Known FEMA Camp Locations Listing

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Me:
http://www.libertyforlife.com/jail-police/concentration_camp_army_regulation_21035.htm

 " Army Regulation 210—35
Installations
Civilian Inmate
Labor Program
Headquarters
Department of the Army
Washington, DC
14 January 2005
UNCLASSIFIED

SUMMARY of CHANGE
AR 210—35
Civilian Inmate Labor Program
This rapid action revision dated 14 January 2005--
o Assigns responsibilities to Headquarters, Installation Management Agency (para l-4j) -
o Makes administrative and editorial changes (throughout)
This new regulation dated 9 December 1997
o Provides Army policy and guidance for establishing civilian inmate labor programs and civilian prison camps on Army installations.
o Discusses sources of Federal and State civilian inmate labor.

*Army Regulation 210—35

Headquarters
Department of the Army
Washington, DC
14 January 2005

Effective 14 February 2005

Installations
Civilian Inmate Labor Program

By Order of the Secretary of the Army:

PETER J. SCHOOMAKER
General, United States Army
Chief of Staff

Official:

SANDRA R. RILEY
Administrative Assistant to the
Secretary of the Army
History. This publication is a rapid action revision. The portions affected by this rapid action revision are listed in the summary of change.
Summary. This regulation provides guidance for establishing and managing civilian inmate labor programs on Army installations. It provides guidance on establishing prison camps on Army installations. It addresses recordkeeping and reporting incidents related to the Civilian Inmate Labor Program and/or prison camp administration.
Applicability. This regulation applies to the Active Army, the Army National

Army Reserve unless otherwise stated. During mobilization, the Assistant Chief of Staff for Installation Management may modify chapters and policies contained in this regulation.
Proponent and exception authority.
The proponent of this regulation is the Assistant Chief of Staff for Installation Management. The proponent has the authority to approve exceptions or waivers to this regulation that are consistent with controlling law and regulations. The proponent may delegate this approval authority, in writing, to a division chief within the proponent agency or a direct reporting unit or field operating agency of the proponent agency in the grade of colonel or the civilian equivalent. Activities may request a waiver to this regulation by providing justification that includes a full analysis of the expected benefits and must include formal review by the activity’s senior legal officer. All waiver requests will be endorsed by the commander or senior leader of the requesting activity and forwarded through their higher headquarters to the policy proponent. Refer to AR 25—30 for specific guidance.
Army management control process.

trol provisions and identifies key management controls that must be evaluated.
Supplementation. Supplementation of this regulation and establishment of command and local forms are prohibited without prior approval from Assistant Chief of Staff for Installation Management (DAIM—ZA), 600 Army Pentagon, Washington, DC 20310—0600.
Suggested improvements. Users are invited to send comments and suggested improvements on DA Form 2028 (Recommended Changes to Publications and Blank Forms) directly to Assistant Chief of Staff for Installation Management (DAIM—MD), 600 Army Pentagon, Washington, DC 20310—0600.
Distribution. This publication is available in electronic media only and is intended for command levels A, B, C, D, and E for the Active Army, Army National Guard of the United States, and the U.S. Army Reserve.

Contents (Listed by paragraph and page number)

Chapter 1

Introduction, page 1

Purpose 1—1, page 1
References • 1—2, page 1
Explanation of abbreviations and terms 1—3, page 1
Responsibilities • 1—4, page 1
Civilian inmate labor programs • 1—5, page 2
The process 1—6, page 2
Chapter 2
Establishing Installation Civilian Inmate Labor Programs, page 4
Policy statement 2—1, page 4
*This regulation supersedes AR 210—35, dated 9 December 1997.
AR 210—35 • 14 January 2005
UNCLASSIFIED

Guard of the United States, and the U.S. This regulation contains management con-

Contents—Continued
Negotiating with corrections systems representatives 2—2, page 4
Governing provisions • 2—3, page 4
Procedures for establishing installation civilian inmate labor programs 2—4, page 7
Chapter 3
Establishing Civilian Inmate Prison Camps on Army Installations, page 8
Policy statement 3—i, page 8
Negotiating with correctional systems representatives to establish prison camps 3—2, page 8
Governing criteria civilian inmate prison camps • 3—3, page 8
Governing provisions for operating civilian inmate prison camps on Army installations • 3—4, page 9
Procedures for establishing a civilian inmate prison camp on Army installations 3—5, page 9
Interservice, interagency, or interdepartmental support agreements 3—6, page 10
Chapter 4
Reporting and Recordkeeping, page 10
Incident reports 4—1, page 10
Media coverage 4—2, page 10
Recordkeeping 4—3, page 11
Appendixes
A. References, page 12
B. Memorandum of Agreement Format, page 13
C. Sample Inmate Labor Plan, page 19
0. Management Control Evaluation Checklist. page 23
E. 18 USC 4125(A), and Executive Order 11755, page 23
Figure List
Figure i—i: Civilian Inmate Labor Program process, page 3
Figure B—i: Sample format for a memorandum of agreement, page 14
Figure B—i: Sample format for a memorandum of agreement—continued, page 15
Figure B—i: Sample format for a memorandum of agreement—continued, page 16
Figure B—i: Sample format for a memorandum of agreement—continued, page 17
Figure B—i: Sample format for a memorandum of agreement—continued, page 18
Figure B—i: Sample format for a memorandum of agreement—continued, page 19
Figure C—i: Sample Inmate Labor Plan—continued, page 20
Figure C—i: Sample Inmate Labor Plan—continued, page 21
Figure C—i: Sample Inmate Labor Plan—continued, page 22
Glossary
Index
ii AR 210—35 • 14 January 2005

Chapter 1
Introduction
1—1. Purpose
This regulation provides Army policy and guidance for establishing civilian inmate labor programs and civilian prison camps on Army installations. Sources of civilian inmate labor are limited to on— and off—post Federal corrections facilities, State and/or local corrections facilities operating from on—post prison camps pursuant to leases under Section 2667, Title 10, United States Code (10 USC 2667), and off—post State corrections facilities participating in the demonstration project authorized under Section 1065, Public Law (PL) 103—337. Otherwise, State and/or local inmate labor from off—post corrections facilities is currently excluded from this program.
1—2. References
Required and related publications and prescribed and referenced forms are listed in appendix A.
1—3. Explanation of abbreviations and terms
Abbreviations and special terms used in this regulation are explained in the glossary.
1—4. Responsibilities
a. The Assistant Secretary of the Army (Installations and Environment) (ASA(I&E)) will—
(1) Provide policy guidance and resolve policy issues.
(2) Provide overall program direction.
(3) Serve as approval authority for establishing civilian inmate labor programs and civilian inmate prison camps on Army installations.
(4) Provide procedural guidance on real property acquisition, management, and disposal relating to establishing prison camps on Army installations.
b. The Assistant Secretary of the Army (Financial Management and Comptroller) (ASA(FM&C)) will—
(1) Provide reimbursement policy guidance on interservice, interagency, and/or interdepartmental support agreements between installations and corrections facilities to establish civilian inmate prison camps on Army installations.
(2) Provide reimbursement policy for civilian inmate labor utilization, other than reimbursement for inmate labor itself.
(3) Review all actions pertaining to the Civilian Inmate Labor Program for compliance with Army financial management guidance.
c. The Chief of Public Affairs will—
(1) Monitor media coverage on installation civilian inmate labor programs and civilian inmate prison camps on Army installations.
(2) Coordinate all proposed media coverage of potential national interest concerning the Army Civilian Inmate Labor Program and civilian inmate prison camps with the Assistant Chief of Staff for Installation Management (ACSIM) prior to release.
d. The Assistant Secretary of the Army (Manpower and Reserve Affairs) (ASA(M&RA)) will—
(1) Provide policy guidance on inmate labor utilization issues pertaining to existing in—house resources.
(2) Provide policy guidance and procedures for apprising installation government employee labor unions of proposals to use civilian inmate labor and, for existing installation civilian inmate labor programs, apprising these unions of changes in agreements with corrections facilities governing inmate use.
e. The Assistant Chief of Staff for Installation Management will—
(1) Execute the Army Civilian Inmate Labor Program.
(2) Develop and implement policy and procedures for using civilian inmate labor and establishing civilian inmate prison camps on Army installations.
(3) Serve as the focal point for staff coordination on issues pertaining to the Civilian Inmate Labor Program and/or civilian inmate prison camps.
(4) Conduct a program review in accordance with AR 11—2 once every 5 years.
(5) Provide policy guidance on flinctions for which civilian inmate labor can be used.
(6) Review reports of availability pertaining to granting the use of Army real property.
(7) Immediately inform the Chief, Legislative Liaison of approval of civilian inmate labor programs and civilian inmate prison camps on Army installations to facilitate notification to interested members of Congress.
f The General Counsel and the Judge Advocate General will review all actions pertaining to the Civilian Inmate Labor Program and civilian inmate prison camps for compliance with applicable laws and regulations.
g. The Chief of Engineers will, in those cases involving use of Army real property, handle all matters pertaining to granting the use of Army real property.
h. The Provost Marshal General will—
AR 210—35 • 14 January 2005 1"

JTCoyoté:
Here is one of my all time "faves."... this is a possible death camp and sorting center... was completed in '98...



http://video.google.com/videoplay?docid=277826260716604258

This is the one in Beach Grove Indiana.

I did some research on the "so called" furnaces and the white AGA Gas Inc. Cylinder.

The "so called" furnaces are exhaust fans. This is not an incinerator

AGA GAS Inc. Sells mostly asphyxiation type gases... you can verify this by doing a search via dogpile for AGA GAS Inc. and then look for web site MDS and they will list the gases.

In the video it shows a huge gas main from the tank, you can see there are 2 or 3 connections with regulators on top. Regulators are used to regulate pressure and gas mixtures.

It seems that this is indeed a "death camp" for those on the red and blue list. It can process 26,000 people every 24hrs. The site has since been cleaned up to look inconspicuous.

The above speculates on the possibilities of what this place is... you might pay close attention to the gates and the prison style turn-stile gate/entries... and why would huge gas mains that carry not gas for burning like natural gas or propane but gas that would come from a company that specializes in exotic gases, be regulated into a very large sealed building with huge flow control exhaust fans at one end, that will hold up to 12 rail cars at a time on six tracks that pass through the building with huge overhead doors that close tightly where the tracks pass thru the building from where thy enter to where they exit...

--Oldyoti

"Shake off all the fears of servile prejudices, under which weak
minds are servilely crouched. Fix reason firmly in her seat,
and call on her tribunal for every fact, every opinion. Question
with boldness even the existence of a God; because if there
be one, he must more approve of the homage of reason
than that of blindfolded fear." -- Thomas Jefferson

yanaar:
I've checked the numbers.  These camps are not large enough to hold the Washington Pedophile Club.  AND THAT'S EXACTLY WHO SHOULD BE THEIR FUTURE OCCUPANTS!

Nailer:
Terrorism Act, a law that labels those who "engage in sit-ins, civil disobedience, trespass, or any other crime in the name of animal rights" as terrorists. Other groups in the crosshairs could be anti-abortion protesters, anti-tax agitators, immigration activists, environmentalists, peace demonstrators, Second Amendment rights supporters ... the list goes on and on. According to author Naomi Wolf, the National Counterterrorism Center holds the names of roughly 775,000 "terror suspects" with the number increasing by 20,000 per month.

What could the government be contemplating that leads it to make contingency plans to detain without recourse millions of its own citizens?

mr anderson:
I'm certain the Immigration Dentention Centre in Woomera, South Australia could be used for citizens too.


FACTBOX: Australia's detention camps

August 28, 2001 - CNN World.

CANBERRA, Australia -- At detention camps in Australia riots and breakouts are common and every incident is widely reported by the government and local media.

Here is a breakdown of the main points about the country’s controversial detention centers and a timeline of major violence at the camps.

-- Australia currently holds about 2,500 illegal immigrants, including up to 500 children, in nine camps of which six are permanent.

-- The government says Australia has 12,000 places per year for humanitarian refugees, a scheme it says is "more generous on a per capita basis than anywhere else bar Canada".

-- Australia is only one of eight countries that has a formal refugee resettlement program, the government says.

-- Over the years, detainees at the three biggest camps -- Port Hedland, Curtin and Woomera -- have staged peaceful breakouts and hunger strikes and unleashed bursts of violence to protest being held and denied rights afforded to those refugees who arrive legally.

-- The detention centers are run by a private operator -- Australasian Correctional Management (ACM), a unit of U.S. prison operator Wackenhut Corrections Corp. Critics of the camps protest at the outsourcing saying it is wrong for a private firm to seek profit from managing refugees.

-- The cost to the government and taxpayer amounts to $53 per aslyum-seeker per day.

-- Plans are afoot to allow for an increase in capacity for up to a further 3,000 illegal immigrants.

-- The Australian government has increased the penalty for escaping from a detention center to five years jail from two and increased the term for helping escapees or inciting violence to ten years.

Timeline of camp violence

June 8, 2000 -- 500 break out of Woomera.

June 9 -- 150 break out of Curtin.

November 29 -- Ten hospitalized after hunger strike at Woomera.

January 21, 2001 -- 180 riot at Port Hedland.

January 30 -- 300 riot at Curtin.

March 27 -- 14 escape from Villawood.

March 30 -- 60 riot at Port Hedland.

April 4 -- 200 riot at Curtin.

May 8 -- 100 riot at Port Hedland.

May 26 -- 170 police raid Port Hedland camp, arrest 22 detainees and seize a cache of homemade weapons.

June 2 -- 200 riot at Curtin.

July 19 -- 23 escape from Villawood.

July 23 -- 23 escape from Villawood.

July 26 -- South African man commits suicide at Villawood.

August 26 -- 39 detainees in hunger strike at Curtin. Five sew their lips together in protest.

August 13 -- Six-year-old Iranian boy removed from a center is placed in foster care after refusing to eat, drink or speak.

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