Guess who's dealing the drugs in Afghanistan

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Offline David Rothscum

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Guess who's dealing the drugs in Afghanistan
« on: October 04, 2008, 03:26:32 PM »
As always, it's a small incestuous clique:
http://www.nytimes.com/2008/10/05/world/asia/05afghan.html?partner=rssnyt&emc=rss&pagewanted=all
Reports Link Karzai’s Brother to Heroin Trade
Ruth Fremson/The New York Times

Article Tools Sponsored By
By JAMES RISEN
Published: October 4, 2008

WASHINGTON — When Afghan security forces found an enormous cache of heroin hidden beneath concrete blocks in a tractor-trailer outside Kandahar in 2004, the local Afghan commander quickly impounded the truck and notified his boss.

Before long, the commander, Habibullah Jan, received a telephone call from Ahmed Wali Karzai, the brother of President Hamid Karzai, asking him to release the vehicle and the drugs, Mr. Jan later told American investigators, according to notes from the debriefing obtained by The New York Times. He said he complied after getting a phone call from an aide to President Karzai directing him to release the truck.

Two years later, American and Afghan counternarcotics forces stopped another truck, this time near Kabul, finding more than 110 pounds of heroin. Soon after the seizure, United States investigators told other American officials that they had discovered links between the drug shipment and a bodyguard believed to be an intermediary for Ahmed Wali Karzai, according to a participant in the briefing.

The assertions about the involvement of the president’s brother in the incidents were never investigated, according to American and Afghan officials, even though allegations that he has benefited from narcotics trafficking have circulated widely in Afghanistan.

Both President Karzai and Ahmed Wali Karzai, now the chief of the Kandahar Provincial Council, the governing body for the region that includes Afghanistan’s second largest city, dismiss the allegations as politically motivated attacks by longtime foes.

“I am not a drug dealer, I never was and I never will be,” the president’s brother said in a recent phone interview. “I am a victim of vicious politics.”

But the assertions about him have deeply worried top American officials in Kabul and in Washington. The United States officials fear that perceptions that the Afghan president might be protecting his brother are damaging his credibility and undermining efforts by the United States to buttress his government, which has been under siege from rivals and a Taliban insurgency fueled by drug money, several senior Bush administration officials said. Their concerns have intensified as American troops have been deployed to the country in growing numbers.

“What appears to be a fairly common Afghan public perception of corruption inside their government is a tremendously corrosive element working against establishing long-term confidence in that government — a very serious matter,” said Lt. Gen. David W. Barno, who was commander of coalition military forces in Afghanistan from 2003 to 2005 and is now retired. “That could be problematic strategically for the United States.”

The White House says it believes that Ahmed Wali Karzai is involved in drug trafficking, and American officials have repeatedly warned President Karzai that his brother is a political liability, two senior Bush administration officials said in interviews last week.

Numerous reports link Ahmed Wali Karzai to the drug trade, according to current and former officials from the White House, the State Department and the United States Embassy in Afghanistan, who would speak only on the condition of anonymity. In meetings with President Karzai, including a 2006 session with the United States ambassador, the Central Intelligence Agency’s station chief and their British counterparts, American officials have talked about the allegations in hopes that the president might move his brother out of the country, said several people who took part in or were briefed on the talks.

“We thought the concern expressed to Karzai might be enough to get him out of there,” one official said. But President Karzai has resisted, demanding clear-cut evidence of wrongdoing, several officials said. “We don’t have the kind of hard, direct evidence that you could take to get a criminal indictment,” a White House official said. “That allows Karzai to say, where’s your proof?”

Neither the Drug Enforcement Administration, which conducts counternarcotics efforts in Afghanistan, nor the fledgling Afghan anti-drug agency has pursued investigations into the accusations against the president’s brother.

Several American investigators said senior officials at the D.E.A. and the office of the Director of National Intelligence complained to them that the White House favored a hands-off approach toward Ahmed Wali Karzai because of the political delicacy of the matter. But White House officials dispute that, instead citing limited D.E.A. resources in Kandahar and southern Afghanistan and the absence of political will in the Afghan government to go after major drug suspects as the reasons for the lack of an inquiry.

“We invested considerable resources into building Afghan capability to conduct such investigations and consistently encouraged Karzai to take on the big fish and address widespread Afghan suspicions about the link between his brother and narcotics,” said Meghan O’Sullivan, who was the coordinator for Afghanistan and Iraq at the National Security Council until last year.

Humayun Hamidzada, press secretary for President Karzai, denied that the president’s brother was involved in drug trafficking or that the president had intervened to help him. “People have made allegations without proof,” Mr. Hamidzada said.

Spokesmen for the Drug Enforcement Administration, the State Department and the Office of the Director of National Intelligence declined to comment.

An Informant’s Tip

The concerns about Ahmed Wali Karzai have surfaced recently because of the imprisonment of an informant who tipped off American and Afghan investigators to the drug-filled truck outside Kabul in 2006.

The informant, Hajji Aman Kheri, was arrested a year later on charges of plotting to kill an Afghan vice president in 2002. The Afghan Supreme Court recently ordered him freed for lack of evidence, but he has not been released. Nearly 100 political leaders in his home region protested his continued incarceration last month.

Mr. Kheri, in a phone interview from jail in Kabul, said he had been an informant for the Drug Enforcement Administration and United States intelligence agencies, an assertion confirmed by American counternarcotics and intelligence officials. Several of those officials, frustrated that the Bush administration was not pressing for Mr. Kheri’s release, came forward to disclose his role in the drug seizure.

Ever since the American-led invasion of Afghanistan in 2001, critics have charged that the Bush administration has failed to take aggressive action against the Afghan narcotics trade, because of both opposition from the Karzai government and reluctance by the United States military to get bogged down by eradication and interdiction efforts that would antagonize local warlords and Afghan poppy farmers. Now, Afghanistan provides about 95 percent of the world’s supply of heroin.

Just as the Taliban have benefited from money produced by the drug trade, so have many officials in the Karzai government, according to American and Afghan officials. Thomas Schweich, a former senior State Department counternarcotics official, wrote in The New York Times Magazine in July that drug traffickers were buying off hundreds of police chiefs, judges and other officials. “Narco-corruption went to the top of the Afghan government,” he said.

Suspicions of Corruption

Of the suspicions about Ahmed Wali Karzai, Representative Mark Steven Kirk, an Illinois Republican who has focused on the Afghan drug problem in Congress, said, “I would ask people in the Bush administration and the D.E.A. about him, and they would say, ‘We think he’s dirty.’ ”

In the two drug seizures in 2004 and 2006, millions of dollars’ worth of heroin was found. In April 2006, Mr. Jan, by then a member of the Afghan Parliament, met with American investigators at a D.E.A. safe house in Kabul and was asked to describe the events surrounding the 2004 drug discovery, according to notes from the debriefing session. He told the Americans that after impounding the truck, he received calls from Ahmed Wali Karzai and Shaida Mohammad, an aide to President Karzai, according to the notes.

Mr. Jan later became a political opponent of President Karzai, and in a 2007 speech in Parliament he accused Ahmed Wali Karzai of involvement in the drug trade. Mr. Jan was shot to death in July as he drove from a guesthouse to his main residence in Kandahar Province. The Taliban were suspected in the assassination.

Mr. Mohammad, in a recent interview in Washington, dismissed Mr. Jan’s account, saying that Mr. Jan had fabricated the story about being pressured to release the drug shipment in order to damage President Karzai.

But Khan Mohammad, the former Afghan commander in Kandahar who was Mr. Jan’s superior in 2004, said in a recent interview that Mr. Jan reported at the time that he had received a call from the Karzai aide ordering him to release the drug cache. Khan Mohammad recalled that Mr. Jan believed that the call had been instigated by Ahmed Wali Karzai, not the president.

“This was a very heavy issue,” Mr. Mohammad said.

He provided the same account in an October 2004 interview with The Christian Science Monitor. Mr. Mohammad said that after a subordinate captured a large shipment of heroin about two months earlier, the official received repeated telephone calls from Ahmed Wali Karzai. “He was saying, ‘This heroin belongs to me, you should release it,’ ” the newspaper quoted Mr. Mohammad as saying.

Languishing in Detention

In 2006, Mr. Kheri, the Afghan informant, tipped off American counternarcotics agents to another drug shipment. Mr. Kheri, who had proved so valuable to the United States that his family had been resettled in Virginia in 2004, briefly returned to Afghanistan in 2006.

The heroin in the truck that was seized was to be delivered to Ahmed Wali Karzai’s bodyguard in the village of Maidan Shahr, and then transported to Kandahar, one of the Afghans involved in the deal later told American investigators, according to notes of his debriefing. Several Afghans — the drivers and the truck’s owner — were arrested by Afghan authorities, but no action was taken against Mr. Karzai or his bodyguard, who investigators believe serves as a middleman, the American officials said.

In 2007, Mr. Kheri visited Afghanistan again, once again serving as an American informant, the officials said. This time, however, he was arrested by the Karzai government and charged in the 2002 assassination of Hajji Abdul Qadir, an Afghan vice president, who had been a political rival of Mr. Kheri’s brother, Hajji Zaman, a former militia commander and a powerful figure in eastern Afghanistan.

Mr. Kheri, in the phone interview from Kabul, denied any involvement in the killing and said his arrest was politically motivated. He maintained that the president’s brother was involved in the heroin trade.

“It’s no secret about Wali Karzai and drugs,” said Mr. Kheri, who speaks English. “A lot of people in the Afghan government are involved in drug trafficking.”

Mr. Kheri’s continued detention, despite the Afghan court’s order to release him, has frustrated some of the American investigators who worked with him.

In recent months, they have met with officials at the State Department and the office of the Director of National Intelligence seeking to persuade the Bush administration to intervene with the Karzai government to release Mr. Kheri.

“We have just left a really valuable informant sitting in jail to rot,” one investigator said.

Carlotta Gall contributed reporting from Kabul, Afghanistan.

Offline David Rothscum

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Re: Guess who's dealing the drugs in Afghanistan
« Reply #1 on: October 04, 2008, 03:31:01 PM »
Bush Will Not Stop Afghan Opium Trade
http://archive.newsmax.com/archives/articles/2002/3/28/95240.shtml
    Charles R. Smith
    Thursday, March 28, 2002

The Bush administration has decided not to destroy the opium crop in Afghanistan. President Bush, who previously linked the Afghan drug trade directly to terrorism, has now decided not to destroy the Afghan opium crop.

"The war in Afghanistan will be decided within the next six weeks based on whether or not the poppy crops go to market," stated a U.S. intelligence official who recently returned from Afghanistan.

The source, who requested that he not be identified, noted that the opium poppy fields are blooming and ready for harvest. U.S. forces could destroy the crops using aerial spraying techniques, but no such actions are planned.

"If the estimated 3,000 tons of opium reaches market, it will lead to a new upsurge in international terrorism and a great loss in international credibility for the Bush administration and the United States' ability to conduct war in the 21st century. America's enemies throughout the world from China to North Korea to Iran will be emboldened by this lack of strategic vision and political will," said the source.

U.N. Ban on Opium Trade

The U.S. and all its allies signed onto a worldwide ban on opium sales. In January 2002, the U.N. issued a report on the Afghan opium production, noting that allied forces needed to act quickly to destroy the 2002 opium poppy crops before the end of spring.

"The global importance of the ban on opium poppy cultivation and trafficking in Afghanistan is enormous," states the January 2002 U.N. report on drug trafficking.

"Afghanistan has been the main source of illicit opium: 70 percent of global illicit opium production in 2000 and up to 90 percent of heroin in European drug markets originated from Afghanistan," states the U.N. report.

"There are reliable indications that opium poppy cultivation has resumed since October 2001 in some areas (such as the southern provinces Uruzgan, Helmand, Nangarhar and Kandahar), following the effective implementation of the Taliban ban on cultivation in 2001, not only because of the breakdown in law and order, but also because the farmers are desperate to find a means of survival following the prolonged drought," states the U.N. report.

This Is Your CIA

Several sources inside Capitol Hill noted that the CIA opposes the destruction of the Afghan opium supply because to do so might destabilize the Pakistani government of Gen. Pervez Musharraf. According to these sources, Pakistani intelligence had threatened to overthrow President Musharraf if the crops were destroyed.

The threat to overthrow Musharraf is motivated in part by Islamic radical groups linked to the Pakistani intelligence service, Inter-Services Intelligence (ISI). The radical groups reportedly obtain their primary funding through opium production and trade.

"Pakistan's intelligence service is corrupt, unreliable, and we don't owe them a damn thing. The CIA has a very checkered past as far as who they choose to get in the sack with. Maybe it's time to stop being clever and do the right thing," stated another source close to the Bush administration.

"If they [the CIA] are in fact opposing the destruction of the Afghan opium trade, it'll only serve to perpetuate the belief that the CIA is an agency devoid of morals; off on their own program rather than that of our constitutionally elected government," stated the source.

"If we don't take this opportunity to destroy the opium production in Afghanistan, we are no better than the Taliban, who did nothing to stop it despite claims to the contrary," he concluded.

This Is Your CIA on Drugs

The CIA decision not to stop the Afghan opium production has been greeted silently by U.S. allies. According to intelligence sources, both the U.K. and French governments have quietly given their approval of the American policy by not acting in accordance with the U.N. global ban on opium traffic.

However, one foreign intelligence official was quick to point out that the CIA has a history of supporting international drug trafficking.

"The CIA did almost the identical thing during the Vietnam War, which had catastrophic consequences – the increase in the heroin trade in the USA beginning in the 1970s is directly attributable to the CIA. The CIA has been complicit in the global drug trade for years, so I guess they just want to carry on their favorite business," noted an allied intelligence official who works closely with U.S. law enforcement.

"The sole reason why organized crime groups and terrorists have the power that they do is all because of drug trafficking. Like the old saying, 'those who don't know history are doomed to repeat it,'" stated the official.

TV War on Terror

According to intelligence sources, a simple grant of $200 a year, no more than $20 million in total, sent to each poorly paid Afghan farmer could stop all opium production. The U.S. war in Afghanistan has already consumed an estimated $40 billion.

After spending millions of dollars on a U.S. advertising campaign that linked illegal drug sales to terrorism, the Bush administration has opted not to destroy Afghanistan's opium production over fears that such an act may destabilize Pakistan.

Clearly, ending opium production inside Afghanistan could be more effective than spending millions on TV advertising. The lack of action in Afghanistan against the drug trade shows that the Bush administration has adopted a hypocritical and flawed policy in its war on terror.

The current U.S. law enforcement tactics aimed at slick TV ads and seizing terrorist money will not stop the flow of illegal drug money flowing into the hands of Osama bin Laden. If the Bush administration is truly interested in ending terrorism, then it must start in the poppy fields of Afghanistan.

Offline David Rothscum

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Re: Guess who's dealing the drugs in Afghanistan
« Reply #2 on: October 04, 2008, 03:38:19 PM »
Afghan Opium production, from 1994 until 2008. Take a look at the huge decrease in 2001. The Taliban were given money by the US to eliminate Opium production, which caused the price to surge tenfold, and thus the profit that could be made with it by whoever got to take over the country after them. How does the Taliban, a bunch of cavedwellers with AK47's, manage to do in 1 year what NATO, the most powerful military alliance in the world, can't do?

EvadingGrid

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Re: Guess who's dealing the drugs in Afghanistan
« Reply #3 on: October 04, 2008, 03:40:17 PM »
Air America still flying . . .



Offline David Rothscum

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Re: Guess who's dealing the drugs in Afghanistan
« Reply #4 on: October 04, 2008, 03:42:41 PM »
A growing concern
http://www.smh.com.au/news/world/a-growing-concern/2008/09/20/1221331276744.html?page=fullpage#contentSwap1
Australian Federal Police officers are trying to stem the flood of opium from Afghanistan, writes Frank Walker.

THE 2008 United Nations annual report on opium in Afghanistan was claiming a triumph.

"The opium floodwaters in Afghanistan have started to recede," it proclaimed in its opening line.

After record levels of opium production in 2007 when Afghanistan pumped out a massive 8200 tonnes - 93percent of global production - the UN was proud to declare 2008 production had fallen by 19percent.

The number of Afghan provinces where poppies were farmed had fallen from 21 to 16.

Australia has four Australian Federal Police officers in Afghanistan and by the end of the year, another eight will train Afghan police to fight the narcotics trade.

And Australian agricultural scientists are helping to develop high-yield wheat strains to make the growing of grain more attractive to Afghan farmers. But what was touted as a successful international effort in battling official corruption and Afghanistan's drug lords was little more than window dressing.

The streets of Europe, the US and Australia are being flooded with heroin derived from the blooming poppy fields of Afghanistan. About 20percent of heroin on Australia's streets comes from Afghanistan.

Australian troops have no orders to destroy opium crops even though Oruzgan, the only part of Afghanistan where they serve, is one of the biggest growing areas in the country. Opium crops grew 23percent in the past 12 months and yields per hectare have increased markedly.

Afghanistan's opium poppy crop expanded rapidly after US and NATO forces ousted the Taliban in the months after the September 11 terrorist attacks.

Afghanistan has always been a centre of world opium production, averaging 60,000hectares under cultivation in the 1990s. But in 2001 the Taliban forced farmers to give it up in the name of Islam and production fell to almost zero.

Under US control, opium farming was back in a big way. US forces did next to nothing to combat the growing of the poppy crop and drug lords, with the aid of corrupt officials, made a fortune.

Over the next few years the Taliban's power grew as its forces flowed across the border from Pakistan. Their religious objection to opium evaporated as they were paid huge amounts for protecting drug lords.

By 2007 opium cultivation covered 200,000hectares and was Afghanistan's largest opium crop. The crop was worth $US1billion ($1.27billion) to Afghan farmers who could make four times more from growing opium than growing wheat. The 7700tonnes of opium produced would convert to 1100tonnes of heroin.

Antonio Costa, executive director of the UN Office on Drugs and Crime, admits much of the fall in production in 2008 could be due to drought, but he said some provincial governors had encouraged farmers to plant feed crops rather than opium.

Ironically, foreign aid to assist with irrigation has allowed farmers to increase their opium yield with one in three farmers receiving aid growing poppies instead of food. The report shattered the myth that farmers had no other source of income. Farmers in the richer agricultural south only switched from food crops to opium after the US invaded and US-built irrigation channels were supplying new poppy fields. Mr Costa conceded the eradication program was ineffective.

Inspectors were forced to pull back after one of their surveyors, Fazal Ahmad, was killed by a suicide bomber along with 20 police officers. And in Helmand province in southern Afghanistan, inspectors were hit by rockets. In Kabul to release the report, Mr Costa congratulated President Hamid Karzai on the reduction in opium crops and urged his Government to keep up the pressure.

"Drugs and terrorists should not determine the fate of Afghanistan," Mr Costa said. He wants to focus on destroying opium labs, transport convoys and drug markets, and governments to prosecute drug lords.

Former US anti-narcotics official Thomas Schweich blew the whistle recently in an article he wrote in The New York Times, accusing the Karzai Government of protecting the drug trade and the US military of turning a blind eye to the opium trade which finances the Taliban.

"The Defence Department tends to see counter-narcotics as other people's business to be settled once the fighting is over," Schweich wrote. "The trouble is that the fighting is unlikely to end as long as the Taliban can finance themselves through drugs - and as long as the Kabul Government is dependent on opium to sustain its hold on power."

He pushed for a total war on opium production - the eradication of fields, attacks on shipments, arrests of anyone who profited from it and proper courts to put them on trial.

President Karzai objected strongly to aerial spraying saying it would cause an uprising that would topple the Government. Despite rumours the US would use the notorious Agent Orange that was used in Vietnam, Schweich insists the chemical used to kill drug crops in South America and Asia, glyphosate, was harmless to humans.

He wrote the military blocked every move to tackle the drug trade, saying it interfered with the war on the Taliban. When police did make an arrest, the drug trafficker simply paid a bribe and walked out the back door.

"Intelligence … indicated senior Afghan officials were deeply involved in the narcotics trade. Narco-traffickers were buying off hundreds of police chiefs, judges, and other officials. Narco-corruption went to the top of the Afghan Government."

In June, AFP Commissioner Mick Keelty visited the AFP officers in Afghanistan. "It is a deadly dangerous place to be in policing," Keelty told a reporter at the time.

With more than 500 Afghan police officers killed this year, that is an understatement.

Offline KingNeil

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Re: Guess who's dealing the drugs in Afghanistan
« Reply #5 on: October 04, 2008, 03:45:38 PM »
I really like how independent the New York Times seems to be becoming.

Offline David Rothscum

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Re: Guess who's dealing the drugs in Afghanistan
« Reply #6 on: October 04, 2008, 03:54:17 PM »
"They'd never do such a thing!"
They've been caught before:
Quote
Mexico drug plane used for US 'rendition' flights: report
http://afp.google.com/article/ALeqM5j6QonBKKMo2gw1e3ql-xUcQEZbVg
Sep 4, 2008

MEXICO CITY (AFP) — A private jet that crash-landed almost one year ago in eastern Mexico carrying 3.3 tons of cocaine had previously been used for CIA "rendition" flights, a newspaper report said here Thursday, citing documents from the United States and the European Parliament.

The plane was carrying Colombian drugs for the fugitive leader of Mexico's Sinaloa cartel, Joaquin "Chapo" Guzman, when it crash-landed in the Yucatan peninsula on September 24, El Universal reported.

The daily said it had obtained documents from the United States and the European Parliament which "show that that plane flew several times to Guantanamo, Cuba, presumably to transfer terrorism suspects."

It said the European Parliament was investigating the private Grumman Gulfstream II, registered by the European Organization for the Safety of Air Navigation, for suspected use in CIA "rendition" flights in which prisoners are covertly transferred to a third country or US-run detention centers.

It also said the US Federal Aviation Administration's (FAA) logbook registered that the plane had traveled between US territory and the US military base in Guantanamo.

It said the FAA registered its last owner as Clyde O'Connor in Pompano Beach, Florida.

Extraordinary rendition has been harshly criticized since it began in the aftermath of the September 11, 2001 attacks in the United States.

Offline David Rothscum

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Re: Guess who's dealing the drugs in Afghanistan
« Reply #7 on: October 04, 2008, 04:21:04 PM »
Let's look at the victim of the drug trade, this shouldn't come as a surprise, it fits perfectly into the puzzle:

Quote
http://www.russiatoday.com/news/news/30901
NATO accused of sheltering Afghan heroin trade
Since NATO forces invaded Afghanistan, the production of heroin in the country increased by 2.5 times and Afghanistan has become the world leader in heroin production. Eighteen tonnes of heroin from Afghanistan ends up in Russia each year.

Russia at war with heroin

As a result of this war Russia has become one of the main markets for Afghan opiates, involuntary acknowledged Russian Federal Drugs Control Service, and drug traffickers are financing terrorist organizations worldwide, says the Interfax news agency.

The Director of FDCS, Viktor Ivanov, tolds journalists that a drug addict’s life is limited to 5-7 years from the moment he becomes one.

He also said that those 400,000 drug addicts officially registered in Russia in 2001 are already dead and the number of new ones is growing by 30% every year. That is why the losses should be regarded as Russia’s direct casualties in the war that NATO wages on Afghanistan.

“The problem of Afghan opiates has a geopolitical character,” stressed Ivanov.

While in Russia up to 90% of drug addicts depend on Afghan opiates, in Europe this volume is up to 10%.
Strategic drug trafficking

The head of the FDCS insists that it is not just the Taliban that manages the heroin traffic but the Afghan governmental and security services’ officials known by name.

The fact that dozens of high-ranking Afghan officials are known to be involved in the drug industry means that corrupted authorities work hand in hand with the Taliban terrorist movement, which in turn means that NATO military forces support the current Afghan regime.

Within the framework of the Russia-NATO Council Russia is financing and conducting special training for Afghan police squads dealing with drug trafficking. Unfortunately, for more than a year not a single Afghan policeman came to Russia for training which is no wonder considering the fact that all actions of Afghanistan’s security services should be sanctioned by the U.S.

http://www.abc.net.au/pm/content/2007/s1870892.htm
Quote
Russia hit by flood of heroin
   PRINT FRIENDLY    EMAIL STORY
PM - Tuesday, 13 March , 2007  18:48:33
Reporter: Emma Griffiths
MARK COLVIN: Last year, Afghanistan produced a record crop of opium poppies; production increased by nearly 60 per cent.

It's now begun hitting the streets of Europe as high-grade heroin, and healthcare workers are bracing for a surge in drug overdoses.

In Russia, officials are calling it a heroin invasion. Russia's a key transit country for the drug, and demand there is growing rapidly.

Moscow Correspondent Emma Griffiths reports.

(sound of women talking)

EMMA GRIFFITHS: At Moscow's Rehabilitation Clinic Number 17, a group of young women are trying to get through another day. They're all addicted to heroin and are in withdrawal.

(sound of Irina talking)

At just 23years of age Irina is a seasoned drug user. She first tried heroin at 13. She hopes to stay clean but knows it will be a tough battle.

"The month before I was brought here I was crying when I injected myself," she says. "It was already beyond me. That's it. I can't live like that any longer."

Another young woman, Natasha, shows me her legs. They're horribly scarred and marked from her years of heroin injecting.

These women are among an estimated five million Russians hooked on heroin.

The country's top drug detective is Sergei Tikhonenko. He says heroin is tearing his community apart.

(sound of Sergei Tikhonenko speaking)

"We see a number of drug addicts," he says. "We see syringes in the staircases of apartment blocks, we see young people dying from overdoses. It's sad and frightening."

Russia has been hit by a flood of heroin heading north from Afghanistan. It's easily smuggled through the porous borders of Central Asia, into Russia and Europe.

Last year's crop of opium poppies in Afghanistan was enough to produce about 600 tonnes of heroin. It's making its way into the world market and an increasing amount is headed for Russia.

The United Nations Office on Drugs and Crime says vulnerable borders are giving traffickers the edge.

Spokesman Flavio Mirella:

FLAVIO MIRELLA: We're looking at production in Afghanistan increasing, we're looking at trafficking routes being well developed already through Central Asia, and border controls are, I would say, requiring substantial attention.

You can basically take a truck from Central Asia, right across Central Asia, into Russia and all the way into Belarus, practically reaching the Polish border, with very limited controls.

EMMA GRIFFITHS: Last year, Russian counter-narcotics officers seized more than 4,000 kilograms of heroin. But they admit that's only a fraction of the amount coming in.

Drug detective Sergei Tikhonenko:

(sound of Sergei Tikhonenko speaking)

"This is an invasion," he says. "It's a real heroin invasion. And unfortunately, it's a war that we are not winning."

And the UN's prognosis for Russia's heroin crisis is bleak.

Flavio Mirella again:

FLAVIO MIRELLA: The market here is just developing and the purchasing power of this population is increasing. So it's a battle which will be confronted by the authorities in this country for the years to come.

EMMA GRIFFITHS: For now, Russia is at the mercy of the poppy growers of Afghanistan, and can only hope this year's crop won't be another one to break records.

This is Emma Griffiths in Moscow for PM
Five million people, and growing. In a dying population that's currently estimated at just 141 million people and declining, having 5 million youth addicted to a drug that'll kill them on average 5 to 7 years after they start using it is a giant problem. No wonder the Russian authorities are pissed at the US about it. Not to mention the fact that these drug users will spread diseases amongst the general population as well. In fact, that's exactly what's happening:
Quote
http://www.rense.com/general2/fastest.htm
10 Percent Russian Adults
May Have AIDS By 2010
Russia's HIV/AIDS Epidemic: Status And Outlook
 
Russia has recently emerged as a new epicenter in the global HIV/AIDS pandemic, with one of the world's highest rates of new infection. As of August 2003, there have been more than 245,000 officially diagnosed cases of HIV infection in Russia, over 80 percent of which were reported in the last three years. It is widely acknowledged, however, that Russia's official statistics represent only a fraction of the actual number of HIV-infected Russians; most experts estimate that the true number is somewhere between 1.5 million and 2 million citizens, or over 2 percent of the adult population.
 
Epidemiologists warn that up to 8 million Russians - over 10 percent of the adult population - could be infected by 2010, under worst-case scenarios. The epidemic is growing fastest among young people aged 15-30, the very same group that should be leading Russia into the 21st century. Figure 1 shows the dramatic growth of Russia's HIV epidemic between 1994 and mid-2003, as measured by official cases of HIV diagnosis registered with the Russian Federal AIDS Center.
Anyone still wondering why Brzezinski, Obama and Biden love the war in Afghanistan so much? It's the "right war", the indirect war against Russia.

Offline larsonstdoc

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Re: Guess who's dealing the drugs in Afghanistan
« Reply #8 on: October 04, 2008, 04:36:39 PM »



  The US is the most evil empire in the world.  Next we will sell Russia AIDS-curing drugs.  It goes on and on and on.
I'M A DEPLORABLE KNUCKLEHEAD THAT SUPPORTS PRESIDENT TRUMP.  MAY GOD BLESS HIM AND KEEP HIM SAFE.

Offline Celebrome

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Re: Guess who's dealing the drugs in Afghanistan
« Reply #9 on: October 04, 2008, 04:40:24 PM »
Did you know that canada finance the opium producer of afhganistan?
They sayd it many time on mainstream media and news paper and governement paper.
Canada give millions and millions of dollard to help farmer in afghanistan but since most farmer grow opium they give it to them. There excuse was : they have been growing opium for years and that the only thing they know how to grow so we wont change it. Ever since Canada is in Afghanistan opium production have more then triple. Its 5 times more important then before canada was there.

Offline xundk

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Re: Guess who's dealing the drugs in Afghanistan
« Reply #10 on: October 04, 2008, 04:40:50 PM »
Old news, with new people saying it...

Offline David Rothscum

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Re: Guess who's dealing the drugs in Afghanistan
« Reply #11 on: October 04, 2008, 04:46:20 PM »
Please add any smoking guns I haven't posted yet, there's probably a lot more information about this subject to be found.
Quote
http://www.globalresearch.ca/index.php?context=va&aid=8180
Narco Aggression: Russia accuses the U.S. military of involvement in drug trafficking out of Afghanistan
by Vladimir Radyuhin

Global Research, February 24, 2008
Frontline   

Global Research Editor's Note

The global proceeds of the Afghan drug trade is in excess of 150 billion dollars a year. There is mounting evidence that this illicit trade is protected by the US military.

Historically, starting in the early 1980s, the Afghan drug trade was used to finance CIA covert support of the Islamic brigades. The 2003 war on Afghanistan was launched following the Taliban government's 2000-2001 drug eradication program which led to a collapse in opium production in excess of 90 percent.

The following report, which accuses the United States of using military transport planes to ship narcotics out of Afghanistan confirms what is already known and documented regarding the Golden Crescent Drug Trade and its insiduous relationship to  US intelligence.

February 23, 2008


Russia, facing a catastrophic rise in drug addiction, accuses the U.S. military of involvement in drug trafficking from Afghanistan.

JOHN MACDOUGALL/AFP
 

Afghan workers cutting open poppy bulbs, the first stage in the harvesting process, in Jalalabad.
Afghanistan produced 8,200 tonnes of opium last year, enough to make 93 per cent of the world’s heroin supply.



Could it be that the American military in Afghanistan is involved in drug trafficking? Yes, it is quite possible, according to Russia’s Ambassador to Afghanistan Zamir Kabulov.

Commenting on reports that the United States military transport aviation is used for shipping narcotics out of Afghanistan, the Russian envoy said there was no smoke without fire.

“If such actions do take place they cannot be undertaken without contact with Afghans, and if one Afghan man knows this, at least a half of Afghanistan will know about this sooner or later,” Kabulov told Vesti, Russia’s 24-hour news channel. “That is why I think this is possible, but cannot prove it.”

Afghan narcotics are an extremely painful issue for Russia. They first hit the Russian market during the Soviet occupation of Afghanistan in the 1980s when Russian soldiers developed a taste for Afghan heroin and smuggled it back to Russia.

The disintegration of the Soviet Union in December 1991 threw open the floodgates of drug trafficking from Afghanistan across Central Asia to Russia and further west to Europe. Afghanistan’s narcotics struck Russia like a tsunami, threatening to decimate its already shrinking population. According to the Federal Drug Control Service, 90 per cent of all heroin sold in Russia comes from Afghanistan. Russia today has about six million drug-users – a 20-fold increase since the collapse of the Soviet Union and a huge figure for a country of 142 million people.

The Federal Drug Control Service said earlier in January that as many as 30 to 40 million people in Russia may have tried drugs at least once. Annually, some 80,000 Russians die of drug-related causes. One in five crimes committed in Russia is related to drugs. The illegal drug turnover in Russia is estimated at between $10 and $15 billion, discounting transit trafficking.

Narcotics have become an integral part of the youth subculture in Russia. In Moscow alone narcotics are sold at about 100 discotheques and cafes frequented by young people, the city drug control service reported in December. About 45 per cent of Russian university students use drugs, according to Russian Minister for Education and Science Andrei Fursenko. He described the situation as “critical”. The Moscow city government plans to introduce mandatory drug tests for all students in the Russian capital this year. Schoolchildren may be next in line for screening: some surveys indicate that four out of five young Russians are familiar with drugs. The Russian Parliament is planning to discuss a law to allow compulsory treatment of drug and alcohol addicts.
President Vladimir Putin has described the drug abuse problem as a “national calamity”. The catastrophic rise in drug addiction in Russia has been spurred by the painful transition from socialism to capitalism that Russia has been going through since 1991. Millions lost their jobs and were reduced to abject poverty during Russia’s worst-ever economic meltdown in the 1990s. But external factors have played a crucial role in the spread of drugs. Last year Putin bluntly stated that Russia and Europe had been victims of “narco-aggression”.

When the Soviet Union broke up into 15 independent states, Moscow overnight lost control of nearly 5,000 kilometres of former Soviet borders in Central Asia and the Caucasus. At the same time, nearly 8,000 km of what used to be internal nominal boundaries between ex-Soviet republics became Russia’s new state borders.

In 1993, Russian border guards returned to Tajikistan in an effort to contain the flow of drugs from opium-producing Afghanistan. In 2002 alone they intercepted 6.7 tonnes of drugs, half of them heroin. However, in 2005 Tajik President Imomali Rakhmon, hoping to win financial aid from the U.S., asked the Russian border guards to leave, saying Tajikistan had recovered enough from a five-year civil war (from 1992-97) to shoulder the task. Within months of the Russian withdrawal, cross-border drug trafficking increased manifold.

Turkmenistan, another major opium route from Afghanistan, threw out Russian border guards in 1999. Since 2000, Turkmenistan has reported no drug seizures to international organisations. President Saparmurat Niyazov, who died last year, claimed his country had no drug problem. However, independent surveys indicate that up to half of Turkmenistan’s male population use drugs. In 2002, the country’s Prosecutor-General Kurbanbibi Atadzhanova was arrested for operating a drug-trafficking ring.

Seventeen years after the break-up of the Soviet Union, borders between the newly independent states are still porous and travel is visa-free. Air passengers arriving from Central Asia are routinely screened for drugs in Russian airports, but if drugs are shipped by land, there is only a remote chance that they get intercepted.

Afghanistan under the U.S.

When Russia backed the U.S.-led invasion of Afghanistan to crush the Taliban and Al Qaeda in the post-9/11 scenario, the last thing it expected to happen was that drug trafficking from Afghanistan would assume gargantuan proportions under the U.S. military. Since 2001, poppy fields, once banned by the Taliban, have mushroomed again. According to the United Nations Office on Drugs and Crime, Afghanistan produced 8,200 tonnes of opium last year, enough to make 93 per cent of the world’s heroin supply.

The U.S.-led North Atlantic Treaty Organisation [NATO] forces in the country have not only failed to eliminate the terrorist threat from the Taliban, but also presided over a spectacular rise in opium production. Russia’s Foreign Minister Sergei Lavrov said Afghanistan was on the brink of becoming a “narco state”.

Narco business has emerged as virtually the only economy of Afghanistan and is valued at some $10 billion a year. Opium trade is estimated by the U.N. to be equivalent to 53 per cent of the country’s official economy and is helping to finance the Taliban.

“Unfortunately, they [NATO] are doing nothing to reduce the narcotic threat from Afghanistan even a tiny bit,” Putin angrily remarked three years ago. He accused the coalition forces of “sitting back and watching caravans haul drugs across Afghanistan to the former Soviet Union and Europe.” As time went by, Russian suspicions regarding the U.S. role in the rise of a narco state in Afghanistan grew deeper, especially after reports from Iraq said that the cultivation of opium poppies was spreading rapidly there too.

“The Americans are working hard to keep narco business flourishing in both countries,” says Mikhail Khazin, president of the consultancy firm Niakon. “They consistently destroy the local infrastructure, pushing the local population to look for illegal means of subsistence. And the CIA [Central Intelligence Agency] provides protection to drug trafficking.”

U.S. freelance writer Dave Gibson recalled in an article published in American Chronicle in December what a U.S. foreign intelligence official, speaking on the condition of anonymity, told NewsMax.com in March 2002 of the CIA’s record of involvement with the international drug trade. The official said: “The CIA did almost the identical thing during the Vietnam War, which had catastrophic consequences – the increase in the heroin trade in the USA beginning in the 1970s is directly attributable to the CIA. The CIA has been complicit in the global drug trade for years, so I guess they just want to carry on their favourite business.”
AFP

A USAF cargo plane takes off from the U.S. airbase in Incirlik in Turkey in March 2003.
A Russian news channel reported that drugs from Afghanistan were hauled
by American transport aircraft to the U.S. airbases in Kyrgyzstan and Turkey.

Now Russia has joined the fray accusing the U.S. military of involvement in the heroin trafficking from Afghanistan to Europe. The Vesti channel’s report from Afghanistan said that drugs from Afghanistan were hauled by American transport aircraft to the U.S. airbases Ganci in Kyrgyzstan and Incirlik in Turkey.

The Ganci Air Force base at the Manas international airport in Kyrgyzstan was set up in late 2001 as a staging post for military operations inside Afghanistan. The Kyrgyz government threatened to close the base after neighbouring Uzbekistan shut down a similar U.S. airbase on its territory in 2005, but relented after Washington agreed to make a one-off payment of $150 million in the form of an assistance package and to pay $15 million a year for the use of the base.

One of the best-informed Russian journalists on Central Asia, Arkady Dubnov, recently quoted anonymous Afghan sources as saying that “85 per cent of all drugs produced in southern and southeastern provinces are shipped abroad by U.S. aviation.”

A well-informed source in Afghanistan’s security services told the Russian journalist that the American military acquired drugs through local Afghan officials who dealt with field commanders in charge of drug production.

Writing in the Vremya Novostei daily, Dubnov claimed that the pro-Western administration of President Hamid Karzai, including his two brothers, Kajum Karzai and Akhmed Vali Karzai, are head-to-heels involved in the narcotics trade.


The article quoted a leading U.S. expert on Afghanistan, Barnett Rubin, as telling an anti-narcotics conference in Kabul last October that “drug dealers had infiltrated Afghani state structures to the extent where they could easily paralyse the work of the government if decision to arrest one of them was ever made.”

Former U.S. Ambassador to the U.N. Richard Holbrooke said in January that “government officials, including some with close ties to the presidency, are protecting the drug trade and profiting from it.”

In an article carried by Washington Post, the diplomat described the $1-billion-a-year U.S. counter-narcotics effort in Afghanistan as “the single most ineffective programme in the history of American foreign policy.”

“It’s not just a waste of money. It actually strengthens the Taliban and Al Qaeda, as well as criminal elements within Afghanistan,” Holbrooke wrote in the The Washington Post in early January.

It is an open question whether the Russian charges of U.S. complicity in drug trafficking are based on hard evidence or have been prompted by Moscow’s frustration at Washington’s failure to address the opium problem in Afghanistan. But it is a fact that the U.S. and NATO have stonewalled numerous offers of cooperation from the Shanghai Cooperation Organisation (SCO) and the Moscow-led Collective Security Treaty Organisation (CSTO), a defence pact of six former Soviet republics.

Nikolai Bordyuzha, CSTO Secretary-General, quoted a Pentagon general as telling him: “We are not fighting narcotics because this is not our task in Afghanistan.”

Instead of joining hands with the SCO and the CSTO in combating the narcotics threat, the CSTO chief said, the U.S. was working to set up rival security structures in the region. Washington is working to “drive a geopolitical wedge between Central Asian countries and Russia and to reorient the region towards the U.S.”, Bordyuzha said last year.

With the U.S. and NATO rebuffing their cooperation offers, Russia, China and the Central Asian states have to rely on their own forces in combating the narcotics threat from Afghanistan. The CSTO has been running a wide-ranging aid and military assistance programme for Afghanistan, which includes training Afghan anti-narcotic police.

Last year, the SCO joined in signing a cooperation protocol with the CSTO, which is aimed, above all, at curbing drug trafficking. At its summit in Bishkek, the Kyrgyzstan capital, last August, the SCO decided to set up jointly with the CSTO an “anti-narcotics belt” around Afghanistan.

 Global Research Articles by Vladimir Radyuhin

Offline L2Design

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Re: Guess who's dealing the drugs in Afghanistan
« Reply #12 on: October 04, 2008, 05:52:55 PM »
I feel it in my gut... they put opium in our food supply for 'addiction' (cereal/grains)

Dont eat that stuff
Make it so!

Offline Suriel

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Re: Guess who's dealing the drugs in Afghanistan
« Reply #13 on: October 04, 2008, 06:28:13 PM »
The more things change the more they stay the same.   :-\
"We have reached a stage at which we have surrounded ourselves with more things, but have less joy." - The Brothers Karamazov by Fyodor Dostoevsky translated by Ignat Avsey

Offline David Rothscum

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Re: Guess who's dealing the drugs in Afghanistan
« Reply #14 on: October 04, 2008, 08:18:15 PM »
I feel it in my gut... they put opium in our food supply for 'addiction' (cereal/grains)

Dont eat that stuff
Why put opium in our food when they have MSG at their disposal?

Offline barndoor77

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Re: Guess who's dealing the drugs in Afghanistan
« Reply #15 on: October 05, 2008, 03:31:29 AM »
Now you just need to make a quick little documentry about this - that is how the war is won, and then 10 million people need to see it.



Offline blind_sided

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Re: Guess who's dealing the drugs in Afghanistan
« Reply #16 on: October 05, 2008, 03:52:18 AM »
meanwhile they played this PSA's on american tv...

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_XFn8MMq_BE

err wish i could find the whole clip but I bet ya'll remember


seems like they are one step away from convincing me the sky is purple.

Offline EchelonMonitor

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Re: Guess who's dealing the drugs in Afghanistan
« Reply #17 on: October 05, 2008, 07:51:04 AM »
Meanwhile "liberal" talk radio has grown silent, abandoning it's anti-war position, about the war in Afghanistan since Obama supports it.

Offline barndoor77

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You See...
« Reply #18 on: October 05, 2008, 09:17:40 AM »


Liar, Liar, The Bush Version...


"You See, we have to keep the Cocaine Shipments safe, that is why we have assigned our top agency for handling narcotic trafficking... Yes?"

Reporter "Mr President it was reported and then covered up that one of the CIA planes crashed in the Yutican Peninsula is that true?"

"No, our Cocaine shipments are totally secure, that is just conspiracy propaganda that we lost a shipment...  Next question.."

Reporter "Rumor has it you guys are having difficulty competing with the home grown 'under the sink' meth labs - would you care to comment on that?"

"Hmmmm..... Well.... Ah.... Actually we are mounting a sustained campaign and funding a giant media blitz to make sure that any drug use addiction remains firmly under our control... Next"

Reporter "Do you care to comment that Mexican Gangs are now competing against the CIA drug turf, and Mexico is needing ever larger payoffs for safe passage of CIA Cocaine flights?"

"No I'm confident our recent $680 Million dollar payment to the Mexican government will ensure safe passage of our Cocaine...  The Mexican Generals have given us there word, and well we gave them open crack and hooker discount cards so that should keep them satisfied...  Look I gotta run, my high is wearing off, and I don't want anyone selling a photo of me snorting up, cause the Secret service Agents are starting to complain about the over time cleaning up my hit lists..."

Offline chris jones

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Re: Guess who's dealing the drugs in Afghanistan
« Reply #19 on: October 05, 2008, 04:39:15 PM »
The CIA does not want competition.

This has ben going on since the Golden Traingle, the CIA used Gren .Berets (TDY) and montangyards for their protection at the LZ's.
Check out an old friend of mine who came forward, Paul Withers, Laos, E6, Medal of honor winner. Paul had a change of heart.
Search it if interested.


Offline ES

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Re: Guess who's dealing the drugs in Afghanistan
« Reply #20 on: October 05, 2008, 09:58:43 PM »
Don't sell drugs, the cia hates competition.
"My heroes are people who monkey wrench the new world order". - Jello Biafra

Offline Freeski

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Re: Guess who's dealing the drugs in Afghanistan
« Reply #21 on: October 05, 2008, 10:20:12 PM »
I know some of you think he's a shill but in Michael Ruppert's Crossing the Rubicon, he claims that the global drug trade is so huge (financially), that economies would collapse without it - that drugs are a part of the entire balance.
"He who passively accepts evil is as much involved in it as he who helps to perpetrate it. He who accepts evil without protesting against it is really cooperating with it." Martin Luther King, Jr.

Offline creat3d

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Re: Guess who's dealing the drugs in Afghanistan
« Reply #22 on: October 05, 2008, 11:29:23 PM »
Tonight on a local TV show (Quebec) there was an interview with Julie Couillard, who made headlines throughout Quebec (Canada?) after her relationship with Maxime Bernier (former canadian Foreign Affairs minister), because she had a prior relationship with a member of the Hell's Angels.

Anyway, she mentioned how Bernier considered Canada's involvement in Afghanistan to have nothing to do with "spreading democracy" and instead ensuring the production of opium...

First thing that popped in my head was that chart above  :-\

Offline Freeski

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Re: Guess who's dealing the drugs in Afghanistan
« Reply #23 on: October 05, 2008, 11:42:01 PM »
Tonight on a local TV show (Quebec) there was an interview with Julie Couillard, who made headlines throughout Quebec (Canada?) after her relationship with Maxime Bernier (former canadian Foreign Affairs minister), because she had a prior relationship with a member of the Hell's Angels.

Anyway, she mentioned how Bernier considered Canada's involvement in Afghanistan to have nothing to do with "spreading democracy" and instead ensuring the production of opium...

First thing that popped in my head was that chart above  :-\

Wow! What's the name of the show, do you recall? That said, be careful with Julie Couillard because I belive she had a book ready a month or so after she became known. Disinfo agent or whistleblower or entrepreneur?
"He who passively accepts evil is as much involved in it as he who helps to perpetrate it. He who accepts evil without protesting against it is really cooperating with it." Martin Luther King, Jr.

Offline creat3d

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Re: Guess who's dealing the drugs in Afghanistan
« Reply #24 on: October 06, 2008, 01:56:03 AM »
Wow! What's the name of the show, do you recall? That said, be careful with Julie Couillard because I belive she had a book ready a month or so after she became known. Disinfo agent or whistleblower or entrepreneur?

It was on "Tout le monde en parle", pretty big ratings... you can watch it every sunday 8-10pm EST on Radio-Canada.

I'm pretty skeptical about her. I have no doubt about that opium comment, or another thing she said about him* tonight, but she knows and has met way too many important people to simply be a "bimbo of service"...

She's definately a very ambitious and strong woman, who has no trouble getting to where she wants to be. I'd say more entrepreneur than whistleblower, but I doubt disinfo agent. Her ties with organized crime is the main thing, I can understand how someone can date a person without being affiliated with his "group" (whatever it may be), but biker gangs are huge in Quebec. I'd have to watch the interview again (I taped it) but there were mentions of other past relationships with equally important (and shady) characters, after the biker guy... then she goes on to date the Foreign Affairs minister and chatting with George Bush?
Sounds more like a mole to me. To whom? Your guess is as good as mine.

*: She mentioned how at a fundraiser in Beauce, Quebec (Bernier's district), he was greeting and chatting with voters... and in-between making degoratory comments about them to Julie. THAT is the most plausible thing she said  ;)

Offline Rebelitarian

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Re: Guess who's dealing the drugs in Afghanistan
« Reply #25 on: March 05, 2011, 07:42:42 PM »
Yeah the Globalists have their shills in both American and Canadian intelligence agencies supporting the drug trade.

Offline Freeski

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Re: Guess who's dealing the drugs in Afghanistan
« Reply #26 on: March 05, 2011, 08:20:51 PM »
Tonight on a local TV show (Quebec) there was an interview with Julie Couillard, who made headlines throughout Quebec (Canada?) after her relationship with Maxime Bernier (former canadian Foreign Affairs minister), because she had a prior relationship with a member of the Hell's Angels.

Anyway, she mentioned how Bernier considered Canada's involvement in Afghanistan to have nothing to do with "spreading democracy" and instead ensuring the production of opium...

First thing that popped in my head was that chart above  :-\

Maxime Bernier is, I believe, one of the good guys -- but he dangerously lives and plays among the evil overlords.

http://www.maximebernier.com/en/
"He who passively accepts evil is as much involved in it as he who helps to perpetrate it. He who accepts evil without protesting against it is really cooperating with it." Martin Luther King, Jr.

Offline defendfreedomvet85

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Re: Guess who's dealing the drugs in Afghanistan
« Reply #27 on: March 06, 2011, 03:57:34 PM »
http://forum.prisonplanet.com/index.php?topic=202914.0





Drug Czar sneaks around to the back door, flees from a couple of protesters after emptying his empty bag of old rhetoric on the news all morning!!!!!! http://slog.thestranger.com/slog/archives/2011/03/05/the-drug-czar-comes-to-town-and-nothing-much-happens&cb=ee11d8f3af3fe94e8a04b72cc19daed3&layoutId=PostComment&view=comments#comment-7046851

After seeing the drug Czar's bizarre bipolar behavior Friday, its clear that the Feds Kool-Aid has run out! A Defeated man, Gil exited out of an auxillary entrance after trying to put a juke move on protesters altogether. It was more embarrassing than frustrating as a peaceful OIF Veteran protester. I has trained never to never surrender, and after Gil's acquiescent talks with The Seattle Times (The whole hubub and the "coincidence" that really riled people up in the first place) ;see The Stranger @http://www.thestranger.com/slog/archives/2011/02/25/white-house-requested-meeting-with-seattle-times-editorial-board-to-bully-against-pro-pot-articles

In summation, I'll quote what Brendan Kiley of The Seattle Times said after Friday's activities."The White House's drug czar is making the case in such an empty and specious way, he might as well be arguing for legalization."

PS: Kiro 7's Online Poll shows a whopping 86% chunk of the public for Legalizing Cannabis

PSS I think when Washington legalizes cannabis across the board, we will become the wealthiest state in the USA"-Jeanne Black-Ferguson, Grammas forganja.org.


Thomas Studley
OIF Veteran
US Army Recon (Ret.)