Civil War is being Incited in Pakistan - a new murderous phase begins

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Offline Biggs

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Re: Civil War is being Incited in Pakistan - a new murderous phase begins
« Reply #40 on: September 04, 2008, 07:10:51 PM »
Pakistanis furious over U.S.-led border raid

By Robert Birsel
Thu Sep 4, 5:49 AM ET

http://news.yahoo.com/s/nm/20080904/wl_nm/pakistan_usa_dc

ISLAMABAD (Reuters) - Pakistan is determined to defend its territorial integrity, the country's foreign minister said on Thursday, as anger mounted over a raid by U.S.-led troops on a remote border village.

The pre-dawn helicopter-borne ground assault on the village of Angor Adda on the Afghan border on Wednesday was the first known incursion into Pakistan by U.S.-led troops since the invasion of Afghanistan in 2001.

Twenty people, including women and children were killed, officials said, and a new civilian government, more sensitive to public anger than the previous government, summoned the U.S. ambassador to lodge an angry protest.


Foreign Minister Shah Memood Qureshi said the raid was a shameful violation of rules of engagement agreed with U.S.-led forces in Afghanistan.

"We will not compromise on any violation of our sovereignty," Qureshi told the National Assembly.

"We will defend and ... we have a resolve and we have national consensus in Pakistan to defend our territorial integrity," he said. Both houses of parliament later adopted resolutions condemning the attack.

The United States, a major source of aid to nuclear-armed Pakistan, has not officially commented on the raid but there is little, if any, doubt it was carried out by U.S. troops.

The United States says al Qaeda and Taliban militants lurk in sanctuaries in northwest Pakistan's ethnic Pashtun tribal areas on the Afghan border, where they orchestrate attacks in Afghanistan and Pakistan and plot violence in the West.

Pakistan has been a close U.S. ally in the unpopular campaign against terrorism and has tens of thousands of troops battling militants but it rules out incursions by foreign troops.

There have, however, been numerous missile strikes on militants in Pakistan, most believed launched by U.S.-operated pilotless drone aircraft.

NATO's Afghan peacekeeping force, led by a U.S. general, denied involvement. The United States leads a separate, counter-insurgency force in Afghanistan.

Asked about the raid in South Waziristan, a Pentagon spokesman, Bryan Whitman, said: "I have nothing for you on those reports." The CIA referred questions to the Pentagon.

"FURIOUS"

Analysts said the raid will test ties between the allies.

"The people of Pakistan are furious," said former foreign secretary Shamshad Ahmed Khan.

"At a minimum they want an apology ... and an assurance that this kind of operation will not be repeated ... It could have an irreparable effect on long-term relations."

Since the emergence of a civilian-led government after February elections, there has been growing concern that U.S. military operations were becoming more aggressive.

The number of missile attacks launched by drones has multiplied, and there had been fears U.S. forces would use helicopter gunships or put troops on the ground for "hot pursuit" or commando-style raids to destroy al Qaeda nests.

"This is what Pakistan feared," said military affairs analyst Ayesha Siddiqa, adding she expected more U.S. strikes.

"The government has protested, there will be a lot of anger, but the situation will continue ... the relationship won't break down but there's going to be more bitterness."

While in the past, the government led by former president Pervez Musharraf could virtually ignore public anger, the civilian government led by the widower of assassinated former prime minister Benazir Bhutto will feel pressure.

Asif Ali Zardari, who looks set to become president in an election by legislators on Saturday, is seen as close to the United States but ordinary Pakistanis, many of whom harbor anti-American feelings, will expect him to take a stand.

Zardari, in a commentary published in the Washington Post, repeated his determination to defeat the Taliban insurgency in Pakistan and ensure that Pakistani territory is not used for attacks into Afghanistan. He did not mention the raid.

Pakistani military spokesman Major General Athar Abbas said such raids risked forcing people into the arms of the militants and inciting an uprising in the tribal lands.

Khan said the raid looked like an act of U.S. desperation: "They are in election mode and apparently the Bush administration is desperate to score points."
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Offline Biggs

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Re: Civil War is being Incited in Pakistan - a new murderous phase begins
« Reply #41 on: September 04, 2008, 07:13:26 PM »
and now the digusting scumbags have done yet another attack inside Pakistan, it is not as if these strikes have any real military use, they are designed for one thing, to spread chaos

Four killed in suspected U.S. drone attack in Pakistan

Thu Sep 4, 9:52 AM ET

http://news.yahoo.com/s/nm/20080904/ts_nm/pakistan_missile_dc

MIRANSHAH, Pakistan (Reuters) - Four Islamist militants were killed and five wounded in a missile attack by a suspected U.S. drone in Pakistan's North Waziristan tribal region on Thursday, security officials and witnesses said.


The attack targeted the house of a tribesman, Rehman Wali, in the Mohammad Khel area, near the border with Afghanistan, where the militants were hiding.

"Apparently three missiles were fired by the drone," a witness in the area told Reuters on condition of anonymity.

The attack came a day after helicopter-borne U.S. troops raided a village in the nearby South Waziristan region, killing 20 people
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Offline bigron

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Re: Civil War is being Incited in Pakistan - a new murderous phase begins
« Reply #42 on: September 05, 2008, 07:49:14 AM »
September 5, 2008

Raid May Herald More Confrontational Policy

 
by Daniel Luban

An apparent raid into Pakistani territory by US forces stationed in Afghanistan has prompted angry denunciations from Pakistani officials and renewed questions about the future of the war against the Taliban in the region.

The raid, which took place Wednesday morning in the turbulent Waziristan region, may have killed as many as 20 civilians, according to witnesses and Pakistani officials.

After months in which US military officials have expressed concerns about the Pakistani government's willingness to crack down on Taliban militants operating in its tribal areas, news of the raid has caused speculation about whether the US is planning to take on a more aggressive role in targeting militants in Pakistani territory, and worries about what such a step would mean for the volatile US-Pakistan relationship.

According to sources in the Pakistani military and civilian government, the raid began around 3 a.m. Wednesday morning, when three helicopters carrying US and Afghan troops flew into the Waziristan village of Jala Khel.

Some troops then disembarked, witnesses say, and opened fire upon villagers.

The New York Times reported that the soldiers involved were US Special Operations forces operating outside of the normal NATO chain of command.

According to Owais Ahmed Ghani, the governor of the Northwest Frontier Province, over 20 people were killed in the raid. Ghani condemned the action as a "direct assault on Pakistan's sovereignty" and called for retaliation.

Other Pakistani officials were also quick to condemn the raid. Nadeem Kiani, spokesman for the Pakistani embassy in Washington, told Reuters that the US forces were acting on faulty intelligence that had not been shared with Pakistan, and that those killed were unarmed civilians rather than militants.

US and NATO spokesmen in Afghanistan, as well as a spokesman at US Central Command (CENTCOM) in Florida, declined to comment. But US officials did anonymously confirm that the raid had occurred, with one official telling the New York Times that at least one child had been killed.

The raid came after a long period of friction between US military officials and their Pakistani counterparts, as the US has chafed at Pakistan's apparent reluctance to rein in the Taliban.

Since the US-led invasion of Afghanistan in 2001 overthrew that country's Taliban government, the Taliban, al-Qaeda, and other militants have found sanctuary in Pakistan's Federally Administered Tribal Areas (FATA) bordering Afghanistan, in which the central government exercises little control.

A September 2006 agreement legitimized Taliban power in the Waziristan region of the FATA, and militants have used the region as a staging post for attacks into Afghanistan.

US worries only increased following the resignation in August of Pakistani President Pervez Musharraf, considered by Washington to be a key ally in the war on terror. Elections to choose Musharraf's successor will be held Sep. 6, but US officials appear to have considerably less confidence in Asif Ali Zardari of the Pakistan People's Party (PPP), who is the heavy favorite in the elections.

Questions also swirl about whether Pakistan's incoming civilian government will be able to exert control over the military, which has traditionally been highly autonomous, and the country's powerful Inter-Services Intelligence Directorate (ISI).

In a move that appeared designed to win US confidence, the Pakistani military launched an airpower offensive against the Taliban in the Bajaur region of the tribal areas in August. The campaign has been credited with killing hundreds of Taliban, but has also displaced an estimated 200,000 civilians, according to the International Committee of the Red Cross. This past week, the government declared that it would halt the campaign during the month of Ramadan.

The Taliban retaliated for the government offensive with an Aug. 21 suicide bombing at an arms factory outside Islamabad that killed over 60 people.

This past summer, US officials have begun to confront Pakistan more openly over the militants issue. In July, a CIA official traveled to Islamabad with evidence linking the ISI to the Jul. 7 bombing of the Indian embassy in Kabul.

In late August, Adm. Mike Mullen, chairman of the US Joint Chiefs of Staff, met with Gen. Ashfaq Kayani, chief of staff of the Pakistani Army, aboard an aircraft carrier in the Indian Ocean to discuss strategies for reining in militants in the tribal areas.

Several other prominent US and NATO military officials were present at the meeting, including Gen. David Petraeus, currently the top US commander in Iraq and soon to become head of CENTCOM – the military command overseeing Pakistan and Afghanistan.

US officials told the New York Times that potential unilateral US operations within the tribal areas were not discussed at the meeting. But other officials suggested to the Times that Wednesday's raid was not a mistake or aberration, but rather the product of a concerted decision within the US military hierarchy.

"There's potential to see more [such operations]," one official told the Times.

On Aug. 23, the Los Angeles Times reported that top US military officials have been resistant to the idea of direct military operations in Pakistan, preferring to send trainers to work with the Pakistani military. CIA counterterrorism officials, on the other hand, have been the primary advocates of direct operations.

Wednesday's raid, however, may signal that that dynamic has shifted, and that the military brass has been convinced of the necessity of direct military intervention.

If the raid does in fact mark the beginning of a new US policy in the tribal areas, it is expected to considerably complicate US relations with the Pakistani government.

C. Christine Fair, a South Asia specialist at the RAND Corporation, suggested that the raid did mark a policy shift, and cautioned about the potential consequences of the new strategy.

"Without integrating these attacks within a wider Pakistan strategy – which the US government does not have – we risk a serious blowback which could make things worse, not better," Fair told IPS. "Ninety percent of our logistics still move through Karachi port, so attacking Pakistani targets when we are still dependent on them makes little sense."

Bruce Riedel, a former CIA officer now at the Brookings Institution, argued last month that the US should be willing to use force against "very high value targets" in Pakistan, but cautioned against "loose talk about larger military options."

"The notion of moving NATO forces into the FATA is crazy," Riedel said at a Brookings panel. "We will only spread the cancer deeper into Pakistan...Talk about these issues is extraordinarily counterproductive. It only feeds the paranoia and conspiracy theories of the Pakistani political milieu."

(Inter Press Service)
 
 
Find this article at:
http://www.antiwar.com/ips/luban.php?articleid=13415 
 

Offline bigron

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Re: Civil War is being Incited in Pakistan - a new murderous phase begins
« Reply #43 on: September 05, 2008, 07:56:04 AM »
Opening the Gates of Hell in Pakistan

The Soft Surge

By M. JUNAID LEVESQUE-ALAM

http://www.counterpunch.org/junaid09042008.html

When I was younger, my family would visit Pakistan during summer vacations. In the teeming port city of Karachi, I often went with my uncle to the local bazaar, where merchants and browsers haggled fiercely over prices underneath tan tents.

To conceal my American upbringing, I wore pants in the oppressive heat (shorts were derided as "underwear" at the time), grew my hair out of its crew-cut shape, and avoided slipping into English. If the merchants pegged me as a foreigner, my uncle warned, they would be less willing to field questions about their wares and more eager to sell them at high prices.

Today, American leaders surveying options in the region display even less prudence than a child in an unfamiliar marketplace. They openly speak the language of violence, fail to ask necessary questions, and evince little concern about the costs of their decisions.

Barack Obama, emulating previous Democrats' attempts to outflank Republicans from the right on foreign policy, calls the Pakistan-Afghanistan border the "central front in the war on terror" and pledges to send more troops. John McCain, a modern-day Captain Ahab if there ever was one, soon followed suit with vows to hunt down bin Laden at "the gates of hell." Secretary Gates, whose military boasts a budget bigger than the next 21 nations' combined, announced a $20 billion effort to erase enemies who have danced circles around his army in $2 sandals.

In a sense, the proposed "soft surge" is understandable. The Iraq disaster has made almost any military venture seem wise by comparison, and no one doubts that Al-Qaeda and the Taliban are gaining ground quickly in the tribal belt.

But in pressing and prodding Pakistan to take greater military action alongside America, U.S. leaders reveal just how little they know about the country and the path to lasting peace.

Does the civilian government - whose "cooperation" we seek in the intensified fight - possess any real authority? What are the priorities of Pakistan's perennially-looming institution, the army? Why should ordinary Pakistanis back an escalating war against some of their own?

Failing to answer - let alone pose - such basic questions is an open invitation to a second Iraq.

The civilian leadership's wavering commitment in the war has American elites seething. Unable to fathom why their Pakistani "allies" do not advance like pawns in a game of chess, they miss the larger point: there is no chessboard.

A nation of 170 million people, Pakistan is deeply fractured, war or no war. Loosely bound together only by religion, the people are separated by region, culture, language, and ethnicity. Sindhis, Balochis, Pashtuns, and Punjabis are generally more concerned with local and tribal rather than national interests.

Non-Punjabis harbor bitterness toward Punjab for its unequal dispensation of resources and its command of the army - an army which lost half the country in an unjust campaign against Bengalis in East Pakistan, now Bangladesh, in 1971.

Most Pakistanis are worried about their immediate survival, which the federal government does little to address. The literacy rates stand at 55% and 29% for men and women, respectively. People depend heavily on local contacts and connections, with little sense of allegiance to the federal government.

This is true even among the middle class. Housing, university positions, and government jobs all depend heavily on local ties. Even the smallest matters do not escape the long shadow of nepotism: for one trip back home on the nationally-owned airline, my father had to rely on the favors of a family connection just to make sure our seats on the plane were not "given away" to someone else. My father found the whole affair unpalatable, but in the absence of honest government, what are the alternatives?

None are offered by Pakistan's present leadership. Though it never ceases to remind anyone within earshot of its "democratic" credentials, the "new" government would be mistaken for a troupe of rotating circus clowns anywhere else. After throwing Musharraf overboard with threats of corruption charges, the leaders of the two main parties, Nawaz Sharif and Asif Zardari, recently split because of a dispute over judges who might confront Zardari with—what else—corruption charges. Sharif, dislodged from power by Musharraf in a bloodless coup nine years ago, has himself faced corruption charges.

The scene is so dispiriting that much of the middle class simply ignores politics altogether. My mother's side of the family, all educated and solidly middle-class, have to my recollection never evinced interest in any of the parties in light of the transparent hankering for power displayed by the politicians.

Against this backdrop, the government's cachet among its people is limited. The notion that such a fragile institution, beset by incompetence, invisibility, and cronyism, can simply wave its hands in the air and convince its citizens to become an appendage of the U.S. "war on terror" is a wild fantasy.

The government's ability to make a case for war is also hampered by the intelligence service (ISI) and its military sponsor - another major organ of power the U.S. has failed to understand.

Just after September 11th, understanding was irrelevant: America handed Musharraf an ultimatum to back the "war on terror" and he complied. But all that is old news now and America finds itself frustrated with the Pakistan army's ambivalence in serving as America's most poorly-paid mercenary force.

The army's stance is prompted by two concerns: its own interests and the nation's interests, which are not identical but nonetheless overlap.

As is well-known, the ISI developed its prestige and power during the tenure of Islamist military dictator Zia ul-Haq, who found generous American backing and financial support for his role in the jihad against the Soviet invasion in the 1980s. Less well-known is the timing of American-backed intervention: six months before the Soviets actually invaded, when the fledgling Marxist government was trying to enact crucial reforms to protect women and wrest natural resources from the control of warlords.

Once the Soviets were defeated, America's interest in the country's "freedom" evaporated and it began lending tacit support to the ISI's backing of the Taliban.

Like any unaccountable institution, the ISI developed breathtaking rationales for defending the indefensible. According to the doctrine of "strategic depth", arch-rival India had to be contained, and its access to Central Asia curtailed, through the insertion of Islamist proxies in this key conduit country.

Sections of the military still cling to this doctrine despite its manifest absurdity. Far from achieving strategic depth in Afghanistan, Pakistan has become a victim of the strategic depth achieved by Islamists, who have struck its soldiers and assets with a level of impunity India would dare not dream of.

Nonetheless, the U.S. cannot bully the Pakistani military into abandoning its militant ties. According to veteran journalist Ahmed Rashid's new book, Descent into Chaos, Musharraf decided to retain Pakistan's only - albeit unwieldy - form of leverage when he surmised that America was more interested in pursuing neoconservative pipe dreams in Iraq than in rebuilding Afghanistan.

Rashid also writes that the Pakistani military harbors great enmity toward Afghan President Hamid Karzai, who has presided over business deals with India, and who was once banished from Pakistan for his anti-Taliban stance.

The lesson is clear. Without guarantees and concessions - such as opportunities in Afghan reconstruction - the Pakistani military has no incentive to ease its obsession over Indian ambitions or to abandon its sole means of countering those ambitions: the militants and the chaos they create.

Even the military, however, ultimately bows to another master: the masses. The clamor to see Musharraf ousted, muddily refracted in the platform of the civilian politicians, forced the generals to stand aside as one of their own was removed.

America, too, must pay heed to the street if it wants to win genuine support for the war. And yet, it does little more than mouth platitudes about "the Pakistani people." Although most Pakistanis take a dim view of the Taliban - the secularists decisively won the NWFP regional elections - their view of American policy is even dimmer.

This is not without reason. The one uniting factor among Pakistanis is religion, and America's attitude towards Muslims has few defenders outside of those aching to strike Muslim countries. Unrelenting support for Israel's brutality toward Palestinians is a source of enduring anger. That this support might be occasioned by the pressure of entrenched pro-Israeli lobbies, rather than some fleeting and correctable prejudice, inspires little hope for a fair American foreign policy among Muslims anywhere. The record of atrocities in Iraq and the betrayal of American's own values at Guantanamo scarcely require mention.

Pakistanis also have more immediate grievances. America supported Musharraf the dictator so long as he fought "America's war." It poured billions of dollars into military coffers but gave almost nothing to strengthen Pakistan's civil society or infrastructure. Hundreds of innocent Pakistanis have been illegally rounded up and disappeared by their own government because of American pressure to capture terrorists.

The oft-repeated American vow, "We will fight the terrorists abroad so that we don't have to fight them in our own streets," has but one meaning to most Pakistanis: the fight will take place in their streets, at the expense of their security, jeopardizing their lives. The stark slogans' implications have already been realized for about 200,000 Pakistanis forced to flee the north, where "their" army has tried to smash flies with sledgehammers.

Predictions in the world of politics are a fool's venture, but it is not hard to see where things are headed. Unwilling to look seriously at Pakistan's needs, America sees only one reality: the presence of terrorists and an absence of action.

One might offer a few obligatory words about the need to build schools, hospitals, and roads in Pakistan - combating terror without inflicting more terror. But why bother? Can a government that stared blankly as one of its own cities drowned really be moved to invest in the well-being of a foreign people?

As my uncle would sometimes say to merchants at the bazaar, that is asking too much.

M. Junaid Levesque-Alam blogs about America and Islam at Crossing the Crescent and writes about American Muslim identity for WireTap magazine. He can be reached at: junaidalam1 AT gmail.com.


Offline KingNeil

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Re: U.S. ground operation in Pakistan! Pentagon employees confirm
« Reply #44 on: September 05, 2008, 04:13:55 PM »
Yet another profitable war of centralisation of power for the establishment.

They want to control every country in the world, starting from the least powerful, so that there can be no unexpected world events. They want power over EVERYTHING and every event in the world.

Offline David Rothscum

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Re: Civil War is being Incited in Pakistan - a new murderous phase begins
« Reply #45 on: September 05, 2008, 06:43:14 PM »
Seems to me that Malik knows what's going on:http://www.thenews.com.pk/daily_detail.asp?id=134078
Neighbours supporting, financing militants: Rehman
Saturday, September 06, 2008
By our correspondent

NOWSHERA: Adviser to the Prime Minister on Interior Rehman Malik on Friday held the neighbouring countries responsible for the prevailing unrest and violence in Swat and parts of the Federally Administered Tribal Areas (Fata).

He expressed these views while talking to reporters following his meeting with Maulana Samiul Haq, chief of his own faction of the Jamiat Ulema-e-Islam (JUI-S), to seek support for Asif Ali Zardari in Saturday's presidential election.

"We want cordial and friendly relations with Afghanistan," Rehman said, adding that both the countries could play a vital role to get rid of extremism and terrorism. Rehman Malik warned the neighbouring countries to stop supporting and financing the militants. He said Pakistan was capable of dealing with miscreants in the troubled areas.

Commenting on the ongoing operation in the Bajaur Agency, Rehman Malik said the operation will continue in Swat and the Bajaur Agency until the writ of the government was established in these areas.

"The government will not allow anybody to challenge its writ," he maintained. He said the situation in Bajaur was now returning to normalcy and advised the internally displaced persons (IDPs) to go back to their respective areas. He added that the country was going through a critical situation and urged all the political forces to unite and help the country steer out of crises. About the ongoing clashes between the warring groups in the Kurram Agency, Rehman Malik said the rival groups had been given the last warning to halt attacking each other.

Offline bigron

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Re: Civil War is being Incited in Pakistan - a new murderous phase begins
« Reply #46 on: September 06, 2008, 08:48:19 AM »
Pakistan blocks fuel to US forces 
 
 http://english.aljazeera.net/news/asia/2008/09/2008967658362588.html


Oil tankers were stranded at the border in Torkham .
 
Pakistan has reportedly blocked a major fuel supply route for Western forces in Afghanistan in response to a raid by US forces in northwest Pakistan earlier this week, the defence minister said.

US forces attacked suspected fighter groups inside Pakistani territory on Wednesday, killing 20 people including women and children, Pakistani officials said, drawing a furious response from the Pakistani government.

Chaudhry Ahmed Mukhtar, Pakistan's defence minister, said on Saturday: "We have told them that we will take action and we have already taken action today.

"We have stopped the supply of oil and this will tell how serious we are," he told Pakistan's Dawn Television.

Nato has not confirmed the reports.

The fuel supplies have reportedly been blocked from crossing through the main crossing at Torkham on the Pakistani-Afghan border near Peshawar, the capital of North West Frontier Province.

More than 20 heavily-loaded vehicles, including oil tankers, were stranded at the border in Torkham following the government decision.

Energy vulnerability

A senior government official told Pakistan's Dawn news that an order came "from Islamabad and the Frontier Corps has been asked to stop oil supplies to Nato forces forthwith".

But another official told Dawn in Peshawar that no decision to suspend oil supplies had come from Islamabad, saying instead it was taken at the local level in view of increased fighter activities in the Khyber region.

"Why would Pakistan suspend oil supplies due to increased US attacks in the region? It goes against conventional wisdom," he said.

"Torkham highway has become extremely dangerous due to militancy in Jamrud and Landi Kotal. The administration needs to beef up security of the highway.

"When we have enough troops on the ground to ensure safety of oil tankers, the supplies would be allowed to go through," he told Dawn.

Most fuel and other supplies for US forces in Afghanistan are transported through Pakistan, crossing the border at two points - Torkham and Chaman, to the southwest.

The Chaman crossing, where supplies bound for foreign forces in the south of Afghanistan, particularly Kandahar, was operating normally on Saturday.

In April, Russia agreed to allow Nato to transport non-lethal supplies through its territory and into northern Afghanistan.

Ground assault

Wednesday's pre-dawn ground assault on the village of Angor Adda in South Waziristan on the Afghan border was the first known incursion into Pakistan by US troops since the invasion of Afghanistan in 2001.

Pakistan has been a close US ally. The US has tens of thousands of soldiers fighting in the area.

The US has claimed that al-Qaeda and pro-Taliban fighters live in sanctuaries in northwest Pakistan's ethnic Pashtun tribal areas, where they organise attacks in Afghanistan.

The US has not officially acknowledged any involvement in Wednesday's raid.

Pakistan's envoy to the US said on Friday the raid had failed to capture anyone important and helped fighters by enraging the Pakistani public.

While Wednesday's attack was the first known ground assault, there have been numerous air attacks within Pakistan, many carried out by US-operated pilotless drone aircrafts.

Two such attacks occurred this week. About nine fighters were killed by missiles fired by suspected drones in the northwest on Thursday and Friday.

General Tariq Majid, chairman of Pakistan's joint chiefs of staff committee, said on Friday that cross-border strikes would alienate ethnic Pashtuns.
 
 Source: Agencies 
 

Offline bigron

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Re: Civil War is being Incited in Pakistan - a new murderous phase begins
« Reply #47 on: September 06, 2008, 10:20:43 AM »
US attack inside Pakistan threatens dangerous new war

By Peter Symonds

http://www.wsws.org/articles/2008/sep2008/paki-s05.shtml

05/09/08 "WSW" -- - A ground assault by US Special Forces troops on a Pakistani village on Wednesday threatens to expand the escalating Afghanistan war into its neighbour. Pakistan is already confronting a virtual civil war in its tribal border regions as the country’s military, under pressure from Washington, seeks to crush Islamist militias supporting the anti-occupation insurgency inside Afghanistan.

The attack, which left up to 20 civilians dead, marks a definite escalation of US operations inside Pakistan. While US Predator drones and war planes have been used previously to bomb targets, Wednesday’s raid was the first clear case of an assault by American ground troops inside Pakistani territory. The White House and Pentagon have refused to comment on the incident but various unnamed US officials have acknowledged to the media that the raid took place and indicated that there could be more to come.

The attack was unprovoked. US troops landed by helicopter in the village of Jalal Khei in South Waziristan at around 3 a.m. and immediately targetted three houses. The engagement lasted for about 30 minutes and left between 15 and 20 people dead, including women and children.

A US official acknowledged to CNN that there may have been women and children in the immediate vicinity but when the mission began “everyone came out firing from the compound”. Even this flimsy justification for a naked act of aggression is probably a lie. “It was very terrible as all of the residents were killed while asleep,” a villager Din Mohammad told the Pakistan-based International News.

The newspaper provided details of the dead and injured: nine family members of Faujan Wazir, including four women, two children and three men; Faiz Mohammad Wazir, his wife and two other family members; and Nazar Jan and his mother. Two other members of Nazar Jan’s family were seriously wounded.

The US and international media have described the Angoor Adda area around the village as “a known stronghold of the Taliban and Al Qaeda” but offered no evidence to support the claim. A villager, Jabbar Wazir, told the International News: “All of those killed were poor farmers and had nothing to do with the Taliban.”

In comments to the International Herald Tribune, a senior Pakistani official branded the raid a “cowboy action” that had failed to capture or kill any senior Al Qaeda or Taliban leader. “If they had gotten anyone big, they would be bragging about it,” he commented.

The attack has provoked outrage in Pakistan. Pakistan’s Foreign Ministry issued a statement branding the attack as “a gross violation of Pakistan territory” and summoned US ambassador Anne Patterson to provide an explanation. North West Frontier Province (NWFP) governor Owais Ahmed Ghani declared that “the people expect that the armed forces of Pakistan would rise to defend the sovereignty of the country”. He put the number killed at 20.

Pakistani military spokesman Major General Athar Abbas said the raid was “completely counterproductive” and risked provoking an uprising even among those tribesmen who have previously supported the army’s operations in the border areas.

The International News reported: “Angry villagers later blocked the main road between Pakistan and Afghanistan in Angoor Adda by placing the bodies of their slain tribesmen on the road. They chanted slogans against the US and NATO military authorities for crossing the border without any provocation and killing innocent people.”

The US raid has compounded the political crisis inside Pakistan, where the selection of a new president is due to take place tomorrow. The ruling Pakistan Peoples Party (PPP) has been engaged in a delicate balancing act—continuing to support US demands for a crackdown by the Pakistani military along the border with Afghanistan, while trying to defuse widespread anger and fend off accusations that it is a US puppet.

Reaffirming his support for the Bush administration’s bogus “war on terror”, PPP presidential candidate Asif Ali Zardari declared in a column in yesterday’s Washington Post: “We stand with the United States, Britain, Spain and others who have been attacked.” Zardari went on to promise that he would ensure that Pakistani territory would not be used to launch raids on US and NATO forces inside Afghanistan.

However, as PPP spokesman Farhatullah Babar explained, the US attack was politically compromising. “We have been very clear that any action on this side of the border must be taken by Pakistani forces themselves,” he told the Associated Press. “It is very embarrassing for the government. The people will start blaming the government of Pakistan.”

An expanded war

The decision to launch Wednesday’s attack was undoubtedly taken at the top levels of the White House and Pentagon. As the New York Times reported in articles earlier this year, a high-level debate has been taking place in Washington over the use of US Special Forces inside Pakistan as well as the intensification of existing CIA operations, which include Predator missile strikes.

A meeting in early January involved Vice President Dick Cheney, Secretary of State Condoleezza Rice, Joint Chiefs of Staff chairman Admiral Mike Mullen and top national security and intelligence officials advisers. According to the New York Times on January 6, options discussed included “loosening restrictions on the CIA to strike selected targets in Pakistan” and operations involving US Special Operations forces, such as the Navy Seals.

The Times reported on January 27 that then Pakistani President Pervez Musharraf rejected proposals put by US Director of National Intelligence Mike McConnell and CIA Director Michael Hayden for an expanded American combat presence in Pakistan, either through covert CIA missions or joint operations with Pakistani security forces. While apparently accepting the refusal, the US intensified pressure on Pakistan to bring its border areas under control.

As the anti-occupation insurgency has expanded in Afghanistan, claiming a growing number of US and NATO casualties, Pakistan has become a convenient scapegoat. Washington has repeatedly accused the Pakistani military of failing to suppress Islamist militia and alleged that Pakistani military intelligence is actively supporting anti-US guerrillas inside Afghanistan.

Admiral Mullen has held five meetings since February with his Pakistani counterpart, army chief General Ashfaq Parvez Kayani, to press for tougher action. The most recent took place last weekend aboard the aircraft carrier USS Abraham Lincoln, stationed in the Arabian Sea. In comments to CNN, a US official “declined to say” whether there were any new agreements for US troops to operate inside Pakistani airspace or on the ground to attack Taliban and Al Qaeda.

Whether the Pakistani military quietly approved Wednesday’s attack or not, the Bush administration is making clear that it intends to extend the war into Pakistan. Citing top American officials, the New York Times reported on Wednesday that the raid “could be the opening salvo in a much broader campaign by Special Operations forces against the Taliban and Al Qaeda inside Pakistan, a secret plan that Defence Secretary Robert Gates has been advocating for months within President George W. Bush’s war council”.

This utterly reckless policy, which risks the eruption of a US war against Pakistan, is bipartisan in character. In fact, Democratic presidential candidate Barack Obama has repeatedly declared his support for broadening the “war on terror” through unilateral US attacks on insurgents based inside Pakistan. His candidacy has been strongly backed by sections of the US establishment that have been critical of the Bush administration’s invasion of Iraq for undermining US interests. Far from opposing aggressive US military action, Obama has become the political vehicle for shifting its focus to Afghanistan and Pakistan as the means of advancing US strategic interests in Central Asia and the Indian subcontinent.

The US attack on the village of Jalal Khei is another demonstration that the shift in policy, with all its potentially catastrophic consequences, is already underway.

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Offline bigron

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Re: Civil War is being Incited in Pakistan - a new murderous phase begins
« Reply #48 on: September 06, 2008, 10:52:48 AM »
Pakistan cuts supply lines to NATO troops in Afghanistan

Posted September 5, 2008
http://news.antiwar.com/2008/09/05/pakistan-cuts-supply-lines-to-nato-troops-in-afghanistan/


In a move seen as the latest fallout from Wednesday morning’s US attack on South Waziristan, the Pakistani government has ordered that supply lines to NATO troops in Afghanistan be immediately severed for an indefinite period of time.

The move comes as thousands of protesters marched through South Waziristan’s capital of Wana chanting “death to America”. Officials cited repeated attacks which had made it difficult to provide security for transportation across the only border crossing, but Pakistani media cited other sources who said the move came as the government feared retaliation from South Waziristan tribesmen if they didn’t respond to the US attack.

The strike, which was the first confirmed use of US ground forces in Pakistan since the 2001 invasion of Afghanistan, killed 20 civilians and received widespread condemnation in Pakistan’s government. American officials have suggested that the attack is just the first of many cross-border missions to be expected in the coming months, as the US has expressed growing discontent with Pakistan’s inability to control its long and mountainous border with Afghanistan. The Defense Minister of key NATO ally Germany was also critical of the US attack during his visit to Pakistan, and warned that “Pakistan’s territorial integrity has to be respected”.

With Pakistan’s sole ground link to Afghanistan now closed to them, NATO may be more reliant than ever on Russia for the transportation of non-military supplies to the war-torn country at a time when US-Russian relations are at a post-Cold War low. And while Russia has promised not to block NATO’s overland transport, President Bush’s threat to “punish” Moscow over the recent war with Georgia may put the route in further jeopardy.

compiled by Jason Ditz [email the author]


Offline David Rothscum

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Re: Civil War is being Incited in Pakistan - a new murderous phase begins
« Reply #49 on: September 06, 2008, 11:00:39 AM »
The move comes as thousands of protesters marched through South Waziristan’s capital of Wana chanting “death to America”. Officials cited repeated attacks which had made it difficult to provide security for transportation across the only border crossing, but Pakistani media cited other sources who said the move came as the government feared retaliation from South Waziristan tribesmen if they didn’t respond to the US attack.
Remember, this is the place where Obama wants to sent troops to. Can you see where this is going? We'd be out of Afghanistan by 2003 as well...

EvadingGrid

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Re: Civil War is being Incited in Pakistan - a new murderous phase begins
« Reply #50 on: September 06, 2008, 11:08:57 AM »
Remember, this is the place where Obama wants to sent troops to. Can you see where this is going? We'd be out of Afghanistan by 2003 as well...

In the hysteria of pulling the troops out of Iraq, people forget that St.O-bum-a is not going to bring the troops home, but move them into Pakistan....

Pakistan is at the centre of all of this . . .

Tim Osman (aka Osama Bin Laden) was last seen attending a military hospital in pakistan in 2003, when he was staying as a guest of the US Diplomatic Core. - According to a first hand witness i interviewd.

Offline David Rothscum

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Re: Civil War is being Incited in Pakistan - a new murderous phase begins
« Reply #51 on: September 06, 2008, 11:33:26 AM »
In the hysteria of pulling the troops out of Iraq, people forget that St.O-bum-a is not going to bring the troops home, but move them into Pakistan....

Pakistan is at the centre of all of this . . .

Tim Osman (aka Osama Bin Laden) was last seen attending a military hospital in pakistan in 2003, when he was staying as a guest of the US Diplomatic Core. - According to a first hand witness i interviewd.

True. He'll send more troops to Afghanistan and a bunch into Pakistan. I think Osama is dead though. He looked very weak in his last real video's in late 2001, I doubt he lasted very long afterwards. He likely had Marfan syndrome, judging from his build and heart problems, he needed dialysis every 3 days, and is said to have been diabetic. He basically had every soft kill disease you can think of. All the video's after 2001 show him magically recovering, his beard goes black again, he moves his whole body again etc. They probably have a dozen doubles that Obama will be able to claim are him when he goes into Pakistan though.

Offline Biggs

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Re: Civil War is being Incited in Pakistan - a new murderous phase begins
« Reply #52 on: September 07, 2008, 10:31:41 AM »
more slaughter

Bomber hits Pakistani checkpoint
 
Peshawar hospitals have been inundated with wounded people


At least 30 people have been killed in a suicide car bomb attack in Pakistan, officials say.

The attack - at a paramilitary checkpoint 20km from the north-western city of Peshawar - comes as elections for president are under way.

About 70 people were also wounded by the blast, most of them civilians, reports said.

The attack comes after three days of continuous raids and airstrikes by US-led forces in Pakistan's tribal areas.

Five police officers were among those killed, said Peshawar police chief Muhammad Suleman.

A BBC correspondent says the attack happened close to a market by the checkpoint.

The powerful explosion destroyed part of the market, trapping many people under the debris, officials say.

Witnesses told the BBC the attack had been carried out by a suicide bomber in a pick-up truck.

"I saw the vehicle park itself next to the market, and then it blew up", a roadside hotel owner told the BBC.
 


There was no immediate claim of responsibility for the bombing.

Television pictures showed wrecked vehicles and widespread destruction in the marketplace. The blast left a crater one-metre (3ft) deep.

At Lady Reading Hospital in Peshawar, medic Mohammad Idrees said they were treating people for multiple injuries.

"We have declared an emergency here," he said.

From his hospital bed, 15-year-old Sher Zaman told the AP news agency that he had been selling fruit from a cart at the market when he heard a large explosion and something hit him in the chest, knocking him flat.

He said residents quickly gathered and helped to ferry casualties to hospital.
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Offline Biggs

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Re: Civil War is being Incited in Pakistan - a new murderous phase begins
« Reply #53 on: September 07, 2008, 11:19:38 AM »
excellent article by Tariq Ali on Ali Asif Zardari the newly elected (appointed) president of Pakistan

http://forum.prisonplanet.com/index.php?topic=57454.0
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Offline Biggs

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Re: Civil War is being Incited in Pakistan - a new murderous phase begins
« Reply #54 on: September 07, 2008, 11:23:28 AM »
PAKISTAN: Tribal elders warn against incursions by US-led forces
Sarmad Qazi

http://www.uruknet.info/?p=m47024&hd=&size=1&l=e

Sunday, 7 September, 2008


"ONE more incursion into the Pakistani territory by the US-led occupying forces in Afghanistan and we will retaliate", a senior member of the Pakistani coalition government said yesterday.


Speaking to Gulf Times during a telephone interview from Islamabad, Munir Khan Orakzai, who is the member of Pakistan’s National Assembly from the tribal Kurram Agency, said: "We (the FATA members) have been promised by the government, including Asif Zardari, that if there is another attack on our land from anyone, we must exercise the right to retaliate."

Last week, in an unprecedented step, Nato forces launched a land raid in one of the seven Pakistani tribal agencies bordering Afghanistan, killing civilians. Previously air strikes from either the Nato or coalition forces (ISAF) into the Pakistani territory had been registered.

"The government is preparing a letter, that will be sent by the National Security adviser to the Prime Minister, Major Mahmood Ali Durrani, to the American administration soon, detailing our stance," said Orakzai, who added that he and members of parliament from the FATA are "under tremendous pressure from their constituents who continue to ask why they are being bombarded."
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Offline bigron

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Re: Civil War is being Incited in Pakistan - a new murderous phase begins
« Reply #55 on: September 08, 2008, 06:57:42 AM »
U.S. drones kill 13 in missile attack in Pakistan

Mon Sep 8, 2008 5:36am EDT
By Haji Mujtaba
http://www.reuters.com/article/worldNews/idUSISL24250220080908?feedType=nl&feedName=usmorningdigest


MIRANSHAH, Pakistan (Reuters) - Missiles fired by U.S. drones killed 13 people, including 7 foreign militants, on Monday in a Pakistani village where a religious school founded by an old friend of Osama bin Laden is located, intelligence officials and witnesses said.

"There were two drones and they fired three missiles," said a resident of Dandi Darpakheil, a village in the North Waziristan tribal region near the Afghan border.

A military official said a house and madrasa founded by Taliban commander Jalaluddin Haqqani were the targets.

Haqqani is a veteran commander of the U.S.-backed Afghan war against Soviet invasion in the 1970s and 1980s, and his links with bin Laden go back to the late 80s.

An intelligence official said six civilians and seven foreign militants had been killed in the attack but the nationality of the foreigners could not immediately be established.

"Both Uzbeks as well as Arabs were living in the house and adjacent guest house. Six people were killed but we don't know their identity," the official said on condition of anonymity.

Fifteen to 20 wounded people, most of them women and children, had been taken to main hospital of Miranshah, the main town of North Waziristan, doctors said.

One of Haqqani's younger sons said his father and another son, Sirajuddin, were nowhere near when the attack took place.

While the senior Haqqani is believed to be in poor health and less active, Sirajuddin has been leading the Taliban faction.

"Haqqani and Sirajuddin were in Afghanistan at the time of the attack. They are alive," Badruddin, the commander's third son, told Reuters by telephone.

Badruddin said one of his aunts had been killed in the attack on the family home. He said six missiles had struck the house, which the family had owned for 30 years.

Residents said militants cordoned off the blitzed site.

Military spokesman Major-General Athar Abbas said an "incident" had taken place and its cause was being ascertained.

CLOSE LINKS WITH ISI

Haqqani has had close links with Pakistani intelligence agencies, notably the military Inter-Services Intelligence

(ISI).

The New York Times reported in July that the U.S. Central Intelligence Agency had given Prime Minister Yousaf Raza Gilani evidence of the ISI's involvement with Haqqani along with evidence of ISI connections to a suicide bombing at the Indian embassy in Kabul that killed nearly 60 people on July 7.

Pakistan's new president, Asif Ali Zardari, was due to be sworn in on Tuesday, after sweeping a vote on Saturday by legislators in parliament's two chambers and four provincial assemblies.

Zardari, who forced former army chief Pervez Musharraf to step down last month after nine years in power, has vowed to defeat the Taliban and support the West's mission in Afghanistan.

But the civilian government has to pay more heed to public opinion than Musharraf did in a country rife with anti-American sentiment.

U.S.-led forces recently stepped up cross-border attacks against al Qaeda and Taliban targets in Pakistani tribal areas.

Commandos carried out a helicopter-borne ground assault in South Waziristan on Wednesday, the first known incursion into Pakistan by U.S. troops since the 2001 invasion of Afghanistan.

Pakistani officials said 20 people, including women and children, had been killed in the U.S. attack which drew a furious response from the government.

A day later, four Islamist militants were killed and five wounded in a missile attack in North Waziristan, believed to have been launched by a U.S. drone aircraft.

Intelligence officials and witnesses said five people had been killed in another suspected drone attack on Friday but the Pakistan military denied it.

Anger over the U.S. commando raid and repeated territorial violations prompted the government to partially block supply lines to Western forces in landlocked Afghanistan on Saturday.

Rehman Malik, the top Interior Ministry official, said on Monday the road was unblocked after a few hours, and that it had only been shut for security reasons, contrary to earlier comments by the defense minister that it was a response to the violations.

Separately, the army killed 10 militants in clashes in the northwestern Swat Valley on Sunday night, while police arrested a teenaged suicide bomber who had planned to attack army installations in the northwestern garrison town of Nowshera.

Thirty people were killed in a suicide car bomb attack in the nearby city of Peshawar on Saturday.

(Additional reporting by Alamgir Bitani, Syed Salahuddin and Kamran Haider)

(Writing by Zeeshan Haider; editing by Simon Cameron-Moore and Roger Crabb)


Offline bigron

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Re: Civil War is being Incited in Pakistan - a new murderous phase begins
« Reply #56 on: September 08, 2008, 07:25:42 AM »
Pakistan: The War Party's New Frontier
The more things change…

by Justin Raimondo
September 8, 2008
http://www.antiwar.com/justin/?articleid=13427

"What a world! What a world!" That's what the Wicked Witch of the West exclaimed as she melted in one of the final scenes of The Wizard of Oz, and today her plaintive cry seems the only possible reaction to the headlines reporting trouble every which way: Pakistan about to explode, the Taliban retaking Afghanistan, Iran spreading its influence deep into "liberated" Iraq, and a new cold war brewing in the steppes of the Caucasus. From Eastern Europe to the Far Eastern reaches of Central Asia, a storm is gathering. Whoever is president in 2009 is going to be facing some of the most dangerous crises since the Great War, when a single shot fired in Sarajevo sparked a global conflagration, giving rise to two world wars and the bloodiest century in the history of mankind.

The most serious eruption in this world of trouble at the moment is the crisis in Pakistan, where the corrupt Pakistan Peoples Party of the late Benazir Bhutto has taken power in the latest elections and governs in a very shaky coalition that is already threatening to rip apart. New President Asif Ali Zardari, the husband of the assassinated Bhutto, is known as "Mr. Ten Percent" on account of his reputation for corruption. He is being actively undermined by the Muslim opposition parties, and he enjoys very thin support throughout the country. Worse yet, his ascension to the presidency coincides with an upsurge in violence emanating from the Taliban, the tribal areas, and indigenous Muslim fundamentalist groups. The whole country looks about to burst apart at the seams, with U.S. policymakers no doubt already nostalgic for Gen. Pervez Musharraf, the Pakistani strongman forced to step down because of his notable lack of "democratic" credentials.

As to whether Pakistan needs more democracy instead of more generals like old Mushie – who never hesitated to crack down when the cracking was called for – hardly seems debatable. The only question is whether or not the country can survive the next few months in one piece.

That is a vitally important question, as far as our national security is concerned, because of Pakistan's nuclear arsenal. Musharraf, America's best friend in the region, once stood guard at the gates of the nation's nukes, but no more. Now the avaricious Zardari, weak and corrupt, is all that stands between Osama bin Laden's friends in the region and a considerable arsenal of nuclear weapons. At this point, U.S. officials should be singing the chorus loud and clear: "Oh Mushie, won't you please come home!" It's too late for that, of course, although if I were Mushie, I'd answer with a song of my own: "Who's Sorry Now?"

There was a lot of pressure from the U.S. – particularly from the Democrats in Congress, such as Hillary Clinton and Joe Biden – to force Mushie out and to bring "democracy" to the country. Now the crisis created by U.S. interference needs to be "solved" by even more forceful intervention, and it somehow comes as no surprise that Pakistan is the preferred battlefield of Democratic presidential candidate Barack Obama, who once proposed invading the country and now gleefully points to cross-border raids into the tribal areas by U.S. forces as evidence that he was right all along.

Yet precedents set by the Bush administration hardly constitute evidence of rationality and deep thinking. These are, after all, the same people who led us to disaster in Iraq. Who's to say their policies – continued and expanded on by an Obama administration – won't do the same in Pakistan and Afghanistan? Indeed, that is precisely where we are headed.

The idea that the U.S. can invade and occupy Pakistan and Afghanistan just as it has invaded and occupied Iraq – albeit this time successfully – is perhaps the single most dangerous concept prevalent among partisan Democratic policy wonks and the politicians who heed their advice. Large-scale military action in Pakistan and a stepped-up war across the border in the Afghan south would dwarf our earlier error by several orders of magnitude.

The Pashtun people, who make up the great majority of anti-Western opposition forces in Pakistan's tribal areas and Afghanistan, have successfully resisted waves of invaders stretching back to ancient times. More recently, they defeated the British and the Russians, who sought to impose forms of colonial rule, and the list of the vanquished goes back to the time of Alexander. It is not for nothing that Afghanistan has been called "the boneyard of empires." If this history is too ancient to be considered relevant in our day and age, then one has to wonder: Have the Americans learned nothing from their Iraqi adventure?

Much is made of the Taliban's incursions into Pakistan, but this is nothing new. Tribal fighters have been crossing what is called the "Durand line" – established by British colonial authorities as the official border between Afghanistan and what was then British India – ever since it was demarcated by the British foreign secretary, Sir Mortimer Durand, in 1893. That Pashtuns live on both sides of this divide is a fact that has bedeviled the authorities in Pakistan since 1947, when the Afghan loya jirga declared the Durand line invalid. This region, like much of the rest of the world, is cursed with the legacy of colonial borders imposed by foreigners and fiercely resented.

These lines on a map are the cause of most of the wars occurring in the latter half of the 20th century. The Durand line has no legitimacy, and it is fading along with the memory of the imperial power that gave it force. There is no way that the Pashtuns, a majority in Afghanistan and the second largest ethnic group in Pakistan, are going to respect this crumbling remnant of Britain's imperial heyday.

Many of the same people who excoriate Bush's decision to invade Iraq are champing at the bit to launch a U.S. invasion of Pakistan, most of them partisan Democrats who support the ostensibly antiwar Barack Obama. They argue that this is the war we ought to have been fighting all along: Iraq was a diversion from fighting those who actually attacked us on 9/11, namely, Osama bin Laden and his al-Qaeda organization, who were last seen enjoying the hospitality of the Taliban.

Yet the Taliban is not al-Qaeda. The Taliban movement grew up as a reaction to the warlordism and lawlessness that plagued the country after the Soviets withdrew. The power vacuum was filled by characters who by no stretch of the imagination qualified for the title of "freedom fighter," as their American sponsors described them during the Cold War years.

The Taliban started as a movement among religious students who grew up in the refugee camps in Pakistan. In the chaos that followed the Soviet withdrawal and the rise of bandit gangs as the only "law" in the land, the Taliban – students educated in the madrassas of Pakistan, imbued with the strictures of a fanatical devotion to Sharia law – held out the promise of stability.

The first Taliban revolt and attempt to seize power was sparked by the taking of a young boy by a local warlord, to serve as the warlord's male concubine. Homosexuality is rampant in the region because of the unavailability of women, who live lives of seclusion strictly enforced by their male relatives. As long as it's kept quiet, it is allowed to flourish. However, this open display of impiety was too much for the deeply conservative rural population of Kandahar, and so, in 1994, the Taliban rose up, overthrew the warlord, and sparked a prairie fire that eventually enveloped the capital city of Kabul.

As the only organized alternative to warlords gone wild, the Taliban gained the one thing essential to all governments, everywhere, whether democratic or despotic, and that is legitimacy. Al-Qaeda had nothing to do with the coming of the Taliban to power. Bin Laden latched on to them in his search for refuge, which had taken him out of Sudan and into the wilds of Afghanistan – the leader of a small group of fringe fanatics who had no support in the Muslim world and no base anywhere other than the cave they chose to hide in.

Bin Laden gained enormous stature only in the wake of 9/11, and this is not, I contend, because he planned these terrorist acts, but because he got away with it – in spite of, or, perhaps, because of the massive and hurried U.S. invasion. The inspirer of the 9/11 terrorist attacks escaped under cover of the very war unleashed to destroy him, and he survives to this day, camouflaged by the chaos unleashed by our lumbering, thoughtless aggression.

Impelled by politics rather than a real desire to capture bin Laden and his followers, the U.S. government launched a showy act of "retribution." It had to be immediate, it had to be massive – and, by its very nature, it had to fail. Lost in the fog of war, bin Laden and his cohorts slipped out of the dragnet and into the popular imagination of Muslims worldwide as a heroic figure.

Consider an alternate history in which the U.S. authorities – instead of being driven by internal political considerations and the emotions of the moment – had refrained from launching an all-out attack, and instead, keeping bin Laden in their sights, had prepared a precision strike that would have cut off the head of the snake. We are reduced, today, to slashing at the monster's tail. Our insoluble problem is that each time we cut it off, it grows another in no time at all.

The irony and paradox of our eternal "war on terrorism" – whether waged by Republicans or Democrats – is that it is a great gift to bin Laden and his burgeoning legion of imitators worldwide. As in the 9/11 terrorist attacks, when our planes were used as weapons against us, al-Qaeda and its allies use our technological and military prowess against us. The very fighter jets that sow destruction in the hinterlands of Pakistan will reap a bumper crop of little Osamas – now one of the most popular names parents give to their male children across a wide swath of Pashtunistan and throughout the Muslim world.

Pakistan looks to be the War Party's new frontier. Now there's a phrase we haven't heard for a while, until very recently. It was first utilized by the administration of John F. Kennedy to prettify his program of statism at home and war abroad. Obama is often likened to Kennedy, in his youthful attractiveness and promise of "change" – but I'm afraid that, in the realm of foreign policy, there will be no new frontiers for the Obama administration, only old ones that have long since been explored and mapped. Which only goes to show, once again, the veracity of that old truism: the more things change, the more they remain the same.

~ Justin Raimondo
Copyright Antiwar.com

Offline Biggs

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Re: Civil War is being Incited in Pakistan - a new murderous phase begins
« Reply #57 on: September 09, 2008, 11:08:50 AM »
further to the article posted by Bigron above, the death toll has gone up to 23, and what is especially significant about this attack is that it is against jallaludin Haqqani's network, one which has previously not been attacked in FATA, given that they are far more powerful than Beitullah Mehsud's Tehrik e Talibani this could mean a very serious escalation in the FATA confilict

At Least 23 Killed as US Drones Attack School in North Waziristan
Jason Ditz, Antiwar.com

http://www.uruknet.info/?p=m47076&hd=&size=1&l=e


Posted September 8, 2008

Last Updated 9/8 3:05 PM EST


This morning two US Predator Drones attacked a small village two miles north of Miramshah in Pakistan’s North Waziristan Agency, killing at least 23 and wounding 20 others. Ten of those killed were said by officials to be militants, although a previous official was quoted as saying "no foreign militant was killed" in the strike. At least four women and two children were reported among the dead and most of the wounded are also reported to be women and children.

The attack centered on a religious school founded by Jalaluddin Haqqani, a religious scholar and veteran commander of the US-backed mujahideen who fought against the Soviet Union’s invasion of Afghanistan. Haqqani is well-connected in both militant and government circles, having been accused of ties with both al-Qaeda and Pakistan’s Inter-Services Intelligence by US officials.

Haqqani has recently been accused of a role in the bombing of India’s embassy in Kabul, and was also allegedly linked to an assassination attempt earlier this year against Afghan President Hamid Karzai. Incredibly enough, the United States attempted to install Haqqani as Prime Minister of Afghanistan, a position which he refused citing the number of Afghans killed in the 2001 invasion. Haqqani was reportedly in Afghanistan at the time of the attack.

The strike comes just days after an earlier US drone strike on another village not far from Miramshah, but on the Afghan side of the mountainous border, killed at least five civilians. It also comes less than a week after US ground troops killed 20 civilians in an attack on a village in South Waziristan, an action which led to widespread condemnation from Pakistan’s government and military, as well as anti-US protests among the tribesmen in the area. Pakistan’s government recently cut off supply lines to NATO troops in Afghanistan though there was some disagreement, even within the Pakistani government, whether this was in retaliation for last week’s South Waziristan attack. So far the only comment came from Pakistan’s military, who admitted the incident had occurred and said it was investigating the cause.
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Re: Civil War is being Incited in Pakistan - a new murderous phase begins
« Reply #58 on: September 09, 2008, 11:12:54 AM »
Having spoken to some one from Pakistan who was in the military, and has family in there security services the unfolding events hold no surprise. What is surprising is the level of knowledge difference between those with an education in pakistan and those in the west.

Offline Biggs

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Re: Civil War is being Incited in Pakistan - a new murderous phase begins
« Reply #59 on: September 09, 2008, 11:23:24 AM »
Having spoken to some one from Pakistan who was in the military, and has family in there security services the unfolding events hold no surprise. What is surprising is the level of knowledge difference between those with an education in pakistan and those in the west.


yes the level of ignorance about the state of Pakistan in the west is quite staggering, even on this forum many people do not realise how important the current events in FATA really are.
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Offline Biggs

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Re: Civil War is being Incited in Pakistan - a new murderous phase begins
« Reply #60 on: September 09, 2008, 11:56:37 AM »
as if he could say anything else, but the really dangerous part is that he may well give in to ALL demands made on him by the madmen in charge of the US and that woud lead certainly to a major Pakistan war, he is not a strong man liek Musharraf and does not look like he will be able to stand up to the US neocon cold warrior types

Zardari vows to fight militants
 
The two presidents said they would fight the region's problems together

http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/world/south_asia/7606110.stm

Pakistan's newly sworn-in president, Asif Ali Zardari, and Afghan President Hamid Karzai have said they will stand together to fight terrorism.


Mr Zardari said at a joint news conference shortly after he took the oath of office he had a "comprehensive plan" to fight Islamist militants.

Mr Zardari was swept to the presidency in a parliamentary vote following Pervez Musharraf's resignation.

He faces an economy in crisis and a rampant Islamist insurgency.

Mr Zardari's surprise decision to hold a joint news conference with Mr Karzai just a couple of hours after he was sworn in shows that the "war on terror" is his top priority, says the BBC's Syed Shoaib Hasan in Islamabad.

Many Pakistanis, who see inflation and a faltering economy as their main concerns, had been expecting a policy statement.

Domestic political troubles were also shunted aside in the question and answer session that seemed to focus more on sending positive messages to the international community, our correspondent says.

'Twins joined'

Mr Zardari paid tribute to his late wife, saying: "I accept the presidency of Pakistan in the name of... Benazir Bhutto. I accept this in her name and in the name of all the martyrs of democracy."

He took over leadership of the Pakistan People's Party (PPP) from her after she was assassinated in December.
   ASIF ALI ZARDARI
Widower of assassinated former PM Benazir Bhutto
Took over her PPP after her death in December
Spent 11 years in jail on corruption charges, but not convicted
Born in Karachi, 1955

Profile: Asif Ali Zardari
Zardari urged to tackle militants
Voices from unstable borders
Zardari inherits economic dilemma


With Mr Karzai at his side, Mr Zardari said: "Pakistan intends to work with you, along with you."

He said the government of Pakistan "already has a comprehensive plan" to fight militancy.

Mr Zardari dismissed questions about Pakistan's commitment to fighting Islamist militancy, saying he himself had been a victim of terrorism.

Pakistan and Afghanistan were like "twins joined" said Mr Karzai. "They are inseparable," he said, adding that they suffered "the same problems, the same evils."

He added: "Afghanistan will be there in each step that you take in our joint struggle for peace and prosperity in the region... in each step that you take in the war against terrorism."

In the past, Mr Karzai has accused Pakistan of not doing enough to stop militants crossing into Afghanistan to launch attacks.

But repairing relations with Afghanistan is just one of the tasks facing Pakistan's new president.

His greatest challenge will be how to develop an effective policy to deal with the Islamist insurgency, say analysts.

This will include dealing with an increasingly aggressive US ally, which has stepped up direct strikes against militant targets in Pakistan's border region.

India has welcomed the election of Asif Zardari but officials there question whether the military will allow a civilian president to run the country alongside a democratically-elected prime minister, correspondents say.

'Long live Bhutto'

Mr Zardari smiled nervously as he stumbled through his oath-taking ceremony as the 12th president of Pakistan, our correspondent says
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Re: Civil War is being Incited in Pakistan - a new murderous phase begins
« Reply #61 on: September 09, 2008, 11:59:30 AM »
/me reaches for his SUN GLASSES

Offline bigron

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Re: Civil War is being Incited in Pakistan - a new murderous phase begins
« Reply #62 on: September 11, 2008, 08:39:27 AM »
Thursday, September 11, 2008
14:49 Mecca time, 11:49 GMT   
News CENTRAL/S. ASIA 
http://english.aljazeera.net/news/asia/2008/09/200891121313843992.html

 
Pakistan condemns US attack 
 
 
Kayani said cross-border raids could backfire on the US 'war on terror' .
 
Pakistan's military chief has lashed out at the US air assault from Afghanistan that killed civilians inside Pakistan last week, saying his country's sovereignty would be defended "at all cost".

General Ashfaq Parvez Kayani warned that the cross-border raid into the South Waziristan region could backfire, stoking militancy in a region Washington regards as a haven for al-Qaeda and the Taliban.

"Falling for short-term gains while ignoring our long-term interest is not the right way forward," he said on Wednesday.

"The sovereignty and territorial integrity of the country will be defended at all cost and no external force is allowed to conduct operations inside Pakistan."

He added that Pakistan and US-led forces in Afghanistan had no agreement covering border operations.

Kayani's first public criticism of US policy is a measure of the sensitivity surrounding US military action on Pakistani soil.

Cross-border assaults

The US has long felt that Pakistan is not doing enough to combat the Taliban and al-Qaeda forces now operating on its soil.

According to the American newspaper the New York Times, George Bush, the US president, "secretly approved orders" to allow US special forces to carry out attacks inside Pakistan without the approval of the Pakistani government.

But Pakistani officials warn that any cross-border assaults by the US would only inflame tensions.

Kamal Matinuddin, a former lieutenant-general with the Pakistani Army, told Al Jazeera: "Any crossing of the border would mean the pressure on the Pakistani army to retaliate, the pressure on the newly elected government to retaliate would be there because no one is going to accept the presence of foreign forces on his soil.

"Although we may not retaliate in kind, certainly we can do so by stopping the logistics that are provided to the American forces through Pakistan.

"We can also perhaps find ways and means of not sharing the intelligence that the Americans very badly need."

Missile attack

On Monday, a US missile attack in the North Waziristan tribal region destroyed a school and houses associated with a veteran Taliban commander, killing 20 people, including some women and children.

Pakistani intelligence officials said four foreign fighters were also killed in the raid, three of them al-Qaeda commanders in Pakistan identified as Abu Qasim, Abu Hamza and Abu Haris, a newly-appointed leader for the group in the country.

The tribal belt is considered a possible hiding place for Osama bin Laden and Ayman al-Zawahiri, the al-Qaeda leaders.

The Pentagon has said that the US military was working closely with the Pakistanis on border security.

"We have a shared common interest with respect to terrorism and terrorist activities," Bryan Whitman, a Pentagon spokesman, said.

"Pakistan recognises the challenges that they have, and the United States is committed to helping allies counter terrorism."

Asked if, under Pervez Musharraf, the former Pakistani president and a US ally, Pakistan had ever turned a blind-eye to US military operations in Pakisatan, General Rashid Qureshi, who was a spokesperson for Musharraf, said there had never been any such tacit agreement.

"There were no actions that the United States forces could take in Pakistani territory. All actions that were to be taken - direct or indirect - inside Pakistani territory were to be taken by Pakistani forces," he said.
 
 Source: Al Jazeera and agencies 
 
 

Offline Biggs

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Re: Civil War is being Incited in Pakistan - a new murderous phase begins
« Reply #63 on: September 11, 2008, 09:17:27 AM »
Bush Said to Give Orders Allowing Raids in Pakistan
ERIC SCHMITT and MARK MAZZETTI

http://www.uruknet.info/?p=m47156&hd=&size=1&l=e


September 11, 2008

WASHINGTON
— President Bush secretly approved orders in July that for the first time allow American Special Operations forces to carry out ground assaults inside Pakistan without the prior approval of the Pakistani government, according to senior American officials.

The classified orders signal a watershed for the Bush administration after nearly seven years of trying to work with Pakistan to combat the Taliban and Al Qaeda, and after months of high-level stalemate about how to challenge the militants’ increasingly secure base in Pakistan’s tribal areas.

American officials say that they will notify Pakistan when they conduct limited ground attacks like the Special Operations raid last Wednesday in a Pakistani village near the Afghanistan border, but that they will not ask for its permission.

"The situation in the tribal areas is not tolerable," said a senior American official who, like others interviewed for this article, spoke on condition of anonymity because of the delicate nature of the missions. "We have to be more assertive. Orders have been issued."

The new orders reflect concern about safe havens for Al Qaeda and the Taliban inside Pakistan, as well as an American view that Pakistan lacks the will and ability to combat militants. They also illustrate lingering distrust of the Pakistani military and intelligence agencies and a belief that some American operations had been compromised once Pakistanis were advised of the details.

The Central Intelligence Agency has for several years fired missiles at militants inside Pakistan from remotely piloted Predator aircraft. But the new orders for the military’s Special Operations forces relax firm restrictions on conducting raids on the soil of an important ally without its permission.

Pakistan’s top army officer said Wednesday that his forces would not tolerate American incursions like the one that took place last week and that the army would defend the country’s sovereignty "at all costs."

It is unclear precisely what legal authorities the United States has invoked to conduct even limited ground raids in a friendly country. A second senior American official said that the Pakistani government had privately assented to the general concept of limited ground assaults by Special Operations forces against significant militant targets, but that it did not approve each mission.

The official did not say which members of the government gave their approval.

Any new ground operations in Pakistan raise the prospect of American forces being killed or captured in the restive tribal areas — and a propaganda coup for Al Qaeda. Last week’s raid also presents a major test for Pakistan’s new president, Asif Ali Zardari, who supports more aggressive action by his army against the militants but cannot risk being viewed as an American lap dog, as was his predecessor, Pervez Musharraf.

The new orders were issued after months of debate inside the Bush administration about whether to authorize a ground campaign inside Pakistan. The debate, first reported by The New York Times in late June, at times pitted some officials at the State Department against parts of the Pentagon that advocated aggressive action against Qaeda and Taliban targets inside the tribal areas.

Details about last week’s commando operation have emerged that indicate the mission was more intrusive than had previously been known.

According to two American officials briefed on the raid, it involved more than two dozen members of the Navy Seals who spent several hours on the ground and killed about two dozen suspected Qaeda fighters in what now appeared to have been a planned attack against militants who had been conducting attacks against an American forward operating base across the border in Afghanistan.

Supported by an AC-130 gunship, the Special Operations forces were whisked away by helicopters after completing the mission.

Although the senior American official who provided the most detailed description of the new presidential order would discuss it only on condition of anonymity, his account was corroborated by three other senior American officials from several government agencies, all of whom made clear that they supported the more aggressive approach.

Pakistan’s government has asserted that last week’s raid achieved little except killing civilians and stoking anti-Americanism in the tribal areas.

"Unilateral action by the American forces does not help the war against terror because it only enrages public opinion," said Husain Haqqani, Pakistan’s ambassador to Washington, during a speech on Friday. "In this particular incident, nothing was gained by the action of the troops."

As an alternative to American ground operations, some Pakistani officials have made clear that they prefer the C.I.A.’s Predator aircraft, operating from the skies, as a method of killing Qaeda operatives. The C.I.A. for the most part has coordinated with Pakistan’s government before and after it has launched missiles from the drone. On Monday, a Predator strike in North Waziristan killed several Arab Qaeda operatives.

A new American command structure was put in place this year to better coordinate missions by the C.I.A. and members of the Pentagon’s Joint Special Operations Command, made up of the Army’s Delta Force and the Navy Seals.

The move was intended to address frustration on the ground about different agencies operating under different marching orders. Under the arrangement, a senior C.I.A. official based at Bagram air base in Afghanistan was put in charge of coordinating C.I.A. and military activities in the border region.

Spokesmen for the White House, the Defense Department and the C.I.A. declined to comment on Wednesday about the new orders. Some senior Congressional officials have received briefings on the new authorities. A spokeswoman for Senator Carl Levin, a Michigan Democrat who leads the Armed Services Committee, declined to comment.

American commanders in Afghanistan have complained bitterly that militants use sanctuaries in Pakistan to attack American troops in Afghanistan.

"I’m not convinced we’re winning it in Afghanistan," Adm. Mike Mullen, the chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, told the House Armed Services Committee on Wednesday. "I am convinced we can."

Toward that goal, Admiral Mullen said he had ordered a comprehensive military strategy to address the border region between Pakistan and Afghanistan.

The commando raid last week and an increasing number of recent missile strikes are part of a more aggressive overall American campaign in the border region aimed at intensifying attacks on Al Qaeda and the Taliban in the waning months of the Bush administration, with less than two months to go before November elections.

State Department officials, as well as some within the National Security Council, have expressed concern about any Special Operations missions that could be carried out without the approval of the American ambassador in Islamabad.

The months-long delay in approving ground missions created intense frustration inside the military’s Special Operations community, which believed that the Bush administration was holding back as the Qaeda safe haven inside Pakistan became more secure for militants.

The stepped-up campaign inside Pakistan comes at a time when American-Pakistani relations have been fraying, and when anger is increasing within American intelligence agencies about ties between Pakistan’s Inter-Services Intelligence Directorate, known as the ISI, and militants in the tribal areas.

Analysts at the C.I.A. and other American spy and security agencies believe not only that the bombing of India’s embassy in Kabul, Afghanistan, in July by militants was aided by ISI operatives, but also that the highest levels of Pakistan’s security apparatus — including the army chief, Gen. Ashfaq Parvez Kayani — had knowledge of the plot.

"It’s very difficult to imagine he was not aware," a senior American official said of General Kayani.

American intelligence agencies have said that senior Pakistani national security officials favor the use of militant groups to preserve Pakistan’s influence in the region, as a hedge against India and Afghanistan.

In fact, some American intelligence analysts believe that ISI operatives did not mind when their role in the July bombing in Kabul became known. "They didn’t cover their tracks very well," a senior Defense Department official said, "and I think the embassy bombing was the ISI drawing a line in the sand."
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Offline bigron

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Re: Civil War is being Incited in Pakistan - a new murderous phase begins
« Reply #64 on: September 11, 2008, 09:36:55 AM »
On 9/11 anniversary, Pakistan has a new breed of Taliban
 
 
 http://www.thenews.com.pk/top_story_detail.asp?Id=17179

Thursday, September 11, 2008

By Amir Mir

LAHORE: Seven years after the 9/11 terror attacks in the United States that shook the entire world, Pakistan, despite being a key American ally in the war on terror, continues to be plagued by the menace of Talibanisation with home grown militants persisting with their calls for Jihad.

As the Bush era is coming to a fag end amidst an unending war on terror, the threat of Islamic militancy keeps spreading its tentacles across the globe; the rigid ideology of Taliban claiming new grounds and the al-Qaeda network seemingly thriving.

Despite the deployment of over 80,000 Pakistani troops along the rugged Pak-Afghan border to counter al-Qaeda and Taliban-linked Islamic militancy, the situation is far from stable in the trouble-hit tribal region which is crucial to three world capitals -- Washington, Kabul and Islamabad.

The growing forces of the Taliban and al-Qaeda fighters in the border region not only pose a grave threat to NATO troops in Afghanistan, but also to the people of Pakistan where Taliban militias, like their Afghan counterparts, are trying to impose their harsh medieval version of Islamic law.

Although the Musharraf regime had decided to align with the US soon after 9/11, the harsh reality is that the infrastructure built during the last two decades by the Pakistani military and intelligence establishment was not dismantled. This happened mainly due to the fact that Pakistan, since 9/11, was being ruled by a military dictator who deemed it fit to employ a misguided policy both in Afghanistan and Jammu & Kashmir.

Subsequently, with the Islamic militancy gaining new grounds, the Jihadis literally marching ahead, the Taliban nowhere near defeated either in Afghanistan or in Pakistan and the al-Qaeda still unbroken on both sides of the border, senior US government officials as well as the commanders of the Afghanistan-based NATO and ISAF troops are openly accusing the Pakistani establishment of pursuing a policy of running with the hare and hunting with the hound.

Resultantly, a Pakistan-based Taliban movement, inspired by the past Taliban rulers of Afghanistan, is growing in Waziristan Agency along the Pak-Afghan border, challenging the efforts of the coalition forces to stamp out insurgents in Afghanistan and hunt down Osama bin Laden, Mullah Mohammad Omar and other fugitive al-Qaeda and Taliban leaders.

The Waziristan Agency, making headlines in the international media since 2002 due to frequent clashes between the Pakistani security forces and the al-Qaeda and Taliban-linked militants, is virtually under the control of the local Taliban who have established their grip in the North and South Waziristan areas, besides gaining a significant base from which they wage their resistance against the Allied Forces in Afghanistan.

New militant leaders, new militant cadres and new militant groups are coming up in the Pak-Afghan tribal belt quite often while the old Jihadi leadership of the1980 Afghan war vintage no longer enjoys the kind of hold and sway which they used to command in the past, especially before September 11, 2001.

This new generation of militants is all Pakistani which emerged after the US invasion of Afghanistan and represents a rebellion against the Pakistani establishment joining hands with the United States in the ongoing war against terror. While these extremist elements might be representing a minority view, their threat seems real.

The new breed of the Pakistani Taliban is led by young militants who, unlike the original Taliban, are technology and media-savvy and are influenced by various indigenous tribal nationalisms, honouring the tribal codes that govern social life in Pakistani rural areas.

Though they are called Taliban because they share the same ideology with the Taliban in Afghanistan, they are totally Pakistani. Their holy war is aimed not just at infidels occupying Afghanistan, but also the infidels who they believe are ruling and running their homeland and maintaining the secular values of the Pakistani society. They aim at nothing less than cleansing Pakistan.

Since the 9/11 terror, the Bush administration had been describing Pakistan's former military ruler President General (retd) Musharraf as the most trusted American ally in the war on terror. However it was under Musharraf that FATA in 2008 is not much different to the Taliban-controlled Afghanistan before 9/11.

Most of the top militant commanders are now in FATA and NWFP largely because their military might mushroomed in the Musharraf years. Baitullah Mehsud, a former trainer at a small time fitness centre in Waziristan and now the fugitive Amir of the Tehrik-e-Taliban Pakistan (TTP), Maulana Fazlullah, a former ski lift operator in Swat and now the renegade Amir of the Tehrik-e-Nifaz-e-Shariat-e-Mohammadi (TNSM) and Mangal Bagh, a former truck conductor and now the rebel Amir of the Lashkar-e-Islami (LI) are regarded by their followers as the uncrowned kings of Waziristan Agency, Swat Valley and Khyber Agency respectively.

Aged between 30 and 33, all the three Taliban-linked Jihadi commanders are young and have created ripples not only in the Pak-Afghan border areas owing to their militancy but have also caused alarm bells across the border in Afghanistan which is gradually coming under their growing influence.

Despite being declared most wanted criminals by Pakistan for their involvement in several deadly incidents of terrorism, including suicide bombings directed against the security forces, neither the Musharraf regime nor the new government in Islamabad have been able to challenge their power. Both these governments had first launched military operations against the forces of Baitullah, Fazlullah and Mangal Bagh, but eventually decided to hold talks with them as a last resort to strike peace deals in Waziristan, Swat and Khyber.

Hardly four years ago, no one had even heard of these commanders. It is largely believed that they were groomed by none other than the establishment to secure the border with Afghanistan which it thought had become vulnerable after the fall of the Taliban regime and the subsequent assumption of power in Kabul by the pro-India and anti-Pakistan Northern Alliance.

Since it had become harder for the Pakistani establishment in the wake of the 9/11 attacks to make use of the already established and equally known Jihadi groups in Afghanistan to protect its so-called geo-strategic agenda in the region, the khaki decision makers deemed it fit to create and nurture a new breed of Jihadis along the Pak-Afghan tribal belt, which now challenges the writ of the state by presenting themselves as the Pakistani Taliban.

Therefore, seven years down the road since the 9/11 attacks, the United States, that granted the status of a non-NATO ally to Pakistan due to its role as a frontline state, has intensified pressure on Islamabad to do more for dismantling the al-Qaeda network in the Pakistani tribal areas, saying if there is one country that matters most to the future of the Osama-led terror network, it is none other than Pakistan.
 

Offline bigron

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Re: Civil War is being Incited in Pakistan - a new murderous phase begins
« Reply #65 on: September 11, 2008, 09:42:59 AM »
U.S. sets sights on Taliban, Al Qaeda stronghold

It plans to send more troops to Afghanistan and ramp up attacks in Pakistan.


By Mark Sappenfield and Gordon Lubold | Staff writers of The Christian Science Monitor
from the September 11, 2008 edition

NEW DELHI and WASHINGTON - Two announcements this week suggest that the US is adopting a more aggressive strategy to fight the growing insurgency that spans the Afghan-Pakistani border.

On the heels of allegations last week that US ground forces conducted their first-ever operation in Pakistan, officials there said the US killed four foreign militants in Pakistan in a missile strike Monday. And President Bush announced Tuesday that US forces in Iraq would be reduced by 8,000 troops by February – and 4,500 additional troops sent to Afghanistan.

The events are an acknowledgment both of the severity of the situation in Afghanistan and the perceived inadequacy of US allies.

The strikes in Pakistan are a tacit admission that Pakistan's military has not been up to the task of rooting out terrorist leaders in its inhospitable border area. And Mr. Bush's "quiet surge" comes after repeated failed attempts to persuade NATO partners to shoulder more of the fighting load.

Yet it is an acknowledgment that the US, too, has comparatively neglected Afghanistan while focusing on Iraq. While the situation in Iraq has somewhat stabilized, security in Afghanistan has deteriorated this year to the point that militants are moving beyond suicide bombs to daring and effective attacks against coalition forces and the heart of the Afghan state:

•In August, Taliban fighters ambushed French special forces in Kabul Province – just 30 miles from the capital – killing 10 and wounding 21. The attack was unprecedented: Previously, the Taliban had avoided engaging coalition forces directly.

•Also last month, the Taliban laid siege to Camp Salerno, one of the largest US bases in Afghanistan, using relatively sophisticated tactics such as waves of suicide bombers intended to rip holes in the base's defensive perimeter.

•In June, Taliban militants blew open the gates to a prison in the southern city of Kandahar with a truck bomb, freeing as many as 400 Taliban inmates.

•In April, Taliban gunmen trying to assassinate Afghan President Hamid Karzai opened fire at an Independence Day celebration, killing three.

•In January, Taliban suicide bombers broke into the Serena Hotel – Kabul's only five-star hotel and its most heavily guarded – killing six.

"It is generally accepted now across all [US] government agencies that the situation in Afghanistan has significantly worsened and has become quite dire," says Seth Jones, an analyst at RAND Corp., a security consultancy.

The reasons are many, from faltering confidence in the Afghan government to the lack of a clear strategy. But perhaps the most cited reason, Mr. Jones says, "is every major [insurgent] group's ability to use Pakistan as a command and control hub."

In congressional testimony Wednesday, chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff Adm. Mike Mullen said Pakistan and Afghanistan are "inextricably linked in a common insurgency." For several months he has warned that any terrorist attack carried out on American soil would likely originate from this border region.

US officials believe Osama bin Laden and his deputy, Ayman al-Zawahiri, are in the area. The leader of the group that carried out the attacks on the Serena Hotel and President Karzai, Jalaluddin Haqqani, is also thought to be in Pakistan. Monday's airstrike reportedly killed a wife and a daughter of his.

The Pakistani Army's efforts to neutralize such terrorists have been stuttering at best, characterized by paroxysms of brief fighting followed by toothless cease-fires that allow militants to regroup.

The increased frequency of American strikes suggests that the US believes it must ramp up operations on both sides of the border as a stopgap. The Washington Post reported Wednesday that the number of missile attacks in Pakistan has jumped from three in 2007 to 11 so far this year.

A recent report in a leading Pakistani daily, Dawn, claims that US forces are replicating in Pakistan a narrow strategy pioneered in Iraq: Picking off insurgent leaders one by one. The classic, broader counterinsurgency operations used in Iraq – clearing an area of terrorists, holding it with a large military presence, then building infrastructure – is not possible in Pakistan, which refuses to let US forces fight on its soil.

This is a political necessity. Pakistanis overwhelmingly resent what they see as historic US interference in their country. If Pakistan's fledgling civilian government is perceived as being subservient to the US – a reputation already dogging newly inaugurated President Asif Ali Zardari – it will incur the anger of its people. "It definitely will create difficulties for the new government," says Rashid Ahmad Khan, an analyst at the Islamabad Policy Research Institute.

Already, news of the ground attack in South Waziristan, one of Pakistan's northwestern tribal areas, last week – in which 20 civilians were allegedly killed – has been met with outrage across the country.

"It's not justifiable by any means. It is an attack on our sovereignty. We're a nuclear power but are helpless before the US," says Sardar Muhammad, sitting in a bazaar in the frontier city of Peshawar.

Pakistan's response was to close the Afghan coalition's major overland supply route into Afghanistan, Pakistan's Torkham Pass, to NATO traffic for a day.

"This will tell how serious we are," Defense Minister Chaudhry Ahmed Mukhtar told Dawn Television.

• Ghulam Dastageer contributed from Peshawar, Pakistan.
 

 
 
Find this article at:
http://www.csmonitor.com/2008/0911/p01s01-wosc.html 
 

Offline bigron

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Re: Civil War is being Incited in Pakistan - a new murderous phase begins
« Reply #66 on: September 11, 2008, 09:46:31 AM »
Pakistani Military to Bar Foreign Operations

Posted September 10, 2008
http://news.antiwar.com/2008/09/10/pakistani-military-to-bar-foreign-operations/


With drone attacks already up over threefold from 2007 the US desire to ramp up attacks inside Pakistan even further has run into another wall today as Pakistan’s Chief of Army Staff General Parvez Kayani announced that foreign forces would no longer be allowed to conduct missions inside of Pakistani territory. Gen. Kayani said the rules of engagement were well defined and did not permit coalition forces to operate in Pakistan.

The announcement comes just one week after US helicopters and ground troops attacked a small village in South Waziristan, killing at least 20 civilians according to one Pakistani official. The strike produced a myriad of harsh comments from Pakistani officials and days later the Pakistani government cut supply lines to NATO troops in Afghanistan, a move which Defense Minister Chaudhry Ahmed Mukhtar said would show “how serious we are”. Earlier this week, a drone strike against a school in North Waziristan which was reportedly carried out by the CIA killed at least 23.

This comes amid reports that the National Intelligence Council warned President Bush last month that attacks in Pakistan were liable to further destabilize Pakistan’s government and military. However, speaking before the House Armed Services Committee today, Defense Secretary Robert Gates and Joint Chiefs head Admiral Michael Mullen stressed the need for striking the “safe havens” of militants inside Pakistan, and recent activities suggest this strategy has won out despite the NIC’s warnings.

compiled by Jason Ditz

Offline bigron

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Re: Civil War is being Incited in Pakistan - a new murderous phase begins
« Reply #67 on: September 11, 2008, 09:50:48 AM »
ANALYSIS-US strikes on Pakistan border may not halt al Qaeda


Randall Mikkelsen
Reuters North American News Service
http://wiredispatch.com/news/?id=338592
Sep 10, 2008 14:07 EST

WASHINGTON (Reuters) - Renewed U.S. efforts to defeat al Qaeda leader Osama bin Laden and Taliban fighters based in the rugged, lawless Pakistan-Afghanistan border area may fall short because of an incomplete strategy and lack of local support.

Last week's election by lawmakers of Asif Ali Zardari as Pakistan's new president raises fresh questions about whether his government will give even tacit approval for the growing number of U.S. strikes at the militants, analysts said.

Ousting Taliban and al Qaeda fighters from the border area is a key to stability in Afghanistan, riven by violence nearly seven years after the U.S.-led invasion, and in Pakistan, where Islamist attacks are straining an already unstable government.

"There is no quick fix to this problem," said Andrew McGregor, terrorism editor at the Jamestown Foundation, a security think tank.

A substantial strengthening of U.S. and NATO forces in Afghanistan, and a strong police presence in Pakistan, were necessary to do the job, analysts said.


SHIFTING FORCES

As the United States prepared for the somber anniversary of the Sept. 11 attacks by al Qaeda in 2001, President Bush this week announced plans to send more U.S. troops to Afghanistan, reflecting a partial shift in forces from Iraq.

The U.S. military conceded Wednesday it was not winning in Afghanistan and said it would revise its strategy to include safe havens in Pakistan.

Still, Bush's plan to step up the fight in Afghanistan was quickly criticized as inadequate.

"The core frustration is we just don't have what we need to do the job on the ground in Afghanistan," said Frederick Barton of the Center for Strategic and International Studies.

Pakistan's failure to control its side of the border made the problem worse, he said.

The United States has killed several senior al Qaeda figures in Pakistan through stepped-up attacks by pilotless aircraft over the last year.

The Washington Post said Pakistani officials reported 11 strikes so far this year, up from three in 2007. Tension rose last week when U.S. commandos attacked an al Qaeda target inside Pakistan, apparently without prior notice to Islamabad.

Angry officials in Pakistan said women and children were among the dead in the first known U.S. ground operation there since the 2001 invasion of Afghanistan.

"Such attacks can discredit the new government," said Hassan Abbas, a Harvard University research fellow and former regional Pakistani police chief in the border area.

He called the timing of the strikes "surprising, because that creates political problems for the new president."


QUIET UNDERSTANDING

Zardari was sworn in as president Tuesday to succeed Pervez Musharraf, a close U.S. ally who resigned to avoid impeachment.

Musharraf and the Bush administration are believed to have had quiet understandings about U.S. military strikes but Abbas said these were now under review by the new administration in Islamabad.

Zardari vowed at his swearing in to work with neighbors including Afghan President Hamid Karzai, who had tensions with Musharraf, but said defeating the militants required popular support and avoiding civilian casualties.

Whether or not Zardari acquiesces to permit new attacks, he "will have great difficulty in exerting any influence on the situation," McGregor said.

Further hampering the government, he said, Pakistan's military intelligence maintains ties with the Taliban as a way to project influence into Afghanistan.

Drone strikes and commando raids can have only limited success against the militants without a broader strategy to protect local populations, analysts said.

"The only way you are going to be able to shut them down is if you have a reassuring presence in enough of the villages ... and the people of these communities are comfortable and they turn on these people (the militants) themselves," Barton said.

Pakistan's fragile government and tank-heavy army are ill-suited to mountain fighting, senior U.S. intelligence official Thomas Fingar said last week.

Rather than troops, a heavy police presence was needed in the region, Assad said.

"Effective law enforcement is critical for defeating terrorists," he wrote in the Sept. 11 issue of a West Point Combating Terrorism Center's journal.

As for bin Laden, who remains at large as Bush prepares to leave office in January after presidential and congressional elections on Nov. 4, the White House vowed to keep hunting but suggested it may be a long-term project.

"This president, and I'm sure future presidents, will continue to try to track down al Qaeda leaders," spokeswoman Dana Perino said Wednesday. "We will continue to try to find Osama bin Laden." (Editing by Kristin Roberts and John O'Callaghan)

Source: Reuters North American News Service


Offline David Rothscum

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Re: Civil War is being Incited in Pakistan - a new murderous phase begins
« Reply #68 on: September 11, 2008, 10:11:20 AM »
http://www.dawn.com/2008/09/11/nat9.htm
8 killed in Parachinar

By Our Correspondent

PARACHINAR, Sept 10: Eight more people were killed and a child among seven others injured as fighting between rival tribes continued on Wednesday.

Fresh clashes between the warring Bangash and Turi tribes killed eight more people from both sides. Both sides fired mortar, rocket launchers and missiles against each other’s positions in Chardewal, Jalamai, Baleshkhel, Tangi, Arali, Kanj Alizai, Pawar and Karman.

Offline David Rothscum

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Re: Civil War is being Incited in Pakistan - a new murderous phase begins
« Reply #69 on: September 12, 2008, 10:38:18 AM »
http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/south_asia/7611721.stm
'Another US strike' hits Pakistan
Map

Five civilians and seven militants have been killed in north-west Pakistan in a suspected US missile attack, local officials say.

Missiles hit two buildings near Miranshah, the main town in the North Waziristan region on the Afghan border.

It has emerged that President Bush recently authorised US raids against militants in Pakistan without prior approval from Islamabad.

There is growing concern in Pakistan over unilateral US military action.

Early reports said all, or nearly all, of the dead were Taleban fighters killed by one missile.

But later reports from the scene said missiles hit two buildings - in one three women and two children were killed, and in the other seven Taleban militants died.

The missiles were fired from a drone - an unmanned US plane - local people said.

Military spokesman Maj Murad Khan confirmed "a missile attack at around 5.30 in the morning" and said the government had been informed.

Pakistani troops in the Khyber region
Tensions in the border region are rising

American and international troops are fighting Taleban and al-Qaeda militants close to the scene of the attack in neighbouring Afghanistan.

Meanwhile, the Pakistani army says its troops have killed at least 28 militants in the north-west of the country.

The BBC's M Ilyas Khan in Pakistan says that heavy fighting is continuing around the strategically important area of Loisam in the Bajaur tribal area.

House destroyed

Friday's missile attack was in the Tol Khel area on the outskirts of Miranshah, local officials and eyewitnesses told the BBC.

Civilians fleeing Bajaur
Fighting in Bajaur has escalated in recent days

It is the fifth time since the beginning of this month that US forces have carried out cross border strikes, according to local people.

On Monday, at least 14 people were killed and 15 injured in a suspected US missile strike in North Waziristan, witnesses and officials said.

The attacks follow persistent US accusations that Pakistan is not doing enough to eliminate Taleban and al-Qaeda sanctuaries in the border region.

An unnamed senior Pentagon official told the BBC that at some point within the past two months President Bush issued a classified order to authorise US raids against militants in Pakistan

Pakistan has said it will not allow foreign forces onto its territory and that it will vigorously protect its sovereignty. It says that cross border raids are not the best way of fighting the "war against terror".

The country's Chief of Army Staff, Gen Ashfaq Parvez Kayani, said there was "no question of any agreement or understanding with the coalition forces whereby they are allowed to conduct operations on our side of the border".

The upsurge in strikes has alarmed Pakistani military and government officials, who say it seriously undermines their counter-insurgency operations.

Claim disputed

Meanwhile, the Pakistani army says it killed at least 28 militants in the north-west of the country on Thursday night.

Masked militants close to Pakistan's border with Afganistan (file image)
The US says militants are hiding out in north-west Pakistan

They said two army soldiers were also killed in the fighting. The killings took place in the troubled districts of Swat and Bajaur, on the Afghan border.

The militants have disputed the army's claim, saying no Taleban have been killed.

An army spokesman, Major Murad Khan, told the BBC that those killed included foreign fighters as well.

A Taleban spokesman, Maulvi Omar, told the BBC's Urdu service that no Taleban fighter had died in Thursday's fighting.

The casualty figures could not be independently verified.

Bajaur is believed to be a major al-Qaeda sanctuary, and has attracted several suspected US missile attacks from across the border in Afghanistan.

Security forces launched an operation against militants in the area in the first week of August.

Most markets and shops in the area have remained closed since then.

More than 300,000 people have since fled the area to avoid fighting.

Witnesses say those who are still in the area are faced with severe food and medicine shortages.

This is horrible news. Why? Well first of all our criminal government killing women and children, but second, Pakistan may strike back:
http://www.nation.com.pk/pakistan-news-newspaper-daily-english-online/Politics/12-Sep-2008/Pakistan-to-retaliate-if-attacked
Pakistan to retaliate if attacked
Source: Special Correspondent submitted 18 hours 2 minutes ago

ISLAMABAD - The Chief of Army Staff General Ashfaq Pervez Kayani chaired the two-day Corps Commanders Conference that started at the General Headquarters on Thursday.
Informed sources said that all the Corp Commanders and Principal Staff Officers participated in the conference.
Sources said that a number of issues were discussed during the first day of the conference including war games and welfare of Army Jawans and others.
Director General Military Operations gave a detailed briefing on the security situation in Swat and FATA.
The conference, sources said, also took stock of the situation arising out of the belligerent statements of the US military commanders that coalition forces in Afghanistan could carry out direct actions inside Pakistan.
The commanders took serious view of the situation on Pak-Afghan border and resolved that no external forces would be allowed to conduct operations inside Pakistan, thus vowing to defend the sovereignty and integrity of the country at all costs.
The two-day Corps Commanders Conference will conclude on Friday (today). 
Monitoring Desk adds: Pakistan would retaliate if US-led foreign forces violated Pakistan’s territorial sovereignty again, a private TV channel quoted an Army spokesman as saying in an interview with BBC.
Pakistan had told the Nato forces in Afghanistan that any further violation of its frontiers would not be tolerated, said spokesman Maj-Gen Athar Abbas, adding that the country reserved right to defend its sovereignty.
To a question, he said that Pakistan’s reaction would be as per the US interference, and decision to strike back would be taken at proper time.

Offline Nailer

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Re: Civil War is being Incited in Pakistan - a new murderous phase begins
« Reply #70 on: September 12, 2008, 02:01:17 PM »
 It looks like we will now be going to war with Pakistan also..

http://www.presstv.ir/detail.aspx?id=69186&sectionid=351020401
Fri, 12 Sep 2008 08:35:21 GMT
Pak army ordered to hit back US forces
Fri, 12 Sep 2008 08:35:21 GMT
 
 
Pak army put on high alert to confront any US agression
The Pakistani Army has been given orders to retaliate against any unilateral strike by the Afghanistan-based US troops inside the country.

 

 
 
Pak army put on high alert to confront any US agression
The Pakistani Army has been given orders to retaliate against any unilateral strike by the Afghanistan-based US troops inside the country.

Army Spokesman Maj Gen Athar Abbas confirmed the orders in a brief interview with Geo News on late Thursday night.

The decision was made on the first day of the two-day meeting of Pakistan's top military commanders to discuss the US coalition's ground and air assault in Waziristan region which killed dozens of civilians.

Army Chief General Ashfaq Parvez Kayani chaired the meeting which began in Rawalpindi on Thursday at the Army General Headquarters.

Pakistan's military commanders expressed their determination to defend the country's borders without allowing any external forces to conduct operations inside the tribal belt bordering Afghanistan, sources said.

A senior official said the military commanders also discussed the implications of the American attacks inside Pakistan and took stock of the public feeling.

"In his statement, Genral Kayani has represented the feeling of the entire nation, as random attacks inside Pakistan have angered each and every Pakistani," he said.

Earlier on Wednesday, Kayani rebuffed the American policy of including Pakistani territory in their operations against the al-Qaeda and Taliban linked militants hiding in the areas near Afghan border.

Also, Prime Minister Syed Yousuf Raza Gilani noted that Kayani's remarks on country's defense were true reflection of the government policy.

The army decision followed bloody incursions by the US ground troops into tribal belt as well as a string of missile strikes by CIA-operated drone aircraft.

The reaction also comes after US President George W. Bush approved US military raids on militants inside Pakistan without Islamabad's agreement.

The development also brought into the open the increasing mistrust between the Americans and the Pakistanis over how to handle the Taliban and al-Qaeda linked militants in Pakistan's tribal areas.

Some political expert predict the break out of an all-out war between the United States troops and Pakistani army following the Bush administration's approval of ground and air assaults inside the country.

JR/DT
 
I am a realist that is slightly conservative yet I have some republican demeanor that can turn democrat when I feel the urge to flip independant.
 
The truth shall set you free, if not a 45ACP round will do the trick.. HEHE

Offline David Rothscum

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Re: Civil War is being Incited in Pakistan - a new murderous phase begins
« Reply #71 on: September 12, 2008, 02:14:36 PM »
We're heading into Pakistan and meanwhile the public is still mesmerized by Obama saying he'll pull out of Iraq.
I can't believe this.

Offline David Rothscum

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Re: Civil War is being Incited in Pakistan - a new murderous phase begins
« Reply #72 on: September 12, 2008, 03:39:31 PM »
Pakistan order to kill US invaders
http://www.theaustralian.news.com.au/story/0,25197,24336245-26397,00.html
Bruce Loudon, South Asia correspondent | September 13, 2008

KEY corps commanders of Pakistan's 600,000-strong army issued orders last night to retaliate against "invading" US forces that enter the country to attack militant targets.

The move has plunged relations between Islamabad and Washington into deep crisis over how to deal with al-Qa'ida and the Taliban

What amounts to a dramatic order to "kill the invaders", as one senior officer put it last night, was disclosed after the commanders - who control the army's deployments at divisional level - met at their headquarters in the garrison city of Rawalpindi under the chairmanship of army chief and former ISI spy agency boss Ashfaq Kayani.

Leading English-language newspaper The News warned in an editorial that the US determination to attack targets inside Pakistan was likely to be "the best recruiting sergeant that the extremists ever had", with even "moderates" outraged by it.

The "retaliate and kill" order came amid reports of unprecedentedly fierce fighting in the Bajaur Agency of Pakistan's tribal areas, an al-Qa'ida stronghold frequently mentioned as the most likely lair of Osama bin Laden and Ayman al-Zawahiri.

At the same time, a series of brutal killings by the militants were reported.

The beheaded bodies of two of nearly 40 police recruits abducted a week ago were found near the town of Hangu. Their discovery follows warnings that the recruits would be put to death, one by one, unless Pakistan stopped its big offensive in Bajaur.

The bodies of three local Bajaur men who had been shot in the neck were also found yesterday. Notes were attached declaring the men to have been spies.

In a day of what appears to have been unrelenting combat in Bajaur, helicopter gunships, heavy artillery and tanks were used to strike al-Qa'ida targets.

Officials said at least 100 militants had been killed, bringing the number who have died in the six weeks since the offensive was launched to well over 700. The figure is regarded as remarkable, given that NATO forces in Afghanistan seldom achieve a "kill" rate of more than about 30 in any single operation. Many of those killed are reported to have been "foreign fighters" - mostly Arabs and Central Asians, who have been flooding into Pakistan's tribal areas to join al-Qa'ida and the Taliban.

Ground troops are said to have moved into key areas formerly controlled by the militants, despite a promised ceasefire marking the holy month of Ramadan.

"We launched strikes against militant hideouts in Bajaur and destroyed several compounds they were using," an official was quoted as saying.

The order to retaliate against incursions by "foreign troops", directed specifically at the 120,000 Pakistani soldiers deployed along the border with Afghanistan, follows US President George W. Bush's authorisation of US attacks in Pakistan.

Washington's determination to launch such attacks has caused outrage across Pakistan, with Prime Minister Yousuf Raza Gilani last night strongly backing a warning by General Kayani that Pakistan would not allow its territorial integrity to be violated.

The "kill" order against invading forces, and the sharp deterioration in relations with the US, has far-reaching implications for the war on terror.

Anger at all levels in Pakistani society was summed up last night in The News, not normally sympathetic to the militants.

"There is an escalating sense of furious impotence among the ordinary people of Pakistan," the newspaper said.

"Many - perhaps most - of them are strongly opposed to the spread of Talibanisation and extremist influence across the country: people who might be described as 'moderates'.

"Many of them have no sympathy for the mullahs and their burning of girls' schools and their medieval mindset.

"But if you bomb a moderate sensibility often enough, it has a tendency to lose its sense of objectivity and to feel driven in the direction of extremism.

"If America bombs moderate sensibilities often enough, you may find that its actions are the best recruiting sergeant that the extremists ever had."

Offline Biggs

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Re: Civil War is being Incited in Pakistan - a new murderous phase begins
« Reply #73 on: September 13, 2008, 12:57:29 PM »
We're heading into Pakistan and meanwhile the public is still mesmerized by Obama saying he'll pull out of Iraq.
I can't believe this.

well you can put lipstick on a pig, but..... its still a pig
( which is what placing Obama in office appears to be about, making a system and empire that is utterly corrupted look like something other than a pig)
STOP THE KILLING NOW
END THE CRIMINAL SIEGE OF GAZA - FREE PALESTINE!!!!!!!

Offline David Rothscum

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Re: Civil War is being Incited in Pakistan - a new murderous phase begins
« Reply #74 on: September 13, 2008, 04:03:36 PM »
Pak fighter jets patrol tribal belt along Afghan border
http://www.zeenews.com/articles.asp?aid=468917&sid=SAS
Islamabad, Sept 13: Fighter jets of the Pakistan Air Force on Saturday conducted patrols in the North Waziristan tribal region, where recent missile strikes by US drones from across the Afghan border have killed dozens.

A tribal elder in Miranshah, the main town of North Waziristan, told NNI news agency on phone that he saw Pakistani fighter jets hovering over the region.

"The people are very happy over the action by Pakistani aircraft in view of the frequent airspace violations by US spy planes," he said.

"I saw the fighter plane also flying towards the Afghan border area," the tribal elder said.

Earlier this week, Pakistan Air Force chief Air Chief Marshal Tanvir Mehmood Ahmed had said that his force would respond to violations of the country's airspace by the US forces if the government issues orders to do so.

Chief military spokesman Maj Gen Athar Abass said on Thursday that the army had been issued orders to react in case of any violation of Pakistani territory by Afghanistan-based US forces.

The US-led forces in Afghanistan have carried out a series of missile strikes in Waziristan, considered a stronghold of the Pakistani Taliban led by commander Baitullah Mehsud.

The attacks have angered local resident as several women and children were killed.

Bureau Report

Offline Triadtropz

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Re: Civil War is being Incited in Pakistan - a new murderous phase begins
« Reply #75 on: September 13, 2008, 04:17:25 PM »
Those missle strikes arent even being done by the US.. they are just taking credit for them..
one man with courage makes a majority..TJ

Offline David Rothscum

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Re: Civil War is being Incited in Pakistan - a new murderous phase begins
« Reply #76 on: September 13, 2008, 04:20:10 PM »
Those missle strikes arent even being done by the US.. they are just taking credit for them..
No, Pakistan is flying around to keep the US from violating their territory again.

Offline Triadtropz

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Re: Civil War is being Incited in Pakistan - a new murderous phase begins
« Reply #77 on: September 13, 2008, 04:31:01 PM »
pakistans fighter jets will lose to those drones..they arent really slow CIA predator drones, thats a cover-up..they are galactic federation drones and will outfly a fighter..theirs a guy running them trying to collect alqaeda bounty...it sounds crazy, but notice the US never admits to these strikes.
one man with courage makes a majority..TJ

Offline David Rothscum

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Re: Civil War is being Incited in Pakistan - a new murderous phase begins
« Reply #78 on: September 13, 2008, 04:47:52 PM »
pakistans fighter jets will lose to those drones..they arent really slow CIA predator drones, thats a cover-up..they are galactic federation drones and will outfly a fighter..theirs a guy running them trying to collect alqaeda bounty...it sounds crazy, but notice the US never admits to these strikes.
Yeah, you're right, Emperor Palpatine himself probably orders these strikes.  :'( There really is no hope for humanity is there? I mean, you can read in the Washington Post how the Rockefeller foundation is funding China's one child policy and this is what the resistance consists of. God help us. I'm sorry if I sound mean, I don't want to be mean, it just makes me sad to read this.

Offline Biggs

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Re: Civil War is being Incited in Pakistan - a new murderous phase begins
« Reply #79 on: September 14, 2008, 07:40:38 PM »
pakistans fighter jets will lose to those drones..they arent really slow CIA predator drones, thats a cover-up..they are galactic federation drones and will outfly a fighter..theirs a guy running them trying to collect alqaeda bounty...it sounds crazy, but notice the US never admits to these strikes.

I have seen you make good posts and bad posts, but really you need to realise that there is no 'galactic federation' involvement in such strikes, what nonsense have you been listening too, wake up
STOP THE KILLING NOW
END THE CRIMINAL SIEGE OF GAZA - FREE PALESTINE!!!!!!!