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Author Topic: Education Reform!  (Read 41899 times)
Geolibertarian
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« on: January 23, 2009, 12:55:00 PM »

As anyone who follows electoral politics knows, for many decades candidates from both major parties have been parroting the same old empty rhetoric about how determined they are to "improve" or "reform" our so-called "education" system. Yet, whether from ignorance or willful complicity, they never tell people that the compulsory government school system is producing precisely the pathetic results it was designed to produce (which is why throwing more tax money at it has never worked, nor ever will work):

-----------------------------------------

http://web.archive.org/web/20110807193530/http://www.johntaylorgatto.com/hp/frames.htm

[Alexander] Inglis, for whom a lecture in education at Harvard is named, makes it perfectly clear that compulsory schooling on this continent was intended to be just what it had been for Prussia in the 1820s: a fifth column into the burgeoning democratic movement that threatened to give the peasants and the proletarians a voice at the bargaining table. Modern, industrialized, compulsory schooling was to make a sort of surgical incision into the prospective unity of these underclasses. Divide children by subject, by age-grading, by constant rankings on tests, and by many other more subtle means, and it was unlikely that the ignorant mass of mankind, separated in childhood, would ever reintegrate into a dangerous whole.
  
Inglis breaks down the purpose -- the actual purpose -- of modem schooling into six basic functions, any one of which is enough to curl the hair of those innocent enough to believe the three traditional goals listed earlier:
  
1) The adjustive or adaptive function. Schools are to establish fixed habits of reaction to authority. This, of course, precludes critical judgment completely. It also pretty much destroys the idea that useful or interesting material should be taught, because you can't test for reflexive obedience until you know whether you can make kids learn, and do, foolish and boring things.
  
2) The integrating function. This might well be called "the conformity function," because its intention is to make children as alike as possible. People who conform are predictable, and this is of great use to those who wish to harness and manipulate a large labor force.
  
3) The diagnostic and directive function. School is meant to determine each student's proper social role. This is done by logging evidence mathematically and anecdotally on cumulative records. As in "your permanent record." Yes, you do have one.
  
4) The differentiating function. Once their social role has been "diagnosed," children are to be sorted by role and trained only so far as their destination in the social machine merits -- and not one step further. So much for making kids their personal best.

5) The selective function. This refers not to human choice at all but to Darwin's theory of natural selection as applied to what he called "the favored races." In short, the idea is to help things along by consciously attempting to improve the breeding stock. Schools are meant to tag the unfit -- with poor grades, remedial placement, and other punishments -- clearly enough that their peers will accept them as inferior and effectively bar them from the reproductive sweepstakes. That's what all those little humiliations from first grade onward were intended to do: wash the dirt down the drain.

6) The propaedeutic function. The societal system implied by these rules will require an elite group of caretakers. To that end, a small fraction of the kids will quietly be taught how to manage this continuing project, how to watch over and control a population deliberately dumbed down and declawed in order that government might proceed unchallenged and corporations might never want for obedient labor.
 
That, unfortunately, is the purpose of mandatory public education in this country. And lest you take Inglis for an isolated crank with a rather too cynical take on the educational enterprise, you should know that he was hardly alone in championing these ideas. Conant himself, building on the ideas of Horace Mann and others, campaigned tirelessly for an American school system designed along the same lines. Men like George Peabody, who funded the cause of mandatory schooling throughout the South, surely understood that the Prussian system was useful in creating not only a harmless electorate and a servile labor force but also a virtual herd of mindless consumers. In time a great number of industrial titans came to recognize the enormous profits to be had by cultivating and tending just such a herd via public education, among them Andrew Carnegie and John D. Rockefeller.

[Continued...]


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fsDuL4jTkz0

George Carlin on education and the "real owners" of America

But if you talk to one of them about this -- if you isolate them, sit 'em down, rationally, and you talk to 'em about the low IQs and the dumb behavior and the bad decisions -- right away they start talking about education. That's the big answer to everything: education. They say we need more money for education. We need more books, more teachers, more classrooms, more schools; we need more testing for the kids.

And you say to them, "Well, you know we've tried all of that, and the kids still can't pass the tests." And they say, "Ah, don't you worry about that, because we're going to lower the passing grades." And that's what they do in a lot of these schools, now, they lower the passing grades so more kids can pass -- more kids pass, the school looks good, everybody's happy, the IQ of the country slips another 2 or 3 points, and pretty soon all you'll need to get into college is a f**kin' pencil. Got a pencil? Get the f**k in there, it's physics.

Then everyone wonders why 17 other countries graduate more scientists than we do. "Education" -- politicians know that word, they use it on you. Politicians have traditionally hidden behind 3 things: the flag, the bible, and children -- "no child left behind; no child left behind." Oh, really? It wasn't too long ago you were talking about giving children a "head start." Head start? Left behind? Someone's losing f**king ground here.

But there's a reason...There's a reason for this. There's a reason education sucks, and it's the same reason it will never, ever, ever be fixed. It's never gonna get any better, don't look for it, be happy with whatcha got.

Because the owners of this country don't want that. I'm talkin about the real owners now: the big wealthy business interests that control things and make all the important decisions. Forget the politicians; they're irrelevant. The politicians are put there to give you the idea that you have freedom of choice. You don't. You have no choice. You have owners. They own you. They own everything. They own all the important land. They own and control the corporations. They've long since bought and paid for the Senate, the Congress, the statehouses, the city halls; they've got the judges in their back pockets; and they own all the big media companies, so they control just about all of the news and information you get to hear. They've got you by the balls. They spend billions of dollars every year lobbying...to get what they want. Well we know what they want: they want more for themselves and less for everybody else.
  
But I'll tell you what they don't want. They don't want a population of citizens capable of critical thinking. They don't want well-informed, well-educated people capable of critical thinking. They're not interested in that. That doesn't help them. That's against their interests. That's right. You know something? They don't want people who are smart enough to sit around the kitchen table and figure out how badly they're getting f**ked by a system that threw them overboard 30 f**kin' years ago. They don't want that.
  
You know what they want? They want obedient workers, obedient workers -- people who are just smart enough to run the machines and do the paperwork, and just dumb enough to passively accept all these increasingly sh*ttier jobs with the lower pay, the longer hours, the reduced benefits, the end of overtime and the vanishing pension that disappears the minute you go to collect it. And now, they're comin' for your Social Security money. They want your f**kin' retirement money. They want it back, so they can give it to their criminal friends on Wall Street. And you know somethin'? They'll get it. They'll get it all from ya sooner or later, because they own this f**kin' place. It's a big club, and you ain't in it. You and I are not in the big club.

[Continued...]

-----------------------------------------

"Well that sucks!" I can hear some people saying, "What should we do to solve this?"

IMHO, we should do the following six things.

First and foremost, end federal involvement, and pass the savings onto the bottom 90% of income earners:

       http://www.deliberatedumbingdown.com
       http://www.hslda.org/docs/nche/000000/00000063.asp
       http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hNFOGiHEw8Q (Peg Luksik: Who Controls Our Children?)
       http://www.cato.org/research/federal-education-policy

Second, repeal compulsory attendance laws (and thereby make government schools "public" in the same sense that libraries are "public"):

       http://fff.org/explore-freedom/article/compulsory-school-attendance-laws-part-1/

Third, repeal teacher certification laws:

       http://www.hslda.org/docs/nche/000002/00000214.asp

Fourth, as long as there's any sort of income tax at any level of government, grant dollar-for-dollar tax credits to parents who choose to send their kids to private school:

       http://www.lewrockwell.com/dieteman/dieteman86.html

Fifth, reform the property tax (which practically goes hand-in-hand with the issue of public schooling) so that houses, buildings and other improvements are all exempt, thus making it a land value tax. The success of the "split-rate" property tax proves this can be done:

       http://www.earthrights.net/docs/success.html
       http://savingcommunities.org/issues/race.html

Sixth, to alleviate fear as to how children from poor households will be educated, pass a law that maintains the tax dollar-per-student ratio at its current level, but which prohibits it from increasing.

Thus, as working families' discretionary income rises due to the 1st, 4th and 5th reforms, thereby increasing their ability to afford private education; and as price-lowering competition among private educators rises due to the 2nd and 3rd reforms -- thereby increasing affordability even further -- the percentage of parents who send their kids to government schools will come down gracefully own its own, and with it the amount of tax money needed to fund these schools (due to the aforementioned freeze on the tax dollar-per-student ratio).
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"Abolish all taxation save that upon land values." -- Henry George

"If our nation can issue a dollar bond, it can issue a dollar bill." -- Thomas Edison

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JonTheSavage
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« Reply #1 on: January 23, 2009, 01:00:54 PM »

The ONLY way for kids to get a proper education is being home schooled, or a private school that doesn't teach government propaganda.
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Geolibertarian
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« Reply #2 on: January 23, 2009, 01:07:18 PM »

The ONLY way for kids to get a proper education is being home schooled, or a private school that doesn't teach government propaganda.

Agreed, the question is how do we get from here to there. Hence the reform measures and supportive links I listed in my last post.

On a side note, since homeschooling is "private" by definition, I use "private education" as an all-encompassing term for both homeschooling and private schooling.
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"Abolish all taxation save that upon land values." -- Henry George

"If our nation can issue a dollar bond, it can issue a dollar bill." -- Thomas Edison

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« Reply #3 on: January 23, 2009, 05:20:34 PM »

how about we reform and educate those who make the education policies by hanging them by their necks from trees?
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« Reply #4 on: January 24, 2009, 12:02:21 PM »

Great post Geo!

Quote
5) The selective function. This refers not to human choice at all but to Darwin's theory of natural selection as applied to what he called "the favored races." In short, the idea is to help things along by consciously attempting to improve the breeding stock. Schools are meant to tag the unfit -- with poor grades, remedial placement, and other punishments -- clearly enough that their peers will accept them as inferior and effectively bar them from the reproductive sweepstakes. That's what all those little humiliations from first grade onward were intended to do: wash the dirt down the drain.

... allowing the better-brainwashed to grow into their ruling class roles and perpetuate the scam even further. I wonder, though, if the chosen breeding stock is 'in the know', or if you can think of that group in a hierarchical/compartmentalized way too (like right to the top)?

About IQ: isn't that just a measure of one's adherence to the official line?

Quote
First and foremost, end federal involvement, and pass the savings onto the bottom 3/4 of income earners:

I prefer to give the money back (or to stop stealing it in the first place): under what moral authority can it just be redistributed some other way?
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Geolibertarian
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« Reply #5 on: January 24, 2009, 12:11:37 PM »

About IQ: isn't that just a measure of one's adherence to the official line?

I've never researched the history of the IQ test, so I honestly don't know.

Quote
I prefer to give the money back

That's what "pass the savings onto" means.

Quote
(or to stop stealing it in the first place):

Reducing the individual income tax for the bottom 90% in proportion to current DoE outlays would do precisely that.

Quote
under what moral authority can it just be redistributed some other way?

See above. If you're wondering why I exempted the top 10% from the resultant "savings," it's to offset both (a) the fact that, for all practical purposes, that top 10% literally "owns" this country, and (b) the fact that the payroll tax falls much harder on the bottom 90% than it does the top 10%.
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"Abolish all taxation save that upon land values." -- Henry George

"If our nation can issue a dollar bond, it can issue a dollar bill." -- Thomas Edison

http://webofdebt.com
http://schalkenbach.org
http://forum.prisonplanet.com/index.php?topic=203330.0
scoffer
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« Reply #6 on: January 24, 2009, 03:56:50 PM »

They failed miserably, 0/6, on me.


1) The adjustive or adaptive function. Schools are to establish fixed habits of reaction to authority. This, of course, precludes critical judgment completely. It also pretty much destroys the idea that useful or interesting material should be taught, because you can't test for reflexive obedience until you know whether you can make kids learn, and do, foolish and boring things.
 
2) The integrating function. This might well be called "the conformity function," because its intention is to make children as alike as possible. People who conform are predictable, and this is of great use to those who wish to harness and manipulate a large labor force.
 
3) The diagnostic and directive function. School is meant to determine each student's proper social role. This is done by logging evidence mathematically and anecdotally on cumulative records. As in "your permanent record." Yes, you do have one.
 
4) The differentiating function. Once their social role has been "diagnosed," children are to be sorted by role and trained only so far as their destination in the social machine merits -- and not one step further. So much for making kids their personal best.

5) The selective function. This refers not to human choice at all but to Darwin's theory of natural selection as applied to what he called "the favored races." In short, the idea is to help things along by consciously attempting to improve the breeding stock. Schools are meant to tag the unfit -- with poor grades, remedial placement, and other punishments -- clearly enough that their peers will accept them as inferior and effectively bar them from the reproductive sweepstakes. That's what all those little humiliations from first grade onward were intended to do: wash the dirt down the drain.

6) The propaedeutic function. The societal system implied by these rules will require an elite group of caretakers. To that end, a small fraction of the kids will quietly be taught how to manage this continuing project, how to watch over and control a population deliberately dumbed down and declawed in order that government might proceed unchallenged and corporations might never want for obedient labor
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heavyhebrew
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« Reply #7 on: January 24, 2009, 04:02:30 PM »

Great post Geolibertarian!

And it would work naturally. Those areas that slack on education do not thrive, those that do do. So we would figure out rather quickly, what works and what doesn't.
And the tax saving plan would really benefit homeschooling families the most.
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« Reply #8 on: January 24, 2009, 05:00:21 PM »

The public school system was set in motion by Dewey the NWO clone...

"Train up a child in the way he [she] should go: and when he [she] is old, he [she] will not depart from it." Proverbs 22:6

It does not matter if you believe in the Bible or not...what counts is HOW THE PARENT RAISES THE CHILD....

( i happen to believe in the Bible and i home schooled both my Son and my Daughter)

America has become illiterate by design....

Young children need LOVE first...then the lessons.. Wink
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« Reply #9 on: January 24, 2009, 05:31:19 PM »

Peg Luksik Saw the light in 92
http://www.youtube.com/view_play_list?p=F736434B2A69194B

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« Reply #10 on: June 22, 2010, 09:02:20 AM »

The Seven-Lesson Schoolteacher

by John Taylor Gatto - 1991 New York State Teacher of the Year


Call me Mr. Gatto, please. Twenty-six years ago, having nothing better to do at the time, I tried my hand at schoolteaching. The license I hold certifies that I am an instructor of English language and English literature, but that isn't what I do at all. I don't teach English, I teach school -- and I win awards doing it.

Teaching means different things in different places, but seven lessons are universally taught from Harlem to Hollywood Hills. They constitute a national curriculum you pay for in more ways than you can imagine, so you might as well know what it is. You are at liberty, of course, to regard these lessons any way you like, but believe me when I say I intend no irony in this presentation. These are the things I teach, these are the things you pay me to teach. Make of them what you will.

1. CONFUSION

A lady named Kathy wrote this to me from Dubois, Indiana the other day:

    "What big ideas are important to little kids? Well, the biggest idea I think they need is that what they are learning isn't idiosyncratic -- that there is some system to it all and it's not just raining down on them as they helplessly absorb. That's the task, to understand, to make coherent."

Kathy has it wrong. The first lesson I teach is confusion. Everything I teach is out of context. I teach the un-relating of everything. I teach disconnections. I teach too much: the orbiting of planets, the law of large numbers, slavery, adjectives, architectural drawing, dance, gymnasium, choral singing, assemblies, surprise guests, fire drills, computer languages, parents' nights, staff-development days, pull-out programs, guidance with strangers my students may never see again, standardized tests, age-segregation unlike anything seen in the outside world....What do any of these things have to do with each other?

Even in the best schools a close examination of curriculum and its sequences turns up a lack of coherence, full of internal contradictions. Fortunately the children have no words to define the panic and anger they feel at constant violations of natural order and sequence fobbed off on them as quality in education. The logic of the school-mind is that it is better to leave school with a tool kit of superficial jargon derived from economics, sociology, natural science and so on than to leave with one genuine enthusiasm. But quality in education entails learning about something in depth. Confusion is thrust upon kids by too many strange adults, each working alone with only the thinnest relationship with each other, pretending for the most part, to an expertise they do not possess.

Meaning, not disconnected facts, is what sane human beings seek, and education is a set of codes for processing raw facts into meaning. Behind the patchwork quilt of school sequences and the school obsession with facts and theories, the age-old human search lies well concealed. This is harder to see in elementary school where the hierarchy of school experience seems to make better sense because the good-natured simple relationship of "let's do this" and "let's do that" is just assumed to mean something and the clientele has not yet consciously discerned how little substance is behind the play and pretense.

Think of the great natural sequences like learning to walk and learning to talk; following the progression of light from sunrise to sunset; witnessing the ancient procedures of a farmer, a smithy, or a shoemaker; watching your mother prepare a Thanksgiving feast -- all of the parts are in perfect harmony with each other, each action justifies itself and illuminates the past and the future. School sequences aren't like that, not inside a single class and not among the total menu of daily classes. School sequences are crazy. There is no particular reason for any of them, nothing that bears close scrutiny. Few teachers would dare to teach the tools whereby dogmas of a school or a teacher could be criticized since everything must be accepted. School subjects are learned, if they can be learned, like children learn the catechism or memorize the Thirty-nine Articles of Anglicanism.

I teach the un-relating of everything, an infinite fragmentation the opposite of cohesion; what I do is more related to television programming than to making a scheme of order. In a world where home is only a ghost, because both parents work, or because too many moves or too many job changes or too much ambition, or because something else has left everybody too confused to maintain a family relation, I teach you how to accept confusion as your destiny. That's the first lesson I teach.

2. CLASS POSITION

The second lesson I teach is class position. I teach that students must stay in the class where they belong. I don't know who decides my kids belong there but that's not my business. The children are numbered so that if any get away they can be returned to the right class. Over the years the variety of ways children are numbered by schools has increased dramatically, until it is hard to see the human beings plainly under the weight of numbers they carry. Numbering children is a big and very profitable undertaking, though what the strategy is designed to accomplish is elusive. I don't even know why parents would, without a fight, allow it to be done to their kids.

In any case, again, that's not my business. My job is to make them like it, being locked in together with children who bear numbers like their own. Or at the least to endure it like good sports. If I do my job well, the kids can't even imagine themselves somewhere else, because I've shown them how to envy and fear the better classes and how to have contempt for the dumb classes. Under this efficient discipline the class mostly polices itself into good marching order. That's the real lesson of any rigged competition like school. You come to know your place.

In spite of the overall class blueprint, which assumes that ninety-nine percent of the kids are in their class to stay, I nevertheless make a public effort to exhort children to higher levels of test success, hinting at eventual transfer from the lower class as a reward. I frequently insinuate that the day will come when an employer will hire them on the basis of test scores and grades, even though my own experience is that employers are rightly indifferent to such things. I never lie outright, but I've come to see that truth and schoolteaching are, at bottom, incompatible, just as Socrates said they were thousands of years ago. The lesson of numbered classes is that everyone has a proper place in the pyramid and that there is no way out of your class except by number magic. Failing that, you must stay where you are put.

3. INDIFFERENCE

The third lesson I teach kids is indifference. I teach children not to care about anything too much, even though they want to make it appear that they do. How I do this is very subtle. I do it by demanding that they become totally involved in my lessons, jumping up and down in their seats with anticipation, competing vigorously with each other for my favor. It's heartwarming when they do that; it impresses everyone, even me. When I'm at my best I plan lessons very carefully in order to produce this show of enthusiasm. But when the bell rings I insist that they stop whatever it is that we've been working on and proceed quickly to the next work station. They must turn on and off like a light switch. Nothing important is ever finished in my class, nor in any other class I know of. Students never have a complete experience except on the installment plan.

Indeed, the lesson of the bells is that no work is worth finishing, so why care too deeply about anything? Years of bells will condition all but the strongest to a world that can no longer offer important work to do. Bells are the secret logic of schooltime; their logic is inexorable. Bells destroy the past and future, converting every interval into a sameness, as the abstraction of a map renders every living mountain and river the same, even though they are not. Bells inoculate each undertaking with indifference.

4. EMOTIONAL DEPENDENCY

The fourth lesson I teach is emotional dependency. By stars and red checks, smiles and frowns, prizes, honors and disgraces I teach kids to surrender their will to the predestined chain of command. Rights may be granted or withheld by any authority without appeal, because rights do not exist inside a school -- not even the right of free speech, as the Supreme Court has ruled -- unless school authorities say they do. As a schoolteacher, I intervene in many personal decisions, issuing a pass for those I deem legitimate, or initiating a disciplinary confrontation for behavior that threatens my control. Individuality is constantly trying to assert itself among children and teenagers, so my judgments come thick and fast. Individuality is a contradiction of class theory, a curse to all systems of classification.

Here are some common ways it shows up: children sneak away for a private moment in the toilet on the pretext of moving their bowels, or they steal a private instant in the hallway on the grounds they need water. I know they don't, but I allow them to deceive me because this conditions them to depend on my favors. Sometimes free will appears right in front of me in children angry, depressed or happy about things outside my ken; rights in such matters cannot be recognized by schoolteachers, only privileges that can be withdrawn, hostages to good behavior.

5. INTELLECTUAL DEPENDENCY

The fifth lesson I teach is intellectual dependency. Good people wait for a teacher to tell them what to do. It is the most important lesson, that we must wait for other people, better trained than ourselves, to make the meanings of our lives. The expert makes all the important choices; only I, the teacher, can determine what you must study, or rather, only the people who pay me can make those decisions which I then enforce. If I'm told that evolution is a fact instead of a theory, I transmit that as ordered, punishing deviants who resist what I have been told to tell them to think. This power to control what children will think lets me separate successful students from failures very easily.

Successful children do the thinking I appoint them with a minimum of resistance and a decent show of enthusiasm. Of the millions of things of value to study, I decide what few we have time for, or actually it is decided by my faceless employers. The choices are theirs, why should I argue? Curiosity has no important place in my work, only conformity.

Bad kids fight this, of course, even though they lack the concepts to know what they are fighting, struggling to make decisions for themselves about what they will learn and when they will learn it. How can we allow that and survive as schoolteachers? Fortunately there are procedures to break the will of those who resist; it is more difficult, naturally, if the kid has respectable parents who come to his aid, but that happens less and less in spite of the bad reputation of schools. No middle-class parents I have ever met actually believe that their kid's school is one of the bad ones. Not one single parent in twenty-six years of teaching. That's amazing and probably the best testimony to what happens to families when mother and father have been well-schooled themselves, learning the seven lessons.

Good people wait for an expert to tell them what to do. It is hardly an exaggeration to say that our entire economy depends upon this lesson being learned. Think of what would fall apart if kids weren't trained to be dependent: the social-service businesses could hardly survive; they would vanish, I think, into the recent historical limbo out of which they arose. Counselors and therapists would look on in horror as the supply of psychic invalids vanished. Commercial entertainment of all sorts, including television, would wither as people learned again how to make their own fun. Restaurants, prepared-food and a whole host of other assorted food services would be drastically down-sized if people returned to making their own meals rather than depending on strangers to plant, pick, chop, and cook for them. Much of modern law, medicine, and engineering would go too, the clothing business and schoolteaching as well, unless a guaranteed supply of helpless people continued to pour out of our schools each year.

Don't be too quick to vote for radical school reform if you want to continue getting a paycheck. We've built a way of life that depends on people doing what they are told because they don't know how to tell themselves what to do. It's one of the biggest lessons I teach.

6. PROVISIONAL SELF-ESTEEM

The sixth lesson I teach is provisional self-esteem. If you've ever tried to wrestle a kid into line whose parents have convinced him to believe they'll love him in spite of anything, you know how impossible it is to make self-confident spirits conform. Our world wouldn't survive a flood of confident people very long, so I teach that your self-respect should depend on expert opinion. My kids are constantly evaluated and judged.

A monthly report, impressive in its provision, is sent into students' homes to signal approval or to mark exactly, down to a single percentage point, how dissatisfied with their children parents should be. The ecology of "good" schooling depends upon perpetuating dissatisfaction just as much as the commercial economy depends on the same fertilizer. Although some people might be surprised how little time or reflection goes into making up these mathematical records, the cumulative weight of the objective-seeming documents establishes a profile that compels children to arrive at certain decisions about themselves and their futures based on the casual judgment of strangers. Self-evaluation, the staple of every major philosophical system that ever appeared on the planet, is never considered a factor. The lesson of report cards, grades, and tests is that children should not trust themselves or their parents but should instead rely on the evaluation of certified officials. People need to be told what they are worth.

7. ONE CAN'T HIDE

The seventh lesson I teach is that one can't hide. I teach children they are always watched, that each is under constant surveillance by myself and my colleagues. There are no private spaces for children, there is no private time. Class change lasts three hundred seconds to keep promiscuous fraternization at low levels. Students are encouraged to tattle on each other or even to tattle on their own parents. Of course, I encourage parents to file their own child's waywardness too. A family trained to snitch on itself isn't likely to conceal any dangerous secrets.

I assign a type of extended schooling called "homework," so that the effect of surveillance, if not that surveillance itself, travels into private households, where students might otherwise use free time to learn something unauthorized from a father or mother, by exploration, or by apprenticing to some wise person in the neighborhood. Disloyalty to the idea of schooling is a Devil always ready to find work for idle hands.

The meaning of constant surveillance and denial of privacy is that no one can be trusted, that privacy is not legitimate. Surveillance is an ancient imperative, espoused by certain influential thinkers, a central prescription set down in The Republic, in The City of God, in the Institutes of the Christian Religion, in New Atlantis, in Leviathan, and in a host of other places. All these childless men who wrote these books discovered the same thing: children must be closely watched if you want to keep a society under tight central control. Children will follow a private drummer if you can't get them into a uniformed marching band.

II

It is the great triumph of compulsory government monopoly mass-schooling that among even the best of my fellow teachers, and among the best of my students' parents, only a small number can imagine a different way to do things. "The kids have to know how to read and write, don't they?"  "They have to know how to add and subtract, don't they?"  "They have to learn to follow orders if they ever expect to keep a job."

Only a few lifetimes ago things were very different in the United States. Originality and variety were common currency; our freedom from regimentation made us the miracle of the world; social-class boundaries were relatively easy to cross; our citizenry was marvelously confident, inventive, and able to do much for themselves independently, and to think for themselves. We were something special, we Americans, all by ourselves, without government sticking its nose into our lives, without institutions and social agencies telling us how to think and feel. We were something special, as individuals, as Americans.

But we've had a society essentially under central control in the United States since just before the Civil War, and such a society requires compulsory schooling, government monopoly schooling, to maintain itself. Before this development schooling wasn't very important anywhere. We had it, but not too much of it, and only as much as an individual wanted. People learned to read, write, and do arithmetic just fine anyway; there are some studies that suggest literacy at the time of the American Revolution, at least for non-slaves on the Eastern seaboard, was close to total. Thomas Paine's Common Sense sold 600,000 copies to a population of 3,000,000, twenty percent of whom were slaves, and fifty percent indentured servants.

Were the colonists geniuses? No, the truth is that reading, writing, and arithmetic only take about one hundred hours to transmit as long as the audience is eager and willing to learn. The trick is to wait until someone asks and then move fast while the mood is on. Millions of people teach themselves these things, it really isn't very hard. Pick up a fifth-grade math or rhetoric textbook from 1850 and you'll see that the texts were pitched then on what would today be considered college level. The continuing cry for "basic skills" practice is a smoke screen behind which schools preempt the time of children for twelve years and teach them the seven lessons I've just described to you.

The society that has become increasingly under central control since just before the Civil War shows itself in the lives we lead, the clothes we wear, the food we eat, and the green highway signs we drive by from coast to coast, all of which are the products of this control. So, too, I think, are the epidemics of drugs, suicide, divorce, violence, cruelty, and the hardening of class into caste in the United States products of the dehumanization of our lives, the lessening of individual, family, and community importance, a diminishment that proceeds from central control. The character of large compulsory institutions is inevitable; they want more and more until there isn't any more to give. School takes our children away from any possibility of an active role in community life -- in fact it destroys communities by relegating the training of children to the hands of certified experts -- and by doing so it ensures our children cannot grow up fully human. Aristotle taught that without a fully active role in community life one could not hope to become a healthy human being. Surely he was right. Look around you the next time you are near a school or an old people's reservation if you wish a demonstration.

School as it was built is an essential support system for a vision of social engineering that condemns most people to be subordinate stones in a pyramid that narrows as it ascends to a terminal of control. School is an artifice which makes such a pyramidical social order seem inevitable, although such a premise is a fundamental betrayal of the American Revolution. From colonial days through the period of the Republic we had no schools to speak of -- read Benjamin Franklin's Autobiography for an example of a man who had no time to waste in school -- and yet the promise of Democracy was beginning to be realized. We turned our backs on this promise by bringing to life the ancient pharaonic dream of Egypt: compulsory subordination for all. That was the secret Plato reluctantly transmitted in The Republic when Glaucon and Adeimantus exhorted from Socrates the plan for total state control of human life, a plan necessary to maintain a society where some people take more than their share. "I will show you," says Socrates, "how to bring about such a feverish city, but you will not like what I am going to say."  And so the blueprint of the seven-lesson school was first sketched.

The current debate about whether we should have a national curriculum is phony. We already have a national curriculum locked up in the seven lessons I have just outlined. Such a curriculum produces physical, moral, and intellectual paralysis, and no curriculum of content will be sufficient to reverse its hideous effects. What is currently under discussion in our national school hysteria about failing academic performance misses the point. Schools teach exactly what they are intended to teach and they do it well: how to be a good Egyptian and remain in your place in the pyramid.

III

None of this is inevitable. None of it is impossible to overthrow. We do have choices in how we bring up young people; there is no one right way. If we broke through the power of the pyramidical illusion we would see that. There is no life-and-death international competition threatening our national existence, difficult as that idea is even to think about, let alone believe, in the face of a continual media barrage of myth to the contrary. In every important material respect our nation is self-sufficient, including in energy. I realize that idea runs counter to the most fashionable thinking of political economists, but the "profound transformation" of our economy these people talk about is neither inevitable nor irreversible. Global economics does not speak to the public need for meaningful work, affordable housing, fulfilling education, adequate medical care, a clean environment, honest and accountable government, social and cultural renewal, or simple justice. All global ambitions are based on a definition of productivity and the good life so alienated from common human reality I am convinced it is wrong and that most people would agree with me if they could perceive an alternative. We might be able to see that if we regained a hold on a philosophy that locates meaning where meaning is genuinely to be found -- in families, in friends, in the passage of seasons, in nature, in simple ceremonies and rituals, in curiosity, generosity, compassion, and service to others, in a decent independence and privacy, in all the free and inexpensive things out of which real families, real friends, and real communities are built -- then we would be so self-sufficient we would not even need the material "sufficiency" which our global "experts" are so insistent we be concerned about.

How did these awful places, these "schools", come about? Well, casual schooling has always been with us in a variety of forms, a mildly useful adjunct to growing up. But "modern schooling" as we know it is a by-product of the two "Red Scares" of 1848 and 1919, when powerful interests feared a revolution among our own industrial poor. Partly, too, total schooling came about because old-line American families were appauled by the native cultures of Celtic, Slavic, and Latin immigrants of the 1840s and felt repugnance towards the Catholic religion they brought with them. Certainly a third contributing factor in creating a jail for children called school must have been the consternation with which these same "Americans" regarded the movement of African-Americans through the society in the wake of the Civil War.

Look again at the seven lessons of schoolteaching: confusion, class position, indifference, emotional and intellectual dependency, conditional self-esteem, surveillance -- all of these things are prime training for permanent underclasses, people deprived forever of finding the center of their own special genius. And over time this training has shaken loose from its own original logic: to regulate the poor. For since the 1920s the growth of the school bureaucracy, and the less visible growth of a horde of industries that profit from schooling exactly as it is, has enlarged this institution's original grasp to the point that it now seizes the sons and daughters of the middle classes as well.

Is it any wonder Socrates was outraged at the accusation that he took money to teach? Even then, philosophers saw clearly the inevitable direction the professionalization of teaching would take, preempting the teaching function, which belongs to everyone in a healthy community.  

With lessons like the ones I teach day after day it should be little wonder we have a real national crisis, the nature of which is very different from that proclaimed by the national media. Young people are indifferent to the adult world and to the future, indifferent to almost everything except the diversion of toys and violence. Rich or poor, schoolchildren who face the twenty-first century cannot concentrate on anything for very long; they have a poor sense of time past and time to come. They are mistrustful of intimacy like the children of divorce they really are (for we have divorced them from significant parental attention); they hate solitude, are cruel, materialistic, dependent, passive, violent, timid in the face of the unexpected, addicted to distraction.

All the peripheral tendencies of childhood are nourished and magnified to a grotesque extent by schooling, which, through its hidden curriculum, prevents effective personality development. Indeed, without exploiting the fearfulness, selfishness, and inexperience of children, our schools could not survive at all, nor could I as a certified schoolteacher. No common school that actually dared to teach the use of critical thinking tools -- like the dialectic, the heuristic, or other devices that free minds should employ -- would last very long before being torn to pieces. School has become the replacement for church in our secular society, and like church it requires that its teachings must be taken on faith.

It is time that we squarely face the fact that institutional schoolteaching is destructive to children. Nobody survives the seven-lesson curriculum completely unscathed, not even the instructors. The method is deeply and profoundly anti-educational. No tinkering will fix it. In one of the great ironies of human affairs, the massive rethinking the schools require would cost so much less than we are spending now that powerful interests cannot afford to let it happen. You must understand that first and foremost the business I am in is a jobs project and an agency for letting contracts. We cannot afford to save money by reducing the scope of our operation or by diversifying the product we offer, even to help children grow up right. That is the iron law of institutional schooling -- it is a business, subject neither to normal accounting procedures nor to the rational scalpel of competition.

Some form of free-market system in public schooling is the likeliest place to look for answers, a free market where family schools and small entrepreneurial schools and religious schools and crafts schools and farm schools exist in profusion to compete with government education. I'm trying to describe a free market in schooling just exactly like the one the country had until the Civil War, one in which students volunteer for the kind of education that suits them, even if that means self-education; it didn't hurt Benjamin Franklin that I can see. These options exist now in miniature, wonderful survivals of a strong and vigorous past, but they are available only to the resourceful, the courageous, the lucky, or the rich. The near impossibility of one of these better roads opening for the shattered families of the poor or for the bewildered host camped on the fringes of the urban middle class suggests that the disaster of seven-lesson schools is going to grow unless we do something bold and decisive with the mess of government monopoly schooling.

After an adult lifetime spent teaching school, I believe the method of mass-schooling is its only real content. Don't be fooled into thinking that good curriculum or good equipment or good teachers are the critical determinants of your son's or daughter's education. All the pathologies we've considered come about in large measure because the lessons of school prevent children from keeping important appointments with themselves and with their families to learn lessons in self-motivation, perseverance, self-reliance, courage, dignity, and love -- and lessons in service to others, too, which are among the key lessons of home and community life.

Thirty years ago [in the early 60s] these things could still be learned in the time left after school. But television has eaten up most of that time, and a combination of television and the stresses peculiar to two-income or single-parent families have swallowed up most of what used to be family time as well. Our kids have no time left to grow up fully human and only thin-soil wastelands to do it in.

A future is rushing down upon our culture which will insist all of us learn the wisdom of non-material experience; a future which will demand as the price of survival that we follow a path of natural life economical in material cost. These lessons cannot be learned in schools as they are. School is a twelve-year jail sentence where bad habits are the only curriculum truly learned. I teach school and win awards doing it. I should know.



---------------------------------

[All emphasis Gatto's]
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« Reply #11 on: July 25, 2010, 06:31:19 PM »

Thank you for posting that excerpt along with the book cover Geolibertarian. I will definitely add it to my reading list. In a few years my wife and I will have to school my 2 children, and we have been trying to determine whether we should send them to public school or home-school.
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« Reply #12 on: August 12, 2010, 08:13:36 AM »

http://www.prisonplanet.com/valedictorian-speaks-out-against-schooling-in-graduation-speech.html

Valedictorian Speaks Out Against Schooling in Graduation Speech

Youtube
Aug 12, 2010

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9M4tdMsg3ts

The following speech was delivered by top of the class student Erica Goldson during the graduation ceremony at Coxsackie-Athens High School on June 25, 2010

Here I stand

There is a story of a young, but earnest Zen student who approached his teacher, and asked the Master, “If I work very hard and diligently, how long will it take for me to find Zen? The Master thought about this, then replied, “Ten years.” The student then said, “But what if I work very, very hard and really apply myself to learn fast – How long then?” Replied the Master, “Well, twenty years.” “But, if I really, really work at it, how long then?” asked the student. “Thirty years,” replied the Master. “But, I do not understand,” said the disappointed student. “At each time that I say I will work harder, you say it will take me longer. Why do you say that?” Replied the Master, “When you have one eye on the goal, you only have one eye on the path.”

This is the dilemma I’ve faced within the American education system. We are so focused on a goal, whether it be passing a test, or graduating as first in the class. However, in this way, we do not really learn. We do whatever it takes to achieve our original objective.

Some of you may be thinking, “Well, if you pass a test, or become valedictorian, didn’t you learn something? Well, yes, you learned something, but not all that you could have. Perhaps, you only learned how to memorize names, places, and dates to later on forget in order to clear your mind for the next test. School is not all that it can be. Right now, it is a place for most people to determine that their goal is to get out as soon as possible.

I am now accomplishing that goal. I am graduating. I should look at this as a positive experience, especially being at the top of my class. However, in retrospect, I cannot say that I am any more intelligent than my peers. I can attest that I am only the best at doing what I am told and working the system.

Yet, here I stand, and I am supposed to be proud that I have completed this period of indoctrination. I will leave in the fall to go on to the next phase expected of me, in order to receive a paper document that certifies that I am capable of work. But I contend that I am a human being, a thinker, an adventurer – not a worker.

A worker is someone who is trapped within repetition – a slave of the system set up before him. But now, I have successfully shown that I was the best slave. I did what I was told to the extreme. While others sat in class and doodled to later become great artists, I sat in class to take notes and become a great test-taker. While others would come to class without their homework done because they were reading about an interest of theirs, I never missed an assignment. While others were creating music and writing lyrics, I decided to do extra credit, even though I never needed it.

So, I wonder, why did I even want this position? Sure, I earned it, but what will come of it? When I leave educational institutionalism, will I be successful or forever lost? I have no clue about what I want to do with my life; I have no interests because I saw every subject of study as work, and I excelled at every subject just for the purpose of excelling, not learning. And quite frankly, now I’m scared.

John Taylor Gatto, a retired school teacher and activist critical of compulsory schooling, asserts, “We could encourage the best qualities of youthfulness – curiosity, adventure, resilience, the capacity for surprising insight simply by being more flexible about time, texts, and tests, by introducing kids into truly competent adults, and by giving each student what autonomy he or she needs in order to take a risk every now and then. But we don’t do that.” Between these cinderblock walls, we are all expected to be the same. We are trained to ace every standardized test, and those who deviate and see light through a different lens are worthless to the scheme of public education, and therefore viewed with contempt.

H. L. Mencken wrote in The American Mercury for April 1924 that the aim of public education is not “to fill the young of the species with knowledge and awaken their intelligence. … Nothing could be further from the truth. The aim … is simply to reduce as many individuals as possible to the same safe level, to breed and train a standardized citizenry, to put down dissent and originality. That is its aim in the United States.”

To illustrate this idea, doesn’t it perturb you to learn about the idea of “critical thinking?” Is there really such a thing as “uncritically thinking?” To think is to process information in order to form an opinion. But if we are not critical when processing this information, are we really thinking? Or are we mindlessly accepting other opinions as truth?

This was happening to me, and if it wasn’t for the rare occurrence of an avant-garde tenth grade English teacher, Donna Bryan, who allowed me to open my mind and ask questions before accepting textbook doctrine, I would have been doomed. I am now enlightened, but my mind still feels disabled. I must retrain myself and constantly remember how insane this ostensibly sane place really is.

And now here I am in a world guided by fear, a world suppressing the uniqueness that lies inside each of us, a world where we can either acquiesce to the inhuman nonsense of corporatism and materialism or insist on change. We are not enlivened by an educational system that clandestinely sets us up for jobs that could be automated, for work that need not be done, for enslavement without fervency for meaningful achievement. We have no choices in life when money is our motivational force. Our motivational force ought to be passion, but this is lost from the moment we step into a system that trains us, rather than inspires us.

We are more than robotic bookshelves, conditioned to blurt out facts we were taught in school. We are all very special, every human on this planet is so special, so aren’t we all deserving of something better, of using our minds for innovation, rather than memorization, for creativity, rather than futile activity, for rumination rather than stagnation? We are not here to get a degree, to then get a job, so we can consume industry-approved placation after placation. There is more, and more still.

The saddest part is that the majority of students don’t have the opportunity to reflect as I did. The majority of students are put through the same brainwashing techniques in order to create a complacent labor force working in the interests of large corporations and secretive government, and worst of all, they are completely unaware of it. I will never be able to turn back these 18 years. I can’t run away to another country with an education system meant to enlighten rather than condition. This part of my life is over, and I want to make sure that no other child will have his or her potential suppressed by powers meant to exploit and control. We are human beings. We are thinkers, dreamers, explorers, artists, writers, engineers. We are anything we want to be – but only if we have an educational system that supports us rather than holds us down. A tree can grow, but only if its roots are given a healthy foundation.

For those of you out there that must continue to sit in desks and yield to the authoritarian ideologies of instructors, do not be disheartened. You still have the opportunity to stand up, ask questions, be critical, and create your own perspective. Demand a setting that will provide you with intellectual capabilities that allow you to expand your mind instead of directing it. Demand that you be interested in class. Demand that the excuse, “You have to learn this for the test” is not good enough for you. Education is an excellent tool, if used properly, but focus more on learning rather than getting good grades.

For those of you that work within the system that I am condemning, I do not mean to insult; I intend to motivate. You have the power to change the incompetencies of this system. I know that you did not become a teacher or administrator to see your students bored. You cannot accept the authority of the governing bodies that tell you what to teach, how to teach it, and that you will be punished if you do not comply. Our potential is at stake.

For those of you that are now leaving this establishment, I say, do not forget what went on in these classrooms. Do not abandon those that come after you. We are the new future and we are not going to let tradition stand. We will break down the walls of corruption to let a garden of knowledge grow throughout America. Once educated properly, we will have the power to do anything, and best of all, we will only use that power for good, for we will be cultivated and wise. We will not accept anything at face value. We will ask questions, and we will demand truth.

So, here I stand. I am not standing here as valedictorian by myself. I was molded by my environment, by all of my peers who are sitting here watching me. I couldn’t have accomplished this without all of you. It was all of you who truly made me the person I am today. It was all of you who were my competition, yet my backbone. In that way, we are all valedictorians.

I am now supposed to say farewell to this institution, those who maintain it, and those who stand with me and behind me, but I hope this farewell is more of a “see you later” when we are all working together to rear a pedagogic movement. But first, let’s go get those pieces of paper that tell us that we’re smart enough to do so!
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« Reply #13 on: December 07, 2010, 01:23:49 PM »

Charlotte Iserbyt: Federalizing and Corporatizing All The Schools:

       http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=amOQOG3o9DA (part 1 of 3)
       http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-a7E8bqaIxA (part 2 of 3)
       http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=f6I_yTTafCA (part 3 of 3)


           [Image clickable]
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« Reply #14 on: December 09, 2010, 08:17:01 PM »

Charlotte Iserbyt: Federalizing and Corporatizing All The Schools:

       http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=amOQOG3o9DA (part 1 of 3)
       http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-a7E8bqaIxA (part 2 of 3)
       http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=f6I_yTTafCA (part 3 of 3)


           [Image clickable]

Took a while to refind this so bump! Thanks for posting.

I downloaded a big AVI from MonkeyPuppet about Iserbyt and look forward to see what she has to say. Control and manipulation of education is arguably THE most important problem we face.
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« Reply #15 on: December 13, 2010, 12:32:39 PM »

http://www.infowars.com/the-death-of-free-will/

The Death of Free Will

Charlotte Thomson Iserbyt
Infowars.com
December 8, 2010

THE LAST NAIL OF SO-CALLED SCHOOL REFORM is being struck in the coffin of traditional American education which made our nation the envy of the Free World and which produced famous scientists, engineers, mathematicians, writers, artists, musicians, doctors, etc.


Charlotte Iserbyt served as Senior Policy Advisor in the Office of
Educational Research and Improvement, U.S. Department of
Education, during the first Reagan Administration, where she first
blew the whistle on a major technology initiative which would control
curriculum in America’s classrooms.


The reform is not new. It started in the early 1900s when John D. Rockefeller, Jr.’s Director of Charity for the Rockefeller Foundation, Frederick T. Gates, set up the Southern Education Board. In 1913 the organization was incorporated into the General Education Board. These boards set in motion “the deliberate dumbing down of America”. In Frederick T. Gates’ “The Country School of Tomorrow” Occasional Papers No. 1 (General Education Board, New York, 1913) was a section entitled “A Vision of the Remedy” in which he wrote:

    “Is there aught a remedy for this neglect of rural life? Let us, at least, yield ourselves to the gratifications of a beautiful dream that there is. In our dream, we have limitless resources, and the people yield themselves with perfect docility to our moulding hand. The present educational conventions fade from our minds; and unhampered by tradition, we work our own good will upon a grateful and responsive rural folk. We shall not try to make these people or any of their children into philosophers or men of learning or of science. We are not to raise up from among them authors, orators, poets, or men of letters. We shall not search for embryo great artists, painters, musicians. Nor will we cherish even the humbler ambition to raise up from among them lawyers, doctors, preachers, politicians, statesmen, of whom we now have ample supply.”

The above quote sounds like something from one of the public/private school-to-work/tax-exempt foundation partnerships involved in the Reinventing Schools Coalition agenda, as well as other innocuous sounding current-day initiatives that are being implemented across the nation.

Read a revised version of this article as a PDF
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« Reply #16 on: January 08, 2011, 09:33:37 AM »

http://www.prisonplanet.com/over-two-million-children-are-now-homeschooled.html

Over Two Million Children Are Now Homeschooled

Home School Legal Defense Association
Friday, January 7, 2011

Purcellville, VA—In a new study released today the National Home Education Research Institute (NHERI) estimates there were over 2 million children being homeschooled in the United States in 2010. “The growth of the modern homeschool movement has been remarkable,” said Michael Smith, president of HSLDA. “Just 30 years ago there were only an estimated 20,000 homeschooled children,” he added.

According to the U.S. Census Bureau (2008) there were an estimated 54 million K–12 children in the U.S. in spring 2010, which means homeschoolers account for nearly 4% of the school-aged population, or 1 in 25 children.

Today, homeschoolers can be found in all walks of life and with a wide variety of curriculum options, and a proven record of academic as well as social success, homeschooling is rapidly becoming a mainstream education alternative.

The NHERI study used data from both government and private sources in order to arrive at the 2 million figure.

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« Reply #17 on: January 15, 2011, 09:47:44 AM »

The following two clips from the documentary, "Wake Up Call," address the education issue. A must-see:

       http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hI55Z_O3Oxg (Wake Up Call - 13 of 16)
       http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1FnOxWTt1ZE (Wake Up Call - 14 of 16)
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« Reply #18 on: March 20, 2011, 06:42:51 PM »

http://www.prisonplanet.com/preview-charlotte-iserbyt-%E2%80%93-the-miseducation-of-america.html



Today's education system has been subverted. Millions of children and adolescents are intentionally being dumbed-down, wrongfully medicated by the big pharma cartel, being morally and intellectually corrupted by stupid and meaningless media and pop culture like Twilight, Lady Gaga, Justin Bieber, and so forth.

http://psychcentral.com/news/2008/02/15/herd-mentality-explained/1922.html

A large percentage of high school graduates are functionally illiterate, and cannot even point out the United States of America on a globe (I'M NOT KIDDING!) Colleges in the US and elsewhere are also being subverted in the same ways as the public education system.

The next generation of sheeple will be completely unable to think for themselves, they will be totally reliant on the government and will believe anything that they are told.

I pray for the future...
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« Reply #19 on: March 28, 2011, 10:37:32 AM »

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« Reply #20 on: March 28, 2011, 10:14:08 PM »

I posted this in another section, I think it fits good here too.

Obama says too much testing makes education boring

President Barack Obama said Monday that students should take fewer standardized tests and school performance should be measured in other ways than just exam results. Too much testing makes education boring for kids, he said.

"Too often what we have been doing is using these tests to punish students or to, in some cases, punish schools," the president told students and parents at a town hall hosted by the Univision Spanish-language television network at Bell Multicultural High School in Washington, D.C.

Obama, who is pushing a rewrite of the nation's education law that would ease some of its rigid measurement tools, said policymakers should find a test that "everybody agrees makes sense" and administer it in less pressure-packed atmospheres, potentially every few years instead of annually.

At the same time, Obama said, schools should be judged on criteria other than student test performance, including attendance rate.

You found your way to school! Here's a diploma!

MORE HERE




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« Reply #21 on: April 04, 2011, 10:40:06 AM »

Home school, home school, HOME SCHOOL!!!
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« Reply #22 on: June 01, 2011, 11:25:23 AM »

http://www.prisonplanet.com/18-signs-that-life-in-u-s-public-schools-is-now-essentially-equivalent-to-life-in-u-s-prisons.html

18 Signs That Life In U.S. Public Schools Is Now Essentially Equivalent To Life In U.S. Prisons

The American Dream
June 1, 2011

In the United States today, our public schools are not very good at educating our students, but they sure are great training grounds for learning how to live in a Big Brother police state control grid.  Sadly, life in many U.S. public schools is now essentially equivalent to life in U.S. prisons.  Most parents don’t realize this, but our students have very few rights when they are in school.  Our public school students are being watched, tracked, recorded, searched and controlled like never before.  Back when I was in high school, it was unheard of for a police officer to come to school, but today our public school students are being handcuffed and arrested in staggering numbers.  When I was young we would joke that going to school was like going to prison, but today that is actually true.

The following are 18 signs that life in our public schools is now very similar to life in our prisons….

[Continued...]
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« Reply #23 on: June 10, 2011, 01:19:55 PM »

http://www.prisonplanet.com/school-surveillance-how-big-brother-spies-on-pupils.html

School surveillance: how big brother spies on pupils

John Harris
London Guardian
June 10, 2011

‘Every day in communities across the United States, children and adolescents spend the majority of their waking hours in schools that increasingly have come to resemble places of detention more than places of learning. From metal detectors to drug tests, from increased policing to all-seeing electronic surveillance, the schools of the 21st century reflect a society that has become fixated on crime, security and violence.”

So reads a passage from the opening pages of Lockdown High, a new book by the San Francisco-based journalist Annette Fuentes. Subtitled “When the schoolhouse becomes the jailhouse”, it tells a story that decisively began with the Columbine shootings of 1999, and from across the US, the text cites cases that are mind-boggling: a high-flying student from Arizona strip-searched because ibuprofen was not allowed under her school rules; the school in Texas where teachers can carry concealed handguns; and, most amazingly of all, the Philadelphia school that gave its pupils laptops equipped with a secret feature allowing them to be spied on outside classroom hours.

Just about all the schools Fuentes writes about are united by a belief in that most pernicious of principles, “zero tolerance”. Their scanners, cameras and computer applications are supplied by a US security industry that seems to grow bigger and more insatiable every year. And as she sees it, their neurotic emphasis on security has plenty of negative results: it renders the atmosphere in schools tense and fragile, and in coming down hard on young people for the smallest of transgressions, threatens to define their life chances at an early age – because, as she puts it, “suspensions and academic failure are strong predictors of entry into the criminal justice system”. There is also, of course, the small matter of personal privacy.

Full article here
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« Reply #24 on: June 14, 2011, 07:24:12 AM »

That's amusing - I suppose the Guardian will also report on similar things happening in British schools? No?

Then again this is the same paper (along with the Independent) that was sold for $1.60 because it's so heavily in debt...
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« Reply #25 on: June 15, 2011, 06:15:07 PM »

It's like the Rothchilds said we want workers not thinkers.
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« Reply #26 on: July 07, 2011, 11:39:49 AM »

Typing Beats Scribbling: Indiana Schools Can Stop Teaching Cursive
By: Kayla Webley (24 hours ago)



Who still writes in cursive?

That age-old writing method you might never have used since fourth grade will no longer be taught in Indiana schools come fall, thanks to a memo from school officials. Instead, students will be expected to become proficient in keyboard use.

Seems like a smart move as being able to type efficiently is a vital skill in today's world, as opposed to knowing how to write cursive, which — like being able to churn butter and knowing how to hitch a horse to a wagon — is no longer needed.

But it might not mean the end of cursive entirely in the state. The directive from the state's Department of Education allows schools to decide for themselves whether to continue teaching cursive or disband the archaic practice altogether.

NewsFeed has just one question: How will Indiana's students know how to sign their name?

Read more: http://newsfeed.time.com/2011/07/06/typing-beats-scribbling-indiana-schools-can-stop-teaching-cursive/#ixzz1RRT8giKh
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« Reply #27 on: July 07, 2011, 11:40:32 AM »

Just like schools don't require students to show their work on how they solved math problems, thanks to the calculator. Sad
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« Reply #28 on: July 07, 2011, 11:51:17 AM »

We have a similar thing going on here in Illinois.


ISAT writing portion eliminated for High School Juniors
Posted: Jul 06, 2011 5:33 PM

QUINCY, Ill. (WGEM) -- Illinois is down to just reading and arithmetic. In an effort to save money, writing skills will no longer be tested during the ISAT exams for high school juniors.

Since the writing portion of the tests have to be individually scored, the state says this move will save the state about two point four million dollars.

Quincy school officials says even though the state won't be testing for it, teachers will continue to stress the importance of writing in the classroom.

"The state of Illinois tomorrow could say no more writing assessment, we're not focusing on writing and we know better here in this district. We know that writing is critical and so we will always teach it and it will always be important," said Trish Viniard, Quincy's Assistant Superintendent of Curriculum. "

Last year, the state of Illinois dropped the writing portion on ISAT tests for elementary and middle school students in an effort to save money as well.

Video: http://www.wgem.com/story/15036917/isat-writing-portion-eliminated-for-high-school-juniors
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« Reply #29 on: July 07, 2011, 11:53:59 AM »

It really sucks to not even know how to write in cursive except your name.

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« Reply #30 on: July 07, 2011, 12:01:39 PM »

They are already doing it in Louisiana. If it wasn't for some really good teachers in my daughter's school teaching it to the kids outside of the required curriculum they wouldn't know how to write cursive.

I finally bit the bullet and refinanced my house so that I can send my kids to a private school that's family owned with 12-14 kids per classroom.

Every time I go to school for conferences I take the opportunity to strike up conversations with my kids teachers about the state of affairs the public school system is in and the over reaching federal government and they are all well informed about whats going on. The thing now is, when are we the people going to start doing something about it.
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« Reply #31 on: July 07, 2011, 12:04:04 PM »

Of course if people can't write over time and there's no key-board, then finger prints will have to be used for identification.

It's Orwellian conditioning in the early stages.
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« Reply #32 on: July 07, 2011, 12:15:50 PM »

 Yup, it suks all the way around.
 Take away the calculators and keyboards, go ahead and watch the FK results.
  A dependence is being created of the artificial intell, high tech methodry, eliminating the basics.
  Parents need to get involved or forget about it. I know its no walk in the park for the working man to breaks his arse on the job, and most likey the Mom is working also to make ends meet. The last thing on their agenda after coming home is sitting down with their kids and spending time teaching them to write and do simple math with papaer and pencil. I got it, but the deal is simple, 1/2 hour a day and an 1/2 hour given of homework. Thats all.
 Sure machines, high tech is nice, but we can not let the kids be dependent on them. I've seen cashiers use calculators to do a sums that should be instnat, one was a 1.45$ item paid 2.00$, whats the change..A calculator, No shiiite.
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« Reply #33 on: July 07, 2011, 12:16:41 PM »

Of course if people can't write over time and there's no key-board, then finger prints will have to be used for identification.

It's Orwellian conditioning in the early stages.

Fingerprints are probably too easy. chipping is the next stage I bet.
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« Reply #34 on: July 07, 2011, 12:17:38 PM »

Watch the original Time Machine movie by H G Wells.

That's the Globalist's plan for us.  Vain, dumb and ripe for plucking.
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« Reply #35 on: July 07, 2011, 12:38:20 PM »

I am glad I home school my children...they must have a neat penmanship that I can clearly understand.  To me, it is a sign of laziness not to be able to write legibly.  It also allows the student to express their own creativeness, i.e.; style.



http://donnayoung.org/penmanship/
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« Reply #36 on: July 07, 2011, 01:24:55 PM »

Dumb Americans http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3WBtyG2OJvw
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« Reply #37 on: July 07, 2011, 01:35:02 PM »

I am glad I home school my children...they must have a neat penmanship that I can clearly understand.  To me, it is a sign of laziness not to be able to write legibly.  It also allows the student to express their own creativeness, i.e.; style.



http://donnayoung.org/penmanship/


I am gobsmacked that penmenship would be excluded in state schools.
It teaches eye-hand coordination,
visual recognition,
visual and tactile memory,
pattern recognition
and so many other skills.
*******************************************************

I reviewed the above curriculum
and found it quite exciting !
Your children are very lucky.

; )
 
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« Reply #38 on: July 07, 2011, 01:38:15 PM »


Absolutely shameful !

             Shocked
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« Reply #39 on: July 08, 2011, 06:20:46 PM »

I am glad I home school my children...they must have a neat penmanship that I can clearly understand.  To me, it is a sign of laziness not to be able to write legibly.  It also allows the student to express their own creativeness, i.e.; style.



http://donnayoung.org/penmanship/
  Donnay, good on ya...
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