911 and FOX; Terminator: The Sarah Connor Chronicles

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Online Letsbereal

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911 and FOX; Terminator: The Sarah Connor Chronicles
« on: February 21, 2009, 04:03:01 am »
They even had some preliminary programming (In a good way this time cause it's the truth)  in it especially in season one where they had a drum of Kerosene in the house under the stairs (With the clear print KEROSENE on it).

They let you see it clearly.

Later they had to destroy one of the terminated robots and they say something like " We only can use THERMATE because that's the only thing which burns hot enough to destroy the metal Robot :o

Later in the series not much of this "Putting it in your face" 911 stuff, guess the spooks saw it and forbid the writer to play with it any longer.




Experts Warn of "Terminator"-Style Military-Robot Rebellion - Fox News
http://www.foxnews.com/story/0,2933,496309,00.html

Problem with FOX they are so very bored cause they are not allowed to come up with real issues that they invent them themselves.

But actually they didn't invent them cause I happen to watch the FOX Terminator: The Sarah Connor Chronicles series in which this issue is displayed.

This guy sitting is a learning Robot and the other guy has to learn him to be human.

If some of you folks following this serie saw more please report.

(BTW; I like the very gloomy dramatical Sarah Chronicles series)



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Re: 911 and FOX; Terminator: The Sarah Connor Chronicles
« Reply #1 on: March 01, 2009, 12:07:26 am »
Myself think that the most 100% clinical scientific proof which can't be denied is the findings of THERMATE under the microscope by Professor Steven Jones
http://video.google.nl/videoplay?docid=-3187210261278689551

If you deny this than your not in reality any more.
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Re: 911 and FOX; Terminator: The Sarah Connor Chronicles
« Reply #2 on: March 12, 2009, 09:26:04 pm »
The new war machine
7 March 2009,
By Stephen Cave - The Financial Times
http://www.ft.com/cms/s/2/613860da-09dd-11de-add8-0000779fd2ac.html?ftcamp=rss

Androids are slowly taking the place of human soldiers in today’s battlefields. But who will stand at the dock if, while in combat, they commit crimes against humanity?

Moral Machines: Teaching Robots Right from Wrong

By Wendell Wallach and Colin Allen
OUP £15.99 288 pages

Wired for War: The Robotics Revolution and Conflict in the 21st Century
By PW Singer
Penguin Press $29.95 512 pages
FT Bookshop price: £15.99

War Bots: How US Military Robots Are Transforming War in Iraq Afghanistan, and the Future

By David Axe
Nimble Books $28.36 88 pages


Trooper Talon doesn’t get tired or hungry. He doesn’t get scared and he doesn’t panic under fire. He fights on even when, all around him, his comrades are falling. He never forgets his orders, never gets distracted, never even blinks. Unfortunately for the rest of his platoon, he has one flaw: after eight hours in the field, his batteries run out.

Talon is a robot. He is the future of warfare and, with more than 12,000 robotic machines already deployed in Iraq, he is also the present. These machines range from the briefcase-sized PackBot that can scope a house for potential enemies, to the 35m wingspan Global Hawk spy-plane that can survey half of Iraq in one flight. They are doing some of the difficult, dull and dangerous jobs that once cost soldiers’ lives. And since 2002, when a Predator drone assassinated al-Qaeda leader Abu Ali al-Harithi, they are also doing the killing.

While our destructive power is launching into this science-fiction future, however, our principles are stuck in the trenches. There is no precedent for an android to stand in the dock for war crimes. And the Geneva Conventions don’t tell us who to blame when an automaton makes a lethal error, such as when US Patriot missile batteries shot down two allied aircraft in Iraq in 2003, killing two Britons and one American.

We are in the midst of a revolution in the way we wage war, as profound as the discovery of gunpowder or the building of the atomic bomb. Yet most of us hardly know it’s happening – and our legal and moral frameworks are entirely unprepared. But a few people have noticed: three fascinating and timely new books detail these developments and the issues they raise.

The American invasion of Afghanistan in 2001 was the first war in which “many of the forces still rode to battle on horses, and yet robotic drones were flying above,” explains PW Singer, senior fellow at US thinktank the Brookings Institution.

Talon, an all-purpose robot that looks like a dentist’s lamp on caterpillar tracks, was first deployed there for reconnaissance missions – dangerous work that was done by allies within Afghanistan until, as one soldier told Singer: “We began to run out of Afghans.” They were soon also assigned to dispose of the roadside bombs that cost the lives of so many allied soldiers. They proved such a success that by 2008 there were 2,000 in the field, and manufacturer Foster-Miller secured a $400m contract to double that number.

Talon impressed the US Army so much that they cloned him to make his evil twin. Built on the same chassis, Swords can carry a selection of lethal weapons, from assault rifles to grenade launchers. His makers boast that in target practice, “The robot hit the bulls-eye of the target 70 out of 70 tries.” However, though sent to Iraq in 2007, Swords have not been deployed because, writes journalist David Axe in War Bots, “They had a tendency to spin out of control.” But Swords have already been upgraded: expect to see its more stable successor, Maars, in an urban war-zone near you soon.

Axe’s War Bots is a slim, introductory volume. Light on text, its primary virtue is the full-colour pictures showing the droids in action. PW Singer, on the other hand, has written what is likely to be the definitive work on this subject for some time to come. He has a record of drawing out the underlying trends in modern warfare, with previous books on child soldiers and the increasing use of mercenaries. Wired for War will confirm his reputation: it is riveting and comprehensive, encompassing every aspect of the rise of military robotics, from the historical to the ethical.

While writing it, Singer was also co-ordinating the Obama presidential campaign’s defence policy taskforce. So perhaps it is no coincidence that the new US President has already announced his intention to see “greater investment in advanced technology, ranging from the revolutionary, like Unmanned Aerial Vehicles” to “electronic warfare capabilities.” Enormous sums are being invested – $230bn in the US Army’s Future Combat Systems programme alone. Clearly the warbot business will continue to boom.

The logic of moving to unmanned systems is compelling, as Singer makes clear. First, they are saving soldiers’ lives. He describes how the robot-makers’ offices are covered with thank-you letters from soldiers with messages such as: “This little guy saved our butts.” Second, they should also save civilian lives – unlike a hot-headed human trooper, robots don’t panic, don’t get greedy, and don’t set out to avenge their dead buddies. Combined with their accuracy, they promise less collateral damage.

So why is it that the prospect of robot armies makes us nervous? Perhaps we are unduly influenced by a diet of Daleks and Terminator movies. In fact, the use of robotic systems has been growing steadily since the second world war, when the Germans’ V-2 ballistic missile and the Allies’ automated Norden bombsight first took to the skies. The latter was an analogue computer that took over the decision for when to fire and was used to drop the atomic bomb on Hiroshima.

In the intervening decades, robots have become vastly more sophisticated – but they accomplish very specific tasks. Overall, Talon, Swords and others are still less bright than the average garden snail. They may take a wrong turn or identify the wrong target, but they won’t take over the world or enslave the human race.

Robots are currently given little autonomy – even the soldiers who use them feel nervous about machine guns with ideas of their own roaming the battlefield. But the pressure is on to give them a longer leash. A robot can react far faster than a human. If a platoon is being sniped at, a robot with infrared vision can instantly see where the shot came from and fire on the attacker before he can even duck. But if a human controller has to sanction every shot, the sniper will be long gone.

There are also personnel savings. At present, every robot plane flying high over Iraq has a flesh-and-blood pilot sitting in a box in Nevada holding the joy-stick; every Talon has a soldier with a remote control. That’s an expensive package – which would be more efficient if robots could get on with their work alone. And soon, human operators simply won’t be able to keep up, explains Singer. The coming robots “will be too fast, too small, too numerous, and will create an environment too complex for humans to direct”. So the machines will have to go solo.

And that is what should worry us. No matter how clever we make them, these robots will make mistakes. As Singer points out, current Artificial Intelligence systems struggle to tell the difference between an apple and a tomato – how could they distinguish between civilian and insurgent? Yet “the law is simply silent”, he writes, on whether autonomous robots can have a licence to kill, and what should happen if they shoot the wrong man. If a human is somewhere in the decision-making loop, legal accountability can be established. When machines go it alone, accountability disappears – and with it the rule of law. Which is why philosophers Wendell Wallach and Colin Allen are asking how we can persuade robots to do the right thing. The result, in their seminal, but stodgy, book Moral Machines, makes clear just how far we have to go.

They start by exploring the science fiction writer Isaac Asimov’s famous Three Laws of Robotics: that a robot must not injure a human; must obey the orders of a human; and must protect its own existence. But Asimov himself, in his short stories on this theme, showed the contradictions and limitations of these laws. What happens, for example, if two humans give opposing orders?

So the authors turn instead to classical moral theory for help, exploring whether, for example, a robot could be programmed to be a good utilitarian and act to maximise happiness and minimise suffering. Once again they are disappointed: any system would be paralysed by the massive, open-ended calculations required – assuming we could even agree how to measure happiness and suffering. Wallach and Allen ruefully conclude that “with respect to computability ... the moral principles proposed by philosophers leave much to be desired”. The best we can do for now, they believe, is try to make sure that any super-tough, gun-toting androids are at least basically friendly.

Singer agrees: one solution, he suggests, would be to allow robots autonomous use of only non-lethal weapons. There are plenty on offer, ranging from incapacitating goo-guns, which immobilise targets, to microwave pain-rays. The robots could also be armed with more destructive weapons but for use only against the enemy’s hardware, not the people, he argues. Only with the authorisation of a flesh-and-blood – and legally accountable – soldier could lethal force be directed against a human.

These are excellent suggestions. But, with robot planes already dropping bombs on built-up areas, this would require a big shift from present-day practice. Current leaders in the field of high-tech weaponry, such as the US, may be reluctant to tie their hands with such restrictions.

But the world’s only superpower should realise that it might not lead for long. China produces three times as many engineering graduates a year as the US. And so-called “first movers” in new technologies pay heavily for initial development – those who come later can piggy-back on their research and learn from their mistakes. Also, many military robot systems are based on commercially available models – the Marcbot, for example, a small reconnaissance robot used widely by the US in Iraq, was developed from a popular remote-controlled toy car. If terrorists want to build their own droid army, they can order the parts from the internet. Regulating the robots therefore, is in the interests of the west as much as the rest of the world.

We have an ignoble history of deploying destructive new technologies before considering the consequences. Frankenstein visions of mechanical killers hunting down the last survivors of the human race are not entirely mad. But the robotics revolution is only just beginning: if we act now to update the laws of war, we can still avoid the worst-case scenarios. And, who knows, we might even dream of a day when wars will be fought entirely by machines – and the killing of a single human being would constitute a war crime.



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zafada

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Re: 911 and FOX; Terminator: The Sarah Connor Chronicles
« Reply #3 on: March 12, 2009, 10:12:42 pm »
This is one of my favorite series.  I have always loved the terminator.

Basically the only shows I watch are Chuck (ironic eh?), Heroes, Medium, Sarah Connor, Family Guy, American Dad, and South Park.

Connor beats em all though.  I love everything about it.

Online Letsbereal

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Re: 911 and FOX; Terminator: The Sarah Connor Chronicles
« Reply #4 on: April 05, 2009, 06:44:04 pm »
One step for a robot, a giant leap for tin-mankind
4 April 2009,
Leo Lewis in Tokyo From The Times
http://technology.timesonline.co.uk/tol/news/tech_and_web/gadgets_and_gaming/article6032128.ece

Photo: Robots may be able to walk - but Japan wants them to do it on the Moon

The cutting-edge models can lumber around a room without falling over. A few can play the trumpet or serve tea. The truly sophisticated ones can just about manage the washing-up.

But by 2020, Japan predicts, humanoid robots will be ready to colonise the Moon. Other metallic brethren of these mechanical pioneers, said scientists in Tokyo, will be engaged in the bigger, more prosaic mission of cleaning Earth’s orbit of junk.

The first draft of the ambitious plan emerged yesterday from a Japanese task force on space and lunar exploration – a team of experts from various fields answering directly to Taro Aso, the country’s cartoon-loving Prime Minister, and charged with beefing up Japan’s space programme.

The group’s remit was to draft a five-year plan on the development and exploitation of space – a programme for action that was initially to have included the goal of putting a human Japanese astronaut on the Moon within the next 20 years. In the latest plans, though, robots have inherited the prime position in Japan’s first – and still unconstructed – lunar lander.Experts have been arguing for years that the country’s aim should be to develop humanoid robots to the point where they are capable of everything people can do, and more.

For fans of Japanese manga comics it also makes perfect sense: space colonisation by robots is depicted in dozens of titles every week. And yet Japan’s leading robotics experts are painfully aware of how immature the science really is. The Honda engineer Masato Hirose endured 20 years of frustration before making the Asimo robot walk upright on two legs.

Tomomasa Sato, the head of Tokyo University’s faculty of mechano-informatics and the current chairman of the Japan Robotics Association, was equally realistic about how far robots can go with current technology.

“The next stage is to be able to tell a robot to go and fetch something from somewhere in the house and bring it back without breaking it,” he said. “It is at the limit of our science.”

The panel will continue to work on the proposals until later this month, with the final recommendations likely to be formalised next month. The eye-catching plans to land robots on the Moon, though, are likely to be joined by a series of more pragmatic proposals relating to the use of space for defence. The panel has already mooted building a space-based sensor system to detect the launch of a ballistic missile, and has suggested that satellites be used to help to track natural disasters in Asia.

Japan’s renewed fascination with space has generated a rich flow of ideas. The Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency said recently that it was working on a satellite-based robot that could start work on cleaning up some of the 10,000 pieces of man-made space debris circling in orbit and threatening the wellbeing of passing satellites. The proposed robot janitor would extend conductive cable several kilometres in length into the void and fish it back for burning.

Related Links

    * Robot scientist solves genetic problems
http://technology.timesonline.co.uk/tol/news/uk/science/article6024880.ece

    * Honda demonstrates robot controlled by mind power
http://technology.timesonline.co.uk/tol/news/tech_and_web/article6012364.ece
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Re: 911 and FOX; Terminator: The Sarah Connor Chronicles
« Reply #5 on: April 05, 2009, 06:54:20 pm »
Robot achieves scientific first
2 April 2009,
By Clive Cookson, Science Editor
http://www.ft.com/cms/s/0/f2b97d9a-1f96-11de-a7a5-00144feabdc0.html

A laboratory robot called Adam has been hailed as the first machine in history to have discovered new scientific knowledge independently of its human creators.

Adam formed a hypothesis on the genetics of bakers’ yeast and carried out experiments to test its predictions, without intervention from its makers at Aberystwyth University.

The result was a series of “simple but useful” discoveries, confirmed by human scientists, about the gene coding for yeast enzymes. The research is published in the journal Science.

Professor Ross King, the chief creator of Adam, said robots would not supplant human researchers but make their work more productive and interesting.

“Ultimately we hope to have teams of human and robot scientists working together in laboratories,” he said.

Adam is the result of a five-year collaboration between computer scientists and biologists at Aberystwyth and Cambridge universities.

The researchers endowed Adam with a huge database of yeast biology, automated hardware to carry out experiments, supplies of yeast cells and lab chemicals, and powerful artificial intelligence software.

Although they did not intervene directly in Adam’s experiments, they did stand by to fix technical glitches, add chemicals and remove waste.

The team has just completed a successor robot called Eve, which is about to work with Adam on a series of experiments designed to find new drugs to treat tropical diseases such as malaria and schistosomiasis.

“Adam is a prototype,” says Prof King. “Eve is better designed and more elegant.”

In the new experiments, Adam and Eve will work together to devise and carry out tests on thousands of chemical compounds to discover antimalarial drugs.


Read more:

* Scientists a step closer to ‘reading minds’ - Mar-12
http://www.ft.com/cms/s/0/6652c3cc-0f27-11de-ba10-0000779fd2ac.html
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Re: 911 and FOX; Terminator: The Sarah Connor Chronicles
« Reply #6 on: April 05, 2009, 06:57:43 pm »
Science briefing: Wired up for micro-power
26 March 2009,
By Alan Cane
http://www.ft.com/cms/s/0/cdabdde4-1a1f-11de-9f91-0000779fd2ac.html

A microscopic technology capable of generating electricity from human movement such as walking, waving or even blood flowing has been developed by researchers at Georgia Institute of Technology.

Reminiscent in some ways of UK inventor Trevor Baylis’ electricity-generating shoes (abandoned after terrorists used footwear to conceal explosives), the technology – described as a nanogenerator – depends on the special properties of tiny zinc oxide wires.

When subjected to mechanical stress, these wires, only one five thousandth the width of a human hair, generate an electric current.

According to Zhong Lin Wang, lead researcher, the device could be used to charge gadgets such as iPods and BlackBerrys as well as having a impact on defence technology, environmental monitoring and biomedical sciences. “This technology can be used to generate energy under any circumstances as long as there is movement,” he said.

The nanogenerator would be useful to troops far from energy sources in the field but having to use sensors or communication devices, he said.

The zinc oxide wires could be “grown” on a variety of surfaces including metals, ceramics, polymers, clothing and even tent material, where the wind could create enough movement for power generation.


Mussel poison fished out

Anyone falling ill after eating mussels – thankfully, a comparatively rare occurrence – can now blame a tiny marine alga called Azadinium spinosum.

The role of the alga in cases of shellfish poisoning has been uncovered by researchers from the Alfred Wegener Institute for Polar and Marine Research in Germany, who report their findings in the European Journal of Phycology.

The poison that Azadinium produces – azaspiracid – can cause diarrhoea, nausea, vomiting and neurotoxicological effects including paralysis and death.

The identification of the culprit should form the basis of an early warning system for mussel farms. The researchers managed to grow the previously unknown alga in culture and identify it as the producer of azaspiracid, one of a group of so-called algal toxins.

Mussels and other shellfish filter large volumes of these micro-organisms from seawater and the toxins are retained and concentrated in their flesh. Now the researchers are working to establish why the alga produces this poison and its environmental significance.


Wound healing uncovered

The mysteries of wound healing have been further clarified by research that has also found an unlikely link between diabetes and eczema. The work may lead to ways to improve wound healing in diabetics.

Carried out by scientists at the University of California, San Diego, and reported in Nature magazine, the research identifies a protein called caspase 8 that is critical to wound healing – at least, in laboratory mice. This protein is produced overabundantly in diabetics – who typically lack a normal wound response and suffer complications from minor cuts and grazes. But it is deficient in people suffering from eczema whose skin, chronically inflamed, cannot carry out its normal protective function.

The San Diego scientists think that after damage to the skin, loss of caspase 8 from surface cells releases a second protein, interleukin 1-alpha, capable of travelling deep into the skin to stimulate stem cells to produce skin cells to fill and eventually heal the wound.

Cokin Jamora, who led the research, said he hoped it would contribute to alleviating the pain and suffering of millions of people with eczema and diabetes.
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Re: 911 and FOX; Terminator: The Sarah Connor Chronicles
« Reply #7 on: April 06, 2009, 05:27:59 pm »
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Re: 911 and FOX; Terminator: The Sarah Connor Chronicles
« Reply #8 on: April 13, 2009, 12:02:00 pm »
    * Robot Suit HAL" is a cyborg-type robot that can expand and improve physical capability.


    * When a person attempts to move, nerve signals are sent from the brain to the muscles via motoneuron, moving the musculoskeletal system as a consequence. At this moment, very weak biosignals can be detected on the surface of the skin. "HAL" catches these signals through a sensor attached on the skin of the wearer. Based on the signals obtained, the power unit is controlled to move the joint unitedly with the wearer's muscle movement, enabling to support the wearer's daily activities. This is what we call a 'voluntary control system' that provides movement interpreting the wearer's intention from the biosignals in advance of the actual movement. Not only a 'voluntary control system' "HAL" has, but also a 'robotic autonomous control system' that provides human-like movement based on a robotic system which integrally work together with the 'autonomous control system'. "HAL" is the world's first cyborg-type robot controlled by this unique Hybrid System.
    * "HAL" is expected to be applied in various fields such as rehabilitation support and physical training support in medical field, ADL support for disabled people, heavy labour support at factories, and rescue support at disaster sites, as well as in the entertainment field.

HAL-5 Type-B Speficications

Size
wearable robot
Height 1,600mm

Weight
Full Body Type approx. 23kg
(Lower body approx. 15kg)

Power
Battery Drive
Charged battery( AC100V)

Continuous operating time
Approximately 2 hours 40 minutes

Motions
Daily Activities( standing up from a chair, walking, climbing up and down stairs)
Hold and lift heavy objects
and more...

Operation
Hybrid Control System

Working Environment
Indoor and outdoor
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Offline Libertarian Perspective

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Re: 911 and FOX; Terminator: The Sarah Connor Chronicles
« Reply #9 on: April 13, 2009, 12:10:30 pm »
This technology could be use in a good way to enable people with disabilities to get back long lost movement and to make a lot of robot factories therefore making human slave wages in third world nations obsolete, but who are we kidding? They will only use this technology to build he meanest baddest robot who is going to bust your home when you get accused of being a "homegrowner".
“Good luck to him. I don’t blame him at all, but I just
wish he had not hit me so hard. I know he had to protect
his property, and I probably would have done the
same thing in his position. This has certainly stopped
me committing any more crime.” - British burglar elaborating robbery

zafada

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Re: 911 and FOX; Terminator: The Sarah Connor Chronicles
« Reply #10 on: April 13, 2009, 01:27:03 pm »
Yup.

There's another thread about this also.  The Japanese plan on only selling the finished suits to handicapped civilians.

It's hard to believe they're a Buddhist country when you look at the weird ass, f**ked up porn these people have.  I wouldn't know, but I heard lots of things ;)

Anyway, back to the suits.  These suits are not hard to make at all.  The only thing I don't understand about them is what kind of sensor they use to pick up the electrical impulses from the muscles.

There's another which I assume is the one above that operates by tension.  When it feels pressure on the joints it moves.  When it doesn't feel pressure, it doesn't move.

Believe it or not...the model I'm speaking of is the one that the military tested.  It looks closer to the terminator than the haloesque Japanese version up top.

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Re: 911 and FOX; Terminator: The Sarah Connor Chronicles
« Reply #11 on: April 22, 2009, 06:13:56 pm »
btw; Wauw that Terminator:The Sarah Connor Chronicles S02E22 blew my mind, very impressive episode Action wise speaking! " The CIA owns everyone of any significance in the major media.": Quote Former C.I.A. Director William Colby

Army Tests Flying Robo-Sniper
21 April 2009
, by David Hambling (Wired)
http://blog.wired.com/defense/2009/04/army-tests-new.html


[Photo: U.S. Army]

Stopping the pirates of Somalia hasn't been easy. But when the navies of the world have repelled or killed the hijackers, it's often involved three elements: helicopters, drones and trained snipers. The U.S. Army is working on a weapon which combines all three.

It's called the Autonomous Rotorcraft Sniper System. It mounts a powerful rifle onto highly stabilized turret, and fixes the package on board a Vigilante unmanned helicopter. I describe the system in this month's Popular Mechanics.

The system is intended for the urban battlefield — an eye in the sky that can stare down concrete canyons, and blink out targets with extreme precision. Attempting to return fire against the ARSS is liable to be a near-suicidal act: ARSS is described as being able to fire seven to 10 aimed shots per minute, and it's unlikely to miss.

Recent events off Somalia, however, may have suggested other uses for this technology. Last week's standoff between pirates and the U.S. Navy in the Indian Ocean ended famously with three sniper shots, as a drone watched overhead. In 2008, French special forces captured six pirates on land after ransom had been paid. "There were four helicopters involved," The Independent reported at the time. "A sniper [in a Puma helicopter] shot out the motor of the pirates' four-wheel drive vehicle. A second helicopter [a Gazelle] then landed nearby, allowing the six pirates to be arrested" — without any casualties.

The U.S. Coast Guard's Helicopter Interdiction Tactical Squadron (HITRON) uses helicopter-borne snipers to take out drug-running boats. They are accurate enough to knock out engines without harming the crew or damaging fuel tanks. "The driver just threw his hands up," concludes the description of one such action in Men's Vogue, after all three engines were disabled with three shots.

And because the Vigilante is smaller, lighter and cheaper than a manned combat helicopter, it can be supplied in greater numbers, and without the need for those elite, highly-trained snipers.

Sniping from a chopper currently takes tons of skill and training. But ARSS is literally point-and-shoot for the operator on the ground, using a videogame-type controller. The software makes all the necessary corrections, and the system should ensure first-round kills at several hundred yards. The secret is in the control system and stabilized turret (on the right in the picture above), which is currently fitted with a powerful RND Manufacturing Edge 2000 rifle specifically designed for sniping work, using the heavyweight .338 Lapua Magnum cartridge.

The stabilized turret could be fitted to a variety of other vehicles — including a a small blimp, or a fixed-wing unmanned plane, like the Predator. Compared to the Predator's array of Hellfire missiles, the ARSS' lone gun would be much less likely to hit civilians. It would also give a far deeper magazine: dozens of shots instead of a handful of missiles, and at a cost of around $4 per trigger pull rather than about $100,000 for a Hellfire. But the turret doesn't need such a big craft to carry it, as the complete turret assembly weighs less than a single Hellfire.

The name needs changing. But the Autonomous Rotorcraft Sniper System looks like it may have a big future — maybe on land, or maybe at sea.
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Re: 911 and FOX; Terminator: The Sarah Connor Chronicles
« Reply #12 on: April 24, 2009, 02:38:26 am »
COLUMN-Killer robots and a revolution in warfare: Bernd Debusmann
22 April 2009
, by columnist Bernd Debusmann, Washington (Reuters)
http://www.alertnet.org/thenews/newsdesk/LM674603.htm

WASHINGTON, April 22 (Reuters) - They have no fear, they never tire, they are not upset when the soldier next to them gets blown to pieces. Their morale doesn't suffer by having to do, again and again, the jobs known in the military as the Three Ds - dull, dirty and dangerous.

They are military robots and their rapidly increasing numbers and growing sophistication may herald the end of thousands of years of human monopoly on fighting war. "Science fiction is moving to the battlefield. The future is upon us," as Brookings scholar Peter Singer put it to a conference of experts at the U.S. Army War College in Pennsylvania this month.

Singer just published Wired For War - the Robotics Revolution and Conflict in the 21st Century, a book that traces the rise of the machines and predicts that in future wars they will not only play greater roles in executing missions but also in planning them.

Numbers reflect the explosive growth of robotic systems. The U.S. forces that stormed into Iraq in 2003 had no robots on the ground. There were none in Afghanistan either. Now those two wars are fought with the help of an estimated 12,000 ground-based robots and 7,000 unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs), the technical term for drone, or robotic aircraft.

Ground-based robots in Iraq have saved hundreds of lives in Iraq, defusing improvised explosive devices, which account for more than 40 percent of U.S. casualties. The first armed robot was deployed in Iraq in 2007 and it is as lethal as its acronym is long: Special Weapons Observation Remote Reconnaissance Direct Action System (SWORDS). Its mounted M249 machinegun can hit a target more than 3,000 feet away with pin-point precision.

From the air, the best-known UAV, the Predator, has killed dozens of insurgent leaders - as well as scores of civilians whose death has prompted protests both from Afghanistan and Pakistan.

The Predators are flown by operators sitting in front of television monitors in cubicles at Creech Air Force Base in Nevada, 8,000 miles from Afghanistan and Taliban sanctuaries on the Pakistani side of the border with Afghanistan. The cubicle pilots in Nevada run no physical risks whatever, a novelty for men engaged in war.


TECHNOLOGY RUNS AHEAD OF ETHICS

Reducing risk, and casualties, is at the heart of the drive for more and better robots. Ultimately, that means "fully autonomous engagement without human intervention," according to an Army communication to robot designers. In other words, computer programs, not a remote human operator, would decide when to open fire. What worries some experts is that technology is running ahead of deliberations of ethical and legal questions.

Robotics research and development in the U.S. received a big push from Congress in 2001, when it set two ambitious goals: by 2010, a third of the country's long-range attack aircraft should be unmanned; and by 2015 one third of America's ground combat vehicles. Neither goal is likely to be met but the deadline pushed non-technological considerations to the sidelines.

A recent study prepared for the Office of Naval Research by a team from the California Polytechnic State University said that robot ethics had not received the attention it deserved because of a "rush to market" mentality and the "common misconception" that robots will do only what they have been programmed to do.

"Unfortunately, such a belief is sorely outdated, harking back to the time when computers were simpler and their programs could be written and understood by a single person," the study says. "Now programs with millions of lines of code are written by teams of programmers, none of whom knows the entire program; hence, no individual can predict the effect of a given command with absolute certainty since portions of programs may interact in unexpected, untested ways."

That's what might have happened during an exercise in South Africa in 2007, when a robot anti-aircraft gun sprayed hundreds of rounds of cannon shell around its position, killing nine soldiers and injuring 14.

Beyond isolated accidents, there are deeper problems that have yet to be solved. How do you get a robot to tell an insurgent from an innocent? Can you program the Laws of War and the Rules of Engagement into a robot? Can you imbue a robot with his country's culture? If something goes wrong, resulting in the death of civilians, who will be held responsible?

The robot's manufacturer? The designers? Software programmers? The commanding officer in whose unit the robot operates? Or the U.S. president who in some cases authorises attacks? (Barack Obama has given the green light to a string of Predator strikes into Pakistan).

While the United States has deployed more military robots - on land, in the air and at sea - than any other country, it is not alone in building them. More than 40 countries, including potential adversaries such as China, are working on robotics technology. Which leaves one to wonder how the ability to send large numbers of robots, and fewer soldiers, to war will affect political decisions on force versus diplomacy.

You need to be an optimist to think that political leaders will opt for negotiation over war once combat casualties come home not in flag-decked coffins but in packing crates destined for the robot repair shop.


(Bernd Debusmann is a Reuters columnist. The opinions expressed are his own. You can contact the author at Debusmann@Reuters.com)
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Re: 911 and FOX; Terminator: The Sarah Connor Chronicles
« Reply #13 on: May 17, 2009, 09:17:41 pm »
Battlefields: Robots That Kill For America
14 May 2009
, by Quentin Hardy (Forbes)
http://www.forbes.com/2009/05/14/robots-war-military-technology-personal-tech-robots_print.html

We are surrounded by robots, from automated dogs and vacuum cleaners at home to assistants in operating rooms and on the factory floor. The most influential (and the greatest number) of these robots, however, are in a place few Americans see: the battlefield. More than anything, robots are changing the way war works.

On Saturday, thousands of Americans will go on U.S. military bases to commemorate Armed Forces Day, designated to honor current American servicemen and show off some of our state of the art weaponry. As never before, people may see flying drones, observation craft, bomb disposers, automated machine guns, independently operating submarines, even (if they see experimental devices) war bots that bounce, crawl or burrow. Some deliver sensory data to soldiers, while others carry out instructions to kill.

Robotics in war is the most important change in major human activity dating back at least 5,000 years, according to P.W. Singer, a senior fellow at the Brookings Institution think tank and the author of Wired for War: The Robotics Revolution and Conflict in the 21st Century.

In Pictures: 10 Cool And Scary Robots Of War

"Every mission [that] soldiers go out on in Iraq, there's something (automated) flying over them, maybe an unmanned vehicle scouting ahead of them," Singer says. "When they shoot, the key is what they put their laser on for a drone to fire at. ... The story of the surge is not the additional troops, it's the air strikes (by machines like Predator drones) going up by a huge amount."

The numbers illustrate this: With the U.S. military budget likely to fall, spending on robotic systems is steadily rising, even as--thanks to Moore's Law and plain old engineering--the machines are getting cheaper. In 2003, there were barely any ground-based robots in Iraq, the kind of small, treaded vehicles used to look for insurgents and disarm explosives. Today there are over 12,000.

War in the field is still highly dangerous, of course, but even when soldiers are wounded they may have a close encounter with a machine, in the form of bionic limbs that may even allow them to return to combat. Thanks to robots, however, fewer soldiers face those hazards. The predator drones used in Iraq, Afghanistan and Pakistan are "flown" by remote control from safe military bases in the U.S.

In their early stages, robots seem like a great addition to the U.S. arsenal, but problems likely will arise as the systems grow more complex. Nor is this strictly a U.S. phenomenon, Singer notes, or even one that limits war to its traditional nation-state owners. "Forty-three other countries besides the U.S. build military robots," he says. "A few weeks ago we shot down an Iranian drone over Iraq." Hezbollah used four drones to attack Israel in its recent conflict and used others as observation craft before that conflict started, Singer says.

Individuals may be next. "I talked to a researcher who told me that for $50,000 worth of robots he could shut down New York for a day. It was pretty convincing. Warfare will go open source."

Even more, it may be harder than ever to say when and where wars begin and end, given the low cost of leaving sensors and material in the field (or protecting New York), in a kind of perpetual deployment that is impossible with people.

Much remains to be worked out, including perhaps the greatest piece of the puzzle: what robots everywhere will mean for war itself. Historically, victory has meant a superiority of economy, tactics, courage or other elements that defined the winning nation's identity. Germany fell decisively in WWII because fascism was seen as hollow.

"With machines, it will be less and less about why we go--they don't need motivation psychology, the shifts that turned many great battles," says Singer. "War meant committing to an act of violence that could put your nation's survival at stake. It may not mean that now."

In Pictures: 10 Cool And Scary Robots Of War

See Also:

Household Robots:
http://www.forbes.com/2008/10/24/robots-home-consumers-tech-personal-cx_cm_ag_1024robots.html

Dear Diary, I Love My Robot
http://www.yankodesign.com/2009/05/14/dear-diary-i-love-my-robot/

In Pictures: Making A Robot:
http://www.forbes.com/2009/03/12/robots-dean-kamen-technology-breathroughs-robots_slide_2.html?thisspeed=25000

Real World Robots:
http://video.forbes.com/fvn/boost/mf_byb121608

Fema's new toy
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=r0aa8__GZNQ
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Re: 911 and FOX; Terminator: The Sarah Connor Chronicles
« Reply #14 on: May 29, 2009, 09:29:25 am »
US University Shows Radio-controlled Live Beetle
28 Jan 2009
, by Tsuneyuki Miyake (Nikkei Microdevices del.icio.us)
http://techon.nikkeibp.co.jp/english/NEWS_EN/20090128/164717/



The flight experiment

The University of California, Berkeley succeeded in the experiment of controlling a live rhinoceros beetle by radio and disclosed the video of the experiment at the MEMS 2009 academic conference taking place in Sorrento, Italy.

Researchers at the university controlled the movement of beetle wings and some other parts using radio signals sent to the six electrodes on its brain and muscles. They equipped the beetle with a module incorporating a circuit to send signals to the electrodes, wireless circuit, microcontroller and battery. The university has so far succeeded in several experiments of electrically controlling insects, but it used a radio control system this time.

The researchers used rhinoceros beetles in this experiment because they can carry a weight of up to 3g. They can fly carrying the module weighing about 1.3g on their backs. And another reason is that they look cool, according to the university.

For military surveillance?

For what purpose does the university conduct such a research? Considering the fact that the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) of the US is funding the research, it may be intended for military purposes.

Commenting on this point, the university said that the technology can be utilized for peaceful purposes as well. In fact, the radio-controlled beetle can be useful in places that are too narrow or dangerous for a human to enter and for many other purposes.

For that use, the university is planning to mount sensors including a camera on a beetle in the future. With the sensors, rhinoceros beetles will be able to work as surveillance robots in place of humans. As they can carry a weight of 3g, 1.7g of sensors, in addition to the 1.3g of the current module, can be mounted.

However, the ultimate goal of this research goes beyond just incorporating sensors. Beetles are already equipped with "sensors," such as their own eyes. In addition, they have a system to derive energy from food. So, the university is aiming to make the most of insects' own sensors while using their energy system as batteries.

Setting aside the question of whether it is morally right or wrong to use a living creature for such a purpose, we must think about the "production efficiency" to create "cyborgs" that are beneficial to mankind. Commenting on this, the university said it can produce the cyborg in a short period of time because the positions of the electrodes worn by a beetle need not be so precise.


US University Shows Radio-controlled Live Beetle http://tinyurl.com/btn77n
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Re: 911 and FOX; Terminator: The Sarah Connor Chronicles
« Reply #15 on: June 02, 2009, 11:32:12 am »
10 reasons Terminators destroy 'Twitter-brains'
2 June 2006
, by Paul B. Farrell - Arrayo Grande Calif. (MarketWatch)
http://www.marketwatch.com/story/twitter-brained-investors-get-terminated?pagenumber=2

Hypnotized, you'll forget dot-coms, subprimes, the next Great Depression

ARROYO GRANDE, Calif. (MarketWatch)-- In the next "Terminator" sequel, Skynet will "send back" a new, more dangerous "Terminator," not another titanium killing machine but "Twitter Code." And after that, the "Tweet Code" will further limit communications between humanoids, from 140 words to 17 syllables, the length of a Zen koan but without the wisdom.

Two more Skynet weapons further controlling us, destroying our humanity.

"Terminator Salvation" Slideshow: http://smg.photobucket.com/albums/v393/youricarma/Terminator%20Salvation/?albumview=slideshow

Why Twitter, why Tweet? Because both reflect a disturbing trend, the rapidly decreasing attention span and intelligence of the human brain. It's no match for Wall Street's version of the "Terminator's" Skynet that is rapidly expanding it's dominance over the public.

Seriously, Wall Street's Skynet has access to massive data bases on the behavior patterns of all humanoids: Transactions on securities, credit cards, loans, taxes, telephone calls, internet, and soon, all medical records, plus a financial innovation arsenal of quant algorithms and the K-Street network of 42,000 lobbyists gives Wall Street Skynet control of government, and absolute control of investors and our so-called democracy.

Folks, this is too real to make up. Less than a year ago, Wall Street banks were insolvent, near bankruptcy. Then in a swift "disaster capitalism" maneuver by Henry Paulson, Wall Street's Trojan Horse in Washington, they raided our Treasury and the Fed, while our clueless reps in Congress stood by.

Eight short months later, Wall Street's back in "business as usual" with bigger salaries and bonuses, while taxpayers hold the bag for over $5 trillion in new debts, a record $546,668 per household reports USA Today.
Wall Street Skynet and its arsenal of Terminators

Forget the metaphor; Wall Street is the real Skynet. And the Twitter/Tweet Codes are just a few of their many nanobots -- financial-innovation Terminators -- infiltrating the investor's brain, dulling our long-term reasoning powers, replacing them with new short-term irrational neurotoxins that will block their capacity to detect the broader strategies of the Wall Street Skynet Conspiracy.

That coupled with a memory purge is preventing us from assembling the "Resistance," a rebellion against Wall Street's version of Skynet.

Wall Street is hypnotizing Main Street investors: That way we forget the past, embrace the illusions and are easier to manipulate. In a trance state, we'll be unable to resist them.

If you don't believe me, here are the 10 nanobots anaesthetizing your brain. They are inspired by one of America's greatest business writers, Stanley Bing, author of a few books in my library: "Crazy Bosses;" "Rome, Inc.;" "Sun Tzu Was a Sissy;" "100 Bullshit Jobs;" and "What Would Machiavelli Do? The End Justifies the Meanness."

Bing writes a Fortune column. His latest, "Lessons We'll Forget," tells me that Wall Street Skynet is operational: "The moment the human animal is comfortable again, it immediately begins the important task of forgetting everything painful that has happened to it."

The past two years were painful, like the Great Depression, yet the investor's attention span has become so short, we're forgetting the pain, even cheering Wall Street.

So here's Bing's intriguing message, adapted for investors who are Terminator fans. Your memory will be purged now as you read about Wall Street Skynet's strategy. And that purge is setting up Great Depression 2, Wall Street's third crash of this century:

1. You'll forget ... that economists misled us, and will again

Bing says "economics is a bunch of bushwa" -- that's nonsense, BS, hype: "Economists are obviously not only behind the curve ... they are in many cases the cause of it." The memory purge is in progress. We see it in the recent upsurge in the "Consumer Sentiment Index," an resurgence of exuberance that says the masses are ready to be misled again.

2. You'll forget ... new crooks are plotting to steal your money

Our brains are designed to deny and suppress bad experiences. Bing says: "Next time this all happens, people will once again be surprised that the guy who ran the exchange [Madoff was Nasdaq chairman] is the person who also managed the Ponzi scheme." And you've already forgotten that megacrook, former Treasury Secretary Hank Paulson. His Ponzi scheme was 15 times bigger than Bernie's, and Congress didn't indict him.

3. You'll forget ... that regulators are also political hacks in disguise

Bing words: "The law is an ass ... Virtually all of the regulators and legislators who were supposed to be monitoring the finance industry were certainly lawyers, as were the lawmakers who were asleep at the switch." The truth is the SEC, CFTC, all staff lawyers and their lobbyists are just more "politicians" gaming the law for their personal gain. Once the bull's back and you're making a few bucks (on paper), you'll forget all this.

4. You'll forget ... bankers are stupid, and will make stupid loans

Whether it's Rome, the Dutch Tulip Bulb Bubble, the Panic of 1837, or the dot-com insanity, "every panic in history has been precipitated by the same stupid sequence of events." Cash-rich bankers back too many greedy speculators, overextend, run out of cash. Banks go broke. Markets crash. Why do they never learn? Because bankers have a gene that makes them not only greedy but "stupid," says Bing. And "as soon as nobody is looking they'll do so again." Worse, bankers "forget" even faster than investors do.

5. You'll forget ... that America's run by a powerful wealthy elite

About eight million billionaires and millionaires run America. This small minority own and control about 90% of America's total wealth: "They're not smarter. They're not happier. They just know how the game is played and, for the most part, what to do to stay there. Sometimes everybody forgets that the whole thing is designed to keep the powerful in power and the rich in their McMansions." The other 300 million have no real power because America is not a democracy: "We'll forget that, of course, as soon as the markets simmer down."

6. You'll forget ... that the news is just another Wall Street 'Terminator'

Fewer newspapers, fewer reporters and "more blogspit" means "everything will only get worse" with the news, says Bing. "At the height of our troubles, the food chain [still] goes from security analyst and quote monkey straight to the wires and blogs and directly to you. And you read it and think whatever occupies your brain pan for the most recent five minutes." Then five minutes later, another relentless data dump of Wall Street's mind-numbing propaganda is crammed into our overloaded brains. We either forget, or go mad.

7. You'll forget ... your anger, and you'll let them get away with it

The subtitle of Bing's "What Would Machiavelli Do" -- The End Justifies the Meanness -- reflects the viciousness in today's public dialogue: Anger drives people to rebel, to join a revolution, the resistance, take responsibility, fight back. Instead, we'll wimp out, forget.

8. You'll forget ... nothing lasts forever (except Wall Street's hype)

Nothing? Remember the 2004 election when Reaganomics was hot? When Rove talked of a "permanent GOP majority?" Later when Bush had "a lot of political capital and planned to spend it?" When the Dow roared above 14,000? Obama's riding high now. Beware, Bing says: Nothing lasts, "not good times and not bad times either." Nothing.

9. You'll forget ... what's really important as soon as the bull roars

There more to life than stocks, the economy, your career and a retirement portfolio. And no matter what, Bing says, you'll eat breakfast today. Just don't forget it tastes better with loved ones. They will always help you forget everything else, if you haven't already.

10. You'll forget ... you can fight back, but the will is gone

Bing ends gently: "We just forgot all this stuff. Stuff? What stuff?" ... fade to black.

As investors forget the pain of the past couple years, our silence alone will crush the Main Street Resistance. At the peak of the dot-com insanity, on March 20, 2000, I posted a column: "Next Crash, sorry, you'll never hear it coming." Investors were deaf: Then again on March 24, 2004 we warned a second time. Same title. But Wall Street was deaf, let their disaster fester, adding fuel for the catastrophic credit meltdown in 2007.

Warning: A third disaster is festering. The worst is yet to come. Yale's Robert Shiller says: "We recently lived through two epidemics of excessive financial optimism. I believe we are close to a third episode, only this one will spread irrational pessimism and distrust -- not exuberance. If that happens, our economic problems will become much worse than they need to be, and our social problems will multiply."

Bing's "Lessons We'll Forget," is a perfect explanation of the coming third episode. And we have no will to fight back. The Great Depression 2 coming in 2011 is our destiny because 95 million investors are forgetting the lessons of prior "episodes" ... and will do nothing.

Now relax and listen to this soft peaceful hypnotic voice: "Yes, relax as I count backwards from 10 to 1. When we reach 1 you will wake up refreshed, optimistic. You will forget all the bad warnings from Bing, Shiller and Farrell about past and future disasters. Just stay in the eternally blissful 'Now.' Once awake, you will only remember this one fact: 'Wall Street is a trusted friend'... you won't forget that now ... will you?"
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Re: 911 and FOX; Terminator: The Sarah Connor Chronicles
« Reply #16 on: June 20, 2009, 12:07:15 am »
FINALY: The Sarah Conner Chronicles THERMATE SCENE






























Slideshow with Sarah Conner Chronicles Screenerz
Tip: Put in on Fast

http://smg.photobucket.com/albums/v393/youricarma/Sarah%20Conner/?albumview=slideshow
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Re: 911 and FOX; Terminator: The Sarah Connor Chronicles
« Reply #17 on: June 20, 2009, 01:44:47 am »
the date on your post is totally off, it reads 2 June 2006, while on the MarketWatch article (link) it reads

Paul B. Farrell
Jun 8, 2009, 10:19 p.m. EST
10 reasons Terminators destroy 'Twitter-brains'
Hypnotized, you'll forget dot-coms, subprimes, the next Great Depression

LBR, you've gotta think about making this its own thread. I'm gonna blog about it right now. This is huge (!)

:)

10 reasons Terminators destroy 'Twitter-brains'
2 June 2006
, by Paul B. Farrell - Arrayo Grande Calif. (MarketWatch)
http://www.marketwatch.com/story/twitter-brained-investors-get-terminated?pagenumber=2

Hypnotized, you'll forget dot-coms, subprimes, the next Great Depression

ARROYO GRANDE, Calif. (MarketWatch)-- In the next "Terminator" sequel, Skynet will "send back" a new, more dangerous "Terminator," not another titanium killing machine but "Twitter Code." And after that, the "Tweet Code" will further limit communications between humanoids, from 140 words to 17 syllables, the length of a Zen koan but without the wisdom.


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Re: 911 and FOX; Terminator: The Sarah Connor Chronicles
« Reply #18 on: June 20, 2009, 02:04:02 am »
I can't wait to get one of those exo-skeloton robots like they had in that 'reboot' animated programme though...



http://reboot.wikia.com/wiki/Exoskeleton_Suit

I think I would donate my kidney to have one of these, full size bad-boys

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Re: 911 and FOX; Terminator: The Sarah Connor Chronicles
« Reply #19 on: June 20, 2009, 02:36:45 am »
the date on your post is totally off, it reads 2 June 2006, while on the MarketWatch article (link) it reads

Paul B. Farrell
Jun 8, 2009, 10:19 p.m. EST
10 reasons Terminators destroy 'Twitter-brains'
Hypnotized, you'll forget dot-coms, subprimes, the next Great Depression

LBR, you've gotta think about making this its own thread. I'm gonna blog about it right now. This is huge (!)

:)


You can make it a new threat if you want cause I use Twitter as an Link sending machine.

If I have to make long sentence short to use as Headline for a Link, which isn't easy I can tell you, my language brain is in full depletion.

So, this dumbing down doesn't apply to my kinda use of Twitter.

I agree with you if you say that this limited amount of characters using in Twitter is BS! But I don't use it as such (useless chat), you see?

And you have to use TINY URL to shorten up your long links which can be a drag sometimes but you get used to it.

http://tinyurl.com/

http://www.tiny.cc/

Making Powerful Twitter (link) Headlines is real fun though  :)

FINALY: The Sarah Conner Chronicles THERMATE SCENE - Screeners http://tinyurl.com/kktgar

Slideshow with Sarah Conner Chronicles Screenerz Tip: Put in on Fast http://tinyurl.com/knz8g5
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Re: 911 and FOX; Terminator: The Sarah Connor Chronicles
« Reply #20 on: July 14, 2009, 11:59:27 am »
Sarah Connor Has Failed — the British Just Built Skynet
13 June 2008
, by Ed Grabianowski (Military Tech)
http://io9.com/5016092/sarah-connor-has-failed-++-the-british-just-built-skynet

With the launch of a new communications satellite, the British military has completed a highly advanced network that will allow robotic military units to be controlled at long range. Sound vaguely familiar? They actually named the thing Skynet. When the T-1000s come knocking, keep an eye out for the "Made in UK" sticker.

Skynet 5 is the latest iteration of a global communications system deployed by the British Armed Forces. The final satellite in the system was launched this week, and will allow high-bandwidth telecommunications between British forces located anywhere in the world. In addition to voice communications, it will allow data transfer and the remote control of robot airplanes, one of which is called "The Reaper." One of the manufacturers was quoted by BBC News as saying:

Photo: So, computers can talk directly to computers

Are you terrified yet? It gets better. The system is actually privately owned and developed - the British Armed Forces are only promised a portion of the bandwidth as part of the contract. The one reassuring aspect is that the company is not called Cyberdyne.
Seriously, what the hell? Is it British humor to name something like this Skynet, or bureaucratic idiocy? Might as well get to work on the self-awareness chip and the "really angry at humans" algorithm. Image by: BBC News.


Final Skynet satellite launched
12 June 2008
, by Jonathan Amos Science reporter (BBC News)
http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/science/nature/7451867.stm

Video: The rocket carrying the Skynet satellite lifts off

An advanced satellite that will improve greatly the ability of UK military forces to communicate around the globe has been launched into space.

The Skynet 5C platform rode into orbit atop an Ariane 5 rocket from the Kourou spaceport in French Guiana.

It joins the 5A and 5B satellites lofted successfully last year and which are already handling secure traffic for UK forces in Iraq and Afghanistan.

The £3.6bn Skynet project represents the UK's single biggest space venture.

Skynet 5C (Arianespace)

Photo: Skynet 5C during fuelling in Kourou's integration complex

The investment includes replacing and updating control centres, and the major antennas and terminals used by military ships, land vehicles and planes to communicate through the satellites.

The 5C spacecraft - the last in the Skynet series - left the launch pad in Kourou at 1905 local time (2205 GMT).

Skynet 5 allows the British Army, Royal Navy and Royal Air Force (RAF) to pass much more data, faster between command centres.

The bandwidth capacity easily surpasses the current satellite constellation, Skynet 4, whose spacecraft are coming to the end of their design lives.

"Skynet 5 is about two-and-a-half-times more capable than the previous system, and it also gives us the ability to use not just voice communication but also data communication," explains Patrick Wood from spacecraft manufacturer EADS Astrium.

"So, computers can talk directly to computers, as well giving us pictures and real-time video images."

See how the Skynet 5 system is being deployed: http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/science/nature/7451867.stm#map

This extra capability can already be seen in Afghanistan, where the RAF is using a robot surveillance plane called Reaper to hunt down Taleban forces.

Although flying in the skies over Asia, Reaper is actually controlled by RAF personnel sitting in the US behind a computer screen.

Video: An exclusive look at the reaper control centre in Nevada

Commands are sent over Skynet 5's high-bandwidth connections, directing the robot's every move. This includes firing missiles at enemy targets.

The new Skynet platforms look much like any of the other modern commercial telecommunications spacecraft launched from Kourou, but the 5s incorporate technologies that are specially prepared for military use.

Four steerable antennas give them the ability to focus bandwidth onto particular locations where it is most needed - where British forces are engaged in operations.

The spacecraft have also been "hardened" to withstand any interference - attempts to disable or take control of the satellites - and any efforts to eavesdrop on their sensitive communications.

Classified receive-antenna technology enables the 5s to "go deaf" to signals that try to "jam" them whilst still continuing to listen to operational traffic.

Video: Patrick Wood explains how the UK's latest military satellite works

Security was tight in Kourou in the lead-up to 5C's launch. Sentries had been posted outside the spaceport's giant integration complex during the final phases of the launch campaign. No unofficial photography was permitted.

The new Skynet infrastructure is not owned by the UK Ministry of Defence (MoD) but rather by a private company called Paradigm Secure Communications.

The firm won a contract to supply satellite services to the military and has obtained City money to help fund the new-build. Its deal with the MoD runs until 2020 and guarantees UK forces a proportion of the satellites' bandwidth.

Paradigm hopes to earn money for itself by selling spare capacity to Nato countries and other "friendly" forces.
A330-200

Photo: The deal with the AirTanker consortium is one of the biggest deals of its kind

"Skynet 5C is actually our self-insurance," said Paradigm Managing Director Malcolm Peto.

"When we committed to this programme we always promised to give the MoD a certain level of capability; and space, as we all know, is a variable environment for this type of technology. So, the importance of our third satellite is that we have an in-orbit spare should anything go wrong."

Skynet 5 is the largest Private Finance Initiative (PFI) yet delivered to the MoD. The procurement model has now been copied for an even bigger project - the £13bn PFI signed with an EADS-led consortium to provide mid-air refuelling services.

This will offer brand new tankers based on the Airbus A330-200, to replace the ageing fleet of VC-10 and Tristar aircraft.

Skynet 5C was launched along with a commercial "co-passenger" - Turksat 3A, which will beam TV and other telecommunication services to Turkey, Europe and Central Asia.


Photo: Skynet 5 system (BBC)

1. Skynet 5 overhauls satellite communications for UK forces
2. The largely autonomous satellites talk to two UK ground stations
3. Skynet 5 supports high-bandwidth applications, such as UAV video
4. Antennas and terminals are upgraded to make best use of Skynet
5. New battlefield networks, such as Cormorant, feed into the system
6. System gives commanders access to more information, faster


Photo: Skynet 5 system (BBC)

1. Improved technologies, including a solar 'sail', lengthen the platforms' operational lives to at least 15 years
2. The satellites are 'hardened' against interference. A special receive antenna can resist attempts at jamming
3. Each spacecraft has four steerable antennas that can concentrate bandwidth onto particular regions
4. The system gives near-global coverage, providing 2.5 times the capacity afforded by the previous system
5. Each spacecraft is a 3x4x4.5m box and weighs just under 5 tonnes; the solar wings once unfurled measure 34m tip to tip
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Online Letsbereal

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Re: 911 and FOX; Terminator: The Sarah Connor Chronicles
« Reply #21 on: July 14, 2009, 02:27:54 pm »
Upcoming Military Robot Could Feed on Dead Bodies
14 July 2009
, (Fox News)
http://www.foxnews.com/story/0,2933,532492,00.html

It could be a combination of 19th-century mechanics, 21st-century technology — and a 20th-century horror movie.

A Maryland company under contract to the Pentagon is working on a steam-powered robot that would fuel itself by gobbling up whatever organic material it can find — grass, wood, old furniture, even dead bodies.

Robotic Technology Inc.'s Energetically Autonomous Tactical Robot — that's right, "EATR" — "can find, ingest, and extract energy from biomass in the environment (and other organically-based energy sources), as well as use conventional and alternative fuels (such as gasoline, heavy fuel, kerosene, diesel, propane, coal, cooking oil, and solar) when suitable," reads the company's Web site.

That "biomass" and "other organically-based energy sources" wouldn't necessarily be limited to plant material — animal and human corpses contain plenty of energy, and they'd be plentiful in a war zone.

EATR will be powered by the Waste Heat Engine developed by Cyclone Power Technology of Pompano Beach, Fla., which uses an "external combustion chamber" burning up fuel to heat up water in a closed loop, generating electricity.

The advantages to the military are that the robot would be extremely flexible in fuel sources and could roam on its own for months, even years, without having to be refueled or serviced.

Upon the EATR platform, the Pentagon could build all sorts of things — a transport, an ambulance, a communications center, even a mobile gunship.

In press materials, Robotic Technology presents EATR as an essentially benign artificial creature that fills its belly through "foraging," despite the obvious military purpose.

• Click here for a brief description of EATR at the Robotic Technology Web site: http://www.robotictechnologyinc.com/index.php/EATR

• Click here for a much longer overview of the project in PDF format: http://www.robotictechnologyinc.com/images/upload/file/Presentation%20EATR%20Brief%20Overview%206%20April%2009.pdf

• Click here to read about the Cyclone Waste Heat Engine: http://www.cyclonepower.com/works.html

• Click here for FOXNews.com's Patents and Innovation Center: http://www.foxnews.com/scitech/innovation/


Energetically Autonomous Tactical Robot (EATR) Project

We originated the concept of the EATR in 2003 and the project was sponsored as a Phase II Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) project by an agency of the Department of Defense..

The purpose of the Energetically Autonomous Tactical Robot (EATR)™ (patent pending) project is to develop and demonstrate an autonomous robotic platform able to perform long-range, long-endurance missions without the need for manual or conventional re-fueling, which would otherwise preclude the ability of the robot to perform such missions. The system obtains its energy by foraging – engaging in biologically-inspired, organism-like, energy-harvesting behavior which is the equivalent of eating. It can find, ingest, and extract energy from biomass in the environment (and other organically-based energy sources), as well as use conventional and alternative fuels (such as gasoline, heavy fuel, kerosene, diesel, propane, coal, cooking oil, and solar) when suitable.

This demonstration project can lead to three potential Phase III commercialization projects: (1) the development of prototype and operational EATR™ systems for military and civil applications; (2) new civil and military applications for the autonomous intelligent control system; and (3) development of the hybrid external combustion engine system for civil and military automotive applications, whether for manned or unmanned vehicles.

Please click here for an Overview Presentation of EATR: http://www.robotictechnologyinc.com/images/upload/file/Presentation%20EATR%20Brief%20Overview%206%20April%2009.pdf

Please click here for an EATR Overview: http://www.robotictechnologyinc.com/images/upload/file/Overview%20Of%20EATR%20Project%20Brief%206%20April%2009.pdf


How It Works



The Cyclone Engine is a Rankine Cycle heat regenerative external combustion engine, otherwise known as a “Schoell Cycle” engine.   It creates mechanical energy by heating and cooling water in a closed-loop, piston-based engine system.  The process looks like this:

HEAT PROCESS
1. Fuel is atomized and injected into the patented centrifugal combustion chamber (shown as lifted off the engine block for better viewing), where a spark ignites the fuel-air mixture into a flame that spins around the heat coils. Thermocouples (not pictured) control the duration of combustion to keep the heat in the combustion chamber at a constant temperature.         

2. Water contained in the coils becomes super-heated steam (up to 1200°F)  in as little as 5 seconds from start up which is (a) piped to the cylinders, (b) where it enters through a patent-pending valve system (not pictured).  Note, valve timing mechanisms regulate how much steam enters the cylinders – the longer the cut-off the greater the torque and acceleration.

MECHANICAL PROCESS
3. Steam enters the six radial-configured cylinders under pressures up to 3200 psi to push the pistons down in sequence.  Note, no motor oil is used – water is both the working fluid and engine lubricant. Also, because of the valve design, the engine starts without the need of a starter motor.

4. The rotating action of the pistons connected through a patent-pending spider bearing (not pictured) turns the crank shaft.  Note, because the greatest amount of torque occurs at the first rotation, the shaft can be directly connected to a drive train without a transmission.

COOLING PROCESS
5. Steam escapes the cylinders through exhaust ports and (a) enters the patent-pending condensing unit where it turns back into water, and (b) collects in a sealed pan at the bottom of the condenser. Note, this is a closed-loop system – the water does not need to be replaced or topped-off.

6. Blowers spin fresh air around the condenser to speed the cooling process.

REGENERATIVE PROCESS
7. (a) Air which has been pre-heated from the condensing unit, (b) continues up to a second heat exchanger located in the exhaust port of the combustion chamber, further pre-heating the air used for combustion while also cooling the exhaust fumes (to about 320°F).

8.  A high pressure pump (not pictured) pipes water from the collecting pan to the heat coils (a) via heat exchangers surrounding each of the cylinders (only one pictured), and then (b) to the center of the coils to start the heat cycle again.

For more technical info about the Cyclone Engine, including photos and video, click here: http://www.cyclonepower.com/technical_information.html


Technical Information


Profile cross-section of the Mark V automotive engine


Bottom view of Mark V Engine detailing the pistons, spider bearing, variable speed timing, and blower.


Top view of Mark V Engine also showing valve mechanisms
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Offline portuguese anarchist

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Re: 911 and FOX; Terminator: The Sarah Connor Chronicles
« Reply #22 on: July 17, 2009, 07:39:17 pm »
I've also watched this episode, and when I saw the kerosene/thermate scene I immediately thought about the debate (or exposure) about the steel columns of the World Trade Center.

It's a really interesting coincidence. Specially after you know that the series is being produced by The Halcyon Company, that is about the bring the Bilderberg Club story to the big screen:



http://bilderbergbook.com/index.php?option=com_content&task=view&id=66&Itemid=2

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Re: 911 and FOX; Terminator: The Sarah Connor Chronicles
« Reply #23 on: July 17, 2009, 09:07:34 pm »
Sarah Connor Has Failed — the British Just Built Skynet
13 June 2008
, by Ed Grabianowski (Military Tech)
http://io9.com/5016092/sarah-connor-has-failed-++-the-british-just-built-skynet

With the launch of a new communications satellite, the British military has completed a highly advanced network that will allow robotic military units to be controlled at long range. Sound vaguely familiar? They actually named the thing Skynet. When the T-1000s come knocking, keep an eye out for the "Made in UK" sticker.

Skynet 5 is the latest iteration of a global communications system deployed by the British Armed Forces. The final satellite in the system was launched this week, and will allow high-bandwidth telecommunications between British forces located anywhere in the world. In addition to voice communications, it will allow data transfer and the remote control of robot airplanes, one of which is called "The Reaper." One of the manufacturers was quoted by BBC News as saying:

Photo: So, computers can talk directly to computers

Are you terrified yet? It gets better. The system is actually privately owned and developed - the British Armed Forces are only promised a portion of the bandwidth as part of the contract. The one reassuring aspect is that the company is not called Cyberdyne.
Seriously, what the hell? Is it British humor to name something like this Skynet, or bureaucratic idiocy? Might as well get to work on the self-awareness chip and the "really angry at humans" algorithm. Image by: BBC News.

Good premise for them to attack people with robots globally...it was hackers, or an AI, or angry computers that did it...then shut down the Internet.

Online Letsbereal

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Re: 911 and FOX; Terminator: The Sarah Connor Chronicles
« Reply #24 on: July 20, 2009, 03:59:51 pm »
Dutch Dwarf Drones sniffs out cannabis plantations
1 May 2009
, by John Sinteur (The Daily Irrelevant)
http://weblog.sinteur.com/category/nederland-is-gek



 Police in the northeastern Achterhoek region have begun using an unmanned miniature helicopter to track down the illegal cultivation of cannabis, which often takes place indoors. The so-called “canna-chopper” is fitted with cameras and a sniffer to take air samples out of ventilator shafts and chimneys. A dedicated gas analyser is able to recognise traces of weed smell in the air samples.

    Police say they are not breaking the law because the samples can be taken without entering the building. The unmanned dwarf helicopter can stay airborne for a maximum of eight hours. It was designed and built by Dutch police engineers.

This is probably confusing to all foreign readers who think cannabis is entirely legal over here. It isn’t. The Dutch have made a decision not to prosecute small time offenders. This means, a blind eye is turned to possession when the amount is very low (personal use amounts). They also grant licenses to owners of ‘coffee-shops’ to sell cannabis with some fairly tight regulations. I believe the idea behind this is that, as has been discovered in basically every other country on earth, people want to smoke a joint from time to time, and it is better they get it from a regulated (and more importantly, taxed!) business, rather than some guy on the street who will almost certainly try to push the more addictive stuff on to the customer for higher (tax free!) profits.

However, what is not tolerated, is massive scale, cannabis farming which is then sold on for huge profits (without tax being paid, are you spotting a theme here?).

Cannabis sniffer Cannachopper - weed - drugs
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SAlOPGd8WOE

CANNABIS SNIFFER HELICOPTER
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lgCqGC6iIhc
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Re: 911 and FOX; Terminator: The Sarah Connor Chronicles
« Reply #25 on: July 20, 2009, 07:20:49 pm »
Thermite - Terminator: The Sarah Connor Chronicles Wikia Link:
http://terminator.wikia.com/wiki/Thermite

Terminator: The Sarah Connor Chronicles Wikia Link:
http://terminator.wikia.com/wiki/Terminator:_The_Sarah_Connor_Chronicles
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Re: 911 and FOX; Terminator: The Sarah Connor Chronicles
« Reply #26 on: July 25, 2009, 08:15:17 pm »
Bacteria make computers look like pocket calculators
24 July 2009
, by Jacob Aron Friday (Guardian.co.uk - Science Blog)
http://www.guardian.co.uk/science/blog/2009/jul/24/bacteria-computer

Biologists have created a living computer from E. coli bacteria that can solve complex mathematical problems



Photograph: Escherichia coli bacteria (E. coli) Getty; Scanning electron micrograph of E. coli bacteria. A rapidly growing colony can be programmed to act as a hugely powerful parallel computer.

Computers are evolving – literally. While the tech world argues netbooks vs notebooks, synthetic biologists are leaving traditional computers behind altogether. A team of US scientists have engineered bacteria that can solve complex mathematical problems faster than anything made from silicon.

The research, published today in the Journal of Biological Engineering http://www.jbioleng.org/content/3/1/11/abstractv , proves that bacteria can be used to solve a puzzle known as the Hamiltonian Path Problem http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hamiltonian_path_problem . Imagine you want to tour the 10 biggest cities in the UK, starting in London (number 1) and finishing in Bristol (number 10). The solution to the Hamiltonian Path Problem is the the shortest possible route you can take.

This simple problem is surprisingly difficult to solve. There are over 3.5 million possible routes to choose from, and a regular computer must try them out one at a time to find the shortest. Alternatively, a computer made from millions of bacteria can look at every route simultaneously. The biological world also has other advantages. As time goes by, a bacterial computer will actually increase in power as the bacteria reproduce.

Programming such a computer is no easy task, however. The researchers coded a simplified version of the problem, using just three cities, by modifying the DNA of Escherichia coli bacteria. The cities were represented by a combination of genes causing the bacteria to glow red or green, and the possible routes between the cities were explored by the random shuffling of DNA. Bacteria producing the correct answer glowed both colours, turning them yellow.

The experiment worked, and the scientists checked the yellow bacteria's answer by examining their DNA sequence. By using additional genetic differences such as resistance to particular antibiotics, the team believe their method could be expanded to solve problems involving more cities.

This is not the only problem bacteria can solve. The research builds on previous work by the same team, who last year created a bacterial computer to solve the Burnt Pancake Problem http://www.jbioleng.org/content/2/1/8 . This unusually named conundrum is a mathematical sorting process that can be visualised as a stack of pancakes, all burnt on one side, which must be ordered by size.

In addition to proving the power of bacterial computing http://www.guardian.co.uk/technology/computing , the team have also contributed significantly to the field of synthetic biology. Just as electronic circuits are made from transistors, diodes and other devices, so too are biological circuits. Synthetic biologists have worked together to create the Registry of Standard Biological Parts http://partsregistry.org/Main_Page , and this new research has contributed more than 60 new components to the list.

For more information on the expanding field of synthetic biology, download the latest edition of the Guardian's Science Weekly podcast http://www.guardian.co.uk/science/blog/audio/2009/jul/20/science-weekly-podcast-synthetic-biology . Alok Jha and James Randerson were joined in the pod by synthetic biologist Paul Freemont, professor of protein crystallography at Imperial College London, to discuss a future of biological machines.


To get daily news updates from Guardian Science, follow us on Twitter: http://twitter.com/guardianscience

A bacterial computer that can solve complex mathematical problems http://bit.ly/V0lmz

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Online Letsbereal

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Re: 911 and FOX; Terminator: The Sarah Connor Chronicles
« Reply #27 on: July 25, 2009, 08:39:20 pm »
'Bacterial Computers': Genetically Engineered Bacteria Have Potential To Solve Complicated Mathematical Problems
24 July 2009
, (Science Daily)
http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2009/07/090723194321.htm



LARGE IMAGE: http://www.sciencedaily.com/images/2009/07/090723194321-large.jpg

Credit: iStockphoto/Sebastian Kaulitzki: 3-D illustration of bacteria. Researchers have engineered the DNA of Escherichia coli bacteria, creating bacterial computers capable of solving a classic mathematical problem known as the Hamiltonian Path Problem.

ScienceDaily (July 24, 2009) — US researchers have created 'bacterial computers' with the potential to solve complicated mathematics problems. The findings of the research demonstrate that computing in living cells is feasible, opening the door to a number of applications. The second-generation bacterial computers illustrate the feasibility of extending the approach to other computationally challenging math problems.
See also:

A research team made up of four faculty members and 15 undergraduate students from the biology and mathematics departments at Missouri Western State University in Missouri and Davidson College in North Carolina, USA engineered the DNA of Escherichia coli bacteria, creating bacterial computers capable of solving a classic mathematical problem known as the Hamiltonian Path Problem.

The research extends previous work published last year in the same journal to produce bacterial computers that could solve the Burnt Pancake Problem.

The Hamiltonian Path Problem asks whether there is a route in a network from a beginning node to an ending node, visiting each node exactly once. The student and faculty researchers modified the genetic circuitry of the bacteria to enable them to find a Hamiltonian path in a three-node graph. Bacteria that successfully solved the problem reported their success by fluorescing both red and green, resulting in yellow colonies.

Synthetic biology is the use of molecular biology techniques, engineering principles, and mathematical modeling to design and construct genetic circuits that enable living cells to carry out novel functions. "Our research contributed more than 60 parts to the Registry of Standard Biological Parts, which are available for use by the larger synthetic biology community, including the newly split red fluorescent protein and green fluorescent protein genes," said Jordan Baumgardner, recent graduate of Missouri Western and first author of the research paper. "The research provides yet another example of how powerful and dynamic synthetic biology can be. We used synthetic biology to solve mathematical problems; others find applications in medicine, energy and the environment. Synthetic biology has great potential in the real world."

According to Dr. Eckdahl, the corresponding author of the article, synthetic biology affords a new opportunity for multidisciplinary undergraduate research training. "We have found synthetic biology to be an excellent way to engage students in research that connects biology and mathematics. Our students learn firsthand the value of crossing traditional disciplinary lines."


Journal references:

   1. Jordan Baumgardner, Karen Acker, Oyinade Adefuye, Samuel THOMAS Crowley, Will DeLoache, James O Dickson, Lane Heard, Andrew T Martens, Nickolaus Morton, Michelle Ritter, Amber Shoecraft, Jessica Treece, Matthew Unzicker, Amanda Valencia, Mike Waters, A. M. Campbell, Laurie J. Heyer, Jeffrey L. Poet and Todd T. Eckdahl. Solving a Hamiltonian Path Problem with a bacterial computer. Journal of Biological Engineering, (in press) [link] http://www.jbioleng.org/
   2. Haynes et al. Engineering bacteria to solve the Burnt Pancake Problem. Journal of Biological Engineering, 2008; 2 (1): 8 DOI: 10.1186/1754-1611-2-8 http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/1754-1611-2-8

Adapted from materials provided by BioMed Central http://www.biomedcentral.com/ , via EurekAlert! http://www.eurekalert.org/ , a service of AAAS.


'Bacterial Computers': Genetically Engineered Bacteria Have Potential To Solve Complicated Mathematical Problems http://tinyurl.com/nb2eor
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Online Letsbereal

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Re: 911 and FOX; Terminator: The Sarah Connor Chronicles
« Reply #28 on: July 25, 2009, 08:56:25 pm »
Hamiltonian path
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hamiltonian_path


Photo: Hamiltonian path is a path in an undirected graph which visits each vertex exactly once.



Photo: A Hamiltonian path or traceable path is a path that visits each vertex exactly once.
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Re: 911 and FOX; Terminator: The Sarah Connor Chronicles
« Reply #29 on: July 25, 2009, 09:18:36 pm »
Scientists Worry Machines May Outsmart Man
26 July 2009
, by John Markoff (The New York Times)
http://www.nytimes.com/2009/07/26/science/26robot.html?_r=2&partner=rss&emc=rss

A robot that can open doors and find electrical outlets to recharge itself. Computer viruses that no one can stop. Predator drones http://topics.nytimes.com/top/reference/timestopics/subjects/u/unmanned_aerial_vehicles/index.html?inline=nyt-classifier , which, though still controlled remotely by humans, come close to a machine that can kill

Impressed and alarmed by advances in artificial intelligence, a group of computer scientists is debating whether there should be limits on research that might lead to loss of human control over computer-based systems that carry a growing share of society’s workload, from waging war to chatting with customers on the phone.

Their concern is that further advances could create profound social disruptions and even have dangerous consequences.

As examples, the scientists pointed to a number of technologies as diverse as experimental medical systems that interact with patients to simulate empathy, and computer worms and viruses that defy extermination and could thus be said to have reached a “cockroach” stage of machine intelligence.

While the computer scientists agreed that we are a long way from Hal, the computer that took over the spaceship in “2001: A Space Odyssey,” they said there was legitimate concern that technological progress would transform the work force by destroying a widening range of jobs, as well as force humans to learn to live with machines that increasingly copy human behaviors.

The researchers — leading computer scientists, artificial intelligence researchers and roboticists who met at the Asilomar Conference Grounds on Monterey Bay in California — generally discounted the possibility of highly centralized superintelligences and the idea that intelligence might spring spontaneously from the Internet. But they agreed that robots that can kill autonomously are either already here or will be soon.

They focused particular attention on the specter that criminals could exploit artificial intelligence systems as soon as they were developed. What could a criminal do with a speech synthesis system that could masquerade as a human being? What happens if artificial intelligence technology is used to mine personal information from smart phones?

The researchers also discussed possible threats to human jobs, like self-driving cars, software-based personal assistants and service robots in the home. Just last month, a service robot developed by Willow Garage in Silicon Valley proved it could navigate the real world http://www.nytimes.com/2009/06/09/science/09robot.html?_r=1 .

A report from the conference, which took place in private on Feb. 25, is to be issued later this year http://research.microsoft.com/en-us/um/people/horvitz/AAAI_Presidential_Panel_2008-2009.htm . Some attendees discussed the meeting for the first time with other scientists this month and in interviews.

The conference was organized by the Association for the Advancement of Artificial Intelligence http://www.aaai.org/AITopics/pmwiki/pmwiki.php/AITopics/Ethics , and in choosing Asilomar for the discussions, the group purposefully evoked a landmark event in the history of science. In 1975, the world’s leading biologists also met at Asilomar http://profiles.nlm.nih.gov/CD/Views/Exhibit/narrative/dna.html  to discuss the new ability to reshape life by swapping genetic material among organisms. Concerned about possible biohazards and ethical questions, scientists had halted certain experiments. The conference led to guidelines for recombinant DNA research, enabling experimentation to continue.

The meeting on the future of artificial intelligence was organized by Eric Horvitz, a Microsoft researcher who is now president of the association.

Dr. Horvitz said he believed computer scientists must respond to the notions of superintelligent machines and artificial intelligence systems run amok.

The idea of an “intelligence explosion” in which smart machines would design even more intelligent machines was proposed by the mathematician I. J. Good in 1965. Later, in lectures and science fiction novels, the computer scientist Vernor Vinge popularized the notion of a moment when humans will create smarter-than-human machines, causing such rapid change that the “human era will be ended.” He called this shift the Singularity http://www-rohan.sdsu.edu/faculty/vinge/misc/singularity.html .

This vision, embraced in movies and literature, is seen as plausible and unnerving by some scientists like William Joy, co-founder of Sun Microsystems http://topics.nytimes.com/top/news/business/companies/sun_microsystems_inc/index.html?inline=nyt-org . Other technologists, notably Raymond Kurzweil, have extolled the coming of ultrasmart machines, saying they will offer huge advances in life extension and wealth creation.

“Something new has taken place in the past five to eight years,” Dr. Horvitz said. “Technologists are replacing religion, and their ideas are resonating in some ways with the same idea of the Rapture.”

The Kurzweil version of technological utopia has captured imaginations in Silicon Valley. This summer an organization called the Singularity University began offering courses to prepare a “cadre” to shape the advances and help society cope with the ramifications.

“My sense was that sooner or later we would have to make some sort of statement or assessment, given the rising voice of the technorati and people very concerned about the rise of intelligent machines,” Dr. Horvitz said.

The A.A.A.I. report will try to assess the possibility of “the loss of human control of computer-based intelligences.” It will also grapple, Dr. Horvitz said, with socioeconomic, legal and ethical issues, as well as probable changes in human-computer relationships. How would it be, for example, to relate to a machine that is as intelligent as your spouse?

Dr. Horvitz said the panel was looking for ways to guide research so that technology improved society rather than moved it toward a technological catastrophe. Some research might, for instance, be conducted in a high-security laboratory.

The meeting on artificial intelligence could be pivotal to the future of the field. Paul Berg, who was the organizer of the 1975 Asilomar meeting and received a Nobel Prize http://topics.nytimes.com/top/news/science/topics/nobel_prizes/index.html?inline=nyt-classifier for chemistry in 1980, said it was important for scientific communities to engage the public before alarm and opposition becomes unshakable.

“If you wait too long and the sides become entrenched like with G.M.O.,” he said, referring to genetically modified foods, “then it is very difficult. It’s too complex, and people talk right past each other.”

Tom Mitchell, a professor of artificial intelligence and machine learning at Carnegie Mellon University http://topics.nytimes.com/top/reference/timestopics/organizations/c/carnegie_mellon_university/index.html?inline=nyt-org , said the February meeting had changed his thinking. “I went in very optimistic about the future of A.I. and thinking that Bill Joy and Ray Kurzweil were far off in their predictions,” he said. But, he added, “The meeting made me want to be more outspoken about these issues and in particular be outspoken about the vast amounts of data collected about our personal lives.”

Despite his concerns, Dr. Horvitz said he was hopeful that artificial intelligence research would benefit humans, and perhaps even compensate for human failings. He recently demonstrated a voice-based system http://research.microsoft.com/~horvitz/Medical_Bayesian_Kiosk.wmv  that he designed to ask patients about their symptoms and to respond with empathy. When a mother said her child was having diarrhea, the face on the screen said, “Oh no, sorry to hear that.”

A physician told him afterward that it was wonderful that the system responded to human emotion. “That’s a great idea,” Dr. Horvitz said he was told. “I have no time for that.”


Ken Conley/Willow Garage

For all aditional photos and Links: http://www.nytimes.com/2009/07/26/science/26robot.html?_r=2&partner=rss&emc=rss

Scientists Worry Machines May Outsmart Man - The New York Times  http://tinyurl.com/n67ftl
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Re: 911 and FOX; Terminator: The Sarah Connor Chronicles
« Reply #30 on: July 25, 2009, 09:35:56 pm »
TRANSCRIPT PART OF  "TERMINATOR: The Sarah Conner Chronicles" -"DUNGEONS AND DRAGONS"-
http://terminatorwiki.fox.com/account/BrandonLeigh

"So. Skynet. Robots. From the future? And you're a?..." - Charlie Dixon
"Yes. I'm a..." - Cameron
"You need a..." - Sarah Connor
"A minute?" - Charlie Dixon
"I was gonna say a drink". - Sarah Connor
"Oh yeah, that too..." - Charlie Dixon
"Don't you have an endoskeleton you need to disappear or something?" - Sarah Connor
"Yes. I've already prepared the thermite". - Cameron
"Thermite?" - Charlie Dixon
"It's an incendiary chemical. It burns at twenty-five-hundred degrees Celsius; hot enough to liquefy this endoskeleton". - Cameron
"I... I know what thermite is. I'm just a... still working my way around... endoskeleton". - Charlie Dixon

"Every component must be destroyed beyond repair or recovery. Even a single unaccounted-for piece of the endoskeleton can alter the course of technological evolution and hasten the arrival of Judgment Day". - Cameron
"You know... little girl. You freak me the hell out. On the outside, you're just as pretty as a picture. But, on the inside you're a...". - Charlie Dixon
"Hyperalloy Combat Chassis". - Cameron
"Is that a complicated way of saying robot?" - Charlie Dixon
"Cybernetic organism. Living tissue over a metal endoskeleton". - Cameron
"Okay. Scary robot. And here you are; carving up this guy into chum". - Charlie Dixon
"He's not a guy. He's a scary robot". - Cameron
"Okay, he's a scary robot. But you? You're a very scary robot". - Charlie Dixon
"You should go. It's not safe for you here". - Cameron

-"DUNGEONS AND DRAGONS"-
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Re: 911 and FOX; Terminator: The Sarah Connor Chronicles
« Reply #31 on: July 26, 2009, 06:30:22 pm »
The Patented RFID Ink Tattoo
http://somarkinnovations.com/technology/

The SOMARK technology is an RFID-like tattoo unique to the industry.  Unlike conventional RFID, our product is chipless and features electronic ink for identification. We have competitive advantage with a lower price point, increased retention, easy application and reliable reading.

What’s more, injection of our product is short and simple. No shaving is required and the process takes less than two seconds.

Currently, we have three U.S. issued patents.

Click to read SOMARK Platform Technology Capabilities Paper
http://dev.somarkinnovations.com/wp-content/somark-platform-technology-capabilities-r21.pdf


The four parts of SOMARK Technology

INK CARTRIDGE
Needles and ink constitute disposable cartridge

APPLICATOR
Reusable applicator to apply the tattoo with the ink cartridge (for analogy, the applicator is like a gun and the ink cartridge is like a bullet)

SCANNERS
Scanners read tattoo and translate ID number

MIDDLWARE SOFTWARE
Middleware software, linking SOMARK readers with third-party software

Sarah Conner Chronicles "Getting Lasercoded by the machines"









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Online Letsbereal

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Re: 911 and FOX; Terminator: The Sarah Connor Chronicles
« Reply #32 on: July 28, 2009, 10:56:38 pm »
Robot attacked Swedish factory worker
28 April 2009
, (The Local - Swedens News in English)
http://www.thelocal.se/19120/20090428/

A Swedish company has been fined 25,000 kronor ($3,000) after a malfunctioning robot attacked and almost killed one of its workers at a factory north of Stockholm.

Public prosecutor Leif Johansson mulled pressing charges against the firm but eventually opted to settle for a fine.

"I've never heard of a robot attacking somebody like this," he told news agency TT.

The incident took place in June 2007 at a factory in Bålsta, north of Stockholm, when the industrial worker was trying to carry out maintenance on a defective machine generally used to lift heavy rocks. Thinking he had cut off the power supply, the man approached the robot with no sense of trepidation.

But the robot suddenly came to life and grabbed a tight hold of the victim's head. The man succeeded in defending himself but not before suffering serious injuries.

"The man was very lucky. He broke four ribs and came close to losing his life," said Leif Johansson.

The matter was subject to an investigation by both the Swedish Work Environment Authority (Arbetsmiljöverket) and the police.

Prosecutor Johansson chastised the company for its inadequate safety procedures but he also placed part of the blame on the injured worker.

TT/The Local (news@thelocal.se/08 656 6518)
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Online Letsbereal

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Re: 911 and FOX; Terminator: The Sarah Connor Chronicles
« Reply #33 on: August 04, 2009, 09:35:12 pm »
Expert Warns Of 'Terminator' Robot Threat
4 August 2009
,  (SkyNews)
http://uk.news.yahoo.com/5/20090804/twl-expert-warns-of-terminator-robot-thr-3fd0ae9.html



Wars will be fought more often and civilians face extreme danger if the development of killer robots goes unchecked, a British expert has warned. Skip related content

Professor Noel Sharkey said the technology to create Terminator-style machines already exists and international discussion about its military applications is desperately needed.

The University of Sheffield's professor of artificial intelligence and robotics said action must be taken to limit the development of robots that think for themselves.

"The nub of it is that robots do not have the necessary discriminatory ability. They can't distinguish between combatants and civilians," he said.

"People talk about programming the 'laws of war' into a computer to give robots a conscience, so that if the target is a civilian you don't shoot.

"But for a robot to recognise a civilian you need an exact specification, and one of the problems is there's no specific definition of a civilian.

"Soldiers have to rely on common sense."

Robot weapons, such as the Predator and Reaper drones, have already been used in Iraq and Afghanistan.

The pilotless aircrafts armed with bombs and missiles are used against insurgents - but civilians are often also among those killed.

These machines are controlled by humans, but Prof Sharkey said the rapid progress of "autonomous" robots is concerning.

"The military have a strange view of artificial intelligence based on science fiction," he said.

"The next thing that's coming, and this is what really scares me, are armed autonomous robots. The robot will do the killing itself.

"This will make decision-making faster and allow one person to control many robots.

"A single soldier could initiate a large scale attack from the air and the ground."

While Prof Sharkey suggested that scenario was still a long way off, he said robot arms control was an important debate that needed attention.
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Offline nustada

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Re: 911 and FOX; Terminator: The Sarah Connor Chronicles
« Reply #34 on: August 04, 2009, 09:41:13 pm »
I don't know what the agenda of this show was, but it definitely played off the fears of the paranoid (or the rational depending on your POV) among us. I came upon it late, and I watched it online, and a wished it wasn't canceled. Its was a good story despite the horrible character selection. (A stiff breeze could have killed any of the thin-fleshed characters on that show, yet a alone a semi-indestructible robot.)

Online Letsbereal

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Re: 911 and FOX; Terminator: The Sarah Connor Chronicles
« Reply #36 on: August 09, 2009, 03:32:57 pm »
First steps into the robotics boom
9 August 2009
, by Robin Harding in Tokyo (The Financial Times)
http://www.ft.com/cms/s/0/67702488-8502-11de-9a64-00144feabdc0.html



An hour’s drive east of Tokyo, in a cavernous new building in Tsukuba Science City, a company called Cyberdyne is working on a robot called Hal.

Rest easy. Cyberdyne Systems may have been the fictional corporation responsible for the Terminator, a cyborg assassin in the film, and HAL-9000 the computer from 2001: A Space Odyssey, but the goal of Yoshiyuki Sankai, the company’s science-fiction-loving founder, is to make robots that help people rather than exterminate them.

In its work on “assistance robots”, Cyberdyne is at the forefront of what Japan’s government hopes will be a vast new industry and a way to address health and economic issues raised by the dramatic ageing of Japan’s population.

Rather than accept economic decline or allow large-scale immigration to supplement the decreasing population, Japan imagines an army of robot workers.

The strategy is spelt out in a science and technology white paper published by the government this year.

“By 2025, over 30 per cent of Japan’s population is expected to be over 65 . . . At the same time, the number of children will continue to fall, leading to shortages in labour to care for elderly and disabled people, and an increased burden on each care worker,” the white paper says.

It concludes: “In this environment, robots that support people’s independence and cars that are easy to use . . . will be essential.”

This potential has led many of Japan’s largest companies to invest in robotics.

Toyota and Honda have well-funded programmes to build humanoid assistance robots. Trading company Sumitomo and Fuji Heavy Industries, which makes cars under the Subaru brand, are trying to sell cleaning robots.

And Panasonic is launching a robotic drug dispensary in Japan this year and sees robotics as an attractive future market.

“The development of robots as a business is going to make considerable progress,” said Fumio Ohtsubo, president of Panasonic, in a recent interview with the Financial Times.

“The characteristic precision and attention to detail of Japanese people and companies will be well suited to developing safe robots.”

Cyberdyne differs in that it is building not a free-standing robot but an exoskeleton, which attaches to and amplifies the human body.

Hal – which at Cyberdyne stands for hybrid assisted limb – is a series of white plastic plates, with a motor at each joint such as the hip and elbow, which strap on to the outside of the arms and legs to provide additional power.

“Basically, you can pick up something weighing 40kg like this,” says Mitsuhiro Sakamoto, Cyberdyne’s chief operating officer, taking his pen from the desk.

That is only the physical part of the HAL, however. “Our core technology is to detect bioelectric signals and then co-ordinate that with the movement of the suit,” Mr Sakamoto says.

Through sensors attached to the skin, Hal detects and interprets electrical signals from the brain telling the arm or leg to move, and activates the exoskeleton simultaneously.

Cyberdyne is aiming for three main areas of application, Mr Sakamoto says. First, in rehabilitation, where a Hal suit or limb can help someone who is recovering after an accident to walk.

Second, in helping those who cannot walk to do so, including the possibility of completely artificial limbs that detect weak electrical signals from elsewhere in the body.

The third application is in support for heavy work, such as moving patients between beds in a nursing home.

Mr Sakamoto showed video of elderly patients using Hal to walk – somewhat jerkily – and the FT was able to move a robot forearm by means of a sensor attached to the skin.

Hal went into commercial use last month, although the technology is still far from perfect.

The average price is Y170,000 ($1,750) a month for a five-year rental. A single limb costs Y150,000, while a full “passenger suit” is Y220,000. Hal is being used in three hospitals in Japan, Mr Sakamoto says, and Cyberdyne is working with a partner in Denmark to bring the product to Europe.

If the company turns a profit next year, as Mr Sakamoto hopes, that will have been made possible by the extensive research and development grants it receives from the Japanese government.

Four rounds of venture capital have raised Y4bn to fund commercial development. Daiwa House has been the biggest external investor.

Prof Sankai retains 90 per cent voting control, however, because of his determination to see that Hal is never used in its obvious military applications.

If Hal fulfils its promise, Japan will be a nation of pensioners in powered suits hurling boulders like snowballs. Let us hope they never hear the words of Hal in 2001, when they go to open the front door: “I’m sorry, Dave, I’m afraid I can’t do that.”


First steps into the robotics boom: In its work on "assistance robots", Cyberdyne is at the forefront of what Ja.. http://bit.ly/T3Hfi
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Online Letsbereal

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Re: 911 and FOX; Terminator: The Sarah Connor Chronicles
« Reply #37 on: August 12, 2009, 01:35:36 pm »
Robots Trained To Fire On People
By David Mantey, Editor, PD&D
http://www.pddnet.com/column-robots-trained-to-fire-on-people-081209/

It’s a Star Wars dream or nightmare depending on whom you side with. Personally, I’m going to have to side against anything proihuman annihilation. But it seems like the dark side always has the more advanced weaponry.

Among the many *calls for action by the panel of industry experts August 5 at NIWeek in Austin, TX, a few tidbits of info caught my attention and caused spastic Terminator-esque doomsday scenarios in my mind.
*calls for action http://www.pddnet.com/column-the-great-american-lie-081109/

I can’t be held responsible, the panel brought up the subject. Apparently, one question that Dr. David Barrett, director of the Senior Capstone Program in Engineering (SCOPE) at Olin College often fields, relates to human vs. droid futuristic scenarios that don’t stray far from the basic plot behind the Terminator franchise.

The subject sprang up as a result of a question from the audience that boiled down to the ethical debate in innovation. How do we know if/when we’ve gone too far? Would we know or would it be too late?

Essentially, the panelists stated that technology is a tool, and like any tool, it comes with great responsibility. Hearing the Yoda bubble to the top? Luckily, the panel brought it back down to earth by adding … but don’t be naïve.

As long as we have innovators striving towards the utopian greater good, we cannot refute the fact that others are working just as hard – if not harder – to counteract any good we try and add to this planet in our 80-odd years on board.

The crowd was coming to terms with the current cloud lurking over our sunshine and lollipop naivety when Ellen Purdy, enterprise director of joint ground robotics for the U.S. Department of Defense (DoD), appropriately added that the autonomous weapon is coming.

While Purdy stated that the DoD didn’t have a hand in financing or developing the project, she was aware of “robots trained [programmed] to fire on people.” Suddenly, I don’t feel nearly as qualified to battle a droid army as I did when my brothers and I pushed a battalion back into my father’s field and successfully defended the Eagle’s Nest with canes, bats and two sticks tied to the ends of a broken swing that served as a custom nunchuck.

The implications of the evil genius. I suppose that if we’re equipping kids with programming software along with their LEGO sets, it’s not too far of a reach to discuss a hobbyist who builds a robotic guard dog that snipes trespassers.

Specifics weren’t given, but the sometimes grim undeniable candor from the panel was chilling. Then again, are we not just as foolish when we turn a blind eye? When new ground in robotics, or any new technology, is broken, it’s ludicrous to sit back and say, “You know what? I have a good feeling about this vision system – I’m sure nobody would try to program it to recognize and annihilate a human.”

We have a divide when it comes to thinking whether or not we should when we’re gripped with the excitement of challenging ourselves to see whether or not we could.

When asked her opinion on the subject, Jeanne Dietsch, CEO and cofounder of MobileRobots, was concise. “Do we have anything to worry about?” The question echoed through the ballroom as we awaited her reply. She answered, “Yes.”   
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Online Letsbereal

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Re: 911 and FOX; Terminator: The Sarah Connor Chronicles
« Reply #38 on: August 12, 2009, 02:19:32 pm »

THE DON’T NEED HUMANS ANYMORE FOR LABOUR!

UK scientists are developing intelligent harvesting to save thousands a year. http://bit.ly/1bDsZq
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Re: 911 and FOX; Terminator: The Sarah Connor Chronicles
« Reply #39 on: August 13, 2009, 12:26:57 pm »
US military embraces robot 'revolution'
13 August 2009
, by Dan De Luce
http://www.physorg.com/news169378206.html



A prototype of the X-47B Navy Unmannded Combat Air System (UCAS) sits
on diplay at Naval Air Station Pax River Webster Field Annex in St. Inigoes,
Maryland, on August 10. The X-47B, made by Northrop Grumman
Corporation, is to demonstrate the first-ever carrier-based autonomous
launches and recoveries.


Robots in the sky and on the ground are transforming warfare, and the US military is rushing to recruit the new warriors that never sleep and never bleed.

The latest robotics were on display at an industry show this week at a naval airfield in Maryland, with a pilotless helicopter buzzing overhead and a "Wall-E" look-alike robot on the ground craning its neck to peer into a window.

The chopper, the MQ-8B Fire Scout, is no tentative experiment and later this year will be operating from a naval frigate, the USS McInerney, to help track drug traffickers in the eastern Pacific Ocean, Navy officers said.

The rugged little robot searching an enemy building is called a Pakbot, which can climb over rocks with tank treads, pick up an explosive with its mechanical arm and dismantle it while a soldier directs the machine from a safe distance.

There are already 2,500 of them on the ground in Iraq and Afghanistan, and a lighter version weighing six kilograms (14 pounds) has arrived that can be carried in a backpack, according to iRobot, the same company that sells a robot vaccum to civilians, the Roomba.

Monday's demonstration of robotic wonders was organized by defense contractors and the US Navy, which says it wants to lead the American military into a new age where tedious or high-risk jobs are handed over to robots.

"I think we're at the beginning of an unmanned revolution," Gary Kessler, who oversees unmanned aviation programs for the US Navy and Marines, told AFP.

"We're spending billions of dollars on unmanned systems."

Kessler and other Pentagon officials compare the robots to the introduction of the aircraft or the tank, a new technology that dramatically changes strategy and tactics.

Robots or "unmanned systems" are now deployed by the thousands in Iraq and Afghanistan, spying from the sky for hours on end, searching for booby-traps and firing lethal missiles without putting US soldiers at risk.

The use of robotics in the military has exploded in the past several years as technology has advanced while Washington faced a new kind of enemy that required patient, precise surveillance.

In 2003, the US military had almost no robots in its arsenal but now has 7,000 unmanned aircraft and at least 10,000 ground vehicles.

The US Air Force, which initially resisted the idea of pilotless planes, said it trains more operators for unmanned aircraft than pilots for its fighter jets and bombers.

Peter Singer, author of "Wired for War," writes that future wars may see tens of thousands of unmanned vehicles in action, possibly facing off against fleets of enemy robots.

Unlike expensive weapons from the Cold War-era, robotic vehicles are not off-limits to countries with modest defense budgets and dozens of governments are investing in unmanned programs.

At the trade show, military officers from the United States, Chile, Australia, Saudi Arabia and India listened to defense contractors promote their robotic vehicles, including a tiny helicopter about two-feet long and L3's Mobius -- a nimble medium-sized drone that reaches speeds of up to 215 knots.

The technology may sometimes resemble something out of "Star Wars" or a toy shop, but the robots determine matters of life and death on the battlefront.

In the fight against Al-Qaeda, drones are Washington's favored weapon.

Predator and Reaper aircraft, armed with precision-guided bombs and Hellfire missiles, regularly carry out strikes in Pakistan's northwest tribal area, causing an unknown number of civilian casualties.

Last week, a drone strike is believed to have have killed the Pakistani Taliban leader Baitullah Mehsud.

The unmanned aircraft in the US military's inventory range from small Ravens, that can be tossed into the air to see over the next hill, to the giant Global Hawk, a 44-foot-long spy plane that can fly at high altitude for up to 35 hours.

The drones and ground vehicles are often operated using joysticks or consoles familiar to a younger generation raised on video games.

"Soldiers these days have a lot of experience playing video games when they're growing up, and they're really familiar with these controls. So this really reduces the training time on these types of unmanned vehicles," said Charlie Vaida of iRobot, which makes a game console for the Pakbot.

Amid plans for unmanned bomber jets for aircraft carriers, the onslaught of drones could eventually render fighter aces a relic of history.

Military officers insist the robots are a complement and not a substitute for traditional aircraft, and pose no threat to the careers of their fellow pilots.

"I think they understand we're not going to replace them," said Captain Tim Dunnigan, a navy chopper pilot. "This is going to augment them."
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