Predictive Programming in Movies

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Offline DutchPhil

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Predictive Programming in Movies
« on: November 16, 2008, 11:52:28 am »
Predictive programming is a subtle form of psychological conditioning provided by the media to acquaint the public with planned societal changes to be implemented by TPTB.  If and when these changes are put through, the public will already be familiarized with them and will accept them as 'natural progressions', as Alan Watt(*) calls it; thus lessening any possible public resistance and commotion. Predictive programming therefore may be considered as a veiled form of preemptive mass manipulation or mind control, courtesy of our puppet masters.
(*) http://www.cuttingthroughthematrix.com/ http://www.alanwattsentientsentinel.eu/

Offline DutchPhil

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Re: Predictive Programming in Movies
« Reply #1 on: November 16, 2008, 11:58:08 am »
Introduction to predictive programming:

http://1phil4everyill.wordpress.com/2008/09/03/predictive-what/

A video I made of two Alan Watt blurbs in which he explains the basics of predictive programming and gives examples:

http://1phil4everyill.wordpress.com/2008/09/18/alan-watt-predictive-programming-theory-and-practice/

Offline DutchPhil

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Re: Predictive Programming in Movies
« Reply #2 on: November 16, 2008, 12:01:15 pm »
Invoking the Beyond is a 7 part radio interview series of the Collins Brothers (Paul and Phillip) being interviewed by Vyzygoth on predictive programming in culture. Done in 2007.

I have added relevant pictures to the interviews and condensed them into a three part video series:

http://1phil4everyill.wordpress.com/2008/10/09/vyzygoth-interviews-phillip-and-paul-collins-invoking-the-beyond-1-of-3/
http://1phil4everyill.wordpress.com/2008/10/09/vyzygoth-interviews-phillip-and-paul-collins-invoking-the-beyond-2-of-3/
http://1phil4everyill.wordpress.com/2008/10/10/vyzygoth-interviews-phillip-and-paul-collins-invoking-the-beyond-3-of-3/

Offline DutchPhil

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Children of Men (2006)
« Reply #3 on: November 16, 2008, 12:45:50 pm »
    http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0206634/





    Thematic and obvious PP elements:
    [list=1]
    • No children are able to be born through all pervasive human infertility.
    • Fugitives are all over the place, as are civilian arrestees.
    • A full fledged police state has been installed, with the 'posse commitatus' rule nullified (the military is now used as police force).
    • Flash mob activity and terrorism abounds. It is mentioned that terroristic attacks are perpetrated by the government, this will promote fear for the government. 
    • Society has seriously degenerated: living standards have gone down the drain (poverty is commonplace), schools are empty and deserted (at least in the rural area), overpopulation and immigration abounds, presence of military overseen refugee camps, chaotic and discordant populations.
    • Militant Islam is openly professed in Britain. This theatrical given helps to incite fear for and hostility towards Islam by the public.
    Subtle and less obvious PP elements:
    [list=1]
    • Elderly people are mostly senile and robbed of dignity, autonomy and are quite unlike being custodians of wisdom they would have accumulated over the years of their long life (which should be more or less the norm).
    • Subtle hints of medicine use being commonplace (imagery of pill strips are flashed by).
    • Hiding behind the unarmed civil population has zero effectiveness for 'terrorists' since both parties are shot to pieces by 'counter-terrorism' armed forces. This helps to stimulate the widening of the trust gap between hostile resistive civil groups and passive compliant civil groups.

    Offline DutchPhil

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    28 Weeks Later
    « Reply #4 on: November 16, 2008, 12:59:22 pm »
    http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0463854/





    Gory context of the movie:
    Society has plunged into a horrendous crisis where a part of the population has been transformed into raving mad creatures upon having been infected by some horrible transmuting virus (read: biological weapon). The hostile creatures ravage across the land trying to infect, by means of biting or vomiting, all the uninfected humans who come in their way.

    Because of the severity of the national emergency situation, the country (UK) has transformed itself into a full blown police state, in which the military has totally usurped the task of the police and the rights of the people seem to have been totally neutralized.

    Thematic PP elements:
    • Surveillance cameras everywhere (at least in downtown areas), with military snipers doing the extra bit of surveillance through their rifle scopes. This programs the public to accept and get used to all the cameras snooping all over the place as well as the presence of military walking about everywhere and interfering with everyone. The sniper surveillance part seems to serve to instill some extra fear into the public.
    • There's a mention of a presence of refugee camps and so-called "containment areas" (quarantine areas). This programs the public to get used to being herded as cattle and to accept living in camps or confined emergency spaces overseen by the military.
    • Streets are deserted, shops abandoned, there's lots of garbage, and a blatant lack of hygiene and thus the city is depicted as being in a general dystopian mess. Images of chaos and discord such as these, seem to instill fear into the public in case a viral epidemic should break out. More programming of futuristic dormant terror on the plates of the public.
    Suggested PP elements:
    • Because of their utter indiscriminate, remorseless and extreme hostility, people sick by viral infection should not only be shunned literally like the plague but also be destroyed where ever and whenever possible. This programs the public, on the basis of fear, to prepare to part from family and loved ones once they get infected and sick. In addition, the communicated severity of the situation helps to generate acute antipathy of the uninfected towards the infected and sick.
    • Those people infected but who haven't actually become sick should be shunned as well, since they may make one sick through biting or spewing blood-vomit or even simply by kissing. This programs the viewer to prepare to part from friends and loved ones who are infected but who haven't manifested the accompanying disease (yet).
    • Because the military has difficulty in distinguishing between 'friendlies' (uninfected) and 'targets' (infected), just to be on the 'safe side', the military command decides to open fire on both parties. The public will thus be programmed to keep a distance from the infected even more so lest being confused for a 'target' by trigger happy military marksmen.
    • I'm less sure about the next one, but here we go - for completeness' sake. The life in the inner city gets totally obliterated by incendiary bombs. This may instill fear into the part of the public living in crowded cities (at least, downtown) during times of crises and emergencies.
    Needless to say, the conclusion is that this is a particularly antipathetic movie towards those of us who may get infected by viral agents in the future. Let's hope it will never come this far.

    Offline CaptBebops

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    Re: Predictive Programming in Movies
    « Reply #5 on: November 16, 2008, 02:58:38 pm »
    Did you ever bother to listen to the commentaries or extra features on these films?  For that matter did you ever even watch the films?  As much as I enjoy Allan Watt he is sometimes off the mark as far as what filmmakers are doing.  Most just want to make an entertaining story.  They employ techniques they learned in film school, often taken from literary techniques, to tell a better story.   Who wants to make a movie that people leave saying "that really sucked?"  We have enough of those already when the bean counters get involved.   If you listen to stories behind the making of the film and what they wanted to say they are often saying something along the lines of what some people here think.  In fact they actually sound like folks who would fit in just fine here. 

    Honestly some of you need to ask yourselves if you are just becoming paranoid.  Back off, ground out and take a bigger picture view.  Some of the stuff that has been pointed out was just some writer trying to make a few bucks rather than flipping burgers.  They wanted to tell a good story.  I like "Children of Men" and the "28" Days and Weeks franchise.  I believe it was "28 Days" where they actually consulted some research scientists for what kind of behaviors are possible with viruses for more authentic zombies rather than the far-fetched ones that show up in films.  Personally I think that such viruses even if they left the person aggressive they would lack the rationality to protect themselves and would be easy to overcome.  Keep in mind that zombie movies are somewhat a cheap genre because your extras playing zombies don't have to be actors and if they try actor then thats even better.

    The actual message behind these movies was to WARN you about such a future not to get you accustomed to it.  In the 1960's we called such films anti-establishment (the term NWO wasn't in vogue then) and they were popular.  They still are.

    If you want to reference a film with predictive programming that was pure propaganda I would suggest "Untraceable" because it is VERY blatant in that film. 
     
    And if you want to point to some predictive programming look at religions.  That's all they are.

    Offline Banzinator

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    Re: Predictive Programming in Movies
    « Reply #6 on: November 16, 2008, 04:05:19 pm »
    Did you ever bother to listen to the commentaries or extra features on these films?  For that matter did you ever even watch the films?  As much as I enjoy Allan Watt he is sometimes off the mark as far as what filmmakers are doing.  Most just want to make an entertaining story.  They employ techniques they learned in film school, often taken from literary techniques, to tell a better story.   Who wants to make a movie that people leave saying "that really sucked?"  We have enough of those already when the bean counters get involved.   If you listen to stories behind the making of the film and what they wanted to say they are often saying something along the lines of what some people here think.  In fact they actually sound like folks who would fit in just fine here. 

    Honestly some of you need to ask yourselves if you are just becoming paranoid.  Back off, ground out and take a bigger picture view.  Some of the stuff that has been pointed out was just some writer trying to make a few bucks rather than flipping burgers.  They wanted to tell a good story.  I like "Children of Men" and the "28" Days and Weeks franchise.  I believe it was "28 Days" where they actually consulted some research scientists for what kind of behaviors are possible with viruses for more authentic zombies rather than the far-fetched ones that show up in films.  Personally I think that such viruses even if they left the person aggressive they would lack the rationality to protect themselves and would be easy to overcome.  Keep in mind that zombie movies are somewhat a cheap genre because your extras playing zombies don't have to be actors and if they try actor then thats even better.

    The actual message behind these movies was to WARN you about such a future not to get you accustomed to it.  In the 1960's we called such films anti-establishment (the term NWO wasn't in vogue then) and they were popular.  They still are.

    If you want to reference a film with predictive programming that was pure propaganda I would suggest "Untraceable" because it is VERY blatant in that film. 
     
    And if you want to point to some predictive programming look at religions.  That's all they are.


    i agree about ur religion statement but besides that nope.

    predictive programming is very real theyve been doing it before movies with fiction.  have you ever stopped to wonder why they spend so many billions upon billions on the entertainment industry? it's statescraft.  it's gladitorial games at the Colosseum so ceasar doesn't get overthrown.

    i dont care what some director told you in a special edition dvd commentary.  do you know how compartmentalization works?! not everyone is "in on it" sometimes not even the directors.  he provides a script, the movie company says "ok we will fund your movie but u have to make these changes to the script", it's just like federal funding programs on local schools.

    what about the core? was that a coincidence? was that for literary value?
    http://forum.prisonplanet.com/index.php?topic=67893.0

    http://forum.prisonplanet.com/index.php?topic=46215.0

    stop defending the entertainment industry when they are blatantly trying to lie and manipulate you.  they put product placements all over their movies what makes you think they wouldnt do this either?

    how do you think the few are able to control the many?  it's the media that is their main weapon.  they can shape our thoughts and opinions with media.

    Offline Banzinator

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    Re: Predictive Programming in Movies
    « Reply #7 on: November 16, 2008, 04:08:03 pm »
    Invoking the Beyond is a 7 part radio interview series of the Collins Brothers (Paul and Phillip) being interviewed by Vyzygoth on predictive programming in culture. Done in 2007.

    I have added relevant pictures to the interviews and condensed them into a three part video series:

    http://1phil4everyill.wordpress.com/2008/10/09/vyzygoth-interviews-phillip-and-paul-collins-invoking-the-beyond-1-of-3/
    http://1phil4everyill.wordpress.com/2008/10/09/vyzygoth-interviews-phillip-and-paul-collins-invoking-the-beyond-2-of-3/
    http://1phil4everyill.wordpress.com/2008/10/10/vyzygoth-interviews-phillip-and-paul-collins-invoking-the-beyond-3-of-3/

    very insightful blog.  this basically disproves the other poster's comments about predictive programming being paranoia.  saves me the trouble.

    Offline CaptBebops

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    Re: Predictive Programming in Movies
    « Reply #8 on: November 16, 2008, 05:13:27 pm »
    So you all have worked in the entertainment industry and know all about it then?   ;D

    Offline Banzinator

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    Re: Predictive Programming in Movies
    « Reply #9 on: November 16, 2008, 05:31:20 pm »
    So you all have worked in the entertainment industry and know all about it then?   ;D

    are you a politician?

    no? so how can you say politicians are corrupt without being in the industry?

    Offline DutchPhil

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    Re: Predictive Programming in Movies
    « Reply #10 on: November 16, 2008, 07:04:19 pm »
    Did you ever bother to listen to the commentaries or extra features on these films? 
    No.
    For that matter did you ever even watch the films? 
    Of course, several times even.

    As much as I enjoy Allan Watt he is sometimes off the mark as far as what filmmakers are doing.  Most just want to make an entertaining story.  They employ techniques they learned in film school, often taken from literary techniques, to tell a better story.   Who wants to make a movie that people leave saying "that really sucked?"  We have enough of those already when the bean counters get involved.   If you listen to stories behind the making of the film and what they wanted to say they are often saying something along the lines of what some people here think.  In fact they actually sound like folks who would fit in just fine here. 
    Some movies may have whistleblowing elements and themes but I would be hardpressed to believe they will reveal the whole truth. If a movie is a whistleblower then I'd expect the makers to resort to a technique known as limited hangout. As such, such movies, like Conspiracy Theory for example, tell the viewer some truth but then misdirect attention from layers of truth that are hidden at a deeper level.

    Honestly some of you need to ask yourselves if you are just becoming paranoid.  Back off, ground out and take a bigger picture view.  Some of the stuff that has been pointed out was just some writer trying to make a few bucks rather than flipping burgers.  They wanted to tell a good story.  I like "Children of Men" and the "28" Days and Weeks franchise.  I believe it was "28 Days" where they actually consulted some research scientists for what kind of behaviors are possible with viruses for more authentic zombies rather than the far-fetched ones that show up in films.  Personally I think that such viruses even if they left the person aggressive they would lack the rationality to protect themselves and would be easy to overcome.  Keep in mind that zombie movies are somewhat a cheap genre because your extras playing zombies don't have to be actors and if they try actor then thats even better.
    It's better to be hyper-analytic than hypo-analytic in my opinion. Sure I may be paranoid but I feel that Hollywood movies are such a favorite and important medium to dispense programming onto the public that at least stuff should be brought to the attention of critical minds. If the programming is there, such movies tell you something about what's going to happen in the future, on a big scale, and therefore prove their merit already.


    The actual message behind these movies was to WARN you about such a future not to get you accustomed to it.  In the 1960's we called such films anti-establishment (the term NWO wasn't in vogue then) and they were popular.  They still are.
    Some films may warn, but if they do I'd suspect it's limited hangout, after all why would they put in big bucks in movies that may help cause the fall of their own House of Cards. Small budget and independent whistleblowing movies may be of a warning kind, but they rarely make it to the big public and so can do limited damage at best.

    If you want to reference a film with predictive programming that was pure propaganda I would suggest "Untraceable" because it is VERY blatant in that film. 
    Cheers, I saw that one... Why does this movie predictive programming? It's not that I deny, it's just that I'm curious... I've seen so many movies lately, it's hard to keep track of em all.
     
    And if you want to point to some predictive programming look at religions.  That's all they are.
    I would feel that religions nowadays are more like mind control systems. Marx said, it's opiate of the masses and Napoleon said that it was that which prevented the plebs to go after the rich. I think both men were right. Predictive programming refers to the future and how the people should react and behave after some controlled future event. Religions are, nowadays for most practical purposes, good for keeping a check on the 'flock'. A mental and intellectual straight-jacket, if you will. BTW it's not that I'm anti-religion... it's just that I feel the original functions of religion has been perverted a long time ago.


    Offline DutchPhil

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    Gattaca (1997)
    « Reply #11 on: November 16, 2008, 07:10:30 pm »

    Offline CaptBebops

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    Re: Predictive Programming in Movies
    « Reply #12 on: November 16, 2008, 07:57:23 pm »
    Okay, I listened to some of the Collins Brother's stuff but it is just uneducated Neo-Christian stuff and much of it a stretch.  Even Allan Watt would have a good laugh at some of their revelations. 

    I guess I look at films a lot differently than some of you folks do.  To me "Gattaca" was a warning about genetic manipulation, not a advocacy for it.  The same director also made "Lord of War"  which is really a pretty heavy indictment of arms dealing and the establishment.  "28 Weeks" and "Children of Men" are indictments against biological experimentation and warfare.  That's one of Alex's favorite topics.

    "Untraceable" very clearly was propaganda.  There is a scene where the FBI agent asks a hacker if he likes movies and when the hacker answers yes the agent says, "I don't" and points out the hacker has a bunch of movies that he thinks were pirated. As if FBI agents are supposed to be some arbiters of culture.  It was laughable.   That's just one example.  The whole film is saying "government good, public bad."   The FBI even helped them out a lot on the project.  Again you can find out how much by watching the film with the commentary.

    There's probably a chance that more of you have some arts background than have political backgrounds.  I've been in the arts all my life in various fields of it.  Even if you took some art courses you would learn what's just structure and what's predictive programming.  Sometimes things that look like predictive programming were unintentionally done by the creators of the work.  Remember how much people read into the Beatles songs and Don McClean, the author of "American Pie"  (the song not the movies) was amazed at what people read into that tune.   Basically if you write songs you are looking for working phrases.  Maybe you do have something you want to say.  And some people will say your lyrics actually say something different than you intended.

    Not that "predictive programming" doesn't exist in the media but it may not be as pervasive as you think.  I remember reading an interview of Rupert Murdoch a few years back and he was asked how much influence he had over programming at the Fox TV network.  He said none at all.  All he cared about was the enterprise was profitable.  If it wasn't then he would get involved.  And talking with people who have done shows for Fox they say it's very "hands off."  Keep in mind that any skewing of programming comes from a higher level ( the greenlighting and series canceling folks ) in an abstract form.  If they tried Alex's show on network TV and he brought in high ratings they would keep hands off as long as he was brining in the ratings. So yes you can say to a degree there is some compartmentalization.   

    It's good you're looking into this but it is a vast subject and try to dig deeper and find that is really social engineering and what is nothing more than entertainment to separate you and your dollars.   ;D


    Offline Banzinator

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    Re: Predictive Programming in Movies
    « Reply #13 on: November 16, 2008, 08:10:02 pm »
    Well if Rupert Murdoch says everything is fine and dandy, well then by golly everything must be fine and motherf**king dandy!

    Quote
    Even if you took some art courses you would learn what's just structure and what's predictive programming.

    You realize the college is designed to indoctrinate, no educate, right?  And by the way the almost all mainstream music (yes Beatles was mainstream in it's time) is either selectively endorsed or pure NWO.

    Oh just forget it man, I'm too tired to argue today.  Me and you probably agree a lot more than we disagree anyway so there is no point on bickering over which pieces of media are NWO or not.

    Offline TahoeBlue

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    Re: Predictive Programming in Movies
    « Reply #14 on: November 16, 2008, 10:00:34 pm »
    A Boy and His Dog - 1975 - D.U.M.B 's in the future?
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gu9fESAlGc4&feature=related

    Has Alan Watt been mentioned?
    http://www.cuttingthroughthematrix.com/movies.html

    Offline DutchPhil

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    Re: Predictive Programming in Movies
    « Reply #15 on: November 17, 2008, 07:15:34 am »
    I guess I look at films a lot differently than some of you folks do.  To me "Gattaca" was a warning about genetic manipulation, not a advocacy for it.  The same director also made "Lord of War"  which is really a pretty heavy indictment of arms dealing and the establishment.  "28 Weeks" and "Children of Men" are indictments against biological experimentation and warfare.  That's one of Alex's favorite topics.
    I think 'advocacy' is too strong a qualifier for predictive programming in movies. PP themes are neither advocated or condemned in typical Hollywood movies that feature them unless they're satirical of course. Rather PP is 'just there', as a given/theme/concept in a movie as if it was normal and commonplace. That is how PP is sucked in by the viewer IMO. If PP stood out it would be more difficulty in finding acceptance with the viewer IMO as it would be a target for critical viewer scrutiny. 

    There's probably a chance that more of you have some arts background than have political backgrounds.  I've been in the arts all my life in various fields of it.  Even if you took some art courses you would learn what's just structure and what's predictive programming.  Sometimes things that look like predictive programming were unintentionally done by the creators of the work.  Remember how much people read into the Beatles songs and Don McClean, the author of "American Pie"  (the song not the movies) was amazed at what people read into that tune.   Basically if you write songs you are looking for working phrases.  Maybe you do have something you want to say.  And some people will say your lyrics actually say something different than you intended.
    The beauty of culture is that ideas spread infectiously and partly subconsciously even (this is the area of memetics). Some people, including filmmakers, may not be greatly aware that they are propagating ideas and themes they have somehow and somewhere picked up. Authors of PP may not be entirely aware that they are working along an intended PP agenda, simply by hitchhiking on a popular wave of some fashionable futuristic idea about society. 

    BTW My background is neither arts nor politics... I have a PhD degree in physics LOL.
     
    Not that "predictive programming" doesn't exist in the media but it may not be as pervasive as you think.  I remember reading an interview of Rupert Murdoch a few years back and he was asked how much influence he had over programming at the Fox TV network.  He said none at all.  All he cared about was the enterprise was profitable.
    Of course these media moguls deny everything LOL. They are all trained liars as far as I'm concerned. And even if true, I'd suspect that the social engineers dreaming up the broadcasting content have a lot more practical say in the particulars of (predictive) programming and skull-numbing superficial and degenerate boobtoob fluff.

    Offline DutchPhil

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    Offline DutchPhil

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    Minority Report (2002)
    « Reply #17 on: November 17, 2008, 07:21:41 am »

    Offline matrixcutter

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    Re: Predictive Programming in Movies
    « Reply #18 on: November 17, 2008, 08:37:24 am »
    Alan Watt - Predictive Programming (4mins 21s)
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=L8Q8M0u6CnE
    (Section of Reality Check video - transcript.)

    Nov 23, 2006 Alan Watt Blurb
    "PART 1 of Movie Predictive Programming / Occultic Connection" - mp3 - transcript

    Nov 24, 2006 Alan Watt Blurb
    "PART 2 of Movie Predictive Programming / Occultic Connection" - mp3 - transcript


    Oct. 20, 2008
    Alan Watt on the Alex Jones Show - mp3 - transcript
    (Originally Aired Live: Oct. 20, 2008 on Genesis Communications Network)
    Topics discussed:
    League of Nations, World War II, Global System, World Bank - Parallel Government - Conditioning, Propaganda - Power of the Purse. The Great Work - The Profane - War on Terror, "Insanity" - Collectivism, Authorities. Conflict, Group Opposition, Resolutions - U.S. Great Seal. Indoctrination of Children - England, School Teacher Interviews - Bertrand Russell, Experimental Schools - Gene Roddenberry, "Star Trek" series, Predictive Programming. Elite, Plato, Kindergarten, Cancellation of Parental Input. CFR, RIIA, Institute for Pacific Relations - Democracy, Voting - Alteration of Public Perception, Acceptance of Rule by their "Betters". Mass Demonstrations - Planned Takedown - Population Control - Bisphenol in Plastics, Effects on Body - Cancer - Inoculations. Human Genome Project, "Inferior Genes" - "Gattaca" movie, Genetic Enhancement - Modified Food - Monsanto, GM Food - Elite Food Supply, Specialized Breeding. New Financial System, State Issues Credits. Intelligence Agencies, Soviet Union. Moral Relativism, Anything Goes - Dehumanizing Agenda - Saying NO - Bonding, Fraternities. Technotronic Weaponry, Microwave, ID Card Tracking - Frequencies, HAARP - Poles, Antennas, Fields, Control of Minds.

    Offline Jackson Holly

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    Re: Predictive Programming in Movies
    « Reply #19 on: November 17, 2008, 08:40:11 am »
    I've been posting about Sci-Fi and predictive programming here:

    http://forum.prisonplanet.com/index.php?topic=23030.msg380269#msg380269

    The cognoscenti have been at it for a very long time ... but NEVER as all pervasive and staggeringly effective as today's technology allows.
    St. Augustine: “The truth is like a lion; you don't have to defend it. Let it loose; it will defend itself."

    Offline matrixcutter

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    Re: Predictive Programming in Movies
    « Reply #20 on: November 17, 2008, 08:50:14 am »
    More than a year before the 7/7 2005 attacks, on 16 May 2004 an edition of the BBC1 Panorama programme broadcasted a mock exercise, imagining what would happen if a terrorist attack was exectued in London, in the near future, consisting of three explosions on tube trains in the London Underground and one explosion on a road vehicle.

    7/7 Ripple Effect - [1 of 7] (9mins 28s)
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nY2NXPl625A

    ----------

    Back to the Future II had the police in the year 2015 with a computerised database that could identify everybody from their fingerprints. They used it to take Jennifer back to her house, not realising that the Jennifer they had found lying in the street was from the year 1985. This movie is about 20 years old.

    Minority Report had holographic advertisements beamed at individuals when they walked through a mall. The individuals were recognised by computerised records of their irises, and the advertisements were based on previous purchases they had made, which must have also been recorded in the corresponding database.

    Demolition Man also had iris recognition, and so did the book Angels and Demons by Dan Brown. Demolition Man also had references to Brave New World - another predictive programming classic - and it also had a microchipped population.

    The Final Cut, with Robin Williams is set in the near future and has a population in which about 20% are brainchipped. This came after the Loyola University meetings on the brain chip at which they said they would use movies and novels (and cartoons) to condition people to accept the brain chip. And in NBC's Bionic Woman, she has a brain implant.

    May 4, 2007 Alan Watt Blurb - "Great Britain, Embryo of World Government - 1938 RIIA Global Meeting" - mp3 - transcript
    Quote
    Arthur C. Clarke, who I’ve mentioned a few times, wrote a sort of scenario out in allegorical form of this system, beginning for 2001 to kick it all off big-time, the next big push, 2010, for the completion of most of it. Then he takes you in his book, his last one; “3001,” through a journey into a future where they’re down to one billion people on the planet, and even then in the book one of the characters is complaining that’s too many. It is a chipped society. It also has the direct thought-to-thought control electronic equipment working, which we know was discussed at Loyola University with a brain implant for control purposes. These guys don’t make this stuff up. They’re given the facts of the plan and they write stories around them, which fascinate young people. Everyone is fascinated, when they’re young, in science-fiction. It’s predictive programming so that when it actually comes into being in your lifetime, because it’s familiar to you, you accept it without question, as a normal progression.

    We are up against pretty well everything that we take for granted. All of the agencies and organisations, which you hear mentioned briefly on little news quips, are non-governmental organisations. Unelected people and representatives from these organisations run your lives, from all sources, mainly from media and marketing. Marketing is one of the biggest tools they must use in conjunction with television and all advertising. They market ideas to us continuously, all the time.

    We also have secrecy, under the guise of national and international security, on advanced technologies, therefore the public are never told - never ever told - what they actually have, until 50-80 years later. Then it’s obsolete, in fact, when the public get to use to it. They’ve moved on to much more advanced technology by then. There are three levels of technology in use at all times. There’s a professorship down level, who believe everything they’re told, and the public believes everything they read in the science magazines - they’re just starting to work on something and maybe one day in the future they will be able to, and so on. Then there’s the CIA, Mossad, MI6 level, where they have advanced gadgetry. In the 1950’s, Nick Begich has shown us they had, the CIA had technology, which could put direct voice to skull information right into the middle of your head, from line of sight, and you could put the gadget in your pocket! It’s antique stuff by today’s standards. The whole flying saucer scenario covered up the government making the darn things by getting the media to go into action, and even fronting groups to start up the whole alien thing, “well, it must be from aliens, because we don’t have them”. That’s how easy it was to divert attention from black budget projects.

    Remember, there’s always a good reason given to the public, then there’s the real reason, which they’re never told about. That’s how you manage the public. That’s what Francis Bacon, and Machiavelli, and other advisers to kings and queens, talked about. It’s best not to let the public know the real purpose behind laws, and institutions, and movements. As I say, you don’t want to frighten the children, and that’s how we’re looked upon. There are too many children, according to them, and we don’t have a function any more and we might get unruly in fact, if we don’t have enough bread and circuses, like what Mr. Huxley talked about (mp3, transcript).


    April 11, 2007 Alan Watt blurb
    A Good Example of Predictive Programming - mp3 - transcript

    Offline matrixcutter

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    Re: Predictive Programming in Movies
    « Reply #21 on: November 17, 2008, 09:25:44 am »
    As much as I enjoy Allan Watt he is sometimes off the mark as far as what filmmakers are doing.  Most just want to make an entertaining story.  They employ techniques they learned in film school, often taken from literary techniques, to tell a better story.  Who wants to make a movie that people leave saying "that really sucked?"  We have enough of those already when the bean counters get involved.
    And some movies contain obvious examples of predictive programming.
    Pointing out the techniques used to make movies more profitable does not negate this fact in any way.


    Honestly some of you need to ask yourselves if you are just becoming paranoid.
    Due to the abundance of evidence, the answer is no.


    Back off, ground out and take a bigger picture view.  Some of the stuff that has been pointed out was just some writer trying to make a few bucks rather than flipping burgers.
    Some of it?


    They wanted to tell a good story.  I like "Children of Men" and the "28" Days and Weeks franchise.  I believe it was "28 Days" where they actually consulted some research scientists for what kind of behaviors are possible with viruses for more authentic zombies rather than the far-fetched ones that show up in films.
    Research scientists are sometimes involved in the process, people who are many years ahead of the general public in terms of knowledge of their particular field.  So it is possible to include things in such movies which are in effect fore-telling the future, or predictively programming people.


    Personally I think that such viruses even if they left the person aggressive they would lack the rationality to protect themselves and would be easy to overcome.  Keep in mind that zombie movies are somewhat a cheap genre because your extras playing zombies don't have to be actors and if they try actor then thats even better.
    Zombies also represent the dead - the masses who don't think for themselves and just regurgitate what they are told to think, and consume, hence the shopping mall scenes in Dawn of "the Dead".


    The actual message behind these movies was to WARN you about such a future not to get you accustomed to it.
    They are not mutually exclusive.  I find it interesting that WARNer Brothers' Demolition Man showed us a microchipped population.

    The actual message behind these movies is multi-layered.  Predictive programming is largely about instilling an overall sense of inevitability, and inducing a feeling of familiarity when these things occur in reality, years later, which would not have been there without the programming.  Whether the movie appeared to be opposing the concepts portrayed, or supporting them, the more significant effects are the same i.e. the programming.


    In the 1960's we called such films anti-establishment (the term NWO wasn't in vogue then) and they were popular.  They still are.
    The Establishment have always been in control of the movie industry.
    Anti-Establishment movies tend to have a subtle message in support of the agenda of the establishment, although as always, there are exceptions.


    And if you want to point to some predictive programming look at religions.  That's all they are.
    That's not all they are, but yes, predictive programming is in there.
    I am wondering where the 666 will be on the microchip implants when they are mass-marketed to the public, using all the tactics the marketing industry can muster, which will of course include the endorsement of various celebrities who are willing to prostitute themselves for their own short-term gain.

    Offline Overcast

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    Re: Predictive Programming in Movies
    « Reply #22 on: November 17, 2008, 11:37:15 am »
      I remember reading an interview of Rupert Murdoch a few years back and he was asked how much influence he had over programming at the Fox TV network.  He said none at all.  All he cared about was the enterprise was profitable. 


    Of course, that depends on if you actually believe Murdoch - and then, of course exactly "what enterprise" being profitable might be a question too... :)

    I think the true answer is somewhere in the middle - like with most things. Probably more 'programming' than some think and less than others think.
    And dying in your beds, many years from now, would you be willin' to trade ALL the days, from this day to that, for one chance, just one chance, to come back here and tell our enemies that they may take our lives, but they'll never take... OUR FREEDOM!

    Offline Overcast

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    Re: Predictive Programming in Movies
    « Reply #23 on: November 17, 2008, 11:40:19 am »
    The actual message behind these movies is multi-layered.  Predictive programming is largely about instilling an overall sense of inevitability, and inducing a feeling of familiarity when these things occur in reality, years later, which would not have been there without the programming.  Whether the movie appeared to be opposing the concepts portrayed, or supporting them, the more significant effects are the same i.e. the programming.

    And if done right, they can 'plant a seed' for certain types of movies, and all the screenwriters seem to follow suit. Not that the may necessarily be intentionally doing anything, but see it as a 'trend' and go with it.
    And dying in your beds, many years from now, would you be willin' to trade ALL the days, from this day to that, for one chance, just one chance, to come back here and tell our enemies that they may take our lives, but they'll never take... OUR FREEDOM!

    Offline CaptBebops

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    Re: Predictive Programming in Movies
    « Reply #24 on: November 17, 2008, 12:57:46 pm »
    The bottom line if you think about it a bit is that human beings are nothing more than highly trained animals.  You could save everything you experience is "predictive programming."   :D

    Offline matrixcutter

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    Re: Predictive Programming in Movies
    « Reply #25 on: November 17, 2008, 08:46:22 pm »
    The bottom line if you think about it a bit is that human beings are nothing more than highly trained animals.
    Unfortunately, there is truth in this, although I would dispute the words "nothing more than" and "animals".  We are domesticated during childhood, throughout school and on into adulthood.  Most people don't even realise that this domestication takes place.


    You could save everything you experience is "predictive programming."   :D
    So you've gone from arguing that predictive programming is a non-existent paranoid notion, to saying everything that is experienced is predictive programming?

    Neither extreme is true, obviously.

    Predictive programming is a specific type of conditioning.  It is not an umbrella term for all conditioning/domestication/training in general.

    Offline matrixcutter

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    Re: Predictive Programming in Movies
    « Reply #26 on: November 18, 2008, 02:12:51 pm »
    Mindbender Trailer: 9/11 and The War on Terror in GI JOE (3mins 9s)
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wC39ZjAMmtM
    Quote
    The first official trailer to the documentary MindBender. Watch as events from 9/11 unfold in a cartoon from 1985. "The War on Terror" in cartoon form.

    Visit RevelationsMedia.com for updates and information on the film's release.

    Offline CaptBebops

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    Re: Predictive Programming in Movies
    « Reply #27 on: November 18, 2008, 03:27:58 pm »
    So you've gone from arguing that predictive programming is a non-existent paranoid notion, to saying everything that is experienced is predictive programming?

    Never said it was non-existent but that it was questionable that some of the examples given were actually part of predictive programming when both movies were actually warnings and not trying to get the public accustomed to some kind of police state environment.   What about the people who write scripts in their spare time, writing something they would like to see in a theater, and are fortunately enough to have it picked up by a studio and it gets made (somehow) without too much studio intervention or control?  Those people aren't under the control of any organization when they wrote there scripts.  In many cases if they are writing an apocalyptic thriller it is often to warn us of police states,  big government and more importantly big business which is the root of the problem.

    People often don't stand back and look at society are realize how much schooling is designed to make you think a certain way.   You can be deprogrammed of all of it too and it is very worth the effort.  Then you'll definitely see things outside the "matrix."   ;)

    Offline matrixcutter

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    Re: Predictive Programming in Movies
    « Reply #28 on: November 18, 2008, 04:24:20 pm »
    What about the people who write scripts in their spare time, writing something they would like to see in a theater, and are fortunately enough to have it picked up by a studio and it gets made (somehow) without too much studio intervention or control?
    Their good fortune and the mysterious forces that somehow allow that film to be made tell you that the people at the top want it to be made.

    "Too much studio intervention or control" is an interesting subjective term.  There is either intervention and control, or there isn't.  If there is, then the idea of a lone writer making something purely out of his/her own desire goes out of the window.


    Those people aren't under the control of any organization when they wrote there scripts.
    Says who?
    How do you know that any individual who is credited with any individual script a) actually wrote the script and b) isn't a member of any (controlling) organisation?


    In many cases if they are writing an apocalyptic thriller it is often to warn us of police states,  big government and more importantly big business which is the root of the problem.
    I think 1984 was a warning.
    I think there are possibly a handful of others.  There are hundreds of examples of predictive programming.  We will probably never agree on this point.


    People often don't stand back and look at society are realize how much schooling is designed to make you think a certain way.   You can be deprogrammed of all of it too and it is very worth the effort.  Then you'll definitely see things outside the "matrix."   ;)
    The process of deprogramming necessarily involves realising just how widespread the programming was, and continues to be, as well as an appreciation of the many different forms it takes.

    If things are mass-marketed to the public, there is a reason for that.

    "There is always a good reason given to the public.  And then there is the real reason." - Mandell House

    Offline DutchPhil

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    Re: Predictive Programming in Movies
    « Reply #29 on: November 18, 2008, 04:56:26 pm »
    I've been posting about Sci-Fi and predictive programming here:

    http://forum.prisonplanet.com/index.php?topic=23030.msg380269#msg380269

    The cognoscenti have been at it for a very long time ... but NEVER as all pervasive and staggeringly effective as today's technology allows.
    Indeed, there may be a simple positive correlation between the quality (in terms of realistic rendition) of the science fiction on the one hand and efficacy of the predictive programming disseminated on the other. In other words, the more real SciFi looks the more readily accepted will be the piggybacking elements of predictive programming. Whereas in the old days, technological limits also capped the scope and efficacy of predictive programming, nowadays, the sky is the limit, technology wise, and thus predictive programming can be pushed much more effectively and with much higher credibility.


    Offline DutchPhil

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    Death Race (2008)
    « Reply #31 on: November 19, 2008, 04:40:45 pm »
    With the auto industry in the US about to go bust and as a consequence unemployment going through the roof, the scenery in the next movie may indeed become somewhat of a reality sooner rather than later:

    On the rise of the modern-day prison gladiator and the prison industrial complex.

    Death Race (2008)
    http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0452608/



    Review:
    http://1phil4everyill.wordpress.com/2008/10/02/death-race-2008/

    Offline matrixcutter

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    Re: Predictive Programming in Movies
    « Reply #32 on: November 19, 2008, 09:03:17 pm »
    DutchPhil, have you seen this site?
    http://www.imagining911.blogspot.com/
    There are lots of interesting examples of pre-9/11 images, some of which are relevant to this thread and to the work you have been doing.

    It's linked to from another site, which has lots of free audio downloads:
    http://www.beyondthegrassyknoll.com/

    Offline DutchPhil

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    Re: Predictive Programming in Movies
    « Reply #33 on: November 20, 2008, 03:45:20 pm »
    DutchPhil, have you seen this site?
    http://www.imagining911.blogspot.com/
    There are lots of interesting examples of pre-9/11 images, some of which are relevant to this thread and to the work you have been doing.

    It's linked to from another site, which has lots of free audio downloads:
    http://www.beyondthegrassyknoll.com/
    Thanks for the links...

    Offline DutchPhil

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    Re: Predictive Programming in Movies
    « Reply #34 on: November 22, 2008, 06:57:06 am »
    Immediately following September 11 2001, the media began their barrage of showing us different types of footage of disintegrating WTC towers, over and over again, ad nauseum. Those who have watched Independence Day  thus have had ample opportunity to recognize the destructive real life events being similar to the fictional ones as portrayed in the movie. Thus, by virtue of this kind of recognition and familiarity gained from fictional imprinting, the witness is led into accepting a context of response similar to the one as presented in ID. In the movie, a clear identification is made of the enemy and a clear distinction is made between forces of good, that being the world in general and the US in particular, and forces of evil, that being the alien invader from outer space.

    So when the real attacks happened, those who have watched ID are inclined to also adopt this dichotomous and uncompromisingly gung-ho mindset of good vs evil. This type of response was further reinforced when the government, most notably Bush himself, immediately following the terror attacks began to spur the public into immediately start thinking in purely black and white terms of good versus evil. That this technique of moral coercion left no room or time for careful and honest deliberation and reflection became dramatically clear with slogans such as, “you are either with us or you’re with the terrorists.”

    http://1phil4everyill.wordpress.com/2008/09/26/independence-day-1996/

    Offline matrixcutter

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    Re: Predictive Programming in Movies
    « Reply #35 on: November 22, 2008, 09:06:59 am »
    There are various "9/11"s that appeared in movies/TV shows before 9/11, some are more intriguing than others.
    http://www.vyzygoth.com/photo.html
    http://www.beyondthegrassyknoll.com/911Images.html

    The City of New York versus Homer Simpson

    Original Air Date: 21 September 1997

    Gremlins (1984)

    Scene: Zach Galligan gets into his Volkswagen Beetle with Gizmo and successfully starts the engine. He turns the radio on and the red dial is sitting between 9 and 11. Incidentally above the numbers it reads "Sapphire XI." Sapphire is the traditional birthstone for September and XI is the Roman numeral for 11, hence implying "September 11."

    The one from Independence Day happens to include the year too:

    Offline TheCaliKid

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    Re: Predictive Programming in Movies
    « Reply #36 on: November 22, 2008, 09:16:42 am »


    Of course there was Neo's passport:


    Check written for Sept. 11th in the Big Lebowski:
    Better to beg for forgiveness, than to ask for permission

    Avers

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    Re: Predictive Programming in Movies
    « Reply #37 on: November 22, 2008, 09:23:51 am »
    Having watched Indiana Jones and the Kingdom of the Crystal Skull a few days ago, I found it quite in line with other Spielberg predictive programming movies on aliens. Add to that the evil of the russians (which was gone from the mainstream movies for quite some time) and an atomic blast destroying a quiet peacefull village, and it looks quite complete to me... Though I haven't watched for any possible small details, the general picture was clear enough.

    Offline TheCaliKid

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    Re: Predictive Programming in Movies
    « Reply #38 on: November 22, 2008, 09:44:01 am »
    Ha. You think that's bad, this one takes the cake. The Jericho TV series on CBS.


    Jericho (2006 - 2008):















    Better to beg for forgiveness, than to ask for permission

    Offline matrixcutter

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    Re: Predictive Programming in Movies
    « Reply #39 on: November 23, 2008, 01:38:31 pm »
    http://www.bbc.co.uk/survivors/

    One virus
    Millions dead
    A few Survivors

    About
    Quote
    Imagine being the only survivor of a disease that kills every member of your family, that kills lovers, strangers, friends, nearly everyone you've ever met.

    You are among the lonely few to live and now you must start over in a strange new world where everything that was once safe and familiar is now strange and dangerous.

    Set in the present day, Survivors focuses on the world in the aftermath of a devastating virus which wipes out most of the world's population. What would we do? How would any of us cope in a brave new world where all traditional 21st Century comforts - electricity, clean running water, advanced technology - have disappeared?

    These are the questions faced by the bewildered but resilient group of survivors at the centre of the drama. It is an opportunity for new beginnings, but with no society, no police and no law and order, they now face terrible dangers - not just the daily struggle for food and water but also the deadly threat from other survivors.

    "Survivors is about what it means to be human," explains writer and executive producer Adrian Hodges. "It asks questions about our nature and confronts us with our deepest fears. When everything else is stripped away, would we band together and find the best in ourselves, or would we fall apart and retreat into barbarism and savagery? Survivors is about adventure, fear, love, loyalty and friendship. But above all, it's about new hope."

    Survivors, by Adrian Hodges is a re-imagining of the classic 1970s BBC drama series which was based on the novel by Terry Nation. It launched in April 1975 and ran for 38 episodes over three series.

    (Starts tonight - and then probably available online for a few days here.)

    Heroes also had clips set in the future after 98% of the population had been wiped out by a virus, and there have already been various movies mentally preparing us for some sort of pandemic.