Robots to shape wars of the future - 1/3 Unmanned Robots by 2015

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Offline jeremystalked1

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Re: Robots to shape wars of the future
« Reply #40 on: December 28, 2009, 10:41:47 PM »
Plus, if an autonomous robot massacres a group of dissidents, you can blame it on a 'glitch'.

 :D

Or 'hackers', that always works.

:D :D

Offline Monkeypox

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Re: Robots to shape wars of the future
« Reply #41 on: December 28, 2009, 10:44:37 PM »
Plus, if an autonomous robot massacres a group of dissidents, you can blame it on a 'glitch'.

 :D

Or 'hackers', that always works.

:D :D

But, at least the robot would feel guilty about it.

 :D
War Is Peace - Freedom Is Slavery - Ignorance Is Strength


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Offline trailhound

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Re: Robots to shape wars of the future
« Reply #42 on: December 28, 2009, 11:06:26 PM »
But, at least the robot would feel guilty about it.

 :D

 :D

http://www.usatoday.com/tech/science/2009-12-28-robot-weapons-guilt_N.htm?csp=YahooModule_Tech

By Kathleen Curthoys and Matthew Cox, Army Times

Robots may one day be more effective than human soldiers on the battlefield and they may have a sense of ethics — even a sense of guilt, says a robotics expert who has done a study with the support of the Army's research office.


 This is part of what AI has been talking about, TPTB pushing the idea that machines should run everything because people are more error prone. I suspect that road ends badly :-\


"Do not let your hatred of a people incite you to aggression." Qur'an 5:2
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Offline Monkeypox

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Re: Robots to shape wars of the future
« Reply #43 on: December 29, 2009, 05:49:46 PM »
:D

http://www.usatoday.com/tech/science/2009-12-28-robot-weapons-guilt_N.htm?csp=YahooModule_Tech

By Kathleen Curthoys and Matthew Cox, Army Times

Robots may one day be more effective than human soldiers on the battlefield and they may have a sense of ethics — even a sense of guilt, says a robotics expert who has done a study with the support of the Army's research office.


 This is part of what AI has been talking about, TPTB pushing the idea that machines should run everything because people are more error prone. I suspect that road ends badly :-\



Yeah, I also suspect it would end badly:



War Is Peace - Freedom Is Slavery - Ignorance Is Strength


"Educate and inform the whole mass of the people... They are the only sure reliance for the preservation of our liberty."

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Offline jeremystalked1

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Re: Robots to shape wars of the future
« Reply #44 on: December 29, 2009, 07:09:53 PM »
I'd like to see an updated Terminator series where the AI's are deliberately unleashed on 99.9999% of humanity to protect the financial elite from an awakened populace.  All of Earth is turned into a shitpile except for the designated elite hidey-holes.

Offline Monkeypox

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Re: Robots to shape wars of the future
« Reply #45 on: December 30, 2009, 02:34:41 PM »
I'd like to see an updated Terminator series where the AI's are deliberately unleashed on 99.9999% of humanity to protect the financial elite from an awakened populace.  All of Earth is turned into a shitpile except for the designated elite hidey-holes.

Who needs a movie?  Just wait a few years and you can live it.

 :D
War Is Peace - Freedom Is Slavery - Ignorance Is Strength


"Educate and inform the whole mass of the people... They are the only sure reliance for the preservation of our liberty."

—Thomas Jefferson

Offline bigbrothertech

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DARPA announced plans for a program called ‘Transparent Earth’
« Reply #46 on: March 09, 2010, 01:12:37 AM »
They’re spending $4 million this year on preliminary plans for a digital, 3D map that would display “the physical, chemical and dynamic properties of the earth down to 5 kilometer depth.  ???http://www.bigbrothertech.com/news/GoogleUnderground.html

Offline Hardware 952

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Boeing's robo-copter flexes its muscle
« Reply #47 on: March 15, 2010, 05:20:04 PM »
http://news.cnet.com/8301-13639_3-20000488-42.html?part=rss&subj=news&tag=2547-1_3-0-20



March 15, 2010 1:17 PM PDT
Boeing's robo-copter flexes its muscle
by Jonathan Skillings



The pack mule of the 21st century could well be a robot. Don't be surprised to see it in flight.

Boeing on Monday said that its autonomous, unmanned A160T Hummingbird made quick work of a resupply test last week at the U.S. Army's Dugway Proving Ground in Utah. During the demonstration, the cargo copter carried out seven test flights.

Two of those flights were round trips spanning 150 nautical miles, with the Hummingbird toting 1,250-pound sling loads in a simulated mission between forward operating bases. The aircraft completed the mission in less than the required 6 hours and, being a robo-copter and all, did so while operating autonomously (though preprogrammed-ly.) Autonomous deliveries by the A160T, Boeing said without offering specifics, were "extremely accurate."

The Hummingbird also showed that it could perform a 2-minute hover at 12,000 feet with the 1,250-pound sling load and a nighttime delivery to a simulated forward operating base.

The Dugway demonstration was done in conjunction with a $500,000 contract from the U.S. Marines Corps. The Marines are looking to technologies like the Hummingbird as a way to resupply frontline troops hunkered down in rugged terrain.

In earlier tests, the A160T has flown as fast as 140 knots and for more than 18 hours without refueling. It measures 35 long and has a rotor diameter of 36 feet. The unmanned aerial vehicle can also be used for surveillance and reconnaissance missions.


Boeing's not alone in working on unmanned rotorcraft. Northrop Grumman, for instance, has been showing off the ability of its MQ-8B Fire Scout UAV to carry gear into combat zones, offering this description of the aircraft's maneuvering during the Army's recent Expeditionary Warrior Experiment (AEWE) at Fort Benning, Ga.:


During the AEWE, Fire Scout flew to a named area of interest, surveyed the area to ensure it was clear, and landed autonomously within its pre-planned landing point. When Fire Scout's on-board skid sensors detected contact with the ground, a command was sent to release the unmanned ground vehicle. Seconds later, Fire Scout ascended and then loitered at a higher altitude to observe and provide a relay for commands between the UGV and its controller.
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Offline Nailer

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Re: Boeing's robo-copter flexes its muscle
« Reply #48 on: March 15, 2010, 05:29:25 PM »
skynet? automated  vehicles/drones ?    they must have  watched the Terminator way too many times.

So when do we see the actual Terminator/ robotic soldiers?   I know china uses a robot sentry at certain areas of its border that are armed  and very accurate from what I have read.
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Offline Hardware 952

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Re: Boeing's robo-copter flexes its muscle
« Reply #49 on: March 15, 2010, 05:57:02 PM »
Experts Warn of 'Terminator'-Style Military-Robot Rebellion


Autonomous Military Robotics:
Risk, Ethics, and Design
http://ethics.calpoly.edu/ONR_report.pdf



Military’s killer robots must learn warrior code

From The Times February 16, 2009
http://technology.timesonline.co.uk/tol/news/tech_and_web/article5741334.ece

Autonomous military robots that will fight future wars must be programmed to live by a strict warrior code or the world risks untold atrocities at their steely hands.

The stark warning – which includes discussion of a Terminator-style scenario in which robots turn on their human masters – is issued in a hefty report funded by and prepared for the US Navy’s high-tech and secretive Office of Naval Research .

The report, the first serious work of its kind on military robot ethics, envisages a fast-approaching era where robots are smart enough to make battlefield decisions that are at present the preserve of humans. Eventually, it notes, robots could come to display significant cognitive advantages over Homo sapiens soldiers.

“There is a common misconception that robots will do only what we have programmed them to do,” Patrick Lin, the chief compiler of the report, said. “Unfortunately, such a belief is sorely outdated, harking back to a time when . . . programs could be written and understood by a single person.” The reality, Dr Lin said, was that modern programs included millions of lines of code and were written by teams of programmers, none of whom knew the entire program: accordingly, no individual could accurately predict how the various portions of large programs would interact without extensive testing in the field – an option that may either be unavailable or deliberately sidestepped by the designers of fighting robots.

The solution, he suggests, is to mix rules-based programming with a period of “learning” the rights and wrongs of warfare.

A rich variety of scenarios outlining the ethical, legal, social and political issues posed as robot technology improves are covered in the report. How do we protect our robot armies against terrorist hackers or software malfunction? Who is to blame if a robot goes berserk in a crowd of civilians – the robot, its programmer or the US president? Should the robots have a “suicide switch” and should they be programmed to preserve their lives?

The report, compiled by the Ethics and Emerging Technology department of California State Polytechnic University and obtained by The Times, strongly warns the US military against complacency or shortcuts as military robot designers engage in the “rush to market” and the pace of advances in artificial intelligence is increased.

Any sense of haste among designers may have been heightened by a US congressional mandate that by 2010 a third of all operational “deep-strike” aircraft must be unmanned, and that by 2015 one third of all ground combat vehicles must be unmanned.

“A rush to market increases the risk for inadequate design or programming. Worse, without a sustained and significant effort to build in ethical controls in autonomous systems . . . there is little hope that the early generations of such systems and robots will be adequate, making mistakes that may cost human lives,” the report noted.

A simple ethical code along the lines of the “Three Laws of Robotics” postulated in 1950 by Isaac Asimov, the science fiction writer, will not be sufficient to ensure the ethical behaviour of autonomous military machines.

“We are going to need a code,” Dr Lin said. “These things are military, and they can’t be pacifists, so we have to think in terms of battlefield ethics. We are going to need a warrior code.”

Isaac Asimov’s three laws of robotics

1 A robot may not injure a human being or, through inaction, allow a human being to come to harm

2 A robot must obey orders given to it by human beings, except where such orders would conflict with the First Law

3 A robot must protect its own existence as long as such protection does not conflict with the First or Second Law

Introduced in his 1942 short story Runaround




Experts Warn of 'Terminator'-Style Military-Robot Rebellion

http://www.foxnews.com/story/0,2933,496309,00.html

Autonomous military robots that will fight future wars must be programmed to live by a strict warrior code, or the world risks untold atrocities at their steely hands.

The stark warning — which includes discussion of a "Terminator"-style scenario in which robots turn on their human masters — is part of a hefty report funded by and prepared for the U.S. Navy's high-tech and secretive Office of Naval Research.

The report, the first serious work of its kind on military robot ethics, envisages a fast-approaching era where robots are smart enough to make battlefield decisions that are at present the preserve of humans.

Eventually, it notes, robots could come to display significant cognitive advantages over Homo sapiens soldiers.

"There is a common misconception that robots will do only what we have programmed them to do," Patrick Lin, the chief compiler of the report, said. "Unfortunately, such a belief is sorely outdated, harking back to a time when ... programs could be written and understood by a single person."

The reality, Dr. Lin said, was that modern programs included millions of lines of code and were written by teams of programmers, none of whom knew the entire program.

Accordingly, no individual could accurately predict how the various portions of large programs would interact without extensive testing in the field — an option that may either be unavailable or deliberately sidestepped by the designers of fighting robots.
Don't believe me. Don't believe anyone. Go look for yourself.

Offline flaming_red_pill

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Global Hawk=Int'l Eye in the Sky Program passed as climate change monitor
« Reply #50 on: March 31, 2010, 12:53:25 PM »
These RC planes as featured on Yahoo News today (3/31/10) are supposedly for monitoring weather (i.e. "climate change"/manmade global warming).
The European version, however, is fitted for high tech surveillance including RFID monitoring, lol/cry? And some of the articles I found here suggest that the version to be deployed here were used in an offensive capacity in Afghanistan against 'terrorists'.
Yahoo was trying to pass off this bird as some sort of innocent meteorologist tool; if these are deployed over U.S. soil it is to monitor personnel movements, not weather systems, am I wrong????

Also lol at NASA investigating the TOYOTA scandal; what are they now, TEAM AMERICA WORLD POLICE? Sorry if I am overreacting, but I don't believe that these things are flying to solve the "problem" of global warming on behalf of the common man... I believe that communications and surveillance problems were the #1 obstacle for something like an an Allied Union or Project Blue Beam decades ago. These along with orbiting supercomputers and the like provide the dear guv with incredible, real-time persistent surveillance capabilities if I am not mistaken.

Scurry stuff.




http://findarticles.com/p/articles/mi_m0IBO/is_4_28/ai_n14700022/pg_15/

21st century logistics: future UAV pilots: are contractors the solution? RFID Technology: is the capability a boon or a burden for DoD?

http://noolmusic.com/twitter/global_hawk.php



http://nosint.blogspot.com/2009/10/first-international-version-of-combat.html?utm_source=feedburner&utm_medium=feed&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+blogspot%2Ffqzx+%28Naval+Open+Source+INTelligence%29

Quote
First International Version of the Combat-Proven RQ-4 Global Hawk Aircraft Will be the New European Eyes in Skies

Northrop Grumman Corporation and EADS Defence & Security (DS) introduced the first Euro Hawk® unmanned aircraft system (UAS) in an unveiling ceremony today at Northrop Grumman's Palmdale, Calif., facility.

The Euro Hawk® marks the first international configuration of the RQ-4 Global Hawk high-altitude, long-endurance (HALE) UAS, and solidifies Northrop Grumman's first transatlantic cooperation with Germany and DS.

More than 300 employees from Northrop Grumman and DS and officials from the German Air Force and Ministry of Defence (MoD) gathered today for the ceremony, which concluded in a dramatic curtain drop revealing the distinctively different aircraft that will be equipped with German sensors.








http://blog.taragana.com/pr/hypertronics-connectors-provide-signal-integrity-for-northrop-grummans-global-hawk-unmanned-aircraft-system-5026/

Quote
Hypertronics Connectors Provide Signal Integrity for Northrop Grumman’s Global Hawk Unmanned Aircraft System
Prne
August 18th, 2009

HUDSON, Massachusetts -

Hypertronics Corporation (www.hypertronics.com/), a Smiths Interconnect business and world-leading provider of high performance interconnect solutions for the most demanding applications; today announced that their KA electrical connectors were selected for use on Northrop Grumman Corporation’s (NYSE: NOC) Global Hawk unmanned aircraft system (UAS). Used in the braking and master flight control computer systems, the KA connectors were selected due to their reliability and robustness under harsh environments, shock and vibration.

Global Hawk can fly at altitudes of more than 60,000 feet for more than 32 hours, and has many potential Earth science and weather monitoring applications, in addition to overseas contingency operations support. The MIL-DTL-55302 Qualified Parts List Hypertronics KA printed circuit board contact system is able to perform at the high heat and elevations required for UAS. The KA’s are available in over 2,500 model configurations. The robust system uses 0.60 diameter pins/sockets that are rated at 4 amps with an insertion/extraction force of 1 ounce and for ultimate conductivity are 50 micro inches of gold (min) over nickel. They are made from corrosion resistant materials that meet the increasing technological demands of the UAS industry where continuous operation in extreme environments is required.

The Hypertronics Hypertac system is a unique contact design characterized by a wire basket technology which encapsulates a male pin and guarantees continuous signal integrity especially critical in space and military applications where a robust contact is required that can withstand high levels of shock and vibration. The wire basket design creates a 360 degree point of contact which ensures signal reliability, eliminates electrical intermittencies and fretting which can be an issue with many other connectors.

The Global Hawk is used for diverse missions that vary from combat operations on land and sea to supporting civil authorities in disaster relief operations or global climate monitoring. NASA recently announced that the agency will use Global Hawks for environmental science research, providing valuable information to help understand global climate change. These Global Hawks are based at the Dryden Flight Research Center, NASA’s primary installation for atmospheric flight research.

Source: Hypertronics Corporation

Deborah West, Public Relations of Hypertronics Corporation, +1-978-568-2780, debbie.west at hypertronics.com


http://www.examiner.com/x-2430-Science-Examiner~y2009m1d15-Unmanned-eye-in-the-sky-revealed-by-NASA

Quote
Unmanned eye in the sky revealed by NASA
January 15, 5:48 PMScience ExaminerTrina Hoaks
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Global Hawk

Earlier today, NASA revealed two planes that will be used to gather information for atmospheric research. One of the unmanned planes, Global Hawks, as they’re called, will be decked out with scientific instrumentation later this year so that it will be ready for its first mission scheduled for June.

The Global Hawk is larger than its predecessors and Is able to maintain flight for longer than those that came before it.

According to an Associated Press report, project scientist, Paul A. Newman:
 

    "It's a whole new ballgame for us."





http://www.spacewar.com/reports/Global_Hawk_Marks_10_Year_Anniversary_999.html

Quote
UAV NEWS
Global Hawk Marks 10-Year Anniversary

"The Global Hawk provides a persistent 'eye in the sky' that saves Soldiers, Sailors, Marines and Airmen's lives, and helps them take the fight to our enemies," Colonel Thurling said.
by Staff Writers
Edwards AFB CA (SPX) Mar 07, 2008
A Global Hawk unmanned aerial vehicle landed after an eight-hour mission Feb. 28 that marked 10 years since base officials witnessed its first flight at Edwards Air Force Base. On that first flight, the aircraft flew for one hour at an altitude of 32,000 feet, and now the Global Hawk has logged more than 20,000 flight hours including 15,000 hours flown in support of the war on terrorism.

The high-altitude, long-endurance unmanned aerial reconnaissance system is designed to provide commanders with real-time imagery of large geographic areas. The Global Hawk can reach an altitude up to 65,000 feet and loiter for more than 30 hours.


The Global Hawk performed its first flight here because of the Air Force Flight Test Center's proximity to Northrop Grumman facility in San Diego and its easy access to restricted airspace.

During its first flight, Tom Bryson, the 452nd Flight Test Squadron deputy manager for engineering support, was a safety chase driver and had the opportunity to see the UAV and it capabilities.

"I had a front-row seat of this amazing aircraft," Mr. Bryson said. "I was totally amazed to see its capabilities."

The development of the Global Hawk has been phenomenal in the short amount of time they have had it here, Mr. Bryson said.

"The significance of 10 years to this point in time is just amazing because we went from an unproven UAV to a very successful first flight here," Mr. Bryson said.

Though still in the developmental stage, the Global Hawk was deployed in Afghanistan in 2001 to support of the war on terrorism.

"None of us anticipated Sept. 11, 2001, and during that time, the Global Hawk was at a critical stage in its development," Mr. Bryson said. "But the Global Hawk did what it was built to do, and on its first night it saved several lives."

The Global Hawk system is providing vital intelligence to the warfighter, said Lt. Col. Andy Thurling, the 452nd Flight Test Squadron commander.

"The Global Hawk provides a persistent 'eye in the sky' that saves Soldiers, Sailors, Marines and Airmen's lives, and helps them take the fight to our enemies," Colonel Thurling said.

Tom Wayne, 452nd Flight Test Squadron Northrop Grumman deputy flight test manager and Global Hawk pilot, said he was impressed with the aircraft's performance during its first flight and foresees great things for the UAV in the next 10 years.

"At first, I had mixed feelings as a Global Hawk pilot since we are flying the aircraft on the ground as the UAV is up in the sky, but after seeing its capabilities during the first flight here, I was amazed," Mr. Wayne said. "Being a Global Hawk pilot does have its satisfaction because we are breaking new grounds here. I am doing something new in aviation."

Mr. Bryson said Edwards AFB officials have the pleasure of seeing Global Hawk's first, second and third generation, and he is looking forward to see what's in store in the years to come.

"Not only will we still be providing support for the (war on terrorism), but we will also be providing new capabilities for the military," he said. "The future for unmanned vehicles is unlimited."

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In other words, they can sic dogs of the state on the family farm with lightning precision,  :D




Now imagine UAVs equipped with, say, this:
Quote
MILTECH
US, Chinese researchers engineer invisible cloak: study

by Staff Writers
Washington (AFP) Jan 15, 2009
In a breakthrough that could signal a new era for human technology, US and Chinese researchers announced Thursday they are a step closer to creating an invisibility shield.

In a development made possible by advances in complex mathematical algorithms, engineers at Duke University, North Carolina were able to create what they call "metamaterials."

These materials can "guide electromagnetic waves around an object, only to have them emerge on the other side as if they had passed through an empty volume of space," according to the team, whose work was published in the January 16 edition of the journal Science.

The cloaking phenomenon is similar to mirages seen at a distance on a hot day, according to senior researcher David R. Smith.

"You see what looks like water hovering over the road, but it is in reality a reflection from the sky," Smith said.

"In that example, the mirage you see is cloaking the road below. In effect, we are creating an engineered mirage with this latest cloak design."

The team, who were backed by the US Air Force Office of Scientific Research and the National Science Foundation of China among others, worked off their 2006 prototype that proved the project's feasibility.

But Smith said their latest cloak is far superior to the original design, Smith said.

"The new device can cloak a much wider spectrum of waves -- nearly limitless -- and will scale far more easily to infrared and visible light," he said.

"The approach we used should help us expand and improve our abilities to cloak different types of waves."

The breakthrough has the potential of advancing numerous technologies that already exist, and ideas that have yet to be devised.

"By eliminating the effects of obstructions, cloaking devices could improve wireless communications, or acoustic cloaks could serve as protective shields, preventing the penetration of vibrations, sound or seismic waves," said the team.

The cloak, measuring 20 inches (50.8 centimeters) by four inches (10 centimeters) and less than an inch (2.5 centimeter) high, is constructed with 10,000 fiberglass pieces arranged in parallel rows, 6,000 of which are unique.

The unique algorithms that can affect electromagnetic waves determined the shape and placement of each piece, the team indicated.

http://www.spacewar.com/reports/US_Chinese_researchers_engineer_invisible_cloak_study_999.html


We're working with China on this one by the way, isn't that sweet?  :-[
Its preparations are concealed, not published. Its mistakes are buried, not headlined. Its dissenters are silenced, not praised. No expenditure is questioned, no rumor is printed, no secret is revealed.

-President John F. Kennedy on the Global Conspiracy

Offline Monkeypox

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"The Global Hawk provides a persistent 'eye in the sky' that saves Soldiers, Sailors, Marines and Airmen's lives"

In other words, they no longer have to risk injury or death to themselves to kill.

Honor has completely left the battlefield.
War Is Peace - Freedom Is Slavery - Ignorance Is Strength


"Educate and inform the whole mass of the people... They are the only sure reliance for the preservation of our liberty."

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Offline chrisfromchi

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"The Global Hawk provides a persistent 'eye in the sky' that saves Soldiers, Sailors, Marines and Airmen's lives"

In other words, they no longer have to risk injury or death to themselves to kill.

Honor has completely left the battlefield.

Really its more they changed the "radar on" option in the call of duty global warfare options menu of the game.

Offline flaming_red_pill

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http://www.emporia.edu/earthsci/student/graves1/project.html







http://www.wired.com/dangerroom/2010/01/pentagon-shares-earthquake-images-from-high-flying-spy-drone/





Quote
In Germany, the contracting authorities have a requirement for an airborne wide-area surveillance and reconnaissance capability. The solution favoured here is based on Northrop Grumman's Global Hawk, a HALE (High Altitude Long Endurance) type unmanned air vehicle that is to be modified for the installation of German and/or European mission systems and requires certification for Europe as the Euro Hawk system.


EADS Military Aircraft covers an important part of this field, Unmanned Combat Aerial Vehicles (UCAVs), and has already been working on the required specific technologies for many years. Investigations are being conducted together with the German Aerospace Center (DLR) in order to prove the feasibility of remote control technologies. In Ottobrunn, engineers are working on voice control, automatic target identification, automatic guidance and other topics.
All these separate technologies need to be integrated into an overall system. Here, too, the focal points are aerodynamic design of the airframe, flight control, signature footprint, simulation and test, state-of-the-art materials and production methods. But system integration is gaining in significance all the time. Here, the Business Unit is building on the experience it has acquired in programmes such as Tornado, Eurofighter or the X-31. This knowledge is utilised both in the unit's own studies and, for example, as a contribution to the European Technology Acquisition Programme (ETAP).


EADS Military Aircraft is filling this market gap by offering the Mako, a family concept for an advanced trainer and light combat aircraft. Mako is being developed around the concept of a family consisting of the Mako HEAT and a Light Combat Aircraft (LCA). This family concept is well-balanced because it is based on a common platform and provides technical, logistic and commercial advantages. The Mako family concept enables technology and equipment to be used equally for the Mako HEAT and for the LCA, which opens up growth potentials for the coming decades.

http://www.irandefence.net/showthread.php?t=95









~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

http://www.as.northropgrumman.com/products/globalhawk/

Global Hawk

RQ-4 Global Hawk Enterprise
High-Altitude, Long-Endurance Unmanned Aircraft Systems

Mission
The family of high-flying Global Hawks builds on the common RQ-4 high-altitude, long-endurance (HALE) unmanned aircraft system (UAS). When equipped with a variety of available mission-specific sensors, they provide intelligence, surveillance and reconnaissance (ISR) information over a vast geographic area without putting anyone in harm’s way. Global Hawk missions are to provide a broad spectrum of ISR collection capability to support joint combatant forces in worldwide peacetime, contingency and wartime operations. The systems can also be used for various civil and commercial missions such as border patrol, port surveillance, hurricane monitoring, disaster relief support, and high-altitude scientific research. The systems complement manned and space reconnaissance systems by providing near-real-time coverage using imagery intelligence (IMINT) sensors, signals intelligence (SIGINT), and communications relay capability.

Current RQ-4 Programs:

Global Hawk (U.S. Air Force)
A combat-proven HALE UAS with extraordinary ISR capabilities, providing near-real-time high resolution imagery of large geographical areas all day and night in all types of weather. During its trials with the Air Force's 31st Test and Evaluation Squadron and during its first deployment in Operation Enduring Freedom, the Global Hawk system was shown to be flexible and dynamically re-taskable. Global Hawk media gallery.

GHMD (U.S. Navy)
The U.S. Navy procured two Block 10 Global Hawks for the Global Hawk Maritime Demonstration (GHMD) program from the U.S. Air Force, and is using them to help define concept of operations for maritime surveillance, as well as for sensor technology experimentation and fleet orientation exercises. GHMD media gallery.

Euro Hawk® (Germany)
First international version of the Global Hawk UAS for the German Ministry of Defence. The Euro Hawk® is a derivative of the Block 20 Global Hawk, equipped with new SIGINT mission system developed by EADS. The SIGINT system provides stand-off capability to detect electronic intelligence (ELINT) and communications intelligence (COMINT) radar emitters. EADS will also provide the ground stations that will receive and analyze the data from Euro Hawk® as part of an integrated system solution.

NASA Global Hawk (NASA Dryden)
Partnership between NASA Dryden and Northrop Grumman to demonstrate HALE capability for future customers and experiments for the environmental science community to include NOAA, NASA, Department of Energy, and universities. Northrop Grumman will share in use of the aircraft to conduct its own flight demonstrations for expanded markets, missions and airborne capabilities, including UAS integration into national airspace.

NATO AGS (U.S. and allied nations)
After many years exploring options for a NATO owned and operated airborne ground surveillance capability, the North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO) has agreed to a program of record based on the Block 40 Global Hawk with an MP-RTIP sensor. In September 2007, nations agreed to move forward with a UAS-only solution based on an off-the-shelf Block 40. Northrop Grumman will be the prime contractor for the NATO AGS program, supported by industries in the 15 participating nations. NATO AGS media gallery.

Background
Global Hawk has its origins in the 1995 High-Altitude Endurance Unmanned Aerial Vehicle Advanced Concept Technology Demonstration (HAE UAV ACTD) program initiated by the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) and Defense Airborne Reconnaissance Office (DARO). The Global Hawk effort succeeded because it focused on the design and construction of a practical air vehicle that was developmentally mature enough to be transitioned into an operational weapons system. While still a developmental system, the Global Hawk system began supporting overseas contingency operations only two months after the Sept. 11, 2001 attacks, with thousands of combat hours and missions completed thus far.

Distinctions
Global Hawk has achieved several distinctions and awards, including setting an endurance record for a full-scale, operational unmanned aircraft on March 22, 2008, when it completed a flight of 33.1 hours at altitudes up to 60,000 feet over Edwards Air Force Base, Calif. It also set another aviation record on April 23, 2001, when it landed in Australia at 8:40 p.m. local time after a 23-hour, 20-minute trip across the Pacific Ocean. This nonstop flight from Edwards Air Force Base, Calif., marks the first time that an unmanned, powered aircraft crossed the world's largest ocean.

In 2001, Northrop Grumman along with key government and industry partners received the coveted Robert J. Collier Trophy for designing, building, testing, and operating Global Hawk. In addition, Global Hawk is the first UAS to achieve a military airworthiness certification, which along with the certificate of authorization from the Federal Aviation Administration, recognizes Global Hawk's ability to routinely fly within national airspace.

Features
The Global Hawk system consists of the RQ-4 aircraft, mission control element (MCE), launch and recovery element (LRE), sensors, communication links, support element, and trained personnel. They offer a wide variety of employment options. Cruising at extremely high altitudes above 60,000 feet for more than 32 hours at a time, the aircraft can survey large geographic areas with pinpoint accuracy, giving military decision-makers near-real-time information regarding enemy location, resources, and personnel.

The Block 10 configurations carry the IMINT sensors, which include synthetic aperture radar, electro-optical and medium-wave infrared sensors. The Block 20 versions carry an enhanced integrated sensor suite similar to the Block 10 but provides longer range and better resolution. The Block 30 carries the Block 20 imagery sensors as well as the airborne signals intelligence payload, while the newest version, Block 40, carries the Multi-Platform Radar Technology Insertion Program (MP-RTIP) active electronically scanned array radar.

The MCE serves as the RQ-4 cockpit during the operational portion of the mission with a pilot and sensor operator crew. Command and control data links provide RQ-4 crews complete dynamic control of the aircraft. The pilot workstations in the MCE and LRE act as the cockpit on the ground for the pilot to control and display platform status transmitted from the aircraft via the command and control link (health and status of the aircraft, sensors, navigational systems, and communication links). From this station, the pilot communicates with outside entities to coordinate the mission (air traffic control, airborne controllers, ground controllers, other ISR assets, etc.). When necessary the pilot can land the aircraft at any location provided in the aircraft mission plan. The sensor operator workstation manually provides the capability to dynamically update the collection plan, monitor sensor status, initiate sensor calibration and process, distribute, and store data. The sensor operator provides quality control of images on selected targets of high interest (ad hoc, dynamic targets, etc.).

Unlike all other unmanned aircraft, Global Hawk is flown autonomously by flight control software under the direct supervision of a pilot. The pilot does not physically manipulate the control surfaces in flight but instead, he commands the computer to take action when needed, or the system can be left alone and fly a complete preprogrammed mission. Takeoff and landing are software controlled and poor weather is not a limiting factor for operation like it is for other unmanned systems. The pilot and crew can focus on executing the national security intelligence collection mission, collecting thousands of pixels full of critical security intelligence, while the aircraft is flown by the sophisticated flight control computer.

Specifications
The Block 20/30/40 version represents a significant increase in capability over the Block 10 configuration. The larger Block 20/30/40 aircraft can carry up to 3,000 pounds of internal payload and operates with two-and-a-half times the power of its predecessor. Its open system architecture, a so-called "plug-and-play" environment, can accommodate new sensors and communication systems as they are developed to help military customers quickly evaluate and adopt new technologies.

When fully fueled for flight, the Block 20/30/40 weighs approximately 32,250 pounds. More than half the system's components are constructed of lightweight, high-strength composite materials, including its wings, wing fairings, empennage, engine cover, nacelles, and three radomes. Its main fuselage is standard aluminum, semi-monocoque construction.

Block 10
Wingspan: 116.2 ft (35.4 m)
Length: 44.4 ft (13.5 m)
Height: 14.6 ft (4.2 m)
Gross Takeoff Weight: 26,700 lbs (12,110.9 kg)
Maximum Altitude: 65,000 ft (19.8 km)
Payload: 2,000 lbs (907.2 kg)
Ferry Range: 12,000 nm (22,236 km)
Loiter Velocity: 343 knots TAS (True Air Speed)
On-Station Endurance at 1,200 nm: 24 hours
Maximum Endurance: 32+ hours

Block 20/30/40
Wingspan: 130.9 ft (39.9 m)
Length: 47.6 ft (14.5m)
Height: 15.4 ft (4.7 m)
Gross Takeoff Weight: 32,250 lbs (14,628 kg)
Maximum Altitude: 60,000 ft (18.3 km)
Payload: 3,000 lbs (1,360 kg)
Ferry Range: 12,300 nm (22,780 km)
Loiter Velocity: 310 knots TAS (True Air Speed)
On-Station Endurance at 1,200 nm: 24 hours
Maximum Endurance: 32+ hours
Its preparations are concealed, not published. Its mistakes are buried, not headlined. Its dissenters are silenced, not praised. No expenditure is questioned, no rumor is printed, no secret is revealed.

-President John F. Kennedy on the Global Conspiracy

Offline trailhound

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See 'Global Skin' as well, also billed as climate monitor primarily but has plenty ability to monitor alot of other things as well.

Im sure the dukes wouldnt use it to corner the orange juice market or anything like that. (sarc)

"Do not let your hatred of a people incite you to aggression." Qur'an 5:2
At the heart of that Western freedom and democracy is the belief that the individual man, the child of God, is the touchstone of value..." -RFK


Offline flaming_red_pill

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http://www.cnn.com/2010/WORLD/asiapcf/05/04/pakistan.drone.attacks/index.html?hpt=T3



May 4, 2010 6:00 p.m. EDT
Drones are just one tool in a larger counterterrorism strategy, one expert says.
Drones are just one tool in a larger counterterrorism strategy, one expert says.
STORY HIGHLIGHTS

    * Plan is now to attack broader terrorist targets beyond al Qaeda leaders
    * Wider target set approved by Bush White House, stepped up by Obama
    * It is seen as key strategy to protect U.S. forces in Afghanistan
    * Administration sensitive to claims of civilian deaths

RELATED TOPICS

    * Pakistan
    * Taliban Movement of Pakistan
    * Al Qaeda

Washington (CNN) -- When the latest apparent U.S. drone strike was conducted this week against militants in Pakistan, the obvious question appeared to be: Did the United States get a "big fish" in the Taliban or al Qaeda organizations?

But a U.S. counterterrorism official says that's now the wrong question to ask, and chances are those hit were not major players. He wouldn't discuss the specifics of the latest strike, but with the official backing of his bosses, he sought to explain how U.S. strategy has changed in the crucial effort to attack targets inside Pakistan with missiles fired from drones.

The plan now is to attack a broader set of terrorist targets far beyond the original effort to strike and kill top al Qaeda leaders, the official said.

The strategy originated not with President Obama but with the previous administration, he said.

Although the United States is the only country in the region known to have the ability to launch missiles from drones, which are controlled remotely, U.S. officials normally do not comment on suspected drone strikes.

The more expansive target set was approved in the final months of the Bush administration in late 2008 but has been stepped up under the Obama White House, the official said. It is seen as a key strategy to help protect the growing number of U.S. forces in neighboring Afghanistan from insurgents operating in Pakistan's border region.

Drone-launched missiles are now hitting lower-level al Qaeda and Taliban personnel, camps, training areas, bomb makers, buildings and other targets in the remote region.

"You've had an expanded target set for time now, and given the danger these groups pose and their relative inaccessibility, these kinds of strikes -- precise and effective -- have become almost like the cannon fire of this war. They're no longer extraordinary or even unusual," the official said.

"The enemy, to be sure, has lost commanders, operational planners, weapons specialists, facilitators and more. But they've also lost fighters and trainers, the kinds of people who have killed American and allied forces in Afghanistan," he said. "Just because they're not big names doesn't mean they don't kill. They do. Their facilities -- where they prepare, rest and ready weapons -- are legitimate targets, too."

Success in using the drones depends on larger intelligence efforts, said Frances Fragos Townsend, a former homeland security adviser to President George W. Bush and now a CNN intelligence analyst. Drones are just one tool in larger strategy, she said.

It requires other tools -- intelligence, military and diplomatic -- to support it, she said.

The administration has been sensitive to accusations that a large number of civilians have been killed since the stepped-up raids began. Statistics kept by the New America Foundation indicate that 30 percent of those who died in drone strikes in Pakistan since 2004 were not militants.

The U.S. counterterrorism official disputed that, saying, "We believe the number of non-combatant casualties since this campaign intensified is under 30 -- those being people who were near terrorist targets, often by choice -- while the total for militants taken off the battlefield exceeds 500."

The official said those figures are based not only on intelligence but also on visual observations before and after strikes.

"The terrorists, who have a real incentive to spread stories of atrocities from the air, haven't done so because they can't do so," the official said. "They'd have to produce names, dates, photos and witnesses, the kinds of things you see almost instantly if the coalition makes a mistake in Afghanistan. But you just don't see that sort of thing coming out of the tribal areas. Instead, even press accounts from the area speak of militants cordoning off places that have been struck and of local and foreign fighters being hit."
Its preparations are concealed, not published. Its mistakes are buried, not headlined. Its dissenters are silenced, not praised. No expenditure is questioned, no rumor is printed, no secret is revealed.

-President John F. Kennedy on the Global Conspiracy

Offline flaming_red_pill

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Quote
http://www.cnn.com/2010/TECH/05/07/wired.terrorist.drone.strikes/index.html



No-name terrorists now CIA drone targets
By Noah Shachtman
May 8, 2010 2:55 p.m. EDT
The CIA gets approval to attack a wider range of suspected militants, even those whose identity is not known.
The CIA gets approval to attack a wider range of suspected militants, even those whose identity is not known.
STORY HIGHLIGHTS

    * Once-limited program to off senior terrorist leaders has turned into full-scale, if undeclared, war in Pakistan
    * National security law experts debate whether the remotely piloted attacks are legal
    * Starting in the Bush administration, drone pilots have become more free to launch weapons
    * In Afghanistan, dropping a bomb from above is now a tactic of last resort

RELATED TOPICS

    * Pakistan
    * Armed Forces
    * Terrorism
    * Afghanistan War

(WIRED ) -- Once upon a time, the CIA had to know a militant's name before putting him up for a robotic targeted killing. Now, if the guy acts like a guerrilla, it's enough to call in a drone strike.

It's another sign of that a once-limited, once-covert program to off senior terrorist leaders has morphed into a full-scale -- if undeclared -- war in Pakistan. And in a war, you don't need to know the name of someone on the other side before you take a shot.

Across the border, in Afghanistan, the rules for launching an airstrike have become tighter than a balled fist. Dropping a bomb from above is now a tactic of last resort; even when U.S. troops are under fire, commanders are reluctant to authorize air strikes.

In Pakistan, however, the opposite has happened. Starting in the latter days of the Bush administration, and accelerating under the Obama presidency, drone pilots have become more and more free to launch their weapons.

"You've had an expanded target set for [some] time now and, given the danger these groups pose and their relative inaccessibility, these kinds of strikes -- precise and effective -- have become almost like the cannon fire of this war. They're no longer extraordinary or even unusual," one American official tells CNN.

This official -- like many other officials -- insists that the drone strikes have torn up the ranks of militants.

"The enemy has lost not just operational leaders and facilitators -- people whose names we know -- but formations of fighters and other terrorists," the official tells the Los Angeles Times. "We might not always have their names, but ... these are people whose actions over time have made it obvious that they are a threat."

National security law experts, inside the government and out, are in the middle of an intense debate over whether the remotely piloted attacks are legal. One leading law professor told Congress last week that the drone operators could be tried for "war crimes," under certain circumstances.

The State Department's top lawyer counters that the drone attacks are a legitimate act of self-defense.

The connection between the robotic strikes over there and our safety here appears to be growing, The Pakistani Taliban, who have claimed credit for the botched Times Square bombing, say the car bomb was in retaliation for drone strikes.

But the robotic aircraft are only one component in the war in Pakistan. American troops are on the ground there, and getting into firefights. American contractors are operating a fleet of helicopters above. Higher in the sky are the American drones, flown by the U.S. Air Force and the CIA.

Subscribe to WIRED magazine for less than $1 an issue and get a FREE GIFT! Click here!

Copyright 2010 Wired.com.








Quote
http://www.wired.com/dangerroom/2010/04/state-department-flies-mercenary-air-force-over-pakistan/?cnn=yes



State Department Flies Mercenary Air Force Over Pakistan

    * By Nathan Hodge Email Author
    * April 30, 2010  |
    * 3:43 pm  |
    * Categories: Af/Pak
    *

huey-iiThe airspace along the Afghanistan/Pakistan border is pretty crowded these days: Along with U.S., Afghan and Pakistani military missions, the CIA is running its own covert drone ops. Less well known, but perhaps equally controversial, is the State Department’s counter-narcotics air force, staffed by mercenaries.

A recently released State Department Inspector General report, however, gave an unusually detailed look at the size and scope of these operations. The report fills in more details about America’s growing and undeclared war in Pakistan.

The State Department’s Bureau of International Narcotics and Law Enforcement Affairs (known by the abbreviation INL) operates an air wing of around 14 aircraft in Afghanistan and another 17 in Pakistan. The aircraft help monitor the border, fly crop-eradication and interdiction missions, and move equipment and personnel around the region.

These kinds of missions aren’t new: The State Department has similar Air Wing programs in Bolivia, Colombia, Guatemala, and Peru. Perhaps more importantly, the State Department has outsourced much of this mission. The INL’s air wing in Afghanistan and Pakistan is operated by private military company DynCorp, and the presence of U.S. contractors in Pakistan has proven extremely controversial (the released IG report, not surprisingly, was originally marked “sensitive but unclassified”).

For instance, when it was disclosed earlier this month that the U.S. government was seeking land for an aircraft maintenance base DynCorp, the Pakistani press had a field day. Pakistani Interior Minister Rehman Malik had repeatedly denied the presence of U.S. private security contractors on Pakistani soil, but here was the U.S. government, asking for a maintenance base for its contracted air wing. “This is worth recalling here that Interior Minister Rehman Malik had told the National Assembly in February this year, ‘Neither Blackwater nor any other security agency with such name is operating in Pakistan,’” Pakistan’s The Nation newspaper snarkily noted.

In fairness, the State Department hasn’t really been too secretive about this: INL’s winter newsletter featured a news announcement about the delivery to Pakistan of more Huey II helicopters, similar to the rotorcraft pictured here. More interesting is what the recent Inspector General report hints at the extent to which the Pakistani government relies on this air wing for domestic policing and security operations. “In Pakistan, the Air Wing program, funded at $32 million to date, has been generally effective in providing critical air support for activities along the Pakistan-Afghanistan border, including a variety of missions for the Pakistan Government,” the report states.

Inevitably, the report also notes some shortcomings. DynCorp, the IG found, “had problems meeting some of the contract terms, particularly flying hour goals. The inability to meet the required aircraft readiness rate is directly related to low levels of maintenance personnel and, according to INL/A, is also affected by issues with staff from Pakistan’s Ministry of Interior.”

In addition, the IG also found the Pakistani government was less than forthcoming about how it was using State’s aircraft. The government of Pakistan, the report said, “continues its reticence in providing information on flights.”

Incidentally, the inspector general also alluded to another contracted air force, called “Kabul 40.” That air wing provides passenger and cargo movement for diplomatic staff in Afghanistan.

[PHOTO: U.S. Department of Defense]

Read More http://www.wired.com/dangerroom/2010/04/state-department-flies-mercenary-air-force-over-pakistan/?cnn=yes#ixzz0nP2NNEAv


Its preparations are concealed, not published. Its mistakes are buried, not headlined. Its dissenters are silenced, not praised. No expenditure is questioned, no rumor is printed, no secret is revealed.

-President John F. Kennedy on the Global Conspiracy

Offline freedom_commonsense

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The problem is, how do you deal with this kind of spying, short of shooting down the offending object? I can't see regulating space working out too well...

Offline flaming_red_pill

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Quote
Monday, March 8, 2010  |  Modified: Tuesday, March 9, 2010
Boeing develops Phantom Eye surveillance aircraft
Puget Sound Business Journal (Seattle) - by Steve Wilhelm

Read more: Boeing develops Phantom Eye surveillance aircraft - Puget Sound Business Journal (Seattle):




Boeing is working to broaden the offerings of its Unmanned Airborne Systems division through development of a surveillance aircraft — powered by a hydrogen-fueled Ford compact truck engine — that will be able to loiter at high altitudes for up to four days.

The Phantom Eye prototype, now being assembled by Boeing Phantom Works in St. Louis in collaboration with the Kent-based Unmanned Airborne Systems unit, is to fly in early 2011, said Phantom Works spokesman Chris Haddox.

“We worked closely with the UAS division,” Haddox said.“The idea with the UAS division and UAV (unmanned aerial vehicle) portfolio is to create this family of UAVs to serve various missions.”

A key to the aircraft is power from the modified 2.3 liter Ford engine, which is adapted to give the aircraft the greatest possible range for the weight of engine and fuel. The hydrogen fuel will provide three times as much power as gasoline for the same weight of fuel, Haddox said.

The project is internally funded, and is part of an effort by Boeing to catch up in the unmanned aircraft market, currently dominated by Northrop Grumman and General Atomics. Development of the power system is led by Boeing with Mahle Powertrain and Ford as technology partners.

The alliance with Ford has nothing to do with the fact that former Boeing Commercial Airplanes CEO Alan Mulally now is CEO of Ford, Haddox said. He said work with Ford on use of hydrogen as a fuel had been underway before Mulally left Boeing in 2006.

The demonstrator will have a 150-foot wingspan, and will carry a payload of as much as 450 pounds up to 65,000 feet in altitude. No such aircraft now exists, Haddox said.

Boeing Co. (NYSE: BA) also is developing Phantom Ray, an unmanned fighter that is scheduled to fly in late 2010.

“We believe Phantom Eye and Phantom Ray represent two areas where the unmanned aerial vehicle market is heading,” said Dave Koopersmith, Advanced Boeing Military Aircraft vice president.

Read more: Boeing develops Phantom Eye surveillance aircraft - Puget Sound Business Journal (Seattle):



Its preparations are concealed, not published. Its mistakes are buried, not headlined. Its dissenters are silenced, not praised. No expenditure is questioned, no rumor is printed, no secret is revealed.

-President John F. Kennedy on the Global Conspiracy

Offline Shroom!

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It's almost 1984.

Offline flaming_red_pill

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Yes it is!!!

http://www.dfrc.nasa.gov/Gallery/Photo/Global_Hawk/HTML/ED07-0244-78.html

Here is some BS straight from the horse's mouth, lol

Quote
Project
Description:    Two Northrop Grumman Global Hawk Advanced Concept Technology Demonstration aircraft have been transferred from the U.S. Air Force to NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center to support NASA’s Airborne Science Program research missions. The ability of the unmanned Global Hawk aircraft to autonomously fly long distances and remain aloft for extended periods of time brings a new capability to the science community for measuring, monitoring and observing remote locations of the Earth. The two Global Hawks were the first and sixth aircraft built under the original development program sponsored by the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency, and were made available to NASA when the Air Force had no further need for them.

There are threads on this forum about us losing over in Afghanistan, and these planes were made available to NASA "because the Air Force didn't need them". I know that they lost at least two Hawks due to errors or something, so that was like, who knows how many hundred mil down the toilet. BULLSHIT they didn't need them... big brother did, lol
Its preparations are concealed, not published. Its mistakes are buried, not headlined. Its dissenters are silenced, not praised. No expenditure is questioned, no rumor is printed, no secret is revealed.

-President John F. Kennedy on the Global Conspiracy

Offline Pierce2378

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the global hawks were employed in the war on terror and still are to the best of my knowledge.

Offline flaming_red_pill

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the global hawks were employed in the war on terror and still are to the best of my knowledge.
Exactly, which says to me that USA shouldn't have 2 Hawks to spare for NASA until we have brought our troops home. America lost two in crashes in the desert/mountains and were still able to give NASA 2. :P
Its preparations are concealed, not published. Its mistakes are buried, not headlined. Its dissenters are silenced, not praised. No expenditure is questioned, no rumor is printed, no secret is revealed.

-President John F. Kennedy on the Global Conspiracy

Offline flaming_red_pill

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Exactly, which says to me that USA shouldn't have 2 Hawks to spare for NASA until we have brought our troops home. America lost two in crashes in the desert/mountains and were still able to give NASA 2. :P

More huge funding to a "mars" program , NASA

Quote
http://commerce.senate.gov/public/index.cfm?p=PressReleases&ContentRecord_id=759fbbb7-3853-4f30-8d6c-edf52cdcd16c&ContentType_id=77eb43da-aa94-497d-a73f-5c951ff72372&Group_id=8aedf6d9-27a7-4360-a09f-8a52dc758066

Recent Press Releases
IN CASE YOU MISSED IT – NASA's Constellation gets big boost in Senate
Joe Brenckle - Republican Press Office 202-224-3991
May 14 2010

Hutchison PortraitIN CASE YOU MISSED IT – Houston Chronicle

NASA's Constellation gets big boost in Senate

“Backers of NASA's Constellation program scored a significant victory Thursday by winning the Senate Appropriations Committee's support to block the Obama administration from terminating any part of the $108 billion back-to-the-moon program before October.  The maneuver was pushed by Sen. Kay Bailey Hutchison of Dallas and proposed by Sen. Robert Bennett, R-Utah.” May 14, 2010

Houston Chronicle -- NASA's Constellation gets big boost in SenateOrder keeping it alive is added to must-pass bill funding the war

By STEWART M. POWELL
WASHINGTON BUREAU

WASHINGTON — Backers of NASA's Constellation program scored a significant victory Thursday by winning the Senate Appropriations Committee's support to block the Obama administration from terminating any part of the $108 billion back-to-the-moon program before October.

And they did it by piggy-backing the restriction onto a must-pass wartime supplemental budget package involving combat dollars for Afghanistan.

Up until Thursday, the battle over NASA has largely been a political war of words — and this is the first time that a congressional committee has responded directly to President Barack Obama's NASA proposal since February, when the president declared the Constellation program should be shelved.

The maneuver was pushed by Sen. Kay Bailey Hutchison of Dallas and proposed by Sen. Robert Bennett, R-Utah.

By including the language in a $58.8 billion budget supplemental to underwrite the costs of combat, Hutchison and her allies virtually assured that the restriction will be adopted by the full Senate and House and signed by Obama — because the costs of the Afghanistan war must be funded.

The language declares that NASA funds “shall be available to fund continued performance of Constellation contracts, and performance of such Constellation contracts may not be terminated for convenience by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration in Fiscal Year 2010.”

Unanimous approval

The amendment sailed through unanimously.

“The administration's proposals have not been approved by Congress and probably will not be, and it was premature for them to begin terminating procedures,” added Hutchison, a member of the 30-member panel.

“In the supplemental bill, we were able to stop the administration from terminating contracts for work on the Constellation program,” she added.

Until now, Houston-area lawmakers have relied on a public relations campaign to save the moon program — or at least extend the life of the space shuttle — through letter writing and lobbying to build support in Congress. The Constellation program is managed by Houston's Johnson Space Center, home of NASA mission control for manned operations.

“This is the strongest indication yet that Congress is still not convinced that the president's proposed change of direction to cancel Constellation is the direction that the nation should take if we want to maintain American leadership in human spaceflight,' said Rep. Pete Olson, R-Sugar Land. “This action in the Senate will galvanize the House.”

Culberson has a bill

The spending package could be the only major budget measure to clear Congress before the mid-term congressional elections in November.

Rep. John Culberson, R-Houston is pushing a similar effort in the House Appropriations Committee to “help save America's manned space program.”

“I will continue to use every resource at my disposal to ensure that America maintains its competitive edge in space,” he said.

Obama wants to kill the program and shift the money to extending the life of the International Space Station, fostering a fledgling commercial spacecraft industry and putting greater emphasis on earth science missions.

Congress members have been diligently questioning space agency officials about the future of contractors and employees currently working on Constellation projects. In a hearing just this week, NASA administrator Charles Bolden was grilled repeatedly about alleged efforts by NASA to begin terminating or adjusting contracts with aerospace firms working on the Constellation program.

#  #  #
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      Hearing Summary - America Wins When America COMPETES: Building a High-Tech Workforce
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      Hutchison Plans Legislation to Promote Innovative Texas Program to Prepare Math and Science Teachers
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      IN CASE YOU MISSED IT – The Hill - Hutchison and Kosmas: Bipartisanship Key for the Future of Space Program
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      Chairman Rockefeller Statement on Proposed United-Continental Merger
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      Hutchison Statement on United Airlines and Continental Airlines Merger

Quote
http://www.chron.com/disp/story.mpl/nation/7004353.html

NASA's Constellation gets big boost in Senate
Order keeping it alive is added to must-pass bill funding the war
By STEWART M. POWELL
WASHINGTON BUREAU
May 13, 2010, 11:38PM
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WASHINGTON — Backers of NASA's Constellation program scored a significant victory Thursday by winning the Senate Appropriations Committee's support to block the Obama administration from terminating any part of the $108 billion back-to-the-moon program before October.

And they did it by piggy-backing the restriction onto a must-pass wartime supplemental budget package involving combat dollars for Afghanistan.

Up until Thursday, the battle over NASA has largely been a political war of words — and this is the first time that a congressional committee has responded directly to President Barack Obama's NASA proposal since February, when the president declared the Constellation program should be shelved.

The maneuver was pushed by Sen. Kay Bailey Hutchison of Dallas and proposed by Sen. Robert Bennett, R-Utah.

By including the language in a $58.8 billion budget supplemental to underwrite the costs of combat, Hutchison and her allies virtually assured that the restriction will be adopted by the full Senate and House and signed by Obama — because the costs of the Afghanistan war must be funded.

The language declares that NASA funds “shall be available to fund continued performance of Constellation contracts, and performance of such Constellation contracts may not be terminated for convenience by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration in Fiscal Year 2010.”
Unanimous approval

The amendment sailed through unanimously.

“The administration's proposals have not been approved by Congress and probably will not be, and it was premature for them to begin terminating procedures,” added Hutchison, a member of the 30-member panel.

“In the supplemental bill, we were able to stop the administration from terminating contracts for work on the Constellation program,” she added.

Until now, Houston-area lawmakers have relied on a public relations campaign to save the moon program — or at least extend the life of the space shuttle — through letter writing and lobbying to build support in Congress. The Constellation program is managed by Houston's Johnson Space Center, home of NASA mission control for manned operations.

“This is the strongest indication yet that Congress is still not convinced that the president's proposed change of direction to cancel Constellation is the direction that the nation should take if we want to maintain American leadership in human spaceflight,' said Rep. Pete Olson, R-Sugar Land. “This action in the Senate will galvanize the House.”
Culberson has a bill

The spending package could be the only major budget measure to clear Congress before the mid-term congressional elections in November.

Rep. John Culberson, R-Houston is pushing a similar effort in the House Appropriations Committee to “help save America's manned space program.”

“I will continue to use every resource at my disposal to ensure that America maintains its competitive edge in space,” he said.

Obama wants to kill the program and shift the money to extending the life of the International Space Station, fostering a fledgling commercial spacecraft industry and putting greater emphasis on earth science missions.

Congress members have been diligently questioning space agency officials about the future of contractors and employees currently working on Constellation projects. In a hearing just this week, NASA administrator Charles Bolden was grilled repeatedly about alleged efforts by NASA to begin terminating or adjusting contracts with aerospace firms working on the Constellation program.

stewart.powell@chron.com
Its preparations are concealed, not published. Its mistakes are buried, not headlined. Its dissenters are silenced, not praised. No expenditure is questioned, no rumor is printed, no secret is revealed.

-President John F. Kennedy on the Global Conspiracy

Offline flaming_red_pill

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"THE HONORABLE" GEORGE W. BUSH KNEW HE HAD TO START HIS UAV WAR BEFORE THE MACHINES THEMSELVES DEVELOPED MORE CONSCIENCE THAN HE HAS!!!!!!



Quote
[Opinion]

http://www.nowpublic.com/tech-biz/moral-code-predator-uav  Moral Code for Predator UAV
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by peder.sande | June 30, 2009 at 04:28 pm
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Photos
Selex Galileo UAV
Selex Galileo UAV

see larger image

    * Selex Galileo UAV
    * 'Valkyrie' UAV
    * 'Valkyrie' UAV | Photo 02
    * Predator UAV
    * Predator UAV | Photo 02
    * UAV IAI
    * UAV SAGEM
    * UAV IAI | Photo 02
    * UAV | Photo 02
    * UAV Dassault
    * UAV Dassault | Photo 02

Videos
Illah Nourbakhsh Lecture: Ethics in Robotics

see larger video

sourced by peder.sande

Ron Arkin, at the Georgia Institute of Technology, has created software which could be the start of a moral code for military robots. The code stops UAV predator drones from firing at enemies within cemetery lines, allows the UAV predator drones to exhibit guilt when they create collateral dammage and to be more wary of targets in civilian areas.

    A robotics engineer at the Georgia Institute of Technology has developed an "ethical governor," which could be used to program military robots to act ethically when deciding when, and whom, to shoot or bomb.

Source: news.cnet.com

The increased development of UAVs and other intelligent systems have begun to spur a philosophical debate between their creators. UAV predator drones do not feel empathy or remorse and are capable of creating mass violence against humanity. It would seem illogical to charge these machines with war crimes or other criminal suits, in the truest sense these machines would 'just be following orders' yet what if no direct order was given, just there background programming. Who would be responsible? The programmers, the machines, the keepers?

Luckily a human element is built into all UAVs at the moment, but the question will one day need to be addressed and researchers like Ron Arbik and Illah Nourbakhsh are at the forefront trying to answer these questions.

    Fortunately, the developer, Israel Aerospace Industries (IAI), has thoughtfully included a Man in the Loop feature that enables the missile to be controlled in real time in case an attack needs aborting to avoid collateral damage.

Source: news.cnet.com
Its preparations are concealed, not published. Its mistakes are buried, not headlined. Its dissenters are silenced, not praised. No expenditure is questioned, no rumor is printed, no secret is revealed.

-President John F. Kennedy on the Global Conspiracy

H0llyw00d

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"Send in the Spiders"
« Reply #66 on: June 22, 2010, 07:25:11 PM »
Remember those spider like small retinal scanner robots from the movie Minority report? BAE Systems is getting $38 million from the US Army Research Lab to fund the Micro Autonomous Systems and Technology (MAST) consortium; a team of scientists and researchers hell-bent on developing an "autonomous, multifunctional collection of miniature intelligence-gathering robots that can operate in places too inaccessible or dangerous for humans."
Well, if you do manage to fall in a narrow ditch at least you know that some crawly little robots going to keep a watch on you.



Do you enjoy gangs of tiny, spider-like robot insectoids swarming all over your house, car, or personage? If you answered "yes," you're going to love what BAE Systems is cooking up. The company recently received an infusion of $38 million from the US Army Research Lab to fund the Micro Autonomous Systems and Technology (MAST) consortium; a team of scientists and researchers hell-bent on developing an "autonomous, multifunctional collection of miniature intelligence-gathering robots that can operate in places too inaccessible or dangerous for humans." Sure, that description (and accompanying photos, straight from BAE) does give you the impression that whoever came up with this really liked Minority Report, but won't it make you feel safer at night knowing a swarm of metallic spiders are looking out for you? No? Huh, weird.


Not brought to you by these guys ;)
http://www.baesystems.com/

Offline phosphene

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"A strange game. The only winning move is not to play."--Joshua

Offline d0rn

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Re: "Send in the Spiders"
« Reply #68 on: June 22, 2010, 08:33:02 PM »
It's interesting how we quote movies when something like this appears. It's scary how movies have predicted these things. Could it be some kind of unconscious hive mind thing? How come we're moving in the direction many movies depict? It's very interesting. The more humanity imagines itself through entertainment, the more it's leaning towards that reality. Maybe we need to imagine other scenarios for this earth to "get on track" with the better things, whatever that is. If we keep imagining doomsday scenarios and killing, naturally, that will follow in the future. Just sift through many movies that are of Sci-Fi genre, and you'll notice how we're moving towards that future. I recommend 'Equilibrium'.

Very interesting indeed.

Offline phasma

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MICRO UAV`s - should we be worried?
« Reply #69 on: September 05, 2010, 04:40:12 PM »
They are working on making these things as small as possible - this paper explains how!

http://www.naun.org/journals/mechanics/m-12.pdf

:( Great - just what we need ! More tiny eyes in the skies !
Things are not what they appear to be: nor are they otherwise - Surangama Sutra

EvadingGrid

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Re: MICRO UAV`s - should we be worried?
« Reply #70 on: September 05, 2010, 04:42:09 PM »
Gosh...

its one thing to see these sorta things in movies, but another to see a consise white paper on the topic.

EvadingGrid

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Re: MICRO UAV`s - should we be worried?
« Reply #71 on: September 05, 2010, 04:42:53 PM »
Here is the missing sound track Phasma :

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NzlG28B-R8Y

Offline phasma

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Re: MICRO UAV`s - should we be worried?
« Reply #72 on: September 05, 2010, 04:44:34 PM »
yep - couple of years old too unfortunately.

I dont like this at all because many of these things are virtually silent - they could creep up to yuour windows and you`d likely not notice them !

:S

And thanks for that EG!
Things are not what they appear to be: nor are they otherwise - Surangama Sutra

EvadingGrid

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Re: MICRO UAV`s - should we be worried?
« Reply #73 on: September 05, 2010, 04:45:33 PM »
Did you notice the country of the white papers authors ?

 ;D  ;D  ;D  ;D

Offline Femacamper

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Re: MICRO UAV`s - should we be worried?
« Reply #74 on: September 05, 2010, 04:46:14 PM »
Arrrrggggh!

Offline phasma

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Re: MICRO UAV`s - should we be worried?
« Reply #75 on: September 05, 2010, 04:48:25 PM »
Yeah that didnt slip past me  ;)
Things are not what they appear to be: nor are they otherwise - Surangama Sutra

Offline phasma

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Re: MICRO UAV`s - should we be worried?
« Reply #76 on: September 05, 2010, 04:51:21 PM »
erm . . . and then there are these!
(And these are worse some how!)

http://baesystems.com/Newsroom/NewsReleases/autoGen_10832814523.html



Like them creepy things in minority report!

See, movies let us know what is coming!
Things are not what they appear to be: nor are they otherwise - Surangama Sutra

EvadingGrid

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Re: MICRO UAV`s - should we be worried?
« Reply #77 on: September 05, 2010, 04:51:35 PM »
Yeah that didnt slip past me  ;)

Must confess it is tempting to build one !

Rules are 15cm width (about 6") and 90g weight limit.


Offline phasma

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Re: MICRO UAV`s - should we be worried?
« Reply #78 on: September 05, 2010, 04:52:26 PM »
well the blue prints are there EG give it a go !

see what you can get up to . . .

fly one inside big ben !
Things are not what they appear to be: nor are they otherwise - Surangama Sutra

EvadingGrid

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Re: MICRO UAV`s - should we be worried?
« Reply #79 on: September 05, 2010, 04:53:13 PM »
Must get a directional EMF blaster for those vermin.

* cat  wonders if they flog'em on e-bay yet