Author Topic: The Rising Body Count on Main Street/The Human Fallout from the Financial Crisis  (Read 10827 times)

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Offline bigron

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Tom Dispatch
posted 2008-10-19 17:01:11
http://www.tomdispatch.com/post/174991/nick_turse_going_to_extremes_in_america

Tomgram: Nick Turse, Going to Extremes in America

Back in the Great Depression years of the 1930s, unemployed writers, like unemployed steelworkers, were in need of jobs, and so the New Deal's Works Progress Administration, which put all sorts of Americans back to work, did so for writers as well -- 6,500 of them in the Federal Writers' Project at approximately $20 a week. Among other things, the FWP's writers produced a series of classic guide books to American cities and states, still enjoyable to read today. (Richard Wright and John Cheever were among the crew who, for example, did The WPA Guide to New York City.) FWP workers also gathered more than 10,000 first-person oral histories of ordinary -- yet extraordinary -- Americans, relatively few of which were ever published.

Almost 30 years ago, the writer Ann Banks collected 80 of these into a deeply moving memory piece of a book entitled First-Person America. When you read through it, one thing likely to strike you about its narratives from our last spectacular economic meltdown was how many of the speakers didn't distinguish between the 1920s and the 1930s, between, that is, "the roaring twenties" of the "Jazz Age" and the Great Depression era. For lots of them, it was all tough times. As Banks wrote in her introduction: "For most of the people in this book, the Depression was not the singular event it appears in retrospect. It was one more hardship in lives made difficult by immigration, world war, and work in low-paying industries before the regulation of wages and hours. Though they spoke of living through bad times, those interviewed by the Federal Writers seldom mentioned the Depression itself."

This came to my mind recently as I read in the Washington Post about a category of crime I hadn't known existed: desperate people in a money crunch, often behind on loan payments to car dealerships, who torch their cars and then try to collect insurance on them (usually by claiming they were stolen). Washington police estimate hundreds of such cases in their region just in the past two years. Though the numbers of such attempted frauds may now be on the rise, it's a phenomenon that hardly began with the collapse of Bear Stearns, or the tanking of the stock market, or the global credit crunch that followed. I was left wondering how many people this time around won't make much of a distinction between the blow-out 1990s, the Bush years in which the President, in response to the 9/11 attacks, asked Americans to head for Disney World and shop till they drop, and the disaster that is now almost certain to follow and haunt us all.

As more people today are behind on car loans than ever before, we undoubtedly can brace ourselves for a rise in car burnings in the years ahead, just as we are already seeing a rise in all kinds of extreme acts, including suicides, as ever more Americans have their homes foreclosed and face the reality of eviction. As Nick Turse, author of The Complex: How the Military Invades Our Everyday Lives, points out, if you search carefully through local news reports nationwide, you can already see where we're heading, and it isn't pretty. Not one bit. Tom


The Rising Body Count on Main Street
The Human Fallout from the Financial Crisis
By Nick Turse

On October 4, 2008, in the Porter Ranch section of Los Angeles, Karthik Rajaram, beset by financial troubles, shot his wife, mother-in-law, and three sons before turning the gun on himself. In one of his two suicide notes, Rajaram wrote that he was "broke," having incurred massive financial losses in the economic meltdown. "I understand he was unemployed, his dealings in the stock market had taken a disastrous turn for the worse," said Los Angeles Deputy Police Chief Michel R. Moore.

The fallout from the current subprime mortgage debacle and the economic one that followed has thrown lives into turmoil across the country. In recent days, the Associated Press, ABC News, and others have begun to address the burgeoning body count, especially suicides attributed to the financial crisis. (Note that, months ago, Barbara Ehrenreich raised the issue in the Nation.)

Suicide is, however, just one type of extreme act for which the financial meltdown has seemingly been the catalyst. Since the beginning of the year, stories of resistance to eviction, armed self-defense, canicide, arson, self-inflicted injury, murder, as well as suicide, especially in response to the foreclosure crisis, have bubbled up into the local news, although most reports have gone unnoticed nationally -- as has any pattern to these events.

While it's impossible to know what factors, including deeply personal ones, contribute to such extreme acts, violent or otherwise, many do seem undeniably linked to the present crisis. This is hardly surprising. Rates of stress, depression, and suicide invariably climb in times of economic turmoil. As Kathleen Hall, founder and CEO of the Stress Institute in Atlanta, told USA Today's Stephanie Armour earlier this year, "Suicides are very much tied to the economy."

With predictions of a long and deep recession now commonplace, it's not too soon to begin looking for these patterns among the human tragedies already sprouting amid the financial ruins. Troubling trends are to be expected in the years ahead, especially as hundreds of thousands of veterans of the Iraq and Afghan Wars, their families often already under enormous stress, are coming home to scenarios of joblessness and, in some cases, homelessness. Consider this, then, an attempt to look for early anecdotal signs of the fallout from hard times, the results, in this case, of a review of local press reports from across the nation, some tiny but potentially indicative of larger American tragedies, and all suggesting a pattern that is likely to grow more pronounced.

Extreme Evictions

In February, when a sheriff's deputy went to serve an eviction notice on a home owner in Greeley, Colorado, he found the man had slashed his wrists and was lying in a pool of blood. Rushed to a nearby hospital, the man survived, while the Sheriff's office tried to downplay economic reasons for the incident, saying, according to the Denver Post, that "it wasn't linking the suicide attempt to the eviction because the man had known for a week that he was to be kicked out."

In March, Ocala, Florida resident Roland Gore killed his dog and his wife, set fire to his home which was in foreclosure, and then killed himself.

In April, Robert McGuinness, a 24-year-old process server, arrived at the Marion County, Florida doorstep of Frank W. Conrad. According to an article in the local Star Banner, the 82-year-old Conrad was reportedly "cordial" at first. When McGuinness produced the foreclosure notice, however, Conrad got angry and left the room. He returned with a .38 caliber pistol and announced, "You have two seconds to get off my property or you will go to the hospital." Marion County sheriff's deputies later arrested Conrad.

On June 3rd, agents of the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) set out to inform New Orleans resident Eric Minshew that he would be evicted from his "Katrina" trailer. After Minshew threatened them, the FEMA employees called the police. When they arrived, Minshew allegedly threatened them as well and "locked himself in his partially-gutted home, adjacent to his trailer." A SWAT team was called in and tear-gassed the man. Interviewed by the Times-Picayune, local resident Tiffany Flores said, "Some SWAT members told my husband they had never seen anyone withstand that much tear gas." The standoff went on for hours before "an assault team of tactical officers" invaded the home. Though Minshew opened fire, they eventually cornered him on the upper floor. When -- they claimed -- he refused to drop his weapon, they gunned him down.

That same day, in Multnomah County, Oregon, sheriff's deputies served an eviction notice on a desperate tenant. According to Deputy Travis Gullberg, the Multnomah County Sheriff's Public Information Officer, the evictee promptly pulled a gun from his pocket and pointed it at his head before being disarmed by the deputies.

Hard Times

Recently, according to the Los Angeles Times, Rich Paul, a vice president at ValueOptions Inc., which handles mental health referrals, said that over the last year stress-related calls arising from foreclosures or financial hardship had gone up 200% in California. Similarly, Dr. Mason Turner, chief of psychiatry at Kaiser Permanente's San Francisco Medical Center, reported "a fourfold increase in psychiatric admissions at his hospital during August, with roughly 60% of patients saying financial stress contributed to their problems."

Of course, many victims of the linked economic crises never receive treatment. In July, Sacramento County Sheriff's Deputy Mark Habecker told the Sacramento Bee that twice this year "homeowners about to be evicted have committed suicide as he approached to do a lockout." In another case, he said, "a fellow Sacramento deputy found a note in the home that told him where to find the foreclosed homeowner's body." The Bee reported that such cases "received no publicity when they happened," which raises the question of just how many similar suicides have gone unreported nationwide.

In July, when police delivered an eviction notice at the Middleburg, Florida home of George and Bonnie Mangum, the couple barricaded themselves inside. Eventually, George Mangum was talked into surrendering and was arrested. "He did the only thing he knew to do, protect his family, all he did was sit on the other side of the door and say I have a gun, I have a gun and that's why he's going to jail because he threatened the police," said Bonnie. The couple's daughter Robin added, "This is my home, this is all our home and I don't think it's right. My dad was a Green Beret, he's sick, how are you going to kick him out?"

Pinellas Park, Florida resident Dallas Dwayne Carter was a 44-year-old disabled, single dad who lost his job, fell into debt, and was faced with eviction. "He always talked about needing help -- financially and help with the kids," neighbor Kevin Luster told the St. Petersburg Times. On July 19th, Carter apparently called the police to say he was armed and disturbed. When they arrived, Carter fired his pistol and rifle inside the apartment, before emerging and pointing his weapons at the officers on the scene. Police say they ordered him to drop them. When he didn't, they killed him in a 10-round fusillade.

On July 23d, about 90 minutes before her foreclosed Taunton, Massachusetts home was scheduled to be sold at auction, Carlene Balderrama faxed a letter to her mortgage company, letting them know that "by the time they foreclosed on the house today she'd be dead." She continued, "I hope you're more compassionate with my husband and son than you were with me." After that, she took a high-powered rifle and, according to the Boston Globe, shot herself. In an interview with the Associated Press, Balderrama's husband John said, "I had no clue." His wife handled the finances and had been intercepting letters from the mortgage company for months. "She put in her suicide note that it got overwhelming for her," he said. In the letter, she wrote, "take the [life] insurance money and pay for the house."

The day after Balderrama took her life, 50 miles away in Worcester, Massachusetts, a 64-year-old man, who had already been evicted, barricaded himself inside his former home. Police were called to the scene to find him reportedly prepared to ignite four propane tanks. "His intention was to burn the house down with him in it," Sgt. Christopher J. George told the Telegram & Gazette. With the man becoming "even more despondent" as "a moving van arrived on the street," police stormed the house to find him "holding a foot-long knife to his own chest" as a piece of paper burned near the propane. The man was disarmed and the fire extinguished.

That very same day, in Visalia, California, a Tulare County sheriff's deputy tried to serve an eviction notice to Melvin Nicks, 50. Nicks responded by stabbing the deputy with a knife and barricading himself in the house for several hours. He later surrendered.

No Way Out

Bay City, Michigan residents David and Sharron Hetzel, both 56, "lost their home to foreclosure and filed for bankruptcy protection. But they did not follow through with the Chapter 13 proceedings." On August 1st, say police reports, David Hetzel mailed a letter of apology to his family members. Later that night, according to the local police, he attacked his sleeping wife, striking her in the head with a golf club and repeatedly stabbing her with a kitchen knife. After that, he began setting fires throughout the house before crawling into bed beside his wife and killing himself with "a single, fatal wound to his torso."

On August 12th, sheriff's deputies arrived at the Saddlebrook, New Jersey home of 88-year-old Beatrice Brennan, another victim of the mortgage crisis, who had refinanced her home and fallen behind on payments. Refusing to stand idly by while his mother was put out on the street, her 60-year-old son John pulled a .22 caliber handgun on the lawmen. That sent the movers, waiting for a court-imposed 10 a.m. deadline, scurrying for their van. Brennan was able to delay the eviction briefly before a SWAT team arrested him and his mother lost her home. "I'm heartbroken over this," Vincent Carabello, a longtime neighbor, told the local paper, the Record. "How could this happen?"

Roseville, Minnesota resident Sylvia Sieferman was under a great deal of stress and beset by financial difficulties. She worried about how she would care for her two 11-year-old daughters. On August 21st, according to police reports, Sieferman "repeatedly stabbed the girls and herself." "She reached her limit," her friend Carrie Micko told the Star Tribune. "She couldn't cope anymore… she felt that her daughters were suffering because she was failing to provide for them." As Micko further explained, "After a series of financial mishaps, she just couldn't see her way through. She was under extreme financial, emotional and spiritual distress and didn't want to fail them."

By Any Means Necessary

The Boston Globe reported that, on September 5th, "[f]our protesters trying to prevent the eviction of a Roxbury woman from her home were arrested… after they chained themselves to the steps of her back porch." As 40 protesters chanted in the street, officials from Bank of America ordered Paula Taylor out of her house. "This is our eighth blockade and the first time there have been arrests," said Soledad Lawrence, an organizer with City Life, a non-profit organization seeking to halt the large numbers of foreclosures and evictions in Boston neighborhoods. "They can be more aggressive and we'll be more aggressive," she added.

On September 25th, as politicians in Washington tried to hash out a massive bailout package for financial institutions, six Boston police officers confronted about 40 City Life activists in front of the home of Ana Esquivel, a public school employee, and her husband Raul, a construction worker, both in their fifties. The Globe reported that four protesters were arrested as police shoved their way through in order to allow a locksmith into the house to bar the Esquivels from their home. "We've been destroyed by the bank," Ana Esquivel said, sobbing. "The bank is too big for us." While the Esquivel blockade failed, Steven Meacham, a City Life organizer, told a Globe reporter that "the protests have helped to stop about nine evictions. In the successful blockades, the homeowners were given additional time by their mortgage holders to negotiate alternatives to foreclosure."

Two days earlier, Los Angeles County sheriff's deputies came to the Monrovia home of 53-year-old Joanne Carter and her 67-year-old husband John to serve an eviction notice. Joanne Carter refused to accept it. According to "Monrovia spokesman" Dick Singer, as reported in the Pasadena Star-News, she "told deputies she had guns in the house and showed them a shotgun." The next day, Monrovia police officers showed up at the home after being informed that the woman "may have made threats to a workers compensation agency." Police Lieutenant Michael Lee said that Carter told them if they "tried to come in, she would defend her house at any means necessary." She and her husband then reportedly barricaded themselves inside, after which a shotgun was fired. Police from other local departments were called in. Following an hours-long standoff, the Carters surrendered and were arrested.

That same day, in northern California, Cliff Kendall, Petaluma's chief building official, shot himself with a rifle. A week earlier, Kendall had learned that he was being laid off. "He was afraid we'd lose our home, and we probably will because I can't afford to keep it," his wife Patricia, who is on disability with a back injury, told the Press Democrat. "He was extremely upset about it and hurt."

On October 3rd, the day before Karthik Rajaram's mass murder/suicide in Los Angeles, 90-year-old Addie Polk was driven to extremes by the financial crisis. With sheriff's deputies at the door, Polk evidently took the only measure she felt was left to her to avoid eviction from her foreclosed home. She tried to kill herself. Her neighbor Robert Dillon, hearing loud noises from her home, used a ladder to enter the second floor window. He found Polk lying on her bed. "Then she kind of moved toward me a little and I saw that blood, and I said, 'Oh, no. Miss Polk musta done shot herself.'" While she was in the hospital recovering from two self-inflicted gunshot wounds, Fannie Mae spokesman Brian Faith announced the mortgage association had decided to forgive her outstanding debt and give her the house "outright."

On October 6th, in Sevier County, Tennessee, sheriff's deputies, with police in tow, arrived to evict Jimmy and Pamela Ross from their home. They heard a shot and entered the home to find 57-year-old Pamela dead of a self-inflicted gunshot wound to the chest. Neighbor Ruth Blakey told WVLT-TV, "I know she really hated to leave that house. She did not want to leave that house."

Wanda Dunn told neighbors she would rather die than leave her home. On October 13th, the day she was to be evicted, the 53-year-old Pasadena, California native apparently set fire to the home "where her family had lived for generations" before shooting herself in the head. "We knew it was going to happen," neighbor Steve Brooks told the Los Angeles Times. "It was nobody's fault; it was everybody's fault."

Outsourcing Suicide

In September, readers at Slate's "Explainer" column asked the following question: If the financial crisis was so dire, "how come we aren't hearing about executives jumping out of windows?" Writer Nina Shen Rastogi dutifully answered:


"Because the current situation hasn't had nearly as devastating an effect on people's personal finances. The Great Crash of 1929 -- and, to a lesser extent, the crash of 1987 -- did lead some people to commit suicide. But in nearly all of those cases, the deceased had suffered a major loss when the market collapsed. Now, due in large part to those earlier experiences, investors tend to keep their portfolios far more diversified, so as to avoid having their entire fortunes wiped out when stocks take a downturn."

Perhaps this is true. So far, at least, Wall Street's suicides seem to have been outsourced to places that its executives have probably never heard of. There, on the proverbial main streets of America, the Street's financial meltdown is beginning to be measured not only in dollars and cents, but in blood.

Right now, there are no real counts of the many extreme acts born of the financial crisis, but assuredly other murders, suicides, self-inflicted injuries, acts of arson and of armed self-defense have simply gone unnoticed outside of economically hard-hit neighborhoods in cities and small towns across America. With no end in sight for either the foreclosures or the economic turmoil, Americans may have to brace themselves for many more casualties on the home front. Unless extreme economic steps, like mortgage- and debt-forgiveness, are implemented, the number of extreme acts and the ultimate body count may be far more extreme than anyone yet wants to contemplate.

Nick Turse is the associate editor and research director of Tomdispatch.com. His work has appeared in many publications, including the Los Angeles Times, Le Monde Diplomatique (German edition), Adbusters, the Nation, and regularly at Tomdispatch.com. His first book, The Complex: How the Military Invades Our Everyday Lives, an exploration of the new military-corporate complex in America, was recently published by Metropolitan Books. His website is Nick Turse.com.


Copyright 2008 Nick Turse

Offline Nailer

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I am a realist that is slightly conservative yet I have some republican demeanor that can turn democrat when I feel the urge to flip independant.
 
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Offline TahoeBlue

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Quote
As more people today are behind on car loans than ever before, we undoubtedly can brace ourselves for a rise in car burnings in the years ahead, just as we are already seeing a rise in all kinds of extreme acts, including suicides, as ever more Americans have their homes foreclosed and face the reality of eviction. As Nick Turse, author of The Complex: How the Military Invades Our Everyday Lives, points out, if you search carefully through local news reports nationwide, you can already see where we're heading, and it isn't pretty. Not one bit. Tom


http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2010/07/22/reno-foreclosure-fire-2-b_n_655377.html
2 Bodies Found In Foreclosed Reno Home That Burned

RENO, Nev. — Two people found dead in a home that burned in an upscale Reno neighborhood had heavily fortified the foreclosed house, apparently anticipating the sheriff's deputies who came to evict them, police said Wednesday.

An investigation continued into the cause of death of the two people whose bodies were removed from the charred rubble Wednesday morning and taken to the Washoe County medical examiner's office for an autopsy.

They have not been positively identified but were believed to be Therese Christenson, 83, and her son, Gary "Axel" Christenson, 46, who had lived for decades in the house that was sold at a foreclosure auction in June.

Deputies serving the eviction notice Tuesday heard what they thought were gunshots after they announced themselves at the front door about 10:40 a.m. They took cover and noticed the house was on fire.
...
No weapons were found, but investigators suspect an accelerant was used inside the house, Nuttall said. He said the bodies were found next to each other in the kitchen in a part of the house that had burned the least.
...
Citing court records, the Reno Gazette-Journal reported that Therese Christenson had filed for bankruptcy three times in the past three years, but each time, she withdrew the filing and the case was dismissed.
Behold, happy is the man whom God correcteth: therefore despise not thou the chastening of the Almighty: For he maketh sore, and bindeth up: he woundeth, and his hands make whole ; He shall deliver thee in six troubles: yea, in seven there shall no evil touch thee. - Job 5

Offline TahoeBlue

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http://www.ocregister.com/articles/home-253448-old-year.html
Updated: June 16, 2010 12:08 p.m.
Owners of murder-suicide home faced foreclosure
By GREG HARDESTY, DOUG IRVING and DENISSE SALAZAR

ANAHEIM – A couple found dead in an apparent murder-suicide that also left their 3-year-old son critically wounded were awash in credit-card debt and about to lose their home to foreclosure, records show.

Wayne and Herminia Zickefoose were found in their backyard with gunshot wounds to their heads, police said. Their 3-year-old son, shot at least three times, remained in critical condition Tuesday. His 5-year-old brother was not hurt.
...
Behold, happy is the man whom God correcteth: therefore despise not thou the chastening of the Almighty: For he maketh sore, and bindeth up: he woundeth, and his hands make whole ; He shall deliver thee in six troubles: yea, in seven there shall no evil touch thee. - Job 5

Offline TahoeBlue

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http://www.fredericknewspost.com/sections/news/display.htm?StoryID=107030
Suicide victim at fire scene faced foreclosure
Originally published July 07, 2010 - Frederick, Maryland 90ºF SUNNY

Frederick investigators are considering whether the possibility of foreclosure may have influenced the actions of a Frederick County man who shot and killed himself at the scene of a fire Monday in the 14600 block of Black Ankle Road.
...
Frederick County Circuit Court records indicate a foreclosure filing against Thomas R. Baker of 14680 Black Ankle Road in Mount Airy on April 26. The records state a status conference had been set for Jan. 28, 2011.

According to the Sheriff's Office, Thomas R. Baker Sr., 63, set fire to his two-story house and a 100- by 50-foot barn before killing himself.

At about 4:30 p.m. Monday, firefighters found the barn and residence on fire, the Sheriff's Office reported. Officials also saw a man with a firearm in the wooded area near the barn and house

Before sheriff's deputies responded to the scene to assist, fire and rescue officials found Baker who had died from an apparent gunshot wound in the wood line near the burning two-story house.
Behold, happy is the man whom God correcteth: therefore despise not thou the chastening of the Almighty: For he maketh sore, and bindeth up: he woundeth, and his hands make whole ; He shall deliver thee in six troubles: yea, in seven there shall no evil touch thee. - Job 5

Offline TahoeBlue

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http://www.cbsnews.com/stories/2010/03/24/national/main6329383.shtml
Economic Crisis Turns Even More Grim as Two Philadelphia Homeowners Take Own Lives before Evictions
PHILADELPHIA, March 24, 2010

The foreclosure crisis in Philadelphia is now becoming a matter of life and death. In the past month, two homeowners took their own lives before sheriff's deputies arrived to tell them that they were being evicted, reports

On March 5, deputies arriving to post an eviction notice on Lynda Clark's South Philadelphia home found she had hanged herself

Less than three weeks later, owner Gregory Bellows shot and killed himself shortly before deputies arrived to evict him from his Roxborough home.
Behold, happy is the man whom God correcteth: therefore despise not thou the chastening of the Almighty: For he maketh sore, and bindeth up: he woundeth, and his hands make whole ; He shall deliver thee in six troubles: yea, in seven there shall no evil touch thee. - Job 5

Offline TahoeBlue

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http://www.wdef.com/news/suicide_by_cop_linked_to_foreclosure_worries/07/2010
Suicide By Cop' Linked to Foreclosure Worries - July 1, 2010

A medical examiner's report shows that an armed man shot by Chattanooga police who say he rushed at officers outside his house was upset about a foreclosure issue and screaming "suicide by cop."     

The preliminary report on the death of 29-year-old Andrew Carr shows 11 gunshot wounds from the pre-dawn encounter Tuesday with three officers who have temporarily been placed on paid administrative leave.     

The report shows Carr was upset about a foreclosure issue and called 911 threatening suicide
Behold, happy is the man whom God correcteth: therefore despise not thou the chastening of the Almighty: For he maketh sore, and bindeth up: he woundeth, and his hands make whole ; He shall deliver thee in six troubles: yea, in seven there shall no evil touch thee. - Job 5

Offline TahoeBlue

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http://www.michaelmoore.com/words/latest-news/police-foreclosure-led-murder-suicide
Police: Foreclosure Led to Murder-Suicide - May 17th, 2010 3:24 PM

HOUSTON - Homicide investigators say a northwest Houston home under foreclosure apparently led the struggling residents to take their own lives.

Police arrived at approximately 11 p.m. Sunday to the home on Arncliffe Drive near Antoine Drive and found a married couple shot to death.

Because investigators say their corpses were decaying for more than one month, the stench of their bodies could be smelled across the street. The smell apparently alarmed a neighbor enough to contact police.



Behold, happy is the man whom God correcteth: therefore despise not thou the chastening of the Almighty: For he maketh sore, and bindeth up: he woundeth, and his hands make whole ; He shall deliver thee in six troubles: yea, in seven there shall no evil touch thee. - Job 5

Offline TahoeBlue

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http://www.newstimes.com/local/article/Foreclosure-notice-leads-to-suicide-of-nice-lady-307253.php
Foreclosure notice leads to suicide of 'nice lady' - January 3, 2010
Danbury, CT Clear79°F

MILFORD, CT -- A lot of people say "Over my dead body." Vincenza Garcia meant it.

Rather than comply with a foreclosure notice and allow a marshal to evict her from the home she loved at 55 Earle St., Garcia took her own life on Oct. 1. And, in the eyes of her attorney, her story is emblematic of the devastation the foreclosure epidemic has inflicted on so many once-proud homeowners.
...
 a Federal Express package that was found to contain an old black and white photo and two invitations to President George W. Bush's inauguration
...
Across the country there are tales of how job losses and home foreclosures have driven some to take their lives.

"For the first time in all the years I've done this, I'm hearing things mentioned like, `He lost his job. She lost her house. We're in foreclosure,' " veteran Minnesota medical examiner Dr. Janis Amatuzio told The Star Tribune in December.
Behold, happy is the man whom God correcteth: therefore despise not thou the chastening of the Almighty: For he maketh sore, and bindeth up: he woundeth, and his hands make whole ; He shall deliver thee in six troubles: yea, in seven there shall no evil touch thee. - Job 5

Offline TahoeBlue

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http://www2.insidenova.com/isn/news/crime/article/police_investigating_possible_murder-suicide_in_dumfries/41758/
Murder-suicide follows foreclosure - Va. August 22, 2009

Julie Fay served her country in Desert Shield in 1991, and remained a loyal government worker after her military service. Last month, she was forced to leave her job in Fort Belvoir due to failing health. The 57-year-old packed boxes and prepared to move to Colorado with Wallis Fay, her husband of 26 years. They were being forced to leave their Dumfries town house.

They never made it to the Rocky Mountain state. On the eve of their move, Julie and Wallis Fay were found dead inside their home at 3045 Sigel Court.  Police say it was a murder-suicide. Detectives on Friday said they are still investigating the circumstances, but both died of gunshot wounds.

Faced with losing their home of 13 years, the couple had reached out to their mortgage lender J.P. Morgan , politicians and the News & Messenger.

In that interview, Julie Fay said she and her husband returned from his mother’s funeral in Colorado earlier this year to find their lives turned upside down. ...  The man said ‘I bought your property.’  I said ‘What?’ “
 
No idea

The Fays said they had no idea it was even up for auction. The couple’s foreclosure case is a complicated one. And after their deaths, there are still more questions than answers.
...
I thought it was a happy ending, that they both had jobs in Colorado and were all set up to move,” he said. Neighbors said that happy ending was crushed when Wallis Fay learned Costco would not transfer his job from Fredericksburg to Colorado. Fortune said she got a panicked phone call from Wallis Fay. “He called me on the phone and said, ‘Well Ms. Bernice, they turned me down. I am not going to get my transfer. Now I don’t know what I am going to do,’ “ Fortune said.

Behold, happy is the man whom God correcteth: therefore despise not thou the chastening of the Almighty: For he maketh sore, and bindeth up: he woundeth, and his hands make whole ; He shall deliver thee in six troubles: yea, in seven there shall no evil touch thee. - Job 5

Offline TahoeBlue

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This one goes back to 2007:

http://www.chron.com/disp/story.mpl/front/5244051.html
Lengthy standoff ends in Spring with man's suicide
By LINDSAY WISE  Oct. 26, 2007, 7:35AM
A 12-hour standoff ended this morning with a north Houston man lobbing Molotov cocktails at Houston Police before taking his own life rather than vacate a home he'd lost to foreclosure.

James Hahn, a chemist, had told police he would not be taken from the home alive, said Capt. Bruce Williams, an HPD spokesman.

" 'You know what I do for a living and you know what I am capable of,' " said Williams, recalling one of the conversations police had with the man on Wednesday.

The standoff began at 1:10 p.m. Wednesday when police said Hahn pulled a gun on Precinct 4 constable deputies who had attempted to serve him with a warrant for eviction at the home in the 21000 block of Covington Bridge in Spring, authorities said.

It would appear that Hahn had prepared for the standoff. He had nailed plywood over windows and doors and stuffed insulation into cracks. A cache of weapons and explosive devices were found in the home, along with a gas mask, chemical suit similar to those worn by Haz-Mat crew members.

Williams said it explained why Hahn didn't vacate the house after police shot tear gas into the residence on three separate occasions in the hopes of bringing the standoff to an end.

Williams said Hahn was recently divorced, depressed and struggled with financial problems and drug addiction.
...
Residents noted there had been a number of foreclosures in the neighborhood lately. But none imagined that Hahn would take his life rather than leave a home that no longer belonged to him.


Behold, happy is the man whom God correcteth: therefore despise not thou the chastening of the Almighty: For he maketh sore, and bindeth up: he woundeth, and his hands make whole ; He shall deliver thee in six troubles: yea, in seven there shall no evil touch thee. - Job 5

Offline TahoeBlue

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When people lose everything they lose it.

http://www.fox5sandiego.com/news/kswb-santee-murder-suicide-01062011,0,3271064.story
Deaths in burned home ruled murder-suicide - January 6, 2011

SANTEE, Calif. -- A Santee couple whose bodies were found over New Year's weekend in the charred rubble of their foreclosed home died in a murder-suicide carried out by the husband, authorities confirmed Thursday.

Michael Cour, 60, and his wife, Janice Gervais, 70, each died of a gunshot wound to the head, according to the county Medical Examiner's Office. Cour's wound was self-inflicted, and Gervais' death was deemed a homicide.

Shortly after 2:30 p.m. Saturday, Cour made an emergency call and told a dispatcher he was going to kill his wife, set fire to their Clifford Heights Road house and then commit suicide. He also threatened to shoot anyone who tried to interfere with the rampage, according to sheriff's officials.
...
Cour and Gervais reportedly filed for bankruptcy last summer, and a bank foreclosed on their home Dec. 6.

Behold, happy is the man whom God correcteth: therefore despise not thou the chastening of the Almighty: For he maketh sore, and bindeth up: he woundeth, and his hands make whole ; He shall deliver thee in six troubles: yea, in seven there shall no evil touch thee. - Job 5

Offline TahoeBlue

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http://westernfarmpress.com/alfalfa/depression-driving-some-dairymen-suicide
Depression driving some dairymen to suicide
Dennis Pollock
Aug. 20, 2009 10:08am

The deepest economic depression in the California dairy industry since the Great Depression has bared a subject far more compelling than the cost of feed and the price of milk.

It is suicide.

“When someone says, ‘This is my last day on earth,’ it’s very frightening,” said Michael Marsh, chief executive officer, Western United Dairymen, Modesto, Calif. He has intervened to help at least two dairy operators this year after they expressed despair. Western represents 1,100 dairy members producing 60 percent of California’s milk.

Marsh said the men were despondent over finances and setbacks in the industry, a shriveling export market, an oversupply of milk and the necessity to trim herds or completely sell out herds as milk prices dipped and losses soared. In brief, he said, “losing everything.”

They survived, in part due to Marsh’s help in accessing mental health services.

But two other California dairy farmers killed themselves in recent months. There were reports of many more.

And on the subject of those suicides, Marsh said, “I pray we have had the last one and that the economic situation turns around.”

The issue of suicide on dairies and the pain of losing the family farm is a national one, and expertise from outside the state has been tapped in recent weeks to strengthen lifelines in California.
...

Mike Rosmann, a clinical psychologist who has a row crop farm in Iowa, is the executive director for AgriWellness, an organization that had its origin in 2001 following the farm crisis of the 1980s. The number of callers to his organization has risen significantly and the reasons for calling are more serious than they were before the nation’s economic decline.

“For example, in Wisconsin, the number increased 20 percent when the first four months of 2009 are compared to 2008. It rose from 431 to 438. The number of callers who indicated financial stress in 2008 totaled 130 – for 2009, it was 252. Three callers indicated they faced severe stress and 41 noted high stress in 2008. In 2009, there were eight reports of severe stress and 68 for high stress.

Rosmann said it takes as much as a year and half for the Centers for Disease Control to release statistics on actual suicides.

...

Wyoming is regularly among the top three states in suicide. Weigel said factors could be isolation, a high percentage of firearms and a lack of health resources.


http://www.ameshistoricalsociety.org/exhibits/depression.htm



Iowa milk blockade

Since they felt nothing was accomplished in the Congress, even though several Congressmen had introduced bills for more extensive farm aid, some radical farmers in Iowa and Nebraska decided to call a farmers' strike in an attempted price-support program of their own.  Falling farm prices were to be combated by withholding farm produce. The leader of this Farm Holiday movement was Milo Reno, head of the Iowa Farmers Union and the Farm Holiday Association.  On May 3 of 1932, a convention of 3000 Iowa farmers led by Reno voted to call a strike on July 4. Their slogan: Stay at Home - Buy Nothing, Sell Nothing, and their song:

   Let's call a Farmers' Holiday
    A Holiday let's hold
    We'll eat our wheat and ham and eggs
    And let them eat their gold
.

Farm Holiday supporters built road blocks on the highways leading to the agricultural markets.  They dumped milk into ditches and turned back cattle trucks, but the blockades weren't effective enough.  Police eventually opened the roads.


http://www.fireandknowledge.org/archives/2008/02/01/the-great-depressions-food-destruction-program-sowell/

The Great Depression’s food destruction program (Sowell)
February 1st, 2008  |  Published in Agriculture, Economics, History, Quotes

During the Great Depression of the 1930s, agricultural price support programs led to vast amounts of food being deliberately destroyed at a time when malnutrition was a serious problem in the United States and hunger marches were taking place in cities across the country.

For example, the federal government bought 6 million hogs in 1933 alone and destroyed them. Huge amounts of farm produce were plowed under, in order to keep it off the market and maintain prices at the officially fixed level, and vast amounts of milk were poured down the sewers for the same reason.

Meanwhile, many American children were suffering from diseases caused by malnutrition
Behold, happy is the man whom God correcteth: therefore despise not thou the chastening of the Almighty: For he maketh sore, and bindeth up: he woundeth, and his hands make whole ; He shall deliver thee in six troubles: yea, in seven there shall no evil touch thee. - Job 5

Offline TahoeBlue

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The Rising Body Count on Main Street
Has anyone noticed the complete lack of news of the rising pain level on the citizens???

http://www.flickr.com/photos/hab3045/3585961101/

Berlin, sein Tanzer is der Tod (Berlin, your dancing partner is Death)

http://www.mitpressjournals.org/doi/abs/10.1162/dram.2009.53.1.73?journalCode=dram
...dances of death to portray the increasingly difficult conditions of humanity
Behold, happy is the man whom God correcteth: therefore despise not thou the chastening of the Almighty: For he maketh sore, and bindeth up: he woundeth, and his hands make whole ; He shall deliver thee in six troubles: yea, in seven there shall no evil touch thee. - Job 5

Offline TahoeBlue

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http://economiccrisis.us/2010/08/rising-suicide-rate-worldwide-linked-economic-crisis-expert/
Rising suicide rate worldwide linked to economic crisis, experts say - Aug 2010
...
Mental health experts say the sour economy has turned what usually manifests as seasonal blues into a full-blown crisis. The fear of losing one’s job and pressures caused by a downturn in business, demotion or pension plan cutbacks can be bad for mental health and therefore increase suicide risk.
...

Japan is already home to one of the highest rates of suicide in the industrialised world, with an estimated 30,000 killing themselves every year. Amid deepening fears of a global recession, the rate is expected to surge even higher, fuelled by the growing prospect of job losses, decreased financial security and a rise in social dissatisfaction.

A recent study from Flinders University in Australia concluded that the suicide rate amongst Australian farmers was around 50%  higher than the rest of the population. “Relationships are one of the greatest supports for suicidal people,” Laura Kennan, Australian expert say. And finances have an impact on relationships.”

In the US, Men and women between 45 and 54 years old have the highest suicide rates in the country among nine different age groups as economy tanks and GOP blocks jobless benefits.

Women seek help for suicidal thoughts more often than men and added that “acknowledging the problem” was a crucial step to getting help.

But while suicides increased slightly in 2006 and 2007 across the United States, researchers noted suicide rates for people in their 40s and 50s have been steadily growing over the last decade.

http://www.worldcrunch.com/greece-depression-and-suicide-rate-rising-face-economic-crisis-national-shame/3350

Greece: Depression And Suicide Rate Rising In Face Of Economic Crisis, National Shame
Unemployment, economic hardship, and the shame of being considered Europe’s black sheep – the Greek have never been so dispirited. And the number of cases of clinical depression and suicides is soaring.

While the rest of Europe may be tormented by the thought of having to cough up ever more money to bail out Athens, the once carefree Greeks are getting more depressed by the day. Psychiatrists say that the economic crisis has triggered a 25 to 30% increase in the number of patients seeking their help.
...

http://healthland.time.com/2011/04/25/why-the-happiest-states-have-the-highest-suicide-rates/
Why the Happiest States Have the Highest Suicide Rates
By Maia Szalavitz Monday, April 25, 2011
...
Economists from the Federal Reserve Bank of San Francisco, the University of Warwick in England and Hamilton College in New York examined life satisfaction scores provided by 2.3 million Americans state by state, and comparing these with state suicide rates.

Utah, for example, ranks highest in life satisfaction — but also has the ninth highest suicide rate in the U.S.
The No. 2 happiest state is Hawaii, which comes in fifth for suicides.

New York, in contrast, comes in 45th in life satisfaction but has America's lowest suicide rate.

http://articles.philly.com/2011-04-13/news/29413955_1_suicide-rate-military-suicides-suicide-prevention
Suicide rate is slowly rising
April 13, 2011 |By Don Sapatkin, Inquirer Staff Writer
...
, societal trends are well-known:

elderly people commit suicide at rates that are 50 percent higher than young people,
whites nearly three times more than blacks,
men nearly four times more than women
...
The difference represents only a few thousand deaths nationwide, adding up to a change in rate from 10.9 per 100,000 population (in 2004, 2005, 2006) to 11.7 per 100,000 (in 2009, based on very preliminary data). But that was enough to move suicide into the list of top 10 killers, down from No. 11 (blood infections) for the first time since classifications changed in 1999.
...

Perhaps the most dramatic trend is not new but has now continued to increase for a decade:

The suicide rate among ages 45 to 64 grew 28 percent between 1999 and 2009, surpassing what for years was the most suicide-prone demographic, the elderly.

Unemployment and financial anxieties could play a role [duhh] . And they tend to go along with factors such as substance abuse and family problems that also are known to affect suicide.
Behold, happy is the man whom God correcteth: therefore despise not thou the chastening of the Almighty: For he maketh sore, and bindeth up: he woundeth, and his hands make whole ; He shall deliver thee in six troubles: yea, in seven there shall no evil touch thee. - Job 5

Offline chris jones

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 This will give the elites an orgasmic high.
 Lets see, they are proposing bringing down the percent of suicided, whats their methody here.
 Less jobs, more corps going overeseas, more foreclosures, more bigpharma physco drugs, more cops, more wars.
The only way a elitist sukling would suicide is if he found a conscience and decided to expose his master, he would suicide allright with a little help from his masters.
 

Offline TahoeBlue

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This will give the elites an orgasmic high.
 Lets see, they are proposing bringing down the percent of suicided, whats their methody here.
 Less jobs, more corps going overeseas, more foreclosures, more bigpharma physco drugs, more cops, more wars.
The only way a elitist sukling would suicide is if he found a conscience and decided to expose his master, he would suicide allright with a little help from his masters.  

Yes possibly like Carter Beese, who helped take down America's Great Bank - Riggs Bank :

BAE Systems - bribes - Prince Bandar - 9/11 attacks

Yes, it is so depressing being a multi-millionaire in Malibu and knowing too many secrets ..... you could just die...
and it is also interesting that there is no mention of his involvement with the creation of the CARLYLE Group here at all.... Humm...


John Carter Beese Jr. - Suicide - Obituary - Wednesday, April 11, 2007:

http://www.thealarmclock.com/mt/archives/2007/04/vc_j_carter_bee.html
VC J. Carter Beese Commits Suicide


J. Carter Beese Jr., venture capitalist and former commissioner of the Securities and Exchange Commission, committed suicide in California on Sunday, according to The Baltimore Sun. Beese, 50, was a partner at Boulder Ventures. He previously was president of Riggs Capital Partners, and was the former vice chairman of the global banking group at Bankers Trust and chairman of Alex. Brown International. At the time of his death, Beese was on the board of China.com among other companies.

http://alt.nntp2http.com/obituaries/2007/05/87bdf515ded0c58d37b45b828eea81d2.html
J. Carter Beese Jr., 50

Originally published April 10, 2007
http://www.baltimoresun.com/news/obituaries/bal-md.ob.beese10apr10,0,540597.story?track=rs
s

J. Carter Beese Jr., a former commissioner of the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission and former principal of Alex. Brown & Sons, ended his life Sunday at a home in Malibu, Calif. The Owings Mills resident was 50.

Mr. Beese was being treated for depression, family members said.

John Carter Beese Jr. was born and raised in Hackensack, N.J. He was a 1974 graduate of Bergen Catholic High School in Oradell, N.J.

After earning a bachelor's degree in economics and political science from Rollins College in 1978, he began his career at Alex. Brown & Sons. He became an officer in 1984, and was named a partner three years later.

In 1990, Mr. Beese was appointed as a director of the Overseas Private Investment Corp. Two years later, he was nominated by President George H.W. Bush to become one of the five members of the SEC. In his two-year term, he focused on cross-border capital flow, the derivatives market and corporate governance.

He returned to Alex. Brown and was chairman of Alex. Brown International from 1994 to 1997. From 1997 to 1998, he was vice chairman of the global banking group at Bankers Trust.

[ See: ***Derivatives as a method of counterfeiting and destruction of the currency   - Bankers Trust - Deutsche Bank  ]

Mr. Beese had been president of Riggs Capital Partners, a venture fund that was a division of Riggs National Corp. in Washington, from 1998 until 2005.

He had been a venture partner and chairman of the advisory committee of Boulder Ventures Ltd., and had been president of RCP Ventures Management Inc., a venture capital management company that closed last year. He was also a senior adviser to Legacy Partners Group, according to a recent article in Forbes magazine.

Last June, he was appointed an independent director of SafeNet Inc., a Belcamp technology company. He was helping with an internal investigation of SafeNet's stock option awards, which also are under federal investigation. The special board inquiry led to two top executives' ouster.

He had been a member of the President's Information Technology Advisory Committee since 2003. He also was a senior adviser to the Washington-based Center for Strategic and International Studies, a nonpartisan think tank, and a governor of financial services for the World Economic Forum. He was active in Republican politics, nationally and locally.

"He was an extraordinarily able young man who had a remarkable career in both business and government," said Truman T. Semans, a former Alex. Brown & Sons colleague and longtime friend.

His local club memberships included the Maryland Club, Green Spring Valley Hunt Club, and the Burning Tree Club. He enjoyed traveling, hunting and fishing.

Plans for funeral services at St. Thomas Episcopal Church in Owings Mills, where Mr. Beese was a member, were incomplete yesterday.

Surviving are his wife of 23 years, the former Natalie Wilson; three sons, John Carter Beese III, Wilson S. Beese and Alex N. Beese, all of Owings Mills; a daughter, Courtney L. Beese, also of Owings Mills; his parents, Elizabeth and John Carter Beese Sr. of Towson; and four sisters, Anne Carroll Kypraios of Winter Park, Fla., Mary Elizabeth Beese of Fort Lee, N.J., Anne Marie Kelley of Ringwood, N.J., and Mary
Rogers Fischer of Waldwick, N.J.
Behold, happy is the man whom God correcteth: therefore despise not thou the chastening of the Almighty: For he maketh sore, and bindeth up: he woundeth, and his hands make whole ; He shall deliver thee in six troubles: yea, in seven there shall no evil touch thee. - Job 5

Offline chris jones

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 Wealth, money, positioning, and above all an opportunists mindset.
It has been said that a family making under 50,000 a year is surviving, not living, personely I'm content with a roof over my head, food in the frig and bills caught up. My extras are my computer, telly, and DVD. . The miitary offered me a future, very good pay and promises of serious advancement, I refused.. While legally bodyguarding here and in various countrys, I was offered work by  both Gov and the organized crime, heaps of money, prestigige, connections, and a parade of goodys. I was fortunate in that I understood the internal price to be paid, even in those wild insane days I had a conscience.
 In short I returned a cady eldorado, and apartment, as part of the goodys. Got on my honda 450 and FKed off, seeking to discover something till today I cant put describe,though I have the feeling it was simply I refused to sell out, I had to get away from these I had protected, this gang of rats and their fake existances feeding on the innocnets. I can't say those who offered me what they considered to  be the ultimate opportunity, the golden key, appreciated my decision.
 My point being, conscience, I believe it in and promote it even then, to me it is Gods voice wispering. Some people suc their way to top, give up their conscience and get there, they are driven, there is never enough, and their lives and actions required are not theirs alone to make. I imagine some look back and recognize the fact they have lost their souls, have betryaed not only themselves but their fellow man. Their lives an endless chain of climbing the ladder at any price, and realize it wans't worth the pizz.
It jus may be this man was one of them.