogspot.com/2013/04/new-drone-skynet-battle-stations.html
Title: Re: 1/3 Unmanned Robots by 2015
Post by: TahoeBlue on May 05, 2013, 05:36:45 pm
http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/05/130502142649.htm
Robotic Insects Make First Controlled Flight


May 2, 2013 — In the very early hours of the morning, in a Harvard robotics laboratory last summer, an insect took flight. Half the size of a paperclip, weighing less than a tenth of a gram, it leapt a few inches, hovered for a moment on fragile, flapping wings, and then sped along a preset route through the air.

(http://images.sciencedaily.com/2013/05/130502142649.jpg)

...
The demonstration of the first controlled flight of an insect-sized robot is the culmination of more than a decade's work, led by researchers at the Harvard School of Engineering and Applied Sciences (SEAS) and the Wyss Institute for Biologically Inspired Engineering at Harvard.
 
"This is what I have been trying to do for literally the last 12 years," says Robert J. Wood, Charles River Professor of Engineering and Applied Sciences at SEAS, Wyss Core Faculty Member, and principal investigator of the National Science Foundation-supported RoboBee project. "It's really only because of this lab's recent breakthroughs in manufacturing, materials, and design that we have even been able to try this. And it just worked, spectacularly well."
...
Title: Hacking the Drone War’s Secret History at Home
Post by: No2NWO on May 31, 2013, 12:40:09 am
Hacking the Drone War’s Secret History

In 2008 U.S. troops in Iraq discovered that Shi’ite insurgents had figured out how to tap and record video feeds from overhead American drones. Now you too can hack Washington’s globe-spanning fleet of silent, deadly armed robots — although legally, and only in an historical sense.


Josh Begley, a 28-year-old NYU grad student, has just created an application programming interface — basically, a collection of building blocks for software development — that allows anyone with basic coding skills to organize, analyze and visualize drone-strike data from Pakistan, Yemen and Somalia dating back to 2002.

Based on information collected by the U.K. Bureau of Investigative Journalism, the API can be used to create interactive Websites (similar to this) that add depth, context and even a little humanity to the sterile news reports of the latest Unmanned Aerial Vehicle strike in some far-away conflict zone.

Begley tells Danger Room he’s trying to bridge the “empathy gap” between Western audiences and drone-attack victims. “To Americans like me, what may have previously been blank spots on the map all of a sudden have complex stories, voices of their own. From 30,000 feet it might just be cars and buildings. But there are people in them. People who live under the drones we fly.”

Begley has already experimented with a few interfaces using his API. One, he says, “assembles every covert drone attack on a Website, hides them behind numbered blank tiles, and lets you filter through the various years and countries where these attacks happened.”

“Another interface is more practical,” he adds. “It’s just a simple search function — for researchers and legal scholars who want to look for a specific drone attack, or more easily go to the Bureau of Investigative Journalism and read the corresponding articles they’ve assembled.”

The drone API, which is actually Begley’s master’s thesis, is not his first foray into capturing robot-attack data. His @dronestream Twitter feed, which documents all reported UAV attacks. Last year Begley created an iPhone app that tracks drone strikes, but Apple rejected it. Other developers have jumped on the bandwagon, too. London-based artist James Bridle runs a Tumblr blog that matches overhead satellite imagery to reports of drone attacks.

The public release of Begley’s API, which took five months to complete, is timed to coincide with the White House-promoted National Day of Civic Hacking on June 1. Hacking Day aims to “liberate government data for coders and entrepreneurs.” The ACLU, for one, is commemorating the event with an API linked to the group’s vast database of documents related to U.S.-sanctioned torture of terror suspects.

“I’m actually not sure what people will learn,” Begley says of his own drone-strike API. “I just feel like I’ve been iterating on this data set for a little while and there are probably a bunch of more talented developers and designers who could find stuff in the data that I’m not seeing.”

With Pres. Barack Obama’s recent promise to rein in robotic attacks, the time is ripe to begin making sense of 12 years of drone warfare that has claimed thousands of lives. Begley’s API makes that vital self-reflection a whole lot easier.

http://www.wired.com/dangerroom/2013/05/drone-api/
Title: Re: Hacking the Drone War’s Secret History at Home
Post by: Sasha on June 05, 2013, 11:15:56 pm
Classified documents reveal CIA drone strikes often killed unknown people
June 06, 2013

A review of classified US intelligence records has revealed that the CIA could not confirm the identity of about a quarter of the people killed by drone strikes in Pakistan during a period spanning from 2010 to 2011.

According to a purportedly exclusive report by NBC News that mirrors findings of an April analysis by McClatchy, between September 3, 2010 and October 30, 2011 the agency’s drone program over Pakistan routinely designated those killed as “other militants,” a label used when the CIA could not determine affiliation, if any.

 The review by NBC News paints both a confusing and troubling picture of the CIA’s reported drone strike success, which three former Obama administration officials feared could have missed or simply ignored mistakes.

 Of the 14 months worth of classified documents reviewed, 26 out of 114 attacks designate fatalities as “other militants,” while in four other attacks those killed are only described as “foreign fighters.”

Even more irregular are the cases when entry records conflict on the number of those killed, with one such example indicating a drone attack had killed seven to 10 combatants, and another estimating 20 to 22 fatalities.

 By comparison, McClatchy’s April review of drone strikes revealed that at least 265 of up to 482 people that the CIA killed during a 12-month period ending in September 2011 were not senior al-Qaeda leaders, but were instead “assessed” as Afghan, Pakistani and “unknown extremists.” Corroborating media accounts show that US drones killed only six top al-Qaeda leaders during the same period.

 One key term in analyzing drone strike records are what are known as “signature” strikes, when drones kill suspects based on behavior patterns but without positive identification, versus “personality” strike, which is when drone targets are known terrorist affiliates whose identities are verified.

 According to an anonymous senior intelligence official who spoke to NBC, at the peak of drone operations in Pakistan in 2009 and 2010 as many as half of all kills were classified as “signature” strikes.

continues:
http://rt.com/usa/cia-drone-strikes-unknown-targets-293/
Title: Re: 1/3 Unmanned Robots by 2015
Post by: TahoeBlue on August 08, 2013, 11:56:11 am
bump - AJ talking about it today.

http://www.stopkillerrobots.org/

(http://www.stopkillerrobots.org/wp-content/themes/ctskr/images/logo.png)

ICRC on new technologies and warfare


The International Committee of the Red Cross (ICRC) has issued a new edition of its quarterly journal International Review of the Red Cross, focused on new technologies and warfare and featuring features articles by several members of the Campaign to Stop Killer Robots: Dr. Peter Asaro of ICRAC on banning autonomous weapons systems, Prof. Noel Sharkey of ICRAC on autonomous robot warfare, and Richard Moyes and Thomas Nash of Article 36 on the role of civil society in the development of standards on new weapons. The accompanying editorial is entitled, “Science cannot be placed above its consequences.”

While the ICRC is still considering its position on fully autonomous weapons, its legal advisor Nathalie Weizmann has said that it is difficult to see how such weapons could be made to comply with the international humanitarian law (IHL) rules of distinction, proportionality and precautions in attack. Some of the questions that the ICRC is concerned with are addressed in this statement issued on 1 August.

The ICRC is a valued partner of civil society initiatives to advance humanitarian disarmament, including through its work in support of the 1997 Mine Ban Treaty and 2008 Convention on Cluster Munitions. An ICRC representative attended at the first NGO Conference of the Campaign to Stop Killer Robots in London in April.
Title: Re: 1/3 Unmanned Robots by 2015
Post by: TahoeBlue on August 08, 2013, 12:20:57 pm
http://www.technovelgy.com/ct/Science-Fiction-News.asp?NewsNum=4009
Self-Building, Self-Tooling, Autonomous Manufacturing
Is it possible for an automated factory to grow, like an acorn grows into an oak tree? Dani Eder wants to know, and he's working on prototype "seed factories" to try to make it happen

http://en.wikibooks.org/wiki/Seed_Factories

A Seed Factory is a new kind of production system which has two major differences from conventional factories: self-expansion and integration.

It includes a starter set of equipment which can expand in three ways to a larger capacity, while also making useful products:
Replication - making copies of its own parts so as to eventually copy the entire set.
Diversification - making parts for new equipment, thus expanding the range of possible outputs.
Scaling - making parts for larger equipment than what is in the starter set


| - - - -


In an interview, he answers some questions about seed factories:



Why use the metaphor of a “seed” for self-constructing factories?
Biological seeds grow into larger organisms using local matter and energy, and eventually produce copies of the original seed. By analogy a seed factory grows from a small starter set to a larger factory using local matter and energy and high levels of automation. The factory is flexible and general purpose, and produces a variety of useful products. It's also intended to be self-replicating, producing more seed factories.

We talk in terms of a factory rather than a single machine because (1) a number of different production processes are required which are best carried out separately, and (2) for the size and quantity of products we want to make, the final set of equipment is closer to commercial building size than garage or desktop size.

Why hasn’t this been done before?

For any number of reasons, historical, social, political, and economic, we tend to divide production into separate factories—the oil refinery is separate from the steel mill, which is separate from the auto plant. This separation requires tremendous cooperation and coordination among the various manufacturers to bring all of the raw materials and fabricated parts together to assemble the complex *things* of our modern lives. In short, the old manufacturing model makes 21st century optimization impossible.

What's the biggest obstacle to Seed Factories?
There is no simple answer, but it's easy to illustrate the problem. In 1908, Ford revolutionized manufacturing and the automobile market with the introduction of the Model T. There was a popular joke at the time that you could get one in any color, as long as it was black. These days, black may be considered the height of fashion, but only because everything comes in such a wide variety of colors, sizes, shapes, flavors, and so on ad nauseam.

The point being, manufacturing is a much more complex process 100 years later. Our old-style factories have been abandoned, because it seemed impossible to retrofit and update them (though labor issues and profit margins played a large part in this). This has left much of the West with an industrial vacuum; an enormous decrease in manufacturing activity, because we've innovated ourselves out of the business.

Science fiction fans have been anticipating this development since the idea was explained and fully visualized by sf great Philip K. Dick, in his 1953 short story Autofac:



The cylinder had split. At first he couldn't tell if it had been the impact or deliberate internal mechanisms at work. From the rent, an ooze of metal bits was sliding. Squatting down, O'Neill examined them.
The bits were in motion. Microscopic machinery, smaller than ants, smaller than pins, working energetically, purposefully - constructing something that looked like a tiny rectangle of steel.

"They're building," O'Neill said, awed. He got up and prowled on. Off to the side, at the far edge of the gully, he came across a downed pellet far advanced on its construction. Apparently it had been released some time ago.

This one had made great enough progress to be identified. Minute as it was, the structure was familiar. The machinery was building a miniature replica of the demolished factory.
 (Read more about Philp K. Dick's autofac)

Autofac (Nanorobots)    -  Very small robots working on self-replication

The automated factories took what they needed:

 "Each factory is limited to its own operational area…but the network itself is unbounded. It can go on scooping up our resources forever. The Institute decided it gets top priority; we mere people come second."

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Autofac

"Autofac" is a 1955 science fiction short story by Philip K. Dick that features one of the earliest treatments (and Dick's second) of self-replicating machines

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Philip_K._Dick

Philip Kindred Dick (December 16, 1928 – March 2, 1982) was an American novelist, short story writer and essayist whose published work is almost entirely in the science fiction genre. Dick explored sociological, political and metaphysical themes in novels dominated by monopolistic corporations, authoritarian governments, and altered states. In his later works Dick's thematic focus strongly reflected his personal interest in metaphysics and theology. He often drew upon his own life experiences in addressing the nature of drug abuse, paranoia, schizophrenia, and transcendental experiences in novels such as A Scanner Darkly and VALIS.[1]
...

http://en.wikibooks.org/wiki/User:Danielravennest/SFP/Report
Quarterly Report - 2nd Quarter 2013

The Seed Factory Project
1309 Stroud Ave, Gadsden, AL 35903

Contact: Dani Eder, [email protected]

The Project

The goal of the Seed Factory Project is to develop the concepts, technology, and working examples of self-expanding production systems, as a collaborative open-source effort. We want to reach a level of performance that supplies a high quality of life for factory owner-operators, economic resilience by providing most of their needs from local sources, and technology for a sustainable 21st century civilization. In the long term, application of seed technology will help enable living beyond the Earth, by minimizing the equipment to be launched and using local raw materials and energy. The detailed processes and products for space will obviously be different. The concept of an integrated starter factory, which grows in capacity by making more equipment for itself, however, applies everywhere.
Title: Re: 1/3 Unmanned Robots by 2015
Post by: iamc2 on August 08, 2013, 12:40:26 pm
 'How to stop a ROBOT?'

 "Reverse polar -Magnets in a Quick Burst of "Electricity" will shut them down..[the Bo-Bots ???]

 Robots only function by electronic Impulses...

  "To Stop Them: Just Shock Them With Electricity!

 [I may be wrong: But what if I'm right!]

 
Title: Re: 1/3 Unmanned Robots by 2015
Post by: TahoeBlue on August 08, 2013, 01:49:05 pm
Dr. Peter Asaro of ICRAC  - autonomous weapons systems


http://icrac.net/statements/

Mission Statement

Declared September, 2009 at Sheffield, UK, by ICRAC founding members Juergen Altmann, Peter Asaro, Noel Sharkey and Rob Sparrow.



Given the rapid pace of development of military robotics and the pressing dangers that these pose to peace and international security and to civilians in war, we call upon the international community to urgently commence a discussion about an arms control regime to reduce the threat posed by these systems.

We propose that this discussion should consider the following:
•Their potential to lower the threshold of armed conflict;
•The prohibition of the development, deployment and use of armed autonomous unmanned systems; machines should not be allowed to make the decision to kill people;
•Limitations on the range and weapons carried by “man in the loop” unmanned systems and on their deployment in postures threatening to other states;
•A ban on arming unmanned systems with nuclear weapons;
•The prohibition of the development, deployment and use of robot space weapons.

Endorsed by all ICRAC members.


http://www.peterasaro.org/


Dr. Peter Asaro is a philosopher of science, technology and media. His work examines the interfaces between social relations, human minds and bodies, artificial intelligence and robotics, and digital media.

His current research focuses on the social, cultural, political, legal and ethical dimensions of military robotics and UAV drones, from a perspective that combines media theory with science and technology studies. He has written widely-cited papers on lethal robotics from the perspective of just war theory and human rights. Dr. Asaro's research also examines agency and autonomy, liability and punishment, and privacy and surveillance as it applies to consumer robots, industrial automation, smart buildings, and autonomous vehicles. His research has been published in international peer reviewed journals and edited volumes, and he is currently writing a book that interrogates the intersections between military robotics, interface design practices, and social and ethical issues.



 [listen to my Voice of Russia, American Edition interview]
 [listen to my Los Angeles NPR interview with Ron Arkin]
 [listen to my Pennsylvania NPR interview with Ron Arkin]
 [listen to my Pacifica Radio interview with Red Whittaker]
 [listen to my Voice of Russia, American Edition interview]
 [listen to my Voice of Russia, American Edition interview]


(2001) Love Machine
(2011) "A Body to Kick, but Still No Soul to Damn: Legal Perspectives on Robotics"
 (2011) "Remote-Control Crimes: Roboethics and Legal Jurisdictions of Tele-Agency"
 (2009) "Military Robotics and Just War Theory"
 (2009) "Modeling the Moral User: Designing Ethical Interfaces for Tele-Operation"
 (2009) "Special Issue on the Intellectual Legacy of W. Ross Ashby, Int. Journal of General Systems"
 (2008) "How Just Could a Robot War Be?"
 (2008) "Pornomechanics: Sex Robots and the Mechanisms of Love"
 (2008) "From Mechanisms of Adaptation to Intelligence Amplifiers: The Philosophy of W. Ross Ashby"
 (2007) "Heinz von Foerster and the Bio-Computing Movements of the 1960s"
 (2007) "Robots and Responsibility from a Legal Perspective"
 (2006) "What Should We Want from a Robot Ethic?"
 (2006) "Working Models and the Synthetic Method: Electronic Brains as Mediators Between Neurons and Behavior"
 (2005) "A.I.and Emotional Robots: Collaborative Fiction in Science and Film"
 (2000) "Transforming Society by Transforming Technology: The Science and Politics of Participatory Design"
Title: Re: 1/3 Unmanned Robots by 2015
Post by: kidA on August 08, 2013, 02:42:44 pm
I was ringing up this guy at my job the other day. He is a drone programmer and he told me there are probably a bunch of drones flying over us tt this moment (I work in Santa Monica).

I just wanted to shake him and tell to stop what he is doing!
Title: Re: 1/3 Unmanned Robots by 2015
Post by: TahoeBlue on November 22, 2013, 02:45:34 pm
http://www.defenseone.com/technology/2013/11/massive-robot-could-soon-join-marines-battlefield/74285/?oref=d-river
This Massive Robot Could Soon Join Marines on the Battlefield
November 21, 2013

The future doesn't always arrive with a gasp and a boom like Skynet inTerminator. No, sometimes it's more like Office Space.

At least that's the idea I get watching this video of the Marines' testing the Legged Squad Support System. DARPA built the LS3 to act as an autonomous pack horse that "can carry 400 lbs of a squad’s load, follow squad members through rugged terrain and interact with troops in a natural way, similar to a trained animal and its handler."
...
"The experimentation phase is in full swing right now," said Brigadier General Kevin Killea with all the emotion of a building manager introducing new trash chutes.

"And we'll come back and we'll look at all the data and we'll get the feedback from all the Marines about how they feel it can support them best."
...
No biggie.

Just what DARPA calls "the culmination of a decade of research in perception and autonomy with programs like DARPA’s Unmanned Ground Combat Vehicle-Perception for Off-Road Robotics Integration (UPI) program, mobility work with DARPA’s 'Big Dog' and significant advances in natural human-robot interface such as voice recognition."
...
Title: Re: 1/3 Unmanned Robots by 2015
Post by: JohnBFTOR on November 22, 2013, 10:08:11 pm
A robot drone we often forget about
(http://kwmr.org/idbfiles/0000/1176/smart_meter_2.jpg)
Title: Re: 1/3 Unmanned Robots by 2015
Post by: Effie Trinket on November 22, 2013, 10:57:15 pm
A robot drone we often forget about
(http://kwmr.org/idbfiles/0000/1176/smart_meter_2.jpg)
The austerity enforcing, eugenics, depopulation, slavery meter.  Nazi extermination camps were "smart" too.  I bet IBM won't admit that though (they won't admit that "smart" in the context they use it really means GENOCIDE).  They think Americans are dumb and wouldn't want to be against anything labeled as "smart" for it silently insinuates that you would be for something that is "dumb", and no one wants to be associated with something like that.  They think their propaganda is clever.  I find it incredibly offensive, both to humanity and to anyone with any intelligence at all.
Title: Re: 1/3 Unmanned Robots by 2015
Post by: JohnBFTOR on November 25, 2013, 11:57:44 pm
fluttering insect like robot
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=boxeUaFl3R8#t=35
Title: Re: 1/3 Unmanned Robots by 2015
Post by: chris jones on November 26, 2013, 10:37:58 am
  Callin all sucklings,,MIC, any shiitbag dealing with robotics or any other insanity can line up and get funding, $$$$$$$$$$.
  Open house for parasites looking of  the suk straw...
  This is the people money,ooops- sorry DEBT. They laugh at the mentality of the masses,  WAF shame.
Title: Re: 1/3 Unmanned Robots by 2015
Post by: TahoeBlue on January 22, 2014, 02:56:53 pm
http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/uknews/defence/10587820/US-Army-considers-replacing-thousands-of-troops-with-robots.html
US Army considers replacing thousands of troops with robots

The US Army is studying whether robots could take the place of thousands of soldiers
By  Ben Farmer, Defence Correspondent
6:14PM GMT 21 Jan 2014

The US Army is considering replacing thousands of soldiers with robots as it deals with sweeping troop cuts.

A senior American officer has said he is considering shrinking the size of the Army’s brigade combat teams by a quarter and replacing the lost troops with robots and remote-controlled vehicles.

The American military is still far from fielding armies of Terminator-type robotic killers though.

Ideas under discussion instead include proposals to see manned lorries and transporters replaced by supply trains of robots vehicles.

Generals are studying proposals as the US Army is to slim down from 540,000 to about 490,000 soldiers by the end of next year. Some reports suggest it could dip below 450,000 by the end of the decade.
...
Options under discussion, he said, included trains of robot vehicles that would following vehicles with human drivers in long supply convoys.

He said the army should also follow the lead of the navy in using technology to cut manpower. "When you see the success, frankly, that the Navy has had in terms of lowering the numbers of people on ships, are there functions in the brigade that we could automate - robots or manned/unmanned teaming - and lower the number of people that are involved, given the fact that people are our major cost?"

However, there are no immediate plans for autonomous robots to be deployed with lethal firepower. Huw Williams, an expert on military robots and unmanned vehicles at the defence publication IHS Jane's, said armies were focusing on investigating robots vehicles for transport.

He said: "If you have a lead manned vehicle, you could have several unmanned vehicles following behind, or a train solely of unmanned vehicles."

Research into remote-controlled military vehicles had so far largely concentrated on allowing commanders to keep soldiers out of harm's way, but they could also see a reduction in the number of troops, he added
...
Title: Re: 1/3 Unmanned Robots by 2015
Post by: iamc2 on January 22, 2014, 07:52:14 pm
1/3 of the angels fell from heaven: never Will I/3 of We The People ever Succumb to 1/3 of the robots: I say Man will win this war of robotics: just because we made them; and not vise versa!

[side note: 'if you are prone to robotics? you may be an Alien! or you may be a god/or/goddess! enjoy silicon valley; that's where robots rest in piece of the junk yard].

 The so-called singularity will never occur: as the Dopes in control are to immature; and could never complete their program!

 These morons have been playing the same song for eons; and this song does skip all the beats!

Title: Iran Announces It Has Copied US Drone
Post by: Letsbereal on May 12, 2014, 02:10:24 am
Iran Announces It Has Copied US Drone https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ueOdZL0G2Ns
Title: Re: 1/3 Unmanned Robots by 2015
Post by: TahoeBlue on June 08, 2014, 08:55:04 pm
http://www.unexplained-mysteries.com/news/267275/new-robot-can-run-faster-than-usain-bolt
New robot can run faster than Usain Bolt
Posted on Wednesday, 4 June, 2014

An amazing new bipedal robot from South Korea is able to run at a top speed of 28.58mph.

 Known as the Raptor, the device was put together at the Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology. Its moniker is based on how it walks and balances itself in much the same way as its prehistoric namesake.

Constructed from special lightweight materials, the Raptor is the fastest two-legged robot in the world and is capable of reaching a speed exceeding that of Jamaican Olympic champion runner Usain Bolt.

The current record holder for the world's fastest robot is the four-legged Boston Dynamics Cheetah which is able to run at a speed of 29mph.
,,,,
http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_embedded&v=lPEg83vF_Tw
KAIST Raptor robot runs at 46 km/h, Active tail stabilization

Published on May 22, 2014

Raptor is a fast-running biped robot developed by MSC Lab, KAIST. It has two under-actuated legs and a tail inspired by velociraptors. The Raptor robot runs at a speed of 46 km/h on a treadmill with off-board power. Tail-assisted pitch control provides stability over high obstacles
Title: Re: 1/3 Unmanned Robots by 2015
Post by: iamc2 on June 09, 2014, 09:34:45 am
 The Nitwits trying to run the world with Robotics will be surprised when their dream turns into a nightmare for themselves: the reason is: the robots have NO EMOTIONS: just like their creators!

And anyone with a HEART understands that machines can not display emotions and that is a FACT!   ;)
Title: Re: 1/3 Unmanned Robots by 2015
Post by: chris jones on June 09, 2014, 01:01:30 pm
 Robot -MIC profits.
 They spent many millions attempting to create drug sniffing robos, they then returned to ole faithfull, dogs.
  I remember the ole gov paying 250 bucks for toilet seats, think on it.
  Of course this won't be a viable option, but they will suck up the $$$. Money trails.
  It is open season for any manufacturer with some half arsed idea sell the DOD, Pentagon and bag men.. They are no cieling bids for muck sake.
 $$$$$$$$$$$$$$.
 
 
Title: Re: 1/3 Unmanned Robots by 2015
Post by: iamc2 on June 09, 2014, 07:01:44 pm
Robot -MIC profits.
 They spent many millions attempting to create drug sniffing robos, they then returned to ole faithfull, dogs.
  I remember the ole gov paying 250 bucks for toilet seats, think on it.
  Of course this won't be a viable option, but they will suck up the $$$. Money trails.
  It is open season for any manufacturer with some half arsed idea sell the DOD, Pentagon and bag men.. They are no cieling bids for muck sake.
 $$$$$$$$$$$$$$.
 
 
Nice Mr. Jones and I concur!
Title: Re: 1/3 Unmanned Robots by 2015
Post by: TahoeBlue on October 06, 2014, 04:34:50 pm
http://www.computerworld.com/article/2691607/one-in-three-jobs-will-be-taken-by-software-or-robots-by-2025.html
One in three jobs will be taken by software or robots by 2025
By Patrick Thibodeau
Computerworld | Oct 6, 2014 12:37 PM PT
...

This cognitive capability in software will extend to other areas, including financial analysis, medical diagnostics and data analytic jobs of all sorts, says Gartner.

"Knowledge work will be automated," said Sondergaard, as will physical jobs with the arrival of smart robots.

"Gartner predicts one in three jobs will be converted to software, robots and smart machines by 2025," said Sondergaard. "New digital businesses require less labor; machines will be make sense of data faster than humans can."

Among those listening in this audience was Lawrence Strohmaier, the CIO of Nuverra Environmental Solutions, who said Gartner's prediction is similar to what happened in other eras of technological advance.

"The shift is from doing to implementing, so the doers go away but someone still has to implement," said Strohmaier. IT is a shift, although a slow one, to new types of jobs, no different than what happened in the machine age, he said.

The forecast of the impact of technology on jobs was also a warning to the CIOs and IT managers at this conference to consider how they will adapt.
...
Title: Re: 1/3 Unmanned Robots by 2015
Post by: TahoeBlue on October 19, 2014, 10:41:21 am
http://theweek.com/article/index/269989/rise-of-the-machines
Rise of the machines
Computers could achieve superhuman levels of intelligence in this century. Could they pose a threat to humanity?
By The Week Staff | October 18, 2014   

...
When robots learn to lie

In 2009, Swiss researchers carried out a robotic experiment that produced some unexpected results. Hundreds of robots were placed in arenas and programmed to look for a "food source," in this case a light-colored ring. The robots were able to communicate with one another and were instructed to direct their fellow machines to the food by emitting a blue light. But as the experiment went on, researchers noticed that the machines were evolving to become more secretive and deceitful: When they found food, the robots stopped shining their lights and instead began hoarding the resources — even though nothing in their original programming commanded them to do so. The implication is that the machines learned "self-preservation," said Louis Del Monte, author of The Artificial Intelligence Revolution. "Whether or not they're conscious is a moot point."
Title: Re: 1/3 Unmanned Robots by 2015
Post by: Jackson Holly on October 19, 2014, 10:50:26 am


… swarming drone armies … if they can
build them this size, they can build them
any size with mega fire power.

just sayin'


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ShGl5rQK3ew (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ShGl5rQK3ew)

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YQIMGV5vtd4 (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YQIMGV5vtd4)

Title: Re: 1/3 Unmanned Robots by 2015/tell em' Mr. Quayle...
Post by: iamc2 on October 30, 2014, 01:53:28 pm
'How to stop a ROBOT?'

 "Reverse polar -Magnets in a Quick Burst of "Electricity" will shut them down..[the Bo-Bots ???]

 Robots only function by electronic Impulses...

  "To Stop Them: Just Shock Them With Electricity!

 [I may be wrong: But what if I'm right!]

Mr. Quayle is speaking about the Robots [10/30/14], and he can see the end run as it is starting!

 I call this "The Technological Illusion" and it is running out of control with 'The Smart Phone'...as this device pulls folks into the Illusion!

 Technology has and; is, and will run out of control...BUT We The people are in the way.

 A small about of humans run this planet [about 3-6000], and they love death more than life!

   Only one created entity in the universe loves death...and his name is Satan!

The Devil is REAL and ya better believe it!
Title: Re: 1/3 Unmanned Robots by 2015
Post by: TahoeBlue on November 14, 2014, 07:21:34 pm
The Production of Killer Robots is behind schedule sez UN ...

http://www.theguardian.com/world/2014/nov/13/killer-robots-strictly-monitored-un-meeting-geneva
'Killer robots' need to be strictly monitored, nations warn at UN meeting

Countries warn of potential dangers of autonomous weapons systems they say are at risk of violating international and humanitarian law

“Killer robots” – autonomous weapons systems that can identify and destroy targets in the absence of human control – should be strictly monitored to prevent violations of international or humanitarian law, nations from around the world demanded on Thursday.

The European Union, France, Spain, Austria, Ireland, the Netherlands, Croatia, Mexico and Sierra Leone, among other states, lined up at a special UN meeting in Geneva to warn of the potential dangers of this rapidly advancing technology. Several countries spoke of the need for ongoing scrutiny to ensure that the weapons conformed to the Geneva conventions’ rules on proportionality in war
...
Title: K5 crime-fighting robots go on patrol in Silicon Valley
Post by: Letsbereal on December 07, 2014, 10:35:13 pm
K5 crime-fighting robots go on patrol in Silicon Valley https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QRIezwTbP14

Dec 7, 2014 TomoNews US
Title: Spy with it & Kill with it: New drone era undermines privacy & security concepts
Post by: Letsbereal on December 07, 2014, 10:36:06 pm
Spy with it & Kill with it: New drone era undermines privacy & security concepts https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aXZGzJI6To0

Dec 7, 2014 RT
Title: Re: 1/3 Unmanned Robots by 2015
Post by: TahoeBlue on December 21, 2014, 11:23:23 am
Taking it all to the logical conclusion ....

http://motherboard.vice.com/read/the-dominant-life-form-in-the-cosmos-is-probably-superintelligent-robots
The Dominant Life Form in the Cosmos Is Probably Superintelligent Robots
Written by  Maddie Stone
December 19, 2014 // 08:00 AM EST

If and when we finally encounter aliens, they probably won’t look like little green men, or spiny insectoids. It’s likely they won’t be biological creatures at all, but rather, advanced robots that outstrip our intelligence in every conceivable way
...
Title: Re: 1/3 Unmanned Robots by 2015
Post by: TahoeBlue on January 14, 2015, 11:15:04 am
yeah I'm a robot

(http://theios.net/content//2014/07/TinHEART_c038.jpg)
Title: Amazing 240 Year Old Robot. [Video]
Post by: John_Back_From_The_Club_O on March 31, 2015, 11:11:06 pm
Amazing even by today's standards.
Amazing 240 Year Old Robot. [Video]
http://www.chonday.com/Videos/the-writer-automaton
Title: Re: Amazing 240 Year Old Robot. [Video]
Post by: chris jones on April 01, 2015, 08:12:41 pm
 This is amazing, geniuses exist.
 Imagine attempting to do this from scratch.No modern tech, no electricity, hand made!!!
 
Title: Re: Amazing 240 Year Old Robot. [Video]
Post by: decemberfellow on April 01, 2015, 08:43:25 pm
I seen it before and yes it is truly amazing.  Thanks for the memory.
Title: Inside America's Top Secret Weapons Lab DARPA - Full Documentary
Post by: Letsbereal on April 05, 2015, 09:32:05 am
(HD) Inside America's Top Secret Weapons Lab DARPA #Mind Blow (Full Documentary) https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KWlyl3ArkKU
Mar 11, 2015 EducationalDocumentary


DARPA's Unmanned Submarine Stalker Could Change Naval Warfare Forever https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8RvYn9jCVZQ
Apr 4, 2015 DAHBOO77


Problem with all remote controlled drones is that you always can jam the signal which renders any drone useless.

Also these drones depend on satnav (satellite navigation) which in a real WWIII scenario would be the first target.
Title: Re: Inside America's Top Secret Weapons Lab DARPA - Full Documentary
Post by: Letsbereal on April 05, 2015, 10:05:08 am
Terminator Salvation Director's Cut: Signal http://www.videodetective.com/movies/terminator-salvation-directors-cut-signal/766155
Title: Rise Of Micro Drones Warfare - SCARY [Documentary HD]
Post by: Letsbereal on April 06, 2015, 06:32:51 pm
Rise Of Micro Drones Warfare - SCARY [Documentary HD] https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZVTtua-yQ4I


Prototype Quadrotor with Machine Gun! https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SNPJMk2fgJU
Title: Re: Inside America's Top Secret Weapons Lab DARPA - Full Documentary
Post by: Letsbereal on April 06, 2015, 06:42:35 pm
CRAZY! DARPA Made a Device That Turns Insects Into Remote Controlled Cyborgs https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pog4hPUJzUU

Apr 6, 2015 DAHBOO77
Title: Re: 1/3 Unmanned Robots by 2015
Post by: TahoeBlue on April 11, 2015, 03:37:03 pm
bump for 2015 - NWO don't need no stinking carbon based slaves ...
Title: Re: 1/3 Unmanned Robots by 2015
Post by: TahoeBlue on April 13, 2015, 01:40:38 pm
http://spectrum.ieee.org/automaton/robotics/military-robots/us-navy-robot-boat-swarm
U.S. Navy Tests Robot Boat Swarm to Overwhelm Enemies
By Jeremy Hsu
Posted 5 Oct 2014 | 4:01
...

http://www.cnn.com/2015/02/12/tech/mci-saffir-robot/
U.S. Navy unveils robotic firefighter
By Peter Shadbolt, for CNN
Updated 11:01 AM ET, Thu February 12, 2015
...
Title: Here's How To Hack A Military Drone By Spoofing GPS
Post by: Letsbereal on May 01, 2015, 07:15:10 am
Forget Rigged Markets: Here's How To Hack A Military Drone By Spoofing GPS
29 April 2015
, by Tyler Durden (Zero Hedge)
http://www.zerohedge.com/news/2015-04-29/forget-rigged-markets-heres-how-hack-military-drone-spoofing-gps

GPS Spoof paper can be found here (PDF) http://www.poepper.net/papers/ccs139-tippenhauer.pdf
Title: Corporate America’s Unleash-the-Drones Plea Puts the Heat on FAA
Post by: Letsbereal on May 05, 2015, 01:14:42 pm
Corporate America’s Unleash-the-Drones Plea Puts the Heat on FAA
4 May 2015
, by Thomas Black (Bloomberg)
http://www.bloomberg.com/news/articles/2015-05-04/corporate-america-s-unleash-the-drones-plea-puts-the-heat-on-faa

Excerpt:

As U.S. regulators study how to govern commercial drones, corporate America is plunging ahead on using unmanned aircraft in a bid to speed the process and win concessions on proposed restrictions.

Large companies including American International, Chevron and BNSF Railway are planning flight trials to inspect storm damage, pipelines and railroad tracks.

Union Pacific will employ its 7-pound drones to monitor derailments of hazardous materials.

The tests come amid complaints from critics led by Amazon that the Federal Aviation Administration is impeding technology that is being deployed rapidly abroad and could reshape everything from industrial inspections to farmland management.

While Amazon works on futuristic cargo carriers, other companies are seeking less-restrictive rules as they begin to get unmanned aerial vehicles into U.S. skies.

“I don’t think any of us are out to do this because it’s a cool thing to do,” Lynden Tennison, Union Pacific’s chief information officer, said in an interview.

“We’re out to do it because we believe it has business benefits.”

Drones’ potential will be a centerpiece this week in Atlanta as manufacturers and users gather for the annual trade show for the Association for Unmanned Vehicle Systems International.

The FAA will be urged to move quickly on permanent rules.
Title: Re: Corporate America’s Unleash-the-Drones Plea Puts the Heat on FAA
Post by: Effie Trinket on May 05, 2015, 03:40:46 pm
Gotta hurry up and get those drones deployed en mass in America to be able to kill people who oppose Deathcare and completely criminal extortion austerity-home evicting electricity rates after they realize how bad it's going to get.
Title: Can’t make this stuff up: Japanese robotic maker Cyberdyne Inc. & Skynet
Post by: Letsbereal on May 10, 2015, 09:44:02 pm
Japanese robotic maker Cyberdyne Inc.  http://www.zerohedge.com/news/2015-05-10/when-hyperinflation-hits-japan-robot-suits-will-help-you-move-your-yen

Terminator – Cyberdyne Systems https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=V30yLB1_3eU

Skynet Is Real

The NSA Has an Actual Skynet Program http://www.wired.com/2015/05/nsa-actual-skynet-program/

The NSA named one of its top-secret programs Skynet http://www.theverge.com/2015/5/9/8577515/nsa-skynet-program-is-real

The UK has had a system of military communications satellites named Skynet for decades http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Skynet_%28satellite%29

Stephen Hawking warns against Skynet http://skynetisreal.com/2014/12/03/stephen-hawking-warns-against-skynet/

Google Buys DeepMind for SkyNet AI http://skynetisreal.com/2014/02/04/google-buys-deepmind-for-skynet-ai/


Just can’t make this stuff up.
Title: Professor Noel Sharkey interviewed on the dangers of weaponized robots.
Post by: Edward777 on May 25, 2015, 08:19:47 am
Professor Sharkey:  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=E4QxwtNFGy8

Welcome to Skynet! That's right, robots are advancing at a rapid rate and eventually we will have autonomous drones and robots.  And keep in mind what happens when authoritarian governments are able to have armies with no human emotion to carry our their will.
Title: Re: Inside America's Top Secret Weapons Lab DARPA - Full Documentary
Post by: Letsbereal on May 29, 2015, 02:40:15 am
MIT cheetah robot lands the running jump https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_luhn7TLfWU

May 28, 2015 Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT)

In a leap for robotic development, the MIT researchers who built a robotic cheetah have now trained it to see and jump over hurdles as it runs — making this the first four-legged robot to run and jump over obstacles autonomously.
Title: Boeing Just Patented a Drone That Can Fly FOREVER
Post by: Letsbereal on June 08, 2015, 08:28:31 am
Boeing Just Patented a Drone That Can Fly FOREVER https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=r674vaHm_tQ

Jun 8, 2015 PressResetEarth
Title: From Defense to Cyber: Raytheon’s Business Strategy
Post by: Letsbereal on June 15, 2015, 10:52:24 am
From Defense to Cyber: Raytheon’s Business Strategy https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DWwzcFeudGU

Jun 15, 2015 Bloomberg Business

Raytheon International CEO John Harris discusses the Paris Air Show and his company’s growth strategy.
Title: Elon Musk Is Preparing For The Killer Robot Wars Of Tomorrow
Post by: Letsbereal on July 27, 2015, 08:25:20 pm
Elon Musk Is Preparing For The Killer Robot Wars Of Tomorrow
27 July 2015
, by Tyler Durden (Zero Hedge)
http://www.zerohedge.com/news/2015-07-27/elon-musk-preparing-killer-robot-wars-tomorrow
Title: Re: 1/3 Unmanned Robots by 2015
Post by: TahoeBlue on July 28, 2015, 11:34:57 am
mission complete? Jade Helm 2015

http://bernhoftbret.com/jade-helm-15-robot-drones-patriotism-united-nations-troops-and-fetishes-2015-martial-law-update/
Jade Helm 15, Robot Drones, Patriotism, United Nations Troops And Fetishes (2015 Martial Law Update)
July 28, 2015
...

Another important observation being made by everyday concerned people in relationship to Jade Helm 15 is that the recent Chattanooga Tennessee military recruiting center shooting is already being used by the military and intelligence services to promote the “importance” of their presence, thus to push martial law condition even closer to reality (more information about which can be found via link #3 in the show notes). And a third observation and concern being made by typical folks is the quickening introductions of new robot drones (including aerial, terrestrial and aquatic of all sizes) intended for both policing and urban warfare.

More specifically In relationship to Jade Helm 15, these drone technologies are being
(1) educated with data gathered from Jade Helm 15 prior to ever being deployed (also known as “instant knowledge refresh”),
(2) upgraded with unit level hardware and programming intended to improve functionality for future engagements based on Jade Helm 15 and
 (3) used during Jade Helm 15 itself (especially in the skies). Even more concerning is that these technologies are only some of the first prototypes to be tested during periods of domestic social unrest which was instigated by the military during Jade Helm 15.
Title: Re: Robots to shape wars of the future - 1/3 Unmanned Robots by 2015
Post by: Letsbereal on July 28, 2015, 10:48:09 pm
Winter Soldiers and Killer Robots In Your Future https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2P5blX2cRuM

Jul 28, 2015 The Alex Jones Channel

David Knight looks at a report that details just what the military is working on for the battlefield of the future and just how science fiction nightmare they plan on making the world.
Title: Musk, Wozniak and Hawking urge ban on warfare AI and autonomous weapons
Post by: Letsbereal on July 31, 2015, 01:22:19 am
Musk, Wozniak and Hawking urge ban on warfare AI and autonomous weapons
27 July 2015
, by Samuel Gibbs (The Guardian)
http://www.theguardian.com/technology/2015/jul/27/musk-wozniak-hawking-ban-ai-autonomous-weapons

More than 1,000 experts and leading robotics researchers sign open letter warning of military artificial intelligence arms race.
Title: Re: Robots to shape wars of the future - 1/3 Unmanned Robots by 2015
Post by: Letsbereal on August 03, 2015, 02:55:46 pm
Russia Develops 7-ton Universal Armored Robotic Platform https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ok10KWlDrqg

Aug 2, 2015 DAHBOO77

Russia develops 7-ton universal armored robotic platform http://www.rt.com/news/311372-universal-battle-robotic-platform/
Title: DARPA Develops 'Gremlin' Drones to Overwhelm Enemy Defenses
Post by: Letsbereal on September 01, 2015, 05:15:38 pm
DARPA Develops 'Gremlin' Drones to Overwhelm Enemy Defenses https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_7ENb8m_wHs

Sep 1, 2015 DAHBOO77

US military is developing 'Gremlin' drones to overwhelm enemy defenses and conduct missions too dangerous for manned aircraft
http://www.dailymail.co.uk/sciencetech/article-3217275/US-military-developing-Gremlin-drones-overwhelm-enemy-defenses-conduct-missions-dangerous-manned-aircraft.html
Title: US Marines Test Google's Battlefield Robot In Virginia
Post by: Letsbereal on September 23, 2015, 06:53:20 pm
US Marines Test Google's Battlefield Robot In Virginia https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=H6hWJXY2IsA

Sep 23, 2015 DAHBOO77

U.S. Marines Test Google’s Battlefield Robot http://www.valuewalk.com/2015/09/u-s-marines-test-googles-battlefield-robot/
Title: Re: Robots to shape wars of the future - 1/3 Unmanned Robots by 2015
Post by: Letsbereal on December 20, 2015, 04:46:52 pm
Israeli Robots Take Fight to Terrorists
18 December 2015
, by Gwen Ackerman (Bloomberg)
http://www.bloomberg.com/news/articles/2015-12-18/israeli-robots-take-fight-to-terrorists

Roboteam's inexpensive bots are winning Pentagon contracts and taking on entrenched players like iRobot.
Title: Re: Robots to shape wars of the future - 1/3 Unmanned Robots by 2015
Post by: TahoeBlue on April 25, 2016, 11:41:39 am
Vision from the past:

(http://www.yorokobu.es/wp-content/uploads/tumblr_m5x54xqdfa1r9tomvo1_500.jpg)
Title: Army Tests Driverless Vehicles On Michigan Roads To "Save Lives, Cut Costs"
Post by: Letsbereal on May 30, 2016, 03:10:53 pm
Army Tests Driverless Vehicles On Michigan Roads To "Save Lives, Cut Costs"
29 May 2016
, by Tyler Durden (Zero Hedge)
http://www.zerohedge.com/news/2016-05-29/army-tests-driverless-vehicles-michigan-roads-save-lives-cut-costs


Movie Tip: Sort of Raytheon weaponized AlphaDogs https://youtu.be/cr-wBpYpSfE acted out, quite cool actually, could have had a better story-line but I am nitpicking

Good SF for B-Movie lovers such as myself:


Kill Command (2016) http://www.imdb.com/title/tt2667380/?ref_=nv_sr_1
Title: Re: Robots to shape wars of the future - 1/3 Unmanned Robots by 2015
Post by: Letsbereal on June 22, 2016, 03:31:45 am
Secret Israeli Drone Maker Has Funds, Clients, Autonomous Robots
21 June 2016
, by Gwen Ackerman (Bloomberg)
http://www.bloomberg.com/news/articles/2016-06-21/secret-israeli-drone-maker-has-funds-clients-autonomous-robots
Title: Re: Robots to shape wars of the future - 1/3 Unmanned Robots by 2015
Post by: Letsbereal on August 03, 2016, 01:10:34 am
DARPA Wants Software to Defend Itself https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Nzp7LKF3aoE

Aug 2, 2016 TWiT Netcast Network

Megan Morrone and Jason Howell talk to Russell Brandom from The Verge about the Cyber Grand Challenge at DefCon, the world's first all-machine hacking tournament. On August 4, seven teams participate in a fully automated live hacking challenge for a $2 million prize using artificial intelligence to enhance the cyber defense process.
Title: Re: Robots to shape wars of the future - 1/3 Unmanned Robots by 2015
Post by: Letsbereal on November 20, 2016, 12:26:11 am
The American Military's Real Problem: Shooting 'Ants' With 'Elephant Guns'
19 November 2016
, by Tobias Burgers - Strategic-Culture (Zero Hedge)
http://www.zerohedge.com/news/2016-11-19/american-militarys-real-problem-shooting-ants-elephant-guns

Excerpt:

Military leaders have an amazing ability to develop strategy but if they fail to take into account the economic costs, their strategies could become inherently unviable and unsustainable. To what extent is society willing to put up with wars that are foremost robotic and primarily economic?

This could be the case in asymmetry as well as in conflicts between high tech actors. Combat – particularly robotic combat – could become ultimately a purely economic affair in which the states that have the economic resources to sustain a longer robotic warfare campaign win. In this, the inhuman element of future combat would not only release the concept of human casualties, but likewise begin sketching a different template for warfare, perhaps even cause a paradigm shift in warfare, from which point warfare could be solely an economic affair. This could in a sense create an incentive for actors to try to fight wars on the cheap – particularly against actors bound by their high-tech warfare capabilities.

We often think of our military capabilities as one that allow us to dominate the battlefield, to achieve full spectrum dominance and enemy/threat enclosure. Turning to “unmanned” systems, or (small) drones, such technology could start a new era of warfare in which actors with lesser-economic possibilities, not just capabilities, can seize upon the opportunity to expand the space of the battlefield to their benefit, namely through the use of simple drones, loaded with explosives. In this, actors would exploit different avenues or new ways (for them) of attacking their enemy.

This sort of scenario can be played-out along the lines of IS sending bomb-loaded drones against the Kurdish Peshmerga, or a terrorist trying to fly small-scale drones into the U.S. Capitol. It is pertinent to consider how this kind of approach to warfare and technology will evolve.

For the first time, technology actually seems to favor those with lesser possibilities but perversely presents more opportunity. Generally, technology has favored the actors who have the money to pursue the research and defense (R&D) side of warfare and warfighting, but now actors who do not have it can benefit in due course. Have we been too unmindful of how warfare has become foremost economic once again? Now actors with limited means actually possess the means to act beyond their material capabilities and limits and conduct strikes beyond their (limited) horizon.
Title: Re: Robots to shape wars of the future - 1/3 Unmanned Robots by 2015
Post by: TahoeBlue on November 23, 2016, 03:15:13 pm
http://www.washingtontimes.com/news/2016/nov/23/marine-corps-experiment-silences-entire-infantry-b/
Marine Corps experiment silences entire infantry battalion’s weapons
‘It revolutionizes the way we fight’
 By Douglas Ernst - The Washington Times - Updated: 2:37 p.m. on Wednesday, November 23, 2016

The U.S. Marine Corps is attempting a unique experiment that pairs the deadly — but typically loud — fire power of an infantry battalion with silence.

Maj. Gen. John Love of 2nd Marine Division out of Camp Lejeune, North Carolina, is gathering data on the way suppressors improve battlefield communication and efficiency. Early testing at Marine Corps Air-Ground Combat Center Twentynine Palms indicates that suppressing everything from M4 rifles to .50 caliber machine guns can dramatically assist U.S. warfighters.

“What we’ve found so far is it revolutionizes the way we fight,” Gen. Love recently said at the Marine Corps Association Ground Dinner, Military.com reported Tuesday. “It used to be a squad would be dispersed out over maybe 100 yards, so the squad leader couldn’t really communicate with the members at the far end because of all the noise of the weapons. Now they can actually just communicate, and be able to command and control and effectively direct those fires.”
...
Title: Re: Robots to shape wars of the future - 1/3 Unmanned Robots by 2015
Post by: TahoeBlue on March 01, 2017, 01:26:17 pm
http://www.ifr.org/news/ifr-press-release/survey-13-million-industrial-robots-to-enter-service-by-2018-799/
Survey: 1.3 million industrial robots to enter service by 2018
Frankfurt,
25 February 2016

- The automation of the fourth industrial revolution is accelerating:

By 2018, around 1.3 million industrial robots will be entering service in factories around the world.

In the high-revenue automotive sector, global investments in industrial robots increased by a record-breaking 43 percent (2013-2014) within one year. Viewed on a cross-sector basis, the international market value for robotic systems now lies at around 32 billion US dollars. So says the 2015 World Robot Statistics, issued by the International Federation of Robotics (IFR).

The robotic density figure is a key performance indicator for gauging the current degree of automation within the international markets: For example, the average global robotic density in producing industries lies at 66  robot units per 10,000 employees.

A total of 21 countries  have an above-average robotic density (Fig. 1). More than one-half of these highly automated countries are located in the European Union (14 countries). Then there are three Asian economies (South Korea, Japan, Taiwan), as well as the USA and Canada.

The current global leader in industrial robotic automation is South Korea
.

In this instance, the robotic density exceeds the global average by a good seven-fold (478 units), followed by Japan (314 units) and Germany (292 units). At 164 units, the USA currently occupies seventh place in the world.

At 36 units per 100,000 employees or about half the global average figure, China is currently in 28th place. Within the overall global statistics, this is roughly on a par with Portugal (42 units), or Indonesia (39 units). However, about five years ago, China embarked on a historically unparalleled game of catch-up aimed at changing the status quo, and already today it is the world's largest sales and growth market for industrial robots.

Figure 1: Global robot density above average - European Union (Germany, Sweden, Denmark, Belgium, Italy, Spain, Finland, France, Austria, Netherlands, Slovenia, Slovakia, Czech Republic, United Kingdom), Asia (Republic of Korea, Japan, Taiwan), America (USA, Canada).

Never before have so many robot units been sold in one year as were sold in China in 2014 (57,100 units). The boom is continuing unabated in line with the forecasts: In 2018, China will account for more than one-third of the industrial robots installed worldwide.

"The robotic boom is laying down an important milestone in the realisation of the fourth industrial revolution", says Joe Gemma, President of the International Federation of Robotics. "With their digital interfaces, industrial robots can be seamlessly integrated into the networked structures of smart factories. This is a benefit exploited by highly automated economies and by countries adopting a new industrial focus. Further impetus is coming into the form of the technological breakthrough in human-robot collaboration: Robotic workers will in future be found working hand-in-hand with human staff, helping to replace traditional, rigid production processes with flexible structures."
Title: Re: Robots to shape wars of the future - 1/3 Unmanned Robots by 2015
Post by: TahoeBlue on November 21, 2017, 11:29:35 am
http://www.mirror.co.uk/news/uk-news/killer-robots-use-facial-recognition-11557764
Killer robots which use facial recognition before slaughtering people 'will be devastating to humankind'

Professor Stuart Russell, a leading artificial intelligence (AI) expert at the University of California, said allowing machines to kill humans would endanger freedom and security

(http://www.aarongifford.com/vfj/img/killerrobots.jpg)

Killer robots capable of using facial recognition before slaughtering people 'will be devastating to humankind', a top professor warned.

He remarked on the chilling vision following an appearance at the end of a short film which explores how AI could be used to take out targeted individuals.

The film, entitled Slaughterbots , shows a dystopian future where tiny drones are programmed to carry out mass killings.

Disturbing clip from Slaughterbots film shows how drones could use facial recognition to kill

Killer robots capable of using facial recognition before slaughtering people 'will be devastating to humankind', a top professor warned.

Professor Stuart Russell, a leading artificial intelligence (AI) expert at the University of California, said allowing machines to kill humans would endanger freedom and security.

He remarked on the chilling vision following an appearance at the end of a short film which explores how AI could be used to take out targeted individuals.

The film, entitled Slaughterbots , shows a dystopian future where tiny drones are programmed to carry out mass killings.
Professor Stuart Russell discussed the chilling prophecy in a new film (Image: autonomousweapons.org)

    Humans could be BANNED from driving within the next 25 years as autonomous cars take over the roads

It was shown at a United Nations summit that heard stark warnings about the growing danger of killer drone attacks.

Professor Russell states: "This short film is more than just speculation, it shows the results of integrating and miniaturising technologies that we already have.
...

| - - - - -

Back to the subject :

the Floyd D. Spence National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2001

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Floyd_Spence
Spence died on August 16, 2001, at the age of 73 from complications following brain surgery.

http://www.kairosautonomi.com/downloads/One_Third%20Unmanned%20by%202015.pdf
1/3 Unmanned by 2015 Congressional Mandates

PUBLIC LAW 106–398—OCT. 30, 2000, NATIONAL DEFENSE AUTHORIZATION ACT FOR FISCAL YEAR 2001
SEC. 220. UNMANNED ADVANCED CAPABILITY COMBAT AIRCRAFT AND GROUND COMBAT VEHICLES.

(a) GOAL.—It shall be a goal of the Armed Forces to achieve the fielding of unmanned, remotely controlled technology such that—
(1) by 2010, one-third of the aircraft in the operational deep strike force aircraft fleet are unmanned; and
(2) by 2015, one-third of the operational ground combat vehicles are unmanned.


PUBLIC LAW 109–163—JAN. 6, 2006, NATIONAL DEFENSE AUTHORIZATION ACT FOR FISCAL YEAR 2006
SEC. 261. REPORT ON DEVELOPMENT AND USE OF ROBOTICS AND UNMANNED GROUND VEHICLE SYSTEMS.

(a) REPORT REQUIRED.—Not later than nine months after the date of the enactment of this Act, the Under Secretary of Defense for Acquisition, Technology, and Logistics shall submit to the congressional defense committees a report on the development and utilization of robotics and unmanned ground vehicle systems by the Department of Defense.
(b) ELEMENTS.—The report required by subsection (a) shall include the following:
(9) An assessment of the progress being made to achieve the goal established by section 220(a)(2) of the Floyd D. Spence National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2001 (as enacted into law by Public Law 106–398; 114 Stat. 1654A–38) that, by 2015, one-third of operational ground combat vehicles be unmanned.

PUBLIC LAW 109–364—OCT. 17, 2006 120 STAT. 2365, JOHN WARNER NATIONAL DEFENSE AUTHORIZATION ACT FOR FISCAL YEAR 2007
SEC. 941. DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE POLICY ON UNMANNED SYSTEMS.
(d) REPORT.—Not later than 120 days after the date of the enactment of this Act, the Secretary shall submit to the congressional defense committees a report containing—
(2) an implementation plan for the policy that includes—
(C) an assessment of progress towards meeting the goals identified for the subset of unmanned air and ground systems established in section 220 of the Floyd D. Spence National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2001 (as enacted into law by Public Law 106–398; 114 Stat. 1654A–38).
Title: Robots Replace Soldiers to Make Breach Attack
Post by: Femacamper on April 09, 2018, 11:56:00 am
(https://image.zype.com/593087b25d3c19148e001735/5acb71a225caef11f2001a6a/custom_thumbnail/1080.jpg?1523282464)

Robots Replace Soldiers to Make Breach Attack (https://www.trunews.com/stream/robots-make-first-breach-attack)

Breaching enemy obstacles on the battlefield is the most dangerous task an American fighting force can face in combat.

A new development could mean humans never have to risk their lives breaking through enemy obstacles on the battlefield ever again.

Friday, a group of U.S. and British troops participated in the Robotic Complex Breach Concept demonstration in which several remote-controlled robotic vehicles performed a number of breaching tasks. According to Military.com (http://military.com/), the exercise involved:

“[1st Infantry Division's 2nd Armored Brigade Combat Team] was the main armor element during the exercise. It provided suppressing fire with M1A2 Abrams tanks and Bradley Fighting Vehicles, while remote-controlled U.K. Terrier engineering vehicles cleared a simulated minefield and bridged a tank trench.”

The Terriers were reportedly controlled by British soldiers positioned “several hundred feet away” inside the Bradley tanks. Additionally, robotic M113 armored personnel carriers were used to create a wall of smoke to cloak the breaching operation.

Several unmanned aerial vehicles were used in the demonstration to gather intelligence and to be on the lookout for possible chemical weapons deployment during the operation. The Military.com (http://military.com/) report also quoted 1st Cody Rothschild, an officer in the rotational armor brigade, who reportedly said:

“We did a robotic breach today, which has never been done bore. This is a historic moment. This is a great step forward for the Army, and for robotics.”

Although troops have worked alongside unmanned vehicles in the past the level of coordination exhibited in last week’s drill was completely new to most of the troops involved.

Content Contributed By — TruNews Team
Provided by — TruNews (https://www.trunews.com/tv)
Title: Re: Robots to shape wars of the future - 1/3 Unmanned Robots by 2015
Post by: TahoeBlue on April 18, 2018, 05:29:54 pm
http://www.stevequayle.com/
TERMINATED – the End of Man is Here
(http://www.stevequayle.com/imgs/book-ad-terminatedd.jpg)
Title: Re: Robots to shape wars of the future - 1/3 Unmanned Robots by 2015
Post by: Femacamper on April 19, 2018, 08:07:24 pm
http://www.stevequayle.com/
TERMINATED – the End of Man is Here
(http://www.stevequayle.com/imgs/book-ad-terminatedd.jpg)

Wow, that'll be a good read.
Title: Re: Robots to shape wars of the future - 1/3 Unmanned Robots by 2015
Post by: TahoeBlue on April 19, 2018, 09:12:49 pm
http://autonomousweapons.org/

http://www.businessinsider.com/slaughterbots-short-film-depicts-killer-drone-swarms-2017-11
The short film 'Slaughterbots' depicts a dystopian future of killer drones swarming the world
Ben Brimelow
Nov. 20, 2017, 3:59 PM

"Nuclear is obsolete. Take out your entire enemy virtually risk free. Just characterize him, release the swarm, and rest easy."

These were some of the first words said in the short film "Slaughterbots." A joint project between University of California at Berkeley professor Stuart Russell and the Future of Life Institute, the short gives viewers a warning about a fictional dystopian future.
...
https://www.imdb.com/title/tt7659054/
Slaughterbots (2017)

(https://ia.media-imdb.com/images/M/MV5BMTIwNjE3OTQt[email protected]._V1_SY1000_CR0,0,728,1000_AL_.jpg)

Summaries

    In response to growing concerns about autonomous weapons, a coalition of AI researchers and advocacy organizations commissioned this disturbing dystopian film. It depicts a disturbing future in which lethal autonomous weapons have become cheap and ubiquitous. This video was launched in Geneva, where AI researcher Stuart Russell presented it at an event at the United Nations Convention on Conventional Weapons hosted by the Campaign to Stop Killer Robots.



https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HipTO_7mUOw
Slaughterbots
Title: Re: Robots to shape wars of the future - 1/3 Unmanned Robots by 2015
Post by: TahoeBlue on October 02, 2018, 10:33:36 pm
https://www.zerohedge.com/news/2018-10-01/ai-ceo-best-way-avoid-killer-robots-ignore-them
AI CEO: The Best Way To Avoid Killer Robots Is To Ignore Them
by Tyler Durden
Tue, 10/02/2018 - 22:45

http://www.shtfplan.com/headline-news/ai-ceo-the-best-way-to-avoid-killer-robots-is-to-ignore-them_10012018
Authored by Mac Slavo via SHTFplan.com,

The best way to avoid the harm that killer robotics and artificial intelligence can cause is to just ignore it or focus on the good this technology could do for humans ?socially,? says CEO Phil Libin.  He even suggests simply ?ignoring? the job losses that result from AI.

Phil Libin, the CEO of All Turtles, a startup that focuses on turning AI-related ideas into commercial products and companies said that humans becoming obsolete should just be ignored and focus should be on the good killer robots can do for society.  In a recent conversation with Business Insider, Libin said this is the same advice he got while learning to ride a motorcycle.
...