The US Edges Closer to Invading Pakistan - Post All Pak War News Here

Author Topic: The US Edges Closer to Invading Pakistan - Post All Pak War News Here  (Read 47328 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Offline bigron

  • Moderator
  • Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 22,124
  • RON PAUL FOR PRESIDENT 2012
Re: Coming War With Pakistan??? - Post News About Pakistan Here
« Reply #40 on: July 22, 2008, 08:44:14 AM »
July 22, 2008

Unilateral Action by U.S. a Growing Fear in Pakistan

By JANE PERLEZ

http://www.nytimes.com/2008/07/22/world/asia/22tribal.html?partner=rssuserland&emc=rss&pagewanted=all


ISLAMABAD, Pakistan — Strong suggestions by the United States that it could resort to unilateral intervention against Al Qaeda and the Taliban in Pakistan are generating increasing anxiety in the Pakistani press and among government officials, who warn that such an action could backfire.

Over the last week, the Pakistani press has been filled with commentaries warning that American attacks without Pakistan’s permission would further inflame anti-American sentiment, drive more people into the camp of the militants and fatally undermine the already fragile civilian government. Privately, one senior government official said American strikes would produce “chaos.”

But the English-language newspapers have also stressed that the Pakistani government has failed to deal with the Islamic militants, and they have made repeated pleas in recent days for the government and the military to take on the militants before Washington does the job, uninvited.

“What is missing and is urgently required in Islamabad is a coherent policy” for dealing with the militants in the tribal areas, said one in a series of recent editorials in a leading newspaper, Dawn. The editorial continued: “The world and all of Pakistan is looking to Islamabad for leadership and vision. The time to act is running out very quickly.”

Washington has increased the pressure in the past 10 days, asserting in public statements and closed-door meetings with senior Pakistani officials that the increase in the number of Pakistani Taliban fighters crossing from the tribal areas into Afghanistan to fight NATO and American forces was unacceptable.

A spike in deaths of United States and NATO soldiers in Afghanistan in the last two months has been largely attributed by American officials to the flow of Pakistani Taliban into southern Afghanistan.

American officials have also emphasized to Pakistani officials their concern that Al Qaeda was plotting attacks on the United States from sanctuaries in the tribal areas, a region of rugged territory adjacent to Afghanistan that is now almost totally controlled by the Pakistani Taliban.

President Bush said at a White House news conference last week that “some extremists are coming out of parts of Pakistan into Afghanistan.” He added, “That’s troubling to us, troubling to Afghanistan, and it should be troubling to Pakistan.” Such statements have been interpreted here as a sign of rising American impatience with a lack of action to stem the tide of militants by the Pakistani government.

Senator Barack Obama, the presumptive Democratic nominee for president, said on Sunday, while visiting Afghanistan, that if the United States had “actionable intelligence against high-value Al Qaeda targets, and the Pakistani government was unwilling to go after those targets,” the United States should strike. Mr. Obama, of Illinois, has been viewed warily in Pakistan because of similar previous comments.

Alarm in Pakistan about possible American intervention rose after a surprise visit July 12 by the chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, Adm. Mike Mullen, to Islamabad, where he met with the army chief of staff, Gen. Ashfaq Parvez Kayani; the prime minister, Yousaf Raza Gilani; and the president, Pervez Musharraf.

It was Admiral Mullen’s fourth visit in six months to see the nation’s leaders. Days afterward, reports about a buildup of NATO forces on the border between Afghanistan and Pakistan added to Pakistani anxiety.

A senior Pakistani government official familiar with the content of the meetings with Admiral Mullen, who declined to be identified because public statements were not released, said the admiral was informed that unilateral action by the United States would be “counterproductive” and would result in “chaos.”

But the Americans did not recognize the downside of intervention, the official said. “They don’t see that,” the official said. “They have tunnel vision. They see more foreign fighters pouring in, more training, more cross-border attacks.”

The Americans were right in their assessment that more fighters from Uzbekistan, Saudi Arabia and Egypt, and a “spurt of Turks,” had come to the tribal areas to join the Taliban since the Pakistani government entered into a peace accord with the leader of the Pakistani Taliban, Baitullah Mehsud, this spring, the official acknowledged.

The official said the Pakistanis had asked Admiral Mullen for infusions of military equipment and the sharing of real-time intelligence, demands made many times to visiting Americans in the past six months.

The frequent request by the Pakistanis for the sharing of current intelligence has been refused by the Bush administration because Washington lacked confidence in what the Pakistani military might do with the information, according to a former United States military officer who served in Pakistan and spoke on condition of anonymity because of the delicate nature of the situation.

The Bush administration has given more than $10 billion in military aid to Pakistan since 9/11, when President Musharraf agreed to become an ally in the campaign against terrorism. Of that amount, $5.5 billion was specifically intended for counterinsurgency efforts by the Pakistani Army. A Congressional report this year said that Pakistan did not spend the $5.5 billion on counterinsurgency, and that the Bush administration had failed to insist that it do so.

“Improve our capability — you’ve been slow on that,” the Pakistani official said, describing the gist of the recent conversation with Admiral Mullen. “We are fighting a war here. But the army is geared to peacetime.”

In unusually blunt terms, some of the commentaries in recent days in the Pakistani English-language press have disputed that the army has actually been fighting the Taliban or Al Qaeda at all.

Hasan-Askari Rizvi, a defense analyst, wrote in Sunday’s issue of The Daily Times, a newspaper, that many in Pakistan’s military and intelligence leadership did not view the Taliban and other Islamic extremists as the main threat to the Pakistani state.

“They view Taliban violence as a reaction to the use of force against them by Pakistan and the U.S., rather than a strategy to establish their hegemony in the name of Islam,” he said.

It was understandable that American commanders would want to take unilateral action against the Taliban, Mr. Rizvi wrote. But there was “no guarantee that such an action would eliminate militancy in the area,” he warned.

“Rather, it may worsen the situation and increase American losses,” he said.

In Washington, a new report on Pakistan by Daniel Markey, a senior fellow at the Council on Foreign Relations, cautioned against uninvited intervention in Pakistan.

“The U.S. military would find Pakistan’s tribal areas extremely tough going,” he said. “The primary challenge would come not from the militants or terrorists but from the rest of Pakistan’s 165 million people and army.”

He concluded, “Under almost any conceivable circumstance, the overwhelming majority of Pakistanis would perceive a U.S. invasion of the tribal areas as an attack on national sovereignty requiring resistance by every means possible.”



Offline Optimus

  • Globalist Destroyer
  • Global Moderator
  • Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 12,802
    • GlobalGulag.com
Re: Coming War With Pakistan??? - Post News About Pakistan Here
« Reply #41 on: July 22, 2008, 10:35:21 AM »
Unilateral US action in Pakistan could 'backfire': report
http://www.ptinews.com/pti%5Cptisite.nsf/0/6E9355982D9ED8F26525748E00206F69?OpenDocument

New York, Jul 22 (PTI) Strong suggestions by the US that it could resort to unilateral intervention against al-Qaeda and the Taliban in Pakistan are generating increasing anxiety among government rpt government officials, who warn that such an action could "backfire", a media report said today.

The US has increased the pressure in the recent days, asserting in public statements and closed-door meetings with Pakistani officials that the increase in the number of Taliban fighters crossing from their tribal areas into Afghanistan to fight American forces was unacceptable, the New York Times said.

A spike in deaths of the US and NATO soldiers in Afghanistan in the last two months has been largely attributed by American officials to the flow of Pakistani Taliban into southern part of the war-torn country, the paper said.

American officials, it said, have also told Pakistani officials their concern that al-Qaeda was plotting attacks on the United States from sanctuaries in the tribal areas.

The Times said alarm in Pakistan about possible American intervention rose after a surprise visit on July 12 by the chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff Admiral Mike Mullen to Islamabad where he met with the Pakistani army chief General Ashfaq Parvez Kayani, Prime Minister Yousaf Raza Gilani and President Pervez Musharraf.

It was Admiral Mullen's fourth visit in six months to see the nation's leaders, the paper noted, saying days afterward, reports about a buildup of NATO forces on the border between Afghanistan and Pakistan added to Pakistani anxiety.

A senior Pakistani government official familiar with the content of the meetings with Mullen was quoted as saying that the admiral was informed that unilateral action by the US would be "counterproductive" and would result in "chaos." PTI
“The Constitution is not an instrument for the government to restrain the people,
it's an instrument for the people to restrain the government.” – Patrick Henry

>>> Global Gulag Media & Forum <<<

Offline Optimus

  • Globalist Destroyer
  • Global Moderator
  • Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 12,802
    • GlobalGulag.com
Re: Coming War With Pakistan??? - Post News About Pakistan Here
« Reply #42 on: July 22, 2008, 10:39:45 AM »
'US will strike targets in Pakistan'
http://www.presstv.ir/detail.aspx?id=64440&sectionid=351020401
Tue, 22 Jul 2008 17:34:06
 

The US presidential hopeful Barack Obama says he will strike at al-Qaeda targets in Pakistan if Washington gets "actionable intelligence".

"... what I've said is that if we had actionable intelligence against high-value al-Qaeda targets and the Pakistani government was unwilling to go after those targets, then we should," the Democrat, who aspires to be the first black-American president, noted.

The 47-year-old senator from Illinois, currently on a tour to Afghanistan and Iraq, told the CBS News, "Now, my hope is that it doesn't come to that. Pakistani government would recognize that if we had Osama bin Laden in our sights, that we should fire or capture..."

Media reports say Washington is taking steps to make it easier to launch covert special missions in Pakistan's remote tribal areas, near Afghan border, where al-Qaeda is believed to be rebuilding its network.

Pakistan's newly elected PPP-led government, apparently seeking to quell such criticism, said that the country has taken "several measures to prevent cross-border infiltration by insurgents."
 
“The Constitution is not an instrument for the government to restrain the people,
it's an instrument for the people to restrain the government.” – Patrick Henry

>>> Global Gulag Media & Forum <<<

Offline Optimus

  • Globalist Destroyer
  • Global Moderator
  • Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 12,802
    • GlobalGulag.com
Re: Coming War With Pakistan??? - Post News About Pakistan Here
« Reply #43 on: July 22, 2008, 10:57:46 AM »
PM for further strengthening Pak-Egypt ties
http://www.app.com.pk/en_/index.php?option=com_content&task=view&id=46107&Itemid=1
       
ISLAMABAD, Jul 22 (APP): Prime Minister Syed Yousuf Raza Gilani on Tuesday said that Egypt is one of the most important country with which Pakistan has always enjoyed cordial fraternal ties. Pakistan and Egypt have long history of brotherly relations and the present government attaches great importance to further strengthening its ties with brotherly Muslim country, he added.

The Prime Minister was talking to Ambassador designate to Egypt Ms. Seema Naqvi who called on him here at Prime Minister House this afternoon.

He urged the Ambassador designate to concentrate her efforts for further promotion of bilateral cooperation in trade, investment, defence, health and education sectors.

The Prime Minister said that he had no doubt that Pakistan-Egypt relations will be further strengthened during Seema Naqvi’s tenure of assignment in Egypt.

The meeting was also attended by some senior foreign ministry officials.
 
“The Constitution is not an instrument for the government to restrain the people,
it's an instrument for the people to restrain the government.” – Patrick Henry

>>> Global Gulag Media & Forum <<<

Offline bigron

  • Moderator
  • Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 22,124
  • RON PAUL FOR PRESIDENT 2012
Re: Coming War With Pakistan??? - Post News About Pakistan Here
« Reply #44 on: July 22, 2008, 12:49:32 PM »
Senior al-Qaida leader gives interview, urges Pakistanis to help Afghans fight US

By MUNIR AHMAD
The Associated Press
http://abcnews.go.com/International/wireStory?id=5422703



ISLAMABAD, Pakistan



A senior al-Qaida leader has urged Pakistanis to help Afghans fight U.S.-led coalition forces and condemned President Pervez Musharraf for arresting Arab and Afghan fighters and handing them over to Washington.

In a rare on-camera interview given to Pakistan's Geo TV and broadcast late Monday, Mustafa Abu al-Yazeed reiterated al-Qaida's claim of responsibility for the June 2 suicide car bombing on the Danish embassy in Islamabad that killed six people.

Al-Yazeed, an al-Qaida commander in Afghanistan, praised Pakistani tribesmen for helping Afghans fight — a reference to the Taliban-led insurgency in the country — but lashed out at the Pakistan government.

"Pervez Musharraf and his government has committed crimes for which there are no examples in the entire world," he said.

Al-Yazeed said that secret organizations — an apparent reference to Pakistani spy agencies — had "arrested Arab mujahedeen and handed them over to infidel Americans."

"This is such an ugly spot on Pakistan's history which cannot be forgotten until doomsday," he said.

Geo TV said the interview was conducted a few days ago in the eastern Afghan province of Khost. The footage shows al-Yazeed wearing a white turban, black-rimmed glasses and brown jacket. It is filmed against a canvas backdrop with a rifle lying to his right side. He spoke Arabic during the interview, which was dubbed into Urdu for local audiences.

Al-Yazeed has previously made video statements distributed through al-Qaida's media arm, al-Sahab, but such an interview of an al-Qaida leader with a television network is rare.

Musharraf made Pakistan a key ally of the United States in its war on terror and rounded up hundreds of al-Qaida militants after the Sept. 11, 2001, attacks. The former army strongman has been sidelined since elections earlier this year, but Pakistan remains a Washington ally although it is facing growing criticism for failing to halt the infiltration of militants from its tribal regions into Afghanistan. Concern is also growing that al-Qaida leaders enjoy sanctuary in the tribal regions, including in Waziristan, which lies opposite Khost.

Al-Yazeed said the Islamabad embassy attack was launched in response to the publication of cartoons of Islam's prophet. The cartoons were originally published in Danish newspapers.

He said the man who carried out the attack was from the "holy land" of Mecca who had come to fight jihad in Afghanistan or Kashmir.

"But when infidels insulted the prophet, peace be upon him, he could not tolerate to live further with humiliation and said death is dearer to me in the way of God," he said.

Al-Yazeed first claimed al-Qaida's responsibility for the attack in an Internet posting soon after the bombing.

In the interview, he called for more Pakistanis to fight in Afghanistan — where U.S. and NATO forces back the elected government that succeeded the hard-line Taliban regime ousted in 2001.

"Thanks be to God" that Muslims from Pakistan's tribal regions are continuing to help Afghans, he said.

"In fact it is obligatory for them to render this help and is a responsibility that is imposed by religion. It is not only obligatory for residents of the tribal regions but all of Pakistan," he said.

————


Offline Truth Warrior

  • Member
  • *
  • Posts: 37
Re: Coming War With Pakistan??? - Post News About Pakistan Here
« Reply #45 on: July 22, 2008, 11:52:39 PM »
White people are making WAR WITH THE EARTH!!!!

Offline Biggs

  • Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 7,440
Re: Coming War With Pakistan??? - Post News About Pakistan Here
« Reply #46 on: July 23, 2008, 07:50:20 AM »
White people are making WAR WITH THE EARTH!!!!

do shut up, it is not about white or brown or black and never really was.
STOP THE KILLING NOW
END THE CRIMINAL SIEGE OF GAZA - FREE PALESTINE!!!!!!!

Offline chris jones

  • Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 21,685
Re: Coming War With Pakistan??? - Post News About Pakistan Here
« Reply #47 on: July 24, 2008, 09:33:23 AM »
Notice something not emphasized, TROOP WITHDRAWAL, as long as we stay , we will accuminlate more and more enemies.

Obama was for bombing Pakistan and still is, though now he wants Iran too.

Don't you agree with our illusrious leaders, our congress does, the SM's do, the sold outs do.

Hey depopulation at its finest, soon the entire world will want a peice of us. America, the land of freedom and justice for all, the rhetoric of old is not the pathway of the new.

When is enough , enough. Well we can't run to the moon now can we, so what are we going to do.

Every illuminated and prophetic human being have revolted agaisnt this evil, most were assassinated, some still remain.

I am a freeman, they will not make me a slave, they may kill me, but NEVER will I bow to these freaks or their power, or sell myself for the money.

My conscience is one son of a bich, If i betray it I pay, i prefer a two tap.

How many want to see the kids, the children of this nation, brainwashed slaves, freedoms erased and replaced with servitude.
do shut up, it is not about white or brown or black and never really was.

Offline Optimus

  • Globalist Destroyer
  • Global Moderator
  • Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 12,802
    • GlobalGulag.com
Re: Coming War With Pakistan??? - Post News About Pakistan Here
« Reply #48 on: July 24, 2008, 11:07:18 AM »
Pakistan hits out at Afghan government
http://www.inthenews.co.uk/news/world/autocodes/countries/pakistan/pakistan-hits-out-at-afghan-government-$1233236.htm
Thursday, 24 Jul 2008 14:49

Pakistani foreign minister Shah Mahmood Qureshi has criticised the Afghan government's stance on security over their mutual border.

Taliban-supporting militants are widely known to retreat across the Pakistani-Afghan border to safe havens in the former's federally administered tribal areas (Fata).

Around 40,000 crossings take place each day and Pakistan today indicated its growing frustration with efforts to tackle the problem by Hamid Karzai's government in Kabul.

"We feel that the effort on the other side is somewhat lacking," Mr Qureshi told an audience at the International Institute of Strategic Studies in London on his first official visit to Britain.

"We cannot do it alone. The government of Afghanistan has to be equally supportive."

There are nearly 1,000 checkpoints on the Pakistani side of the border but not even 100 on the Afghan side, he pointed out.

Mr Qureshi said Pakistan's support for the introduction of biometric ID cards had been met with reluctance by Kabul and that proposals for the use of stickers on vehicles had also been met with doubts.

He added: "It deeply hurts us when there are accusatory statements from Afghanistan that we are endangering their security."

There are 100,000 Pakistani troops in the border region which Afghanistan has voiced concerns over. The bulk of pressure on their role comes from the international community, however, with most suspecting Islamabad of reluctance to tackle the issue.

Fraser Nelson in this week's Spectator even accused the Pakistani government of engaging in a "dangerous double game" on the issue, suggesting many believe the Pakistani government, army and intelligence services all have their own reasons for prevaricating.

Mr Qureshi addressed such concerns head on. "Begin to trust us. Believe what we're saying," he said.

"This menace of terrorism is our concern as much as it is yours. We are concerned and very serious in dealing with this extremist terrorist element.

But he added: "The elected government feels that the military option is not the only option that should be exercised."
“The Constitution is not an instrument for the government to restrain the people,
it's an instrument for the people to restrain the government.” – Patrick Henry

>>> Global Gulag Media & Forum <<<

Offline Optimus

  • Globalist Destroyer
  • Global Moderator
  • Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 12,802
    • GlobalGulag.com
Re: Coming War With Pakistan??? - Post News About Pakistan Here
« Reply #49 on: July 25, 2008, 01:20:00 PM »
US, Australia press Pakistan on Afghan border security
http://afp.google.com/article/ALeqM5jC-b7bkgj6HaclMz6JbzKNldl3zg
July 25, 2008

PERTH, Australia (AFP) — The United States and Australia on Friday urged Pakistan to do more to control militant activity in its border areas to stem the growing insurgency in Afghanistan.

The call came at a joint news conference by Australian Foreign Minister Stephen Smith and US Secretary of State Condoleezza Rice, who was on a brief visit to the West Australian capital Perth.

"What we need to do is look hard at how the Taliban is regrouping, why the Taliban is fighting in the way they are now," Rice said in response to a question about Pakistan's efforts along the border.

"They generally are taken on and defeated pretty handily when they come in actual military formations.

"But certainly there's an uptick in the terrorism, not just against forces but against the Afghan people," Rice said. "And in that regard, everybody needs to do more. But Pakistan does need to do more."

Afghan and Western officials say supporters of the former Taliban regime and Al-Qaeda have been able to regroup in Pakistan's semi-autonomous tribal areas after they were expelled from Afghanistan in 2001 in a US-led invasion.

"We understand that it's difficult, we understand the North West Frontier area is difficult. But militants cannot be allowed to organise there and to plan there and to engage across the borders," Rice said.

Smith described the area as "a hotbed of terrorism," saying that what happened there had regional and international consequences.

"We are very concerned about the Afghanistan-Pakistan border area and we don't believe that can be regarded as a bilateral matter between Pakistan and Afghanistan," he said.

"This is an area where both the regional community and the international community needs to do more. We do need to engage Pakistan more in a dialogue," he said, adding that he had raised the issue with Islamabad.

Pakistani Prime Minister Yousuf Raza Gilani is expected to face searching questions about his commitment to fighting Taliban and Al-Qaeda militants along the Afghan border when he flies to Washington this weekend.

Gilani's visit comes amid mounting fears in Pakistan that the United States is prepared to launch military "hot pursuit" raids into the troubled Pakistani tribal belt as attacks soar in Afghanistan.

US military commanders have reported a 40 percent rise in militant attacks on parts of eastern Afghanistan since Pakistan's new government launched peace talks with Taliban rebels in the tribal belt.

Deaths of western troops in Afghanistan have exceeded those in Iraq for the last two months, while the bombing of the Indian embassy in Kabul and a militant raid that killed nine US troops this month have also set alarm bells ringing.

But Pakistani officials have warned that an increase in US missile strikes in the tribal belt, coupled with a hardening of Washington's rhetoric, are undermining the new government's ability to take on militants.

Rice, who was on a brief informal visit to Smith's hometown of Perth, earlier visited the barracks of the elite special forces unit which has served alongside US troops in Iraq and Afghanistan in recent years.

She also honoured Australia's war dead by laying a wreath at the cenotaph in the city's Kings Park. Australia has about 1,000 troops in Afghanistan. Five have been killed in the past nine months.

Rice later left Perth for a visit to New Zealand.
“The Constitution is not an instrument for the government to restrain the people,
it's an instrument for the people to restrain the government.” – Patrick Henry

>>> Global Gulag Media & Forum <<<

Offline bigron

  • Moderator
  • Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 22,124
  • RON PAUL FOR PRESIDENT 2012
Re: Coming War With Pakistan??? - Post News About Pakistan Here
« Reply #50 on: July 25, 2008, 03:02:57 PM »
Don’t mention the Afghan–Pakistan war

Fraser NelsonWednesday, 23rd July 2008

http://www.spectator.co.uk//the-magazine/features/852816/dont-mention-the-afghanpakistan-war.thtml


Both Britain and America are reluctant to admit it but, says Fraser Nelson, our most pressing foreign policy problem is what to do about Pakistan, a nuclear-armed state in which terrorists have taken sanctuary

At a recent dinner party in the British embassy in Kabul, one of the guests referred to ‘the Afghan-Pakistan war’. The rest of the table fell silent. This is the truth that dare not speak its name. Even mentioning it in private in the Afghan capital’s green zone is enough to solicit murmurs of disapproval. Few want to accept that the war is widening; that it now involves Pakistan, a country with an unstable government and nuclear weapons.

But in fact the military commanders know that they are dealing with far more than just a domestic insurgency. Weapons, men and suicide bombers are flooding in from Pakistan every day. Like it or not, war is being waged on Afghanistan from Pakistan.

Consider the evidence: British forces in Helmand have achieved striking success in repelling the Taleban, but they can never eliminate the enemy entirely because of the constant stream of new recruits flowing over the border from the Pakistani town of Quetta. To Brigadier Mark Carleton-Smith, head of Taskforce Helmand, it is a source of deep frustration. ‘When pushed out of Helmand, the opportunities are there for the Taleban to recruit, equip and retrain on the other side of the border,’ he told me when I visited two months ago.

In theory, the Pakistani government has signed up to the war on terror and is trying as best it can to help us. But in practice, it is playing a dangerous double game. The Pakistani government, army and intelligence services all have their own distinct reasons for keeping the Taleban in business. The Pakistan army effectively ceded Quetta to the Taleban six years ago, for example, hoping their brutal methods would deal with local Baluchistan separatists.

Inside the UK Ministry of Defence the name Quetta is spat out like a curse by British commanders who know they are fighting a lopsided war. ‘We have to start looking at this area as a whole battlefield, Pakistan included,’ one senior MoD source tells me. ‘Because that’s what the locals are doing. We have to think the same way.’ But they cannot admit as much in public. Handling an insurgency is one thing, but any war involving a nuclear-armed country like Pakistan is almost too frightening a prospect to consider.

Quietly, the problem of Pakistan’s terrorist-infested border areas has overtaken Iran to become the British government’s most acute foreign policy challenge. In fact, the Federally Administered Tribal Areas (Fata) of Pakistan can lay good claim to be the most prolific terrorist zone anywhere in the world, thanks to its substantial al-Qa’eda camps. The London, Madrid, Bali and Islamabad bombings were all planned there. MI5 believe half the British terror suspects they are currently monitoring were originally trained in Fata camps.

The problem is becoming too big to ignore. There are an estimated 8,000 foreign militants in Fata, from Arabs to Chechens, operating sophisticated training camps with impunity.

The American failure to understand the complexity of the Pakistan problem is perhaps one of the biggest strategic errors of the war in Afghanistan. President Pervaiz Musharraf reluctantly agreed to join the war on terror, and Washington was keen to take him at his word. But as the Taleban fell, the Pakistani security establishment opened an escape hatch for the enemy by removing their troops from the border of the Fata, allowing the Taleban to relocate. The jihadis now have bases, broadcasting stations and the protection of being in a territory that is part of a nuclear-armed state. The West invaded Afghanistan to stop terrorism being given a state home. Yet al-Qa’eda is alive, well and living in Fata.

Just what to do about this is a source of deep division in Washington. Pakistan is deeply nervous about any American incursions into its territory — even if it is territory like Fata where the Pakistan army itself suffered heavy losses at the hands of the Taleban. Britain is pushing hard for a diplomatic solution, saying that no incursion can succeed without the backing of the Pakistani military, which is geared up to fight India, not to track down insurgents. And anyway, after years of failed policy, and being played like a fiddle by President Musharraf, America is losing patience. The Pentagon provided helicopter gunships to Musharraf that were intended for fighting the Taleban — only to see them used to mow down separatists in the Baluchistan province.

America is increasingly taking matters into its own hands. First came the attacks from the unmanned drone aircraft, then the occasional missiles into known al-Qa’eda camps. Last month saw a further escalation. The US Air Force sanctioned an air strike targeted at militants, but it killed 11 members of the Frontier Corps — the Raj-era defence force which is supposed to be keeping the militants in check. The Americans refused to apologise despite demands from Pakistan that it do so. The Frontier Corps’ uselessness, says the Pentagon, led to a 50 per cent rise in cross-border attacks. ‘They’re pretty much tribals themselves,’ said Dan McNeill, an American general who stepped down as head of Nato forces in Afghanistan last month.

General McNeill has a point. The Fata is an ideal home for al-Qa’eda because it is so extraordinarily undeveloped. It has intentionally been left as a black hole, with no laws and no rights. Its penal system is the Frontier Crimes Regulation introduced by the British Raj in 1901 to repress unruly tribesmen. This suited Pakistan’s purposes well. Men were granted the vote in 1996 but Pakistan political parties are banned from operating here. It was the ideal conduit for America to ship arms to the mujahideen in the 1980s. Now, it is an ideal breeding ground for militias.

Like so many of the world’s problems, Fata can be traced back to a Brit with a map and a marker pen — Sir Mortimer Durand — who drew the border between Pakistan and Afghanistan. Afghanistan and Pakistan have never agreed on where it is and anyway the border is ignored both by the Taleban and the dozen other militant groups understood to be crossing it every day. Its sole significance for the jihadis is that it is a line beyond which no American or Brit can chase them.

But this is what looks likely to change. In Barack Obama’s visit to Afghanistan last weekend, the message of the would-be next president was that he would not be quite so squeamish about taking the fight over this border. ‘If Pakistan cannot or will not act, we will take out high-level terrorist targets like bin Laden if we have them in our sights,’ he said. He later concluded that, ‘If we don’t get a handle on that border region, we are going to continue to have problems,’ explicitly placing Pakistan as part of the problem.

Mr Obama said he would send two more brigades to Afghanistan. John McCain, his Republican rival, said he would deploy three — some 10,000 men. So one can tell which way American policy is heading. Rather than a retreat from Afghanistan, there will be a Rhineland-style American military presence there designed to last for a generation. The question is whether to wait for the Fata, Waziristan and other border areas to be policed properly — or just to go in and get the bad guys.

Another character will play a large part in this decision: General David Petraeus, author of the successful ‘surge’ strategy in Iraq. His next job is running US Central Command, overseeing both the Afghanistan and Iraq conflicts. Even before he was formally appointed, he let it be known he had started talks with Pakistan about their counter-insurgency operations.

The idea of American incursions into Pakistani territory deeply unnerves Britain, and has even been discussed in Cabinet. ‘It would be a disaster — I don’t even want to think about the consequences,’ one minister tells me. But the Foreign Office regards such talk as far-fetched. For his part, Mr Miliband is putting a marker down. ‘There is no military solution to the problems of the Fata,’ he said in a speech recently.

Yet the omens point towards a deterioration. The Afghan government has openly accused Pakistani intelligence of being behind a failed attempt to assassinate Hamid Karzai, its President, and claims to have mobile phone records to substantiate this. For his part, Mr Karzai has said Afghan troops are prepared to chase militants into Pakistani territory if they flee to Fata — which caused uproar in Islamabad. Such claims and counter-claims dominate the press in Kabul and Islamabad.

Pakistan may buckle first. Yousuf Raza Gilani, its new Prime Minister, will lay out plans to hunt the foreign militants in Fata on Monday. Everyone knows his government’s writ does not extend there, but his speech will be a welcome gesture. A firmer sign of progress was the arrest last Sunday of a senior Taleban commander. Whatever information he yielded must have been fruitful because a few hours later, just after midnight, a guided British precision missile landed in a Helmand village and killed Abdul Rasaq, the third Taleban leader to be killed by the British in as many weeks.

It is accepted by Britain, America and all in the Nato operation that the word ‘Afghanistan war’ is insufficient to describe the problem. The troops I spoke to on my visit to Helmand were fond of the toothpaste tube analogy: squeeze a problem from one end, and it comes out the other. The Taleban have not been defeated, they have simply been moved — and over a border where Nato troops cannot follow. The original objective of depriving al-Qa’eda of a base can only be met by sorting out Pakistan and its badlands. This realisation does not make the task any easier.

A century ago, Britain left the puzzle of the Fata unsolved. Lord Curzon, Viceroy of India, then described its border as ‘the razor’s edge on which hang suspended the modern issues of war and peace, of life and death to nations’. As Britain and America brace themselves for the next phase of this expanding Afghan conflict, there will be plenty of time to reflect on how frighteningly true these words remain.


Offline Optimus

  • Globalist Destroyer
  • Global Moderator
  • Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 12,802
    • GlobalGulag.com
Re: Coming War With Pakistan??? - Post News About Pakistan Here
« Reply #51 on: July 25, 2008, 03:34:12 PM »


Vol. 72/No. 30      July 28, 2008

http://www.themilitant.com/2008/7230/723001.html

U.S. escalates war in Afghanistan, Pakistan
Obama, McCain call for more troops

(lead article)
 
BY SAM MANUEL
 
WASHINGTON—After meeting with Afghanistan’s president Hamid Karzai in Kabul July 20, Barack Obama, the presumptive Democratic nominee for U.S. president, reiterated his call to send at least two more U.S. combat brigades, about 7,000 troops, to fight the Taliban and its supporters in Afghanistan.
 
Five days earlier in a campaign stop in Albuquerque, John McCain, the presumptive Republican nominee, said he would send three combat brigades to Afghanistan.

The convergence of McCain’s and Obama’s views on one of the central fronts in Washington’s “global war on terror” is in line with the course the U.S. military has carried out for several months now, including stepped up combat operations by U.S. and NATO troops in Afghanistan and increasing use of air strikes from fighter jets and Predator drones in Pakistan.

Afghanistan was the second stop of a Middle East tour by Obama, after visiting U.S. troops in Kuwait. The tour also includes Iraq, Jordan, and Israel.

Before his departure Obama gave a speech July 15 at the Ronald Reagan Building here outlining his views. The Illinois senator said that Iraq is not the central front in the “war on terror” and that he would be “taking the fight to al-Qaeda in Afghanistan and Pakistan.” He would also seek larger troop contributions from NATO and fewer restrictions on the use of their troops.

Calling the tribal regions in Pakistan the “greatest threat to security,” Obama said, “We need more troops, more helicopters, more satellites, more Predator drones in the Afghan border region. And we must make it clear that if Pakistan cannot or will not act, we will take out high-level terrorist targets like [Osama] bin Laden if we have them in our sights.”

Speaking the same day in Albuquerque, New Mexico, McCain called that remark “bluster” that makes it harder to get cooperation from the Afghani and Pakistani governments. But he made clear that he would also take military action in Pakistan. “When I am commander in chief, there will be nowhere the terrorists can run, and nowhere they can hide,” the Republican candidate said. 
 
Afghanistan surge
McCain has stressed his support for the surge of U.S. troops in Iraq when the Bush administration sent tens of thousands of additional troops there last year.

In his Albuquerque speech McCain said, “Senator Obama will tell you we can’t win in Afghanistan without losing in Iraq. In fact, he has it exactly backwards. It is precisely the success of the surge in Iraq that shows us the way to succeed in Afghanistan.”

Pointing to the increased size of the Iraqi army as part of the surge in Iraq, McCain said the size of the Afghan army needed to be at least doubled to around 160,000 troops.

McCain also said he would work to get agreement from NATO allies to have a single “supreme commander” of all coalition troops in Afghanistan. 
 
No ‘precipitous withdrawal’
In Iraq Obama met with Iraqi prime minister Nouri al-Maliki. An Iraqi government spokesman said afterward that “the Iraqi government believes the end of 2010 is the appropriate time for the withdrawal” of U.S. troops.

Obama has been criticized in the media for appearing to backtrack on his promise to withdraw U.S. troops from Iraq within 16 months of taking office. During a campaign stop in North Dakota on July 3 Obama said he was ready to “refine” his plans.

In an interview published in the July 8 online edition of the Military Times, Obama said he welcomed the opportunity to “correct the record.”

“This whole notion that I would initiate a precipitous withdrawal just isn’t borne out by anything I’ve said. What I have repeatedly said … is that we should be as careful getting out as we were careless getting in,” Obama said.

The Illinois senator further said that if the violence continued to subside and the Iraqi army and police continued to improve that he hoped troops could be drawn down in a deliberate fashion. “If, on the other hand, you’ve got a deteriorating situation for some reason, then that’s going to have to be taken into account,” he added.

Asked if he would keep any Bush appointees, Obama said that Defense Secretary Robert Gates “has brought a level of realism and professionalism and planning to the job that is worthy of praise.”

Obama was met at the Baghdad airport by Gen. David Petraeus and later flew with him by helicopter to the heavily fortified Green Zone that houses the U.S. embassy and Iraqi government offices.

Both Obama and McCain have congratulated Petraeus, the former head of U.S.-led troops in Iraq, and his former deputy, Lt. Gen. Raymond Odierno, on the confirmation of their promotions by the U.S. Senate July 10. Petraeus will now head the Central Command. Odierno will replace him as head of U.S.-led forces in Iraq. The almost unanimous Senate vote keeps together the two men most responsible for operations of the “surge” and integrates the two major fronts of Washington’s “global war on terror”—Iraq and Afghanistan.
“The Constitution is not an instrument for the government to restrain the people,
it's an instrument for the people to restrain the government.” – Patrick Henry

>>> Global Gulag Media & Forum <<<

Offline Optimus

  • Globalist Destroyer
  • Global Moderator
  • Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 12,802
    • GlobalGulag.com
Re: Coming War With Pakistan??? - Post News About Pakistan Here
« Reply #52 on: July 25, 2008, 03:49:17 PM »
Rebels could win Pakistan's nuke haven
http://www.theaustralian.news.com.au/story/0,25197,24078316-2703,00.html
Bruce Loudon, South Asia correspondent | July 26, 2008
 
A CRISIS meeting of Pakistan's new coalition Government has been warned that it could lose control of the North West Frontier Province, which is believed to hold most of its nuclear arsenal.

The warning came yesterday from the coalition leader, who, although he is part of the new Government, is regarded as having the closest links to al-Qa'ida and Taliban militants sweeping through the region.

Maulana Fazlur Rehman bluntly told his colleagues: "The North West Frontier province is breaking away from Pakistan. That is what is happening. That is the reality."

This came just days before new Prime Minister Yousuf Raza Gilani's scheduled meeting with US President George W. Bush to discuss al-Qa'ida and Taliban sanctuaries in Pakistan.

Reports last night said Maulana Fazlur Rehman, regarded as having unparalleled insight into the mood of the three million tribesmen in the NWFP, and leader of the Jamiat Ulema-e-Islam, was backed in his assessment by members of the coalition Government from the Awami National Party, which rules in the province's capital, Peshawar.

They, too, told the meeting of jihadi militant advances throughout the province, with their influence extending to most so-called "settled areas", including Peshawar.

Yesterday, the army was reported to have abruptly ended an operation in the Hangu district, close to Peshawar, after threats by militant leaders.

Maulana Fazlur Rehman and the ANP members blamed the worsening situation on "President (Pervez) Musharraf's eight-year policy to deal with the issue through the barrel of a gun, and the alliance with America".

The crisis meeting resolved to pursue dialogue with the jihadis, a policy derided by US and NATO-led forces in Afghanistan.

It also declared itself to be implacably opposed to US or other forces entering Pakistani territory to deal with the growing jihadi militancy.

Analysts in Islamabad believe the warning about the situation in the NWFP will prompt renewed concern about the security of Pakistan's nuclear arsenal.

US Secretary of State Condoleezza Rice, speaking in Australia, suggested the restive border region was the source of a surge in Taliban-related violence in Afghanistan, and said Pakistan needed to do more to prevent attacks.

"We understand that it's difficult, we understand that the North West Frontier area is difficult, but militants cannot be allowed to organise there and to plan there and to engage across the border," Dr Rice said.

"So, yes, more needs to be done."

Al-Qa'ida's operational commander in Afghanistan, a 53-year-old Egyptian named Mustafa Abu al-Yazid, was interviewed on Pakistani television yesterday and claimed the organisation's strength in Afghanistan was growing so rapidly it would "soon occupy the whole country".

He claimed that "the morale of our fighters in Afghanistan is very high and they are putting up a tough fight against US troops".

He also claimed responsibility in the interview for a terrorist attack on the Danish embassy in Islamabad.

The fact of the interview, as much as what he said, is seen as indicating an important new stage in the crisis.

"The bad guys are even popping up and giving television interviews: that's a reflection of what's happening," one foreign diplomat in Islamabad said last night.

A leading think tank warned this week about the Taliban's use of a media strategy to exaggerate their strength and undermine confidence in the Afghanistan Government.

The International Crisis Group says the administration and its backers must counter this propaganda if they are to defeat an insurgency "that is driving a dangerous wedge between them and the Afghan people", in a report entitled Taliban Propaganda: Winning the War of Words?

The Taliban now publicise their messages, warnings and claims of battle successes through a website, magazines, DVDs, cassettes, pamphlets, nationalist songs, poems and mobile telephones.

Audacious tactics such as the Kandahar jailbreak last month and the April assassination attempt on President Hamid Karzai show that the intent is to grab attention.

"The result is weakening public support for nation building, even though few actively support the Taliban," the report says.

It says the international community should also examine its own actions, adding the benefits of military action are outweighed by the alienation they cause.

"The Taliban is not going to be defeated militarily and is impervious to outside criticism," the ICG says.

"Rather, the legitimacy of its ideas and actions must be challenged more forcefully by theAfghan government and citizens."
“The Constitution is not an instrument for the government to restrain the people,
it's an instrument for the people to restrain the government.” – Patrick Henry

>>> Global Gulag Media & Forum <<<

Offline Optimus

  • Globalist Destroyer
  • Global Moderator
  • Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 12,802
    • GlobalGulag.com
Re: Coming War With Pakistan??? - Post News About Pakistan Here
« Reply #53 on: July 25, 2008, 05:23:45 PM »
Qazi Hussain Ahmad warns US against attack on Pakistan
http://www.daily.pk/national/nationalnews/88-nationalnews/6111-qazi-hussain-ahmad-warns-us-against-attack-on-pakistan.html
Saturday, 26 July 2008 00:00 www.daily.pk
   
Jamaat-e-Islami ameer Qazi Hussain Ahmad has warned America against attacking Pakistan, saying “If Washington committed the folly of invading Pakistan, the entire nation will fight against them and every citizen will turn into a freedom fighter”.

He was talking to newsmen after a meeting of JI Executive Council (Majlis-e-Amla) at Mansoorah on Thursday.

Qazi said national security was in serious dangers as the present government was playing into the hands of conspirators and the entire nation was being deliberately pushed towards frustration. “Prices are deliberately increased by unjustified raise in petrol, power, gas and edibles’ rates to force people to starve and be without basic necessities,” he said.

Qazi said the US-led NATO forces were positioned against Pakistan on Afghan border and had built underground bunkers, while on the other side Indian army was testing Pakistani forces by unprovoked opening of fire across the LoC in Neelum Valley. Qazi termed this situation a slap on the faces of those who called themselves a frontline ally of US in the war on terror and who had stabbed the Kashmir freedom struggle in the back by linking it to terrorism.

He also warned that Pakistan was being used to fight US war against Islam and Muslims, saying it was a matter of shame that Pakistani rulers were standing with the enemies against their own nation. Qazi said after taking people’s mandate, the rulers left them in troubled waters to take refuge in the luxuries of London and Dubai for their own interests. He said the country badly needed a trustworthy and sincere leadership which only the Jamaat-e-Islami could provide. He said the JI Central Executive meeting was called to give a message of hope to the nation by devising a strategy against anti-state conspiracies. He said the JI would organise the nation against American aggressive designs and welcome all forces joining this cause. He said the leadership of Iran and China would also be contacted in this regard.

He said the JI would launch a countrywide movement and its climax would be the party’s three-day annual congregations scheduled for October 24-26 in Lahore. He said this congregation would become a national congregation and public meetings and rallies would be held all over the country to mobilise people.

To a question, Qazi said he had contacted Dr Qadeer Khan who expressed serious disappointment with the present rulers.

He said quoting Dr Qadeer that the government was misguiding the nation about his situation and he was still under detention and facing strong restrictions. Qazi said Dr Qadeer has expressed desire that nation should launch a movement for regaining its sovereignty and security.
“The Constitution is not an instrument for the government to restrain the people,
it's an instrument for the people to restrain the government.” – Patrick Henry

>>> Global Gulag Media & Forum <<<

Offline Optimus

  • Globalist Destroyer
  • Global Moderator
  • Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 12,802
    • GlobalGulag.com
Re: Coming War With Pakistan??? - Post News About Pakistan Here
« Reply #54 on: July 26, 2008, 10:01:22 AM »
Pakistan Rejects Allied Security
SKYNEWS.COM
1:12pm UK, Saturday July 26, 2008

Alistair Bunkall, Sky News reporter

The Pakistani Foreign Minister has told Sky News that British and American troops would not be welcome in Pakistan.

Shah Mahmood Quereshi said allied troops were not required to help secure the border between Pakistan and Afghanistan, a tribal area considered to be a breeding ground for terrorism.

Speaking in London during a three-day visit to Britain, he said: "The security (of foreign troops) would become an issue.

"They'd be unwelcome not just by the government but by the people. It would be unproductive. We are of the view that our troops are capable of dealing with the situation. But we have to focus on the unwanted element that want to slip in."

There is a feeling among Western governments that if the war in Afghanistan is to be successful, then the tribal areas must be made secure and militants must be prevented from launching attacks in both countries.

Pakistan has already committed 100,000 troops to the area and created one thousand manned border crossings.

"We have floated some ideas with the Afghan government, but we feel an equal response should come from the other side of the border," said Mr Quereshi.

"We would like to see allied troops manning the border effectively, but on the other side, in Afghanistan."

Recently the governments of Pakistan and Afghanistan have fallen out, with Hamid Khazi, the Afghan President, blaming his neighbours for terrorist attacks in his country.

Earlier this month he went as far as saying: "The murder, killing, destruction, dishonouring and insecurity in Afghanistan is carried out by the intelligence administration of Pakistan."

But Mr Quereshi disputes that.

"When Hamid Karzai makes that statement, he should also look at the construction efforts Pakistan has made in Afghanistan," he said. "I think knee-jerk reactions and such statements do not enable an environment of co-operation."

As part of his visit to Britain, Mr Quereshi has met with Defence Secretary Des Browne and Foreign Secretary David Miliband.

Talks about how to improve the security situation in Pakistan are understood to be on the agenda.

“The Constitution is not an instrument for the government to restrain the people,
it's an instrument for the people to restrain the government.” – Patrick Henry

>>> Global Gulag Media & Forum <<<

Offline Optimus

  • Globalist Destroyer
  • Global Moderator
  • Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 12,802
    • GlobalGulag.com
Re: Coming War With Pakistan??? - Post News About Pakistan Here
« Reply #55 on: July 27, 2008, 01:42:47 PM »
Looks like Al-CIA-duh is trying to stir up another war between Pakistan and India.


India in lockdown as terror spreads
http://www.theaustralian.news.com.au/story/0,25197,24085689-2703,00.html
Bruce Loudon, South Asia correspondent | July 28, 2008

MAJOR cities and strategic buildings across India were locked down last night after a weekend of Islamic terrorist violence plunged the country into its worst security crisis in years.

Units of the Rapid Action Force were deployed in the city of Ahmedabad, capital of the western state of Gujarat, where more than 40 people were killed and 150 injured in a series of bomb blasts claimed by a fundamentalist Muslim group known as the Indian Mujahideen.

Authorities announced that personnel from the Central Industrial Protection Force would be deployed to protect the country's $40 billion-a-year IT and outsourcing industry after nine bombs ripped through the southern city of Bangalore that is itshub.

Two people died and scores were injured in the Bangalore attacks, which intelligence services believe are linked to the recruitment of as many as 25,000 supporters by al-Qa'ida.

Reports yesterday suggested that the al-Qa'ida-linked groups accused of involvement in the bombings - notably the Students Islamic Movement of India - are targeting software "techies" working in the IT industry, seeking support. It is claimed they have established a potent network of backers in the key city, which is home to more than 1600 IT companies.

"Low intensity blasts, high intensity impact" was how the Economic Times summed up the Bangalore blasts yesterday.

"The sort of widespread fear and panic that was seen in Bangalore after the blasts is just what they want to see and what the jihadists have been aiming at," security expert Balram Singh said last night.

"It's exactly the sort of very potent message they want to send out - that the hub of our global IT and outsourcing industry is under attack and unsafe.

"Together with the attacks inAhmedabad and the mayhem that was caused there, this represents a huge crisis for the Government. Time and again it is showing itself completely impotent in dealing with terrorism."

Last night, as security bosses led by Home Minister Shivraj Patil met in New Delhi, the Government was under pressure over the way in which it scrapped the Prevention of Terrorism Act when it came to power more than four years ago.

"The latest terrorist acts have again highlighted the need for a firm and effective anti-terrorist legal framework," said opposition leader Lal Krishna Advani, who said a security law passed by the Gujarat state assembly had been awaiting presidential assent for four years.

In the hunt for those behind the attacks, fingers were pointed at Pakistan and Pakistan-based jihadi groups working with the country's central intelligence agency, the ISI.

In Ahmedabad, Chief Minister Narendra Modi pledged action, declaring: "The land of Mahatma Gandhi (who came from Gujarat) has been bloodied by terrorists, whom we shall not spare.

"We are at war," he said.

Nine bombs went off in Bangalore in shopping malls, bus shelters and hospitals.

The hospitals bombed in Bangalore were those to which victims were rushed from explosions elsewhere in the city.

Bombs went off as emergency staff were working on casualties.

The bombs, each about as potent as a hand grenade, were placed in buses and other areas, and yesterday public transport across the city was suspended.

In a 14-page manifesto titled "The Rise of Jihad", emailed to television stations just before the Ahmedabad blasts, the Indian Mujahideen group, which had earlier claimed responsibility for a Jaipur bombing in May, said the bombings in the Gujarati capital had been carried out to avenge anti-Muslim violence in the city four years ago in which 2000 people died.

"In the light of the injustice and wrongs on the Muslims of Gujarat, we advance our jihad and call all our brethren under it to unite and answer those irresolute kafireen (infidels) of India," it said.

The group warned of future attacks.

The arrest and interrogation of key SIMI leaders over recent months by police in Karnataka, of which Bangalore is the state capital, is said to have "confirmedhow deeply embedded the local fundamentalist outfit is in the state".

The Economic Times has reported that during the past three years, more than 25,000 supporters had been inducted into the organisation.

The paper said security officials believed Bangalore was the major target of Islamic militants "keen to get techies into their fold".

“The Constitution is not an instrument for the government to restrain the people,
it's an instrument for the people to restrain the government.” – Patrick Henry

>>> Global Gulag Media & Forum <<<

Offline Optimus

  • Globalist Destroyer
  • Global Moderator
  • Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 12,802
    • GlobalGulag.com
Re: Coming War With Pakistan??? - Post News About Pakistan Here
« Reply #56 on: July 27, 2008, 01:50:00 PM »
July 26, 2008 
Pakistani PM May Be Pincushion for U.S. Frustration
http://www.antiwar.com/lobe/?articleid=13203
by Jim Lobe

When Pakistani Prime Minister Yousuf Raza Gilani begins his first official visit here at the White House Monday, the welcome is likely to be a little warmer than he might wish.

Pakistan, which is beset by both a thriving Taliban insurgency and its worst inflation in some 30 years, has become a serious source of frustration and anxiety to top U.S. policymakers who have become increasingly direct in blaming Islamabad for the deteriorating situation in neighboring Afghanistan.

"No question ... that some extremists are coming out of parts of Pakistan into Afghanistan," Gilani's White House host, President George W. Bush, told reporters earlier this month after Afghan President Hamid Karzai charged that Islamabad's intelligence agency was aiding the insurgency.

"That's troubling to us, troubling to Afghanistan, and it should be troubling to Pakistan," he noted, adding that Washington would investigate Karzai's allegations.

Top U.S. military officials, including both the chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, Adm. Michael Mullen, and the head of NATO forces in Afghanistan, Gen. David McKiernan, have also publicly expressed growing frustration with Pakistan. According to a London Times report, Mullen reportedly warned privately during a visit to Islamabad earlier this month that Washington would take unilateral military action if Pakistan did not move more aggressively to stanch the flow of fighters across the border into Afghanistan.

Nor is it just the incumbent policymakers who are complaining. Both major presidential candidates, Democratic Sen. Barack Obama and Republican Sen. John McCain, have echoed Bush's complaints as concern about Afghanistan has gained prominence in the election campaign.

In a major policy address on the eve of his current trip to Afghanistan and other overseas destinations, Obama took an even more hawkish position than those of both the administration and McCain, reiterating a controversial threat he first made early this year that Washington would not "tolerate a terrorist sanctuary" inside Pakistan.

"We must make it clear that if Pakistan cannot or will not act, we will take out high-level terrorist targets if we have them in our sights," he declared, suggesting that such targets might include indigenous Pakistani Taliban leaders, such as Baitullah Mehsud, as well as al Qaeda chiefs who are believed to be sheltered by their Taliban hosts in the Federally Administered Tribal Areas (FATA).

Such threats and complaints have put Gilani in an extremely difficult position.

His government, which was already weakened by the withdrawal of former President Nawaz Sharif's Pakistan Muslim League (N) from the ruling coalition two months ago, now faces a growing economic crisis due to skyrocketing food and fuel prices and shortages in water and electricity that have spurred protests and even outbreaks of violence in some of Pakistan's biggest urban areas.

Despite a brief offensive late last month by the paramilitary Frontiers Corps and police, the Pakistani Taliban forces appear to have tightened their siege of Peshawar, capital of the North-West Frontier Province (NWFP). This growing influence and control of the Pakistani Taliban and its allies both within FATA and beyond has contributed to the sense here that the new government has no strategy for dealing with the insurgency.

"The Taliban is moving forward in a very calculated way," Pervez Hoodbhoy, a prominent Pakistani commentator, told an audience at the Middle East Institute (MEI) here earlier this month.

He warned that the insurgency's ambitions to replace secular and tribal law with Sharia, or Islamic law, extended far beyond the Pashtun-dominated regions of the country. Although much of Pakistan's "establishment is in denial", he said the Taliban's latest moves should be seen as a "stepping stone to the rest of Pakistan".

Even if his government were inclined to take on the Taliban, however, it is not clear that Gilani could get the support or cooperation of the powerful Pakistani military which, under Gen. Ashfaz Kayani as with his predecessors, has reportedly shown little interest in pursuing the kind of aggressive counter-insurgency strategy that Washington believes is necessary.

U.S. officials have grown increasingly disenchanted with Kayani, whose replacement of President Pervez Musharraf last fall had fueled hopes that he could persuade the army that it faced a greater threat from the Taliban and its al Qaeda allies than from India.

But, to date, Kayani has followed in Musharraf's footsteps by quietly negotiating ceasefires with the militants while building up the military's conventional forces.

"It has no intention of fighting a U.S. proxy war in the tribal territories," according to ret. Brigadier F.B. Ali. "It also knows that the U.S. will continue to pay it large subsidies to ensure the safeguarding of he U.S. supply lines to Afghanistan (and the country's nuclear weapons)."

Indeed, Washington's willingness to continue paying such subsidies was very much in evidence this week when the New York Times reported that the Bush administration wanted to use 227 million dollars of a 300-million-dollar military aid package approved by Congress this year to help the Pakistani military buy equipment, such as helicopters and reconnaissance aircraft, useful for counter-insurgency, to upgrade some of its F-16 fighter jets instead.

While the State Department said the F-16s could be used to combat terrorism, some analysts dismissed that notion, suggesting that, by approving such a shift, Washington was effectively undermining its efforts to persuade the military that counter-insurgency should be its top priority.

For his part, Gilani is expected to appeal for more economic assistance, which his government has long argued is critical to defeating or containing the insurgents in any event. Washington has provided some 10 billion dollars in aid to Pakistan since 2002, but almost all of it has been military assistance.

On the aid issue, he will receive a particularly a favorable reception from Democrats, including Obama, who recently endorsed a pending proposal in Congress to triple non-military aid for Pakistan to 1.5 billion dollars a year, much of it targeted at FATA. The administration has also conceded the case for more assistance but has not yet made a specific proposal.

On the Taliban, Gilani will plead, above all, for patience and no doubt warn against any unilateral military action by the U.S. for which there is a growing clamors here, particularly in the aftermath of the Taliban attack earlier this month close to the border in Afghanistan in which nine U.S. soldiers were killed.

"Bombing is going to make things worse," Hoodbhoy told the Institute. "Don't even think of it. ... For every innocent civilian killed, you will create 100 Taliban. It would be a catastrophe for the rest of Pakistan."
 
“The Constitution is not an instrument for the government to restrain the people,
it's an instrument for the people to restrain the government.” – Patrick Henry

>>> Global Gulag Media & Forum <<<

Offline Optimus

  • Globalist Destroyer
  • Global Moderator
  • Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 12,802
    • GlobalGulag.com
Re: Coming War With Pakistan??? - Post News About Pakistan Here
« Reply #57 on: July 28, 2008, 11:51:51 AM »
US suspected behind missile attacks in Pakistan
http://www.merinews.com/catFull.jsp?articleID=138406
On Monday noon a religious school in south Waziristan, Pakistan was hit by missiles in which six people were killed. Pakistan authorities suspect it to be the handiwork of America as its aircrafts have been raiding militant strongholds in the region..
CJ: T. Iqbal ,  46 minutes ago


MISSILE ATTACKS in Pakistan have killed at least six people on the bordering area with Afghanistan. The missiles hit a religious school in a village today. Pakistan’s intelligence sources and media confirmed the news. Till now no militant organisation or a country has claimed responsibility. But, fingers are being raised at the United States because in the recent past its military aircrafts have been conducting air raids against militia outfits’ hideouts in the forest territory of Pakistan.


The strikes are also associated with the arrival of Pakistan’s prime minister at the White House. The American and other international organisations have been putting pressure on Pakistan to track the presence of Taliban and Al Qaeda hideouts its territory.


The state-run television news channel reported that the missiles zoomed in onto Azam Warsak, which is a rural town in south Waziristan zone. It confirmed the death of six school staff and many more injured. The school has been imparting education in Islamic studies to primary children.


According to an official based in Tank, a neighbouring town in south Waziristan, among those who died there were three children.



Over the past few months, United States have been carrying out air attacks in the Afghanistan-Pakistan bordering region for wiping out suspected militant strongholds. This has caused a rift in the bilateral relations between the two countries after the new government took charge of the office in April. The Pakistan government is however, trying to make ceasefire pacts in its mountainous border zone along with Afghanistan to check infiltration of Taliban ultras who are suspected of being actively involved in gory suicide attacks in the strife-torn nation.
“The Constitution is not an instrument for the government to restrain the people,
it's an instrument for the people to restrain the government.” – Patrick Henry

>>> Global Gulag Media & Forum <<<

Offline Optimus

  • Globalist Destroyer
  • Global Moderator
  • Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 12,802
    • GlobalGulag.com
Re: Coming War With Pakistan??? - Post News About Pakistan Here
« Reply #58 on: July 28, 2008, 12:02:27 PM »
Pakistan says US raids harm relations
http://www.presstv.ir/detail.aspx?id=65013&sectionid=351020401
Mon, 28 Jul 2008 19:13:52
 

US drones armed with missiles
step up patrols over Pakistan's
border

 
Pakistan's top military officer has warned visiting US general of damaging bilateral ties caused by repeated US missile strikes in Pakistan.

General Tariq Majid, chairman of Pakistan's Joint Chiefs of Staff warned the visiting head of US Central Command, Lieutenant General Martin Dempsey of straining ties between the two countries hours after US missile strikes in Pakistan territory left six dead.

'Our sovereignty and territorial integrity must be respected, any violation in this regard could be detrimental to bilateral relations,' General Majid said in a meeting with Dempsey in the garrison town of Rawalpindi on Monday.

He "also reemphasized that Pakistan armed forces are capable of handling any challenges to our security."

The US-led coalition forces in Afghanistan early Monday launched a missile that landed in South Waziristan tribal region and killed six people including three boys.

More than 60 civilians have been killed in this year's US strikes in Pakistan from Afghan territory.

Pakistan's tribal areas are believed to be hide-out for Taliban and al-Qaeda militants who carry out cross-border attacks on international forces and Afghan troops.

Pakistan has been under pressure from the US and other coalition partners to stop the militants from entering Afghanistan. The peace talks between the Pakistani government and the militants have also raised criticism from the opponents.

Afghan President Hamid Karzai blamed Pakistani Intelligence, the ISI, of involvement in the bombing of the Indian embassy in Kabul that left 60 people dead. But, General Majid said the "baseless allegations against Pakistan could affect mutual trust and would definitely influence our efforts in the war against terror." 
“The Constitution is not an instrument for the government to restrain the people,
it's an instrument for the people to restrain the government.” – Patrick Henry

>>> Global Gulag Media & Forum <<<

Offline STEVEX

  • Member
  • *
  • Posts: 43
Re: Coming War With Pakistan??? - Post News About Pakistan Here
« Reply #59 on: July 28, 2008, 02:12:00 PM »
Let  see what become of the U.S. trojan Winner?.

In this corner we have the U.S. trojan warriors. KNOWEN to fight 99% of the world wars. WINS -unknowen. A RICH nation of massive nuclear POWER. protected by the N.A.U  borders (mexico and canada).NO working force = the ultimat POLICE/WAR state. Fighting for good of god ::)

In this corner we have POOR quality people. KNOWEN to have nothing to lose but a life (THUGS). Fighting for another good of god. ::)

the only thing in common is the good of god. LET THE FIGHTING BEGAIN.

H.E.L.P. = How. Every. Loser. Prospect.   (Goverment)         
 
J.O.B. = Jorney. Of the. Broke (We the People)
 
illegal business control america. The people have NO RIGHTS, only the right to DEATH.

Offline David Rothscum

  • Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 5,683
Re: Coming War With Pakistan??? - Post News About Pakistan Here
« Reply #60 on: July 28, 2008, 03:29:35 PM »
http://www.prisonplanet.com/pakistan-has-right-to-retaliate-if-allied-forces-attacked-president.html
ISLAMABAD: President Pervez Musharraf Saturday said he is concerned over the Nato forces attack in Pakistani tribal areas and warned a U-S think-tank that no such attacks will be tolerated in future, and Pakistan reserves the right to retaliate. Talking to a senior advisor of the US think-tank Dr Hormon Olmen in Rawalpindi, President Musharaf asserted that the Afghan-based Nato forces are not being attacked from the Pakistani soil nor is any cross-border activity taking place from here. According to sources, the President reiterated that a stable Afghanistan in the interest of Pakistan and said baseless allegations against Pakistan could affect the war on terror. Dr. Olmen told the President that the Pak-Afghan border security is a joint responsibility of both the countries and a cooperation between them is the need of the hour.

By the way guys, where do you think the permanent bases in Afghanistan were build? On the border with Pakistan!

Offline Optimus

  • Globalist Destroyer
  • Global Moderator
  • Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 12,802
    • GlobalGulag.com
Re: Coming War With Pakistan??? - Post News About Pakistan Here
« Reply #61 on: July 29, 2008, 10:35:37 AM »
Pakistan funded Mujahideen in Kashmir says Obama
http://www.karachinews.net/story/387426
Monday 28th July, 2008 (ANI)

New York, July 28 : United States Democratic presidential nominee Barack Obama has said that Pakistan in some cases funded the Mujahideen in Kashmir.

He said this in an interview to the Wall Street Journal published in New York on Monday.

Obama said that such efforts are counterproductive for Islamabad.

He further added that Pakistan's help to Mujahideen continues to be a constant instigator of tension between Islamabad and New Delhi.

When asked about the forthcoming talks between Pakistan Prime Minister Yousuf Raza Gilani and US President George W. Bush in Washington, Obama said the US must emphasise the importance of closing down terrorist camps.

“The Constitution is not an instrument for the government to restrain the people,
it's an instrument for the people to restrain the government.” – Patrick Henry

>>> Global Gulag Media & Forum <<<

Offline David Rothscum

  • Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 5,683
Re: Coming War With Pakistan??? - Post News About Pakistan Here
« Reply #62 on: July 29, 2008, 10:57:48 AM »
Pakistan funded Mujahideen in Kashmir says Obama
http://www.karachinews.net/story/387426
Monday 28th July, 2008 (ANI)

New York, July 28 : United States Democratic presidential nominee Barack Obama has said that Pakistan in some cases funded the Mujahideen in Kashmir.

He said this in an interview to the Wall Street Journal published in New York on Monday.

Obama said that such efforts are counterproductive for Islamabad.

He further added that Pakistan's help to Mujahideen continues to be a constant instigator of tension between Islamabad and New Delhi.

When asked about the forthcoming talks between Pakistan Prime Minister Yousuf Raza Gilani and US President George W. Bush in Washington, Obama said the US must emphasise the importance of closing down terrorist camps.


Here you have it. The Obama version of "Iran is shipping weapons to the insurgency in Iraq."

Offline STEVEX

  • Member
  • *
  • Posts: 43
Re: Coming War With Pakistan??? - Post News About Pakistan Here
« Reply #63 on: July 29, 2008, 11:09:51 AM »
obama (loser) will continue the middle east war, once he is commander in chief. He has been speaking with george (crackhead) bush, i`m sure on war game. this is my prediction. America is fight for oil.so let kill off all the middle east people who will benefit from it. OIL the KING in the U.S. market. Its what made america it is today (GREAT).Oil is the #1 commuity, LIKE black men and women on slave ship 100 years ago. Has you can see people are dieing for oil. some how i believe the human race will kill off it self. when this happen the earth will still have billions of gallons remain below.

The human race, WHAT A DISGRACE!. Peace will never happen, because life is the begining of HELL. why do you think. the humans are pleag with sickness, birth defects, financial burden, mental illness, and millions other. The human is never happy. it the nature of the beast, "to want what it can not have".

Obama is not god or a saver. this is what maks the voter weak, cause they relay on a human to do the work of the good/god ::)....LOL

VOTE FOR YOUR SELF TO BE A BETTER PERSON.

YOU WHERE BORN INTO THE WORLD ALONE,  and

YOUR GOING TO LEAVE/DIE ALONE,

So, don`t you think you should experance life on your owne?.

don`t vote for loser with fake promises.

people who believe in groups are people of CULT-FOLLOWING. the mine of the weak.

The U.S. government are run my NAZI believer left-over/saved from WWII. The new world order was orignally cooked up by the NAZI.... 

H.E.L.P. = How. Every. Loser. Prospect.   (Goverment)         
 
J.O.B. = Jorney. Of the. Broke (We the People)
 
illegal business control america. The people have NO RIGHTS, only the right to DEATH.

Offline Optimus

  • Globalist Destroyer
  • Global Moderator
  • Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 12,802
    • GlobalGulag.com
Re: Coming War With Pakistan??? - Post News About Pakistan Here
« Reply #64 on: July 30, 2008, 10:14:44 AM »
C.I.A. Outlines Pakistan Links With Militants
http://www.nytimes.com/2008/07/30/world/asia/30pstan.html?em&ex=1217563200&en=607005c361f38ab3&ei=5087%0A
By MARK MAZZETTI and ERIC SCHMITT
Published: July 30, 2008

WASHINGTON — A top Central Intelligence Agency official traveled secretly to Islamabad this month to confront Pakistan’s most senior officials with new information about ties between the country’s powerful spy service and militants operating in Pakistan’s tribal areas, according to American military and intelligence officials.

The C.I.A. emissary presented evidence showing that members of the spy service had deepened their ties with some militant groups that were responsible for a surge of violence in Afghanistan, possibly including the suicide bombing this month of the Indian Embassy in Kabul, the officials said.

The decision to confront Pakistan with what the officials described as a new C.I.A. assessment of the spy service’s activities seemed to be the bluntest American warning to Pakistan since shortly after the Sept. 11 attacks about the ties between the spy service and Islamic militants.

The C.I.A. assessment specifically points to links between members of the spy service, the Directorate for Inter-Services Intelligence, or ISI, and the militant network led by Maulavi Jalaluddin Haqqani, which American officials believe maintains close ties to senior figures of Al Qaeda in Pakistan’s tribal areas.

The C.I.A. has depended heavily on the ISI for information about militants in Pakistan, despite longstanding concerns about divided loyalties within the Pakistani spy service, which had close relations with the Taliban in Afghanistan before the Sept. 11 attacks.

That ISI officers have maintained important ties to anti-American militants has been the subject of previous reports in The New York Times. But the C.I.A. and the Bush administration have generally sought to avoid criticism of Pakistan, which they regard as a crucial ally in the fight against terrorism.

The visit to Pakistan by the C.I.A. official, Stephen R. Kappes, the agency’s deputy director, was described by several American military and intelligence officials in interviews in recent days. Some of those who were interviewed made clear that they welcomed the decision by the C.I.A. to take a harder line toward the ISI’s dealings with militant groups.

Pakistan’s prime minister, Yousaf Raza Gilani, is currently in Washington meeting with Bush administration officials. A White House spokesman, Gordon D. Johndroe, would not say whether President Bush had raised the issue during his meeting on Monday with Mr. Gilani. In an interview broadcast Tuesday on the PBS program “The NewsHour with Jim Lehrer,” Mr. Gilani said he rejected as “not believable” any assertions of ISI’s links to the militants. “We would not allow that,” he said.

The Haqqani network and other militants operating in the tribal areas along the Afghan border are said by American intelligence officials to be responsible for increasingly deadly and complex attacks inside Afghanistan, and to have helped Al Qaeda establish a safe haven in the tribal areas.

Lt. Gen. Martin E. Dempsey, the acting commander of American forces in Southwest Asia, made an unannounced visit to the tribal areas on Monday, a further reflection of American concern.

The ISI has for decades maintained contacts with various militant groups in the tribal areas and elsewhere, both for gathering intelligence and as proxies to exert influence on neighboring India and Afghanistan. It is unclear whether the C.I.A. officials have concluded that contacts between the ISI and militant groups are blessed at the highest levels of Pakistan’s spy service and military, or are carried out by rogue elements of Pakistan’s security apparatus.

With Pakistan’s new civilian government struggling to assert control over the country’s spy service, there are concerns in Washington that the ISI may become even more powerful than when President Pervez Musharraf controlled the military and the government. Last weekend, Pakistani military and intelligence officials thwarted an attempt by the government in Islamabad to put the ISI more directly under civilian control.

Mr. Kappes made his secret visit to Pakistan on July 12, joining Adm. Mike Mullen, the chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, for meetings with senior Pakistani civilian and military leaders.

“It was a very pointed message saying, ‘Look, we know there’s a connection, not just with Haqqani but also with other bad guys and ISI, and we think you could do more and we want you to do more about it,’ ” one senior American official said of the message to Pakistan. The official was briefed on the meetings; like others who agreed to talk about it, he spoke on condition of anonymity because of the diplomatic delicacy of Mr. Kappes’s message.

The meetings took place days after a suicide bomber attacked the Indian Embassy in Kabul, killing dozens. Afghanistan’s government has publicly accused the ISI of having a hand in the attack, an assertion American officials have not corroborated.

The decision to have Mr. Kappes deliver the message about the spy service was an unusual one, and could be a sign that the relationship between the C.I.A. and the ISI, which has long been marked by mutual suspicion as well as mutual dependence, may be deteriorating.

The trip is reminiscent of a secret visit that the top two American intelligence officials made to Pakistan in January. Those officials — Mike McConnell, the director of national intelligence, and Michael V. Hayden, the C.I.A. director — sought to press Mr. Musharraf to allow the C.I.A. greater latitude to operate in the tribal territories.



(Page 2 of 2)
http://www.nytimes.com/2008/07/30/world/asia/30pstan.html?pagewanted=2&ei=5087&em&en=607005c361f38ab3&ex=1217563200

It was the ISI, backed by millions of covert dollars from the C.I.A., that ran arms to guerrillas fighting Soviet forces in Afghanistan in the 1980s. It is now American troops who are dying in Afghanistan, and intelligence officials believe those longstanding ties between Pakistani spies and militants may be part of an effort to destabilize Afghanistan.

Spokesmen for the White House and the C.I.A. declined to comment about the visit by Mr. Kappes or about the agency’s assessment. A spokesman for Admiral Mullen, Capt. John Kirby, declined to comment on the meetings, saying “the chairman desires to keep these meetings private and therefore it would be inappropriate to discuss any details.”

Admiral Mullen and Mr. Kappes met in Islamabad with several high-ranking Pakistani officials. They included Mr. Gilani; Mr. Musharraf; Gen. Ashfaq Parvez Kayani, the army chief of staff and former ISI director; and Lt. Gen. Nadeem Taj, the current ISI director.

One American counterterrorism official said there was no evidence of Pakistan’s government’s direct support of Al Qaeda. He said, however, there were “genuine and longstanding concerns about Pakistan’s ties to the Haqqani network, which of course has links to Al Qaeda.”

American commanders in Afghanistan have in recent months sounded an increasingly shrill alarm about the threat posed by Mr. Haqqani’s network. Earlier this year, American military officials pressed the American ambassador in Pakistan, Anne W. Patterson, to get Pakistani troops to strike Haqqani network targets in the tribal areas.

Gen. Dan K. McNeill, the senior NATO commander in Afghanistan until last month, frequently discussed the ISI’s contacts with militant groups with General Kayani, Pakistan’s military chief.

During his visit to the tribal areas on Monday, General Dempsey met with top Pakistani commanders in Miramshah, the capital of North Waziristan, where Pakistan’s 11th Army Corps and Frontier Corps paramilitary force have a headquarters, to discuss the security situation in the region, Pakistani officials said.

North Waziristan, the most lawless of the tribal areas, is a hub of Al Qaeda and other foreign fighters, and the base of operations for the Haqqani network.

On Tuesday, Pakistani security forces raided an abandoned seminary owned by Mr. Haqqani, Pakistani officials said. No arrests were made.

“The Constitution is not an instrument for the government to restrain the people,
it's an instrument for the people to restrain the government.” – Patrick Henry

>>> Global Gulag Media & Forum <<<

Offline Optimus

  • Globalist Destroyer
  • Global Moderator
  • Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 12,802
    • GlobalGulag.com
Re: Coming War With Pakistan??? - Post News About Pakistan Here
« Reply #65 on: July 30, 2008, 10:17:52 AM »
Pakistan denies 'malicious' report on CIA confrontation
http://afp.google.com/article/ALeqM5h71eZAqfE_5QTQevuZ4QocshPTwg
July 30, 2008

ISLAMABAD (AFP) — Pakistan's military Wednesday rejected a "malicious" report that a top CIA official visiting this month confronted Islamabad over ties between the country's intelligence service and militants.

The New York Times said agency deputy director Stephen Kappes highlighted alleged ties between Pakistan's Inter-Services Intelligence (ISI) and those responsible for the surge of violence across the border in Afghanistan.

"We reject this report. This is unfounded, baseless and malicious," chief Pakistani military spokesman Major General Athar Abbas told AFP.

"I would like to emphasise here that ISI is a premier intelligence agency which has caught or apprehended maximum Al-Qaeda operatives including those who were linked with criminals and responsible for attacking the US mainland on September 11, 2001," Abbas said.

Citing anonymous defense and intelligence sources, the Times said the meeting focused on supposed intelligence links with Taliban commander Jalauddin Haqqani, who is based in Pakistan's tribal areas.

It said that earlier this year the US military pressed for Pakistani troops to hit the Haqqani network.

"It was a very pointed message saying, 'Look, we know there's a connection, not just with Haqqani but also with the other bad guys and ISI, and we think you could do more and we want you to do more about it," a senior US official told the Times.

The newspaper said the meeting could be a sign that the relationship between the Central Intelligence Agency and the ISI "may be deteriorating."

The report comes after Pakistani Prime Minister Yousuf Raza Gilani met with US President George W. Bush in Washington and urged him not to act "unilaterally" against militants in Pakistan's lawless tribal zones.

Gilani insisted Monday that Pakistan was committed to fighting extremists.

Pakistan's fledgling government caused concern in Washington by launching talks with militants soon after beating allies of US-backed President Pervez Musharraf in elections in February.
“The Constitution is not an instrument for the government to restrain the people,
it's an instrument for the people to restrain the government.” – Patrick Henry

>>> Global Gulag Media & Forum <<<

Offline bigron

  • Moderator
  • Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 22,124
  • RON PAUL FOR PRESIDENT 2012
Re: Coming War With Pakistan??? - Post News About Pakistan Here
« Reply #66 on: July 30, 2008, 10:23:41 AM »
July 30, 2008

C.I.A. Outlines Pakistan Links With Militants

By MARK MAZZETTI and ERIC SCHMITT

http://www.nytimes.com/2008/07/30/world/asia/30pstan.html?_r=1&partner=rssuserland&emc=rss&pagewanted=all&oref=slogin



WASHINGTON — A top Central Intelligence Agency official traveled secretly to Islamabad this month to confront Pakistan’s most senior officials with new information about ties between the country’s powerful spy service and militants operating in Pakistan’s tribal areas, according to American military and intelligence officials.

The C.I.A. emissary presented evidence showing that members of the spy service had deepened their ties with some militant groups that were responsible for a surge of violence in Afghanistan, possibly including the suicide bombing this month of the Indian Embassy in Kabul, the officials said.

The decision to confront Pakistan with what the officials described as a new C.I.A. assessment of the spy service’s activities seemed to be the bluntest American warning to Pakistan since shortly after the Sept. 11 attacks about the ties between the spy service and Islamic militants.

The C.I.A. assessment specifically points to links between members of the spy service, the Directorate for Inter-Services Intelligence, or ISI, and the militant network led by Maulavi Jalaluddin Haqqani, which American officials believe maintains close ties to senior figures of Al Qaeda in Pakistan’s tribal areas.

The C.I.A. has depended heavily on the ISI for information about militants in Pakistan, despite longstanding concerns about divided loyalties within the Pakistani spy service, which had close relations with the Taliban in Afghanistan before the Sept. 11 attacks.

That ISI officers have maintained important ties to anti-American militants has been the subject of previous reports in The New York Times. But the C.I.A. and the Bush administration have generally sought to avoid criticism of Pakistan, which they regard as a crucial ally in the fight against terrorism.

The visit to Pakistan by the C.I.A. official, Stephen R. Kappes, the agency’s deputy director, was described by several American military and intelligence officials in interviews in recent days. Some of those who were interviewed made clear that they welcomed the decision by the C.I.A. to take a harder line toward the ISI’s dealings with militant groups.

Pakistan’s prime minister, Yousaf Raza Gilani, is currently in Washington meeting with Bush administration officials. A White House spokesman, Gordon D. Johndroe, would not say whether President Bush had raised the issue during his meeting on Monday with Mr. Gilani. In an interview broadcast Tuesday on the PBS program “The NewsHour with Jim Lehrer,” Mr. Gilani said he rejected as “not believable” any assertions of ISI’s links to the militants. “We would not allow that,” he said.

The Haqqani network and other militants operating in the tribal areas along the Afghan border are said by American intelligence officials to be responsible for increasingly deadly and complex attacks inside Afghanistan, and to have helped Al Qaeda establish a safe haven in the tribal areas.

Lt. Gen. Martin E. Dempsey, the acting commander of American forces in Southwest Asia, made an unannounced visit to the tribal areas on Monday, a further reflection of American concern.

The ISI has for decades maintained contacts with various militant groups in the tribal areas and elsewhere, both for gathering intelligence and as proxies to exert influence on neighboring India and Afghanistan. It is unclear whether the C.I.A. officials have concluded that contacts between the ISI and militant groups are blessed at the highest levels of Pakistan’s spy service and military, or are carried out by rogue elements of Pakistan’s security apparatus.

With Pakistan’s new civilian government struggling to assert control over the country’s spy service, there are concerns in Washington that the ISI may become even more powerful than when President Pervez Musharraf controlled the military and the government. Last weekend, Pakistani military and intelligence officials thwarted an attempt by the government in Islamabad to put the ISI more directly under civilian control.

Mr. Kappes made his secret visit to Pakistan on July 12, joining Adm. Mike Mullen, the chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, for meetings with senior Pakistani civilian and military leaders.

“It was a very pointed message saying, ‘Look, we know there’s a connection, not just with Haqqani but also with other bad guys and ISI, and we think you could do more and we want you to do more about it,’ ” one senior American official said of the message to Pakistan. The official was briefed on the meetings; like others who agreed to talk about it, he spoke on condition of anonymity because of the diplomatic delicacy of Mr. Kappes’s message.

The meetings took place days after a suicide bomber attacked the Indian Embassy in Kabul, killing dozens. Afghanistan’s government has publicly accused the ISI of having a hand in the attack, an assertion American officials have not corroborated.

The decision to have Mr. Kappes deliver the message about the spy service was an unusual one, and could be a sign that the relationship between the C.I.A. and the ISI, which has long been marked by mutual suspicion as well as mutual dependence, may be deteriorating.

The trip is reminiscent of a secret visit that the top two American intelligence officials made to Pakistan in January. Those officials — Mike McConnell, the director of national intelligence, and Michael V. Hayden, the C.I.A. director — sought to press Mr. Musharraf to allow the C.I.A. greater latitude to operate in the tribal territories.

It was the ISI, backed by millions of covert dollars from the C.I.A., that ran arms to guerrillas fighting Soviet forces in Afghanistan in the 1980s. It is now American troops who are dying in Afghanistan, and intelligence officials believe those longstanding ties between Pakistani spies and militants may be part of an effort to destabilize Afghanistan.

Spokesmen for the White House and the C.I.A. declined to comment about the visit by Mr. Kappes or about the agency’s assessment. A spokesman for Admiral Mullen, Capt. John Kirby, declined to comment on the meetings, saying “the chairman desires to keep these meetings private and therefore it would be inappropriate to discuss any details.”

Admiral Mullen and Mr. Kappes met in Islamabad with several high-ranking Pakistani officials. They included Mr. Gilani; Mr. Musharraf; Gen. Ashfaq Parvez Kayani, the army chief of staff and former ISI director; and Lt. Gen. Nadeem Taj, the current ISI director.

One American counterterrorism official said there was no evidence of Pakistan’s government’s direct support of Al Qaeda. He said, however, there were “genuine and longstanding concerns about Pakistan’s ties to the Haqqani network, which of course has links to Al Qaeda.”

American commanders in Afghanistan have in recent months sounded an increasingly shrill alarm about the threat posed by Mr. Haqqani’s network. Earlier this year, American military officials pressed the American ambassador in Pakistan, Anne W. Patterson, to get Pakistani troops to strike Haqqani network targets in the tribal areas.

Gen. Dan K. McNeill, the senior NATO commander in Afghanistan until last month, frequently discussed the ISI’s contacts with militant groups with General Kayani, Pakistan’s military chief.

During his visit to the tribal areas on Monday, General Dempsey met with top Pakistani commanders in Miramshah, the capital of North Waziristan, where Pakistan’s 11th Army Corps and Frontier Corps paramilitary force have a headquarters, to discuss the security situation in the region, Pakistani officials said.

North Waziristan, the most lawless of the tribal areas, is a hub of Al Qaeda and other foreign fighters, and the base of operations for the Haqqani network.

On Tuesday, Pakistani security forces raided an abandoned seminary owned by Mr. Haqqani, Pakistani officials said. No arrests were made.

Ismail Khan contributed reporting from Peshawar, Pakistan.



Offline Optimus

  • Globalist Destroyer
  • Global Moderator
  • Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 12,802
    • GlobalGulag.com
Re: Coming War With Pakistan??? - Post News About Pakistan Here
« Reply #67 on: July 30, 2008, 10:39:27 AM »
More foreign fighters join Taliban in Afghanistan
http://in.reuters.com/article/southAsiaNews/idINIndia-34746220080730?sp=true
Wed Jul 30, 2008 5:55pm IST
By Jon Hemming

KABUL (Reuters) - More foreign fighters are joining the ranks of Taliban insurgents in Afghanistan as militants increasingly cross the border from Pakistan to attack Afghan and Western troops, the Afghan Defence Ministry said on Wednesday.

Afghanistan has kept up a barrage of criticism against neighbour Pakistan in the last three months, accusing Pakistani agents of being behind a string of high-profile attacks and allowing militants sanctuary along the long and porous border.

"The presence of foreign fighters is increasing, and increasingly the operations of the terrorists are led by foreigners," Defence Ministry spokesman General Mohammad Zaher Azimi told a news conference.

Afghan, NATO and U.S.-led coalition forces are struggling to contain a sharp surge in violence as the traditional summer fighting season gets into full swing.

Already more U.S. troops were killed in Afghanistan in May and June than in Iraq, where there are some four times more American soldiers.

July, usually the peak month for fighting, could well be the worse month yet for violence since U.S.-led and Afghan forces toppled the Taliban in 2001. Security analysts predict the number of violent incidents could top 1,000 for the first time.

As well as more violence, Afghan and foreign troops are reporting a greater sophistication in Taliban tactics such as multiple roadside bombs and complex ambushes, factors indicating more training and possibly the presence of foreigners.


TALIBAN LEADERS TARGETED

Admiral Mike Mullen, chairman of the U.S. joint chiefs of staff, said this month there were indications that al Qaeda was switching its focus from Iraq back to Afghanistan.

Violence has increased by 40 percent in the last two months compared to last year, NATO says, partly due to the improved weather, but also due to ceasefires between troops and militants in Pakistan's border tribal belt.

Afghanistan believes foreign funding for the Taliban is channelled through Pakistan's Inter-Service Intelligence (ISI) agency, Azimi said.

Money for the insurgency comes through donors in Gulf countries and a tax on Afghanistan's booming drug trade, security analysts say.

Afghan security forces have launched a series of operations along the main highway that loops around the south of Afghanistan, killing around 100 militants in the last two weeks, Azimi said.

Meanwhile, Afghan and international troops have killed 20 senior militant leaders, including one from al Qaeda, in the last month and captured another seven, he said.

Western troops in Afghanistan have concentrated on targeting the Taliban leadership in an effort to degrade the insurgent fighting ability.
“The Constitution is not an instrument for the government to restrain the people,
it's an instrument for the people to restrain the government.” – Patrick Henry

>>> Global Gulag Media & Forum <<<

Offline Optimus

  • Globalist Destroyer
  • Global Moderator
  • Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 12,802
    • GlobalGulag.com
Re: Coming War With Pakistan??? - Post News About Pakistan Here
« Reply #68 on: July 30, 2008, 10:45:53 AM »
Pakistan's deals see more militancy in Afghanistan: NATO force
http://www.khaleejtimes.com/darticlen.asp?xfile=data/subcontinent/2008/July/subcontinent_July992.xml&section=subcontinent&col=
(AFP)

30 July 2008
 
KABUL - Pakistan's peace talks with extremists have resulted in a 40 percent rise in rebel activity in Afghanistan, where there are more foreigners on the battlefield, NATO and Afghan forces said on Wednesday.

It is up to the international community to put pressure on Pakistan to root out the "cause" of the unrest, with NATO's military force not able to pursue militants over the border, spokesman Captain Mike Finney told reporters.

Afghanistan has seen a spike in insurgency-linked violence in recent weeks, with more attacks by Taleban-linked rebels, including against troops with NATO's International Security Assistance Force (ISAF).

Finney said the warmer weather had also played some part.

"There is also evidence that the activities increased by some 40 percent since ... tribal areas became unregulated following the negotiations between the Pakistan government and Baitullah Mehsud,"  he said.

Mehsud is the shadowy leader of Taleban-based militants in Pakistan's tribal areas along the border with Afghanistan. He has vowed to continue "jihad" in Afghanistan even while pursuing peace talks with Islamabad.

"But the ISAF mandate is very clear, and that goes as far as the border," Finney said. "In terms of fighting the cause, that is for the international community to put pressure on those who can do something about it."

Afghan defence ministry spokesman Mohammad Zahir Azimi said meanwhile the number of foreign militants in Afghanistan had increased, with insurgents changing tactics from targeting security forces to focusing on infrastructure.

"In the past the attacks were mostly on Afghan and foreign forces. Now we see they target vital and basic infrastructure,"  Azimi said at the joint press conference with Finney.

The military had reports of militants planning attack on power plants and dams and they were already striking highways and construction projects, he said.

Foreign fighters were identified through documents found on their bodies and the languages they used, he said.

Afghanistan has long accused elements in the Pakistani army and intelligence of supporting Taleban militants for their own strategic interests.

Islamabad has strongly denied the allegations and said it is suffering from extremism as much as Afghanistan.

“The Constitution is not an instrument for the government to restrain the people,
it's an instrument for the people to restrain the government.” – Patrick Henry

>>> Global Gulag Media & Forum <<<

Offline Biggs

  • Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 7,440
Re: Coming War With Pakistan??? - Post News About Pakistan Here
« Reply #69 on: July 30, 2008, 03:53:07 PM »
no let up in the trouble in NWFP


Militants Abduct About 30 Pakistani Police, Troops


STEPHEN GRAHAM | July 29, 2008 02:20 PM EST | 

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2008/07/29/militants-abduct-about-30_n_115584.html

ISLAMABAD, Pakistan
— Islamic militants seized a security post in Pakistan's troubled northwest Tuesday, capturing at least 25 police and troops in a raid that underscored the government's weak grip on territory near the Afghan border.

Extremists also killed two security officers elsewhere in the Swat Valley, a day after three intelligence agents died in an ambush in the same area in further blows to the hopes of Pakistani leaders that they can tame Islamic hard-liners through peace negotiations.

Tuesday's incidents came a day after Prime Minister Yousuf Raza Gilani won praise from President Bush, whose administration is pressing Pakistan for tougher action against militants, as a reliable ally against terrorism.

Pakistani officials said the abducted security force was manning a post near Deolai village in Swat when it was surrounded by an unknown number of militants Tuesday morning.

Police said about 30 officers and paramilitary troops were taken away, while an army statement put the number at "as many as 25."

"All personnel manning the post were taken hostage and shifted to some unknown location," the army's statements said.

The army also reported that "miscreants" killed two security force members and wounded 14 as they went to remove a militant checkpoint in another area of the valley where three intelligence officers were killed by ambushers Monday.

Security forces struck back, killing two militants and capturing six in an operation Tuesday, it said
STOP THE KILLING NOW
END THE CRIMINAL SIEGE OF GAZA - FREE PALESTINE!!!!!!!

Offline Optimus

  • Globalist Destroyer
  • Global Moderator
  • Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 12,802
    • GlobalGulag.com
Re: Coming War With Pakistan??? - Post News About Pakistan Here
« Reply #70 on: July 30, 2008, 05:45:09 PM »
CIA confronts Pakistan over spies' terror links
 
The CIA has confronted senior Pakistani officials with evidence that members of country's secret service have deepened their ties with militant groups responsible for a surge of violence in Afghanistan.

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/worldnews/asia/pakistan/2475748/CIA-confronts-Pakistan-over-spies-terror-links.html

By Alex Spillius in Washington
Last Updated: 9:52PM BST 30 Jul 2008

Stephen Kappes, deputy director of the US agency, travelled to Islamabad this month with new information about links between Pakistan's Inter-Services Intelligence (ISI) agency and militants operating in Pakistan's tribal areas, according to the New York Times.

He joined Admiral Mike Mullen, the chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, for meetings with senior Pakistani civilian and military leaders, in the secret meeting on July 12.

A few days earlier a suicide bomber attacked the Indian Embassy in Kabul, killing dozens. Afghanistan's government has publicly accused the ISI of having a hand in the attack.

Officials said the CIA pointed to links between the ISI and the militant network led by Jalaluddin Haqqani, who is believed to maintain close ties to senior figures of al-Qaeda in Pakistan's tribal areas.

Haqqani was a leader in the Afghan resistance against the Soviet Union and in October 2001 became the Taliban's military commander. He is often attributed with helping Osama bin Laden escape from eastern Afghanistan to Pakistan.

The ISI was closely involved in creation of Taliban, and has always had a "green" wing - named after the colour venerated by Islam - that has maintained its contacts with the Taliban, an ethnic Pashtun militia that operates across the long Afghan-Pakistan border.

Despite long-standing concerns about divided loyalties within the Pakistani service, the CIA has however depended heavily on the ISI for information about militants in Major General Athar Abbas, the chief Pakistani military spokesman, said: "I would like to emphasise here that ISI is a premier intelligence agency which has caught or apprehended maximum al-Qaeda operatives including those who were linked with criminals and responsible for attacking the US mainland on September 11, 2001. We reject this report. This is unfounded, baseless and malicious."

The resurgence of the Taliban and its al-Qaeda allies has caused deep concerns in Washington about militant sanctuaries in Pakistan's semi-autonomous tribal zones.

President George W Bush raised his anxiety with Mr Gilani earlier this week, while Senator Barack Obama, the Democratic candidate in November's presidential election, has said improving Pakistan's cooperation would be at the top of his foreign policy agenda.

“The Constitution is not an instrument for the government to restrain the people,
it's an instrument for the people to restrain the government.” – Patrick Henry

>>> Global Gulag Media & Forum <<<

Offline sands

  • Member
  • *
  • Posts: 47
Re: Coming War With Pakistan??? - Post News About Pakistan Here
« Reply #71 on: July 31, 2008, 02:52:58 AM »
Interesting that there is a prophecy in the scipture of a 1/3 of mankind being killed and the number of the horsemen being 200 million...China can field an army of of 200 million....Pakistan, India, and China border each other, are all nuclear capable, and contain at least a third of the world's population.....

 Here's a video of Irvin Baxter discussing this prophecy...I don't think he mentions Pakistan or India as it's been a while since I've watched it but it is interesting considering the developments..
http://video.google.com/videoplay?docid=2804392957391866972&q=Irvin+Baxter&ei=qV6RSKj1GISUqQKF9IV3&hl=en

Revelation 9

"13And the sixth angel sounded, and I heard a voice from the four horns of the golden altar which is before God, 14Saying to the sixth angel which had the trumpet, Loose the four angels which are bound in the great river Euphrates. 15And the four angels were loosed, which were prepared for an hour, and a day, and a month, and a year, for to slay the third part of men. 16And the number of the army of the horsemen were two hundred thousand thousand: and I heard the number of them. 17And thus I saw the horses in the vision, and them that sat on them, having breastplates of fire, and of jacinth, and brimstone: and the heads of the horses were as the heads of lions; and out of their mouths issued fire and smoke and brimstone. 18By these three was the third part of men killed, by the fire, and by the smoke, and by the brimstone, which issued out of their mouths. 19For their power is in their mouth, and in their tails: for their tails were like unto serpents, and had heads, and with them they do hurt. 20And the rest of the men which were not killed by these plagues yet repented not of the works of their hands, that they should not worship devils, and idols of gold, and silver, and brass, and stone, and of wood: which neither can see, nor hear, nor walk: 21Neither repented they of their murders, nor of their sorceries, nor of their fornication, nor of their thefts."



Offline Optimus

  • Globalist Destroyer
  • Global Moderator
  • Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 12,802
    • GlobalGulag.com
Re: Coming War With Pakistan??? - Post News About Pakistan Here
« Reply #72 on: July 31, 2008, 10:56:07 AM »
Pakistan spy agency accused by US
http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/south_asia/7534968.stm
July 31, 2008

Pakistan says its intelligence agents have been accused by the US of alerting al-Qaeda linked militants before the US launches missile attacks against them.

Defence Minister Ahmed Mukhtar said members of Inter-Services Intelligence were accused of "tipping off" militants before strikes in the tribal areas.

Mr Mukhtar said that the Americans "mistrusted" the ISI.

His unusual public admission of the rebuke seems to mark a new low in ties between the US and Pakistan's spies.

'Who's in charge?'

Mr Mukhtar was speaking in Washington, where he is accompanying Prime Minister Yousuf Raza Gilani on his first visit to the US.

Speaking on Pakistan's Geo TV, he said the Americans had alleged that information about targets was being "leaked".

"The burning issue of course is as to who controls the ISI," he said.

"In their [the Americans'] view there are some people at some level in the ISI who tip off the Taleban at some level about impending missile attacks when these are shared with the Pakistanis.

"They [the Americans] have expressed displeasure over this."

Mr Mukhtar also openly admitted that President Bush had asked who was really in charge of the ISI during the visit to Washington.

The BBC's security correspondent Rob Watson says that relations between the American Central Intelligence Agency (CIA) and the ISI appear decidedly strained.

Our correspondent says that the stern message apparently being delivered to Islamabad was that Pakistan has to do more to tackle ties between the ISI and Islamic extremists based in the country's tribal areas.

American unhappiness with Pakistan's recently-elected civilian government could also embarrass President Musharraf and the Pakistani army, in addition to raising new concerns about the stability of the nuclear-armed state.

'Great institution'

The US no longer gives Pakistan advance notice when it targets militants in tribal areas, correspondents say.

The ISI is the main intelligence wing of the army, which directs its operations, although under the law it reports to the prime minister.

Elements within the ISI have long been accused by politicians and foreign governments alike of supporting the Taleban.

On Saturday, the government said the ISI would be brought under the control of the Interior Ministry.

But the decision was revoked within hours, apparently following intervention from the army.

Prime Minister Gilani - whose Pakistan People's Party has a history of run-ins with the ISI - recently called it a "great institution".

He said that he did not believe reports that some members of the ISI were sympathetic to the militants.

On Wednesday, the New York Times reported that a senior CIA official had confronted Pakistani officials with evidence of ISI links to militants, in addition to its involvement in a recent suicide car bomb attack outside the Indian embassy in Kabul that killed 58 people.

Pakistan strenuously denied any links to the attack.

Our correspondent says that while the latest American complaints in relation to the ISI look like something of a low point, it would be wrong to write off the relationship between the ISI and the CIA.

Western security officials often say you cannot deal with violent Islamic extremists without dealing with Pakistan and you cannot deal with Pakistan without the ISI.



“The Constitution is not an instrument for the government to restrain the people,
it's an instrument for the people to restrain the government.” – Patrick Henry

>>> Global Gulag Media & Forum <<<

Offline Optimus

  • Globalist Destroyer
  • Global Moderator
  • Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 12,802
    • GlobalGulag.com
Re: Coming War With Pakistan??? - Post News About Pakistan Here
« Reply #73 on: July 31, 2008, 11:13:09 AM »
Facing US heat, Pak blames India, Afghanistan for unrest
Hindustan Times

Press Trust Of India
Islamabad, July 31, 2008
First Published: 11:53 IST(31/7/2008)
Last Updated: 12:09 IST(31/7/2008)
   
Facing intense US pressure to act against militants thriving in its restive tribal region, Pakistani has blamed India and Afghanistan for stirring trouble in its northwestern areas and Balochistan province.

Ruling Pakistan People's Party leader Rehman Malik, who functions as the interior minister and is a confidant of party chief Asif Ali Zardari, appealed to Pakistan's western allies, including the US, to stop India and Afghanistan's alleged activities.

"India wants to destabilise FATA (Federally Administered Tribal Areas). What India and (Afghan President Hamid) Karzai are doing must stop. They must stop this," he told reporters in Washington on Wednesday.

Malik, who was a member of the delegation accompanying Prime Minister Yousuf Raza Gilani on his visit to the US, also blamed India for indulging in "baseless propaganda" against Pakistan though the country itself was a victim of terrorism.

"The time has come for us to reveal the facts and tell the world how outside forces are creating troubles in Pakistan," he said.

Asked to identify these "outside forces", he named India, Afghanistan's Northern Alliance, Chechens and Uzbeks who he said were using Pakistan to serve their vested interests.

Though Pakistan has always blamed foreign hands for stirring trouble in Balochistan and the North West Frontier Province, this is the first time since the February 18 election that a senior government official has blamed India for fomenting unrest in the country.

During his three-day visit, Gilani was pressed by the US leadership to go after the Taliban and Al Qaeda militants who have found a safe haven in Pakistan's tribal areas bordering Afghanistan.

“The Constitution is not an instrument for the government to restrain the people,
it's an instrument for the people to restrain the government.” – Patrick Henry

>>> Global Gulag Media & Forum <<<

Offline David Rothscum

  • Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 5,683
Re: Coming War With Pakistan??? - Post News About Pakistan Here
« Reply #74 on: August 01, 2008, 08:54:23 AM »
http://tinyurl.com/6g3w5s
August 1, 2008
Pakistanis Aided Attack in Kabul, U.S. Officials Say
By MARK MAZZETTI and ERIC SCHMITT
WASHINGTON — American intelligence agencies have concluded that members of Pakistan’s powerful spy service helped plan the deadly July 7 bombing of India’s embassy in Kabul, Afghanistan, according to United States government officials.

The conclusion was based on intercepted communications between Pakistani intelligence officers and militants who carried out the attack, the officials said, providing the clearest evidence to date that Pakistani intelligence officers are actively undermining American efforts to combat militants in the region.

The American officials also said there was new information showing that members of the Pakistani intelligence service were increasingly providing militants with details about the American campaign against them, in some cases allowing militants to avoid American missile strikes in Pakistan’s tribal areas.

Concerns about the role played by Pakistani intelligence not only has strained relations between the United States and Pakistan, a longtime ally, but also has fanned tensions between Pakistan and its archrival, India. Within days of the bombings, Indian officials accused the Directorate of Inter-Services Intelligence, or ISI, of helping to orchestrate the attack in Kabul, which killed 54, including an Indian defense attaché.

This week, Pakistani troops clashed with Indian forces in the contested region of Kashmir, threatening to fray an uneasy cease-fire that has held since November 2003.

The New York Times reported this week that a top Central Intelligence Agency official traveled to Pakistan this month to confront senior Pakistani officials with information about support provided by members of the ISI to militant groups. It had not been known that American intelligence agencies concluded that elements of Pakistani intelligence provided direct support for the attack in Kabul.

American officials said that the communications were intercepted before the July 7 bombing, and that the C.I.A. emissary, Stephen R. Kappes, the agency’s deputy director, had been ordered to Islamabad, Pakistan’s capital, even before the attack. The intercepts were not detailed enough to warn of any specific attack.

The government officials were guarded in describing the new evidence and would not say specifically what kind of assistance the ISI officers provided to the militants. They said that the ISI officers had not been renegades, indicating that their actions might have been authorized by superiors.

“It confirmed some suspicions that I think were widely held,” one State Department official with knowledge of Afghanistan issues said of the intercepted communications. “It was sort of this ‘aha’ moment. There was a sense that there was finally direct proof.”

The information linking the ISI to the bombing of the Indian Embassy was described in interviews by several American officials with knowledge of the intelligence. Some of the officials expressed anger that elements of Pakistan’s government seemed to be directly aiding violence in Afghanistan that had included attacks on American troops.

Some American officials have begun to suggest that Pakistan is no longer a fully reliable American partner and to advocate some unilateral American action against militants based in the tribal areas.

The ISI has long maintained ties to militant groups in the tribal areas, in part to court allies it can use to contain Afghanistan’s power. In recent years, Pakistan’s government has also been concerned about India’s growing influence inside Afghanistan, including New Delhi’s close ties to the government of Hamid Karzai, the Afghan president.

American officials say they believe that the embassy attack was probably carried out by members of a network led by Maulavi Jalaluddin Haqqani, whose alliance with Al Qaeda and its affiliates has allowed the terrorist network to rebuild in the tribal areas.

American and Pakistani officials have now acknowledged that President Bush on Monday confronted Pakistan’s prime minister, Yousaf Raza Gilani, about the divided loyalties of the ISI.

Pakistan’s defense minister, Chaudhry Ahmed Mukhtar, told a Pakistani television network on Wednesday that Mr. Bush asked senior Pakistani officials this week, “ ‘Who is in control of ISI?’ ” and asked about leaked information that tipped militants to surveillance efforts by Western intelligence services.

Pakistan’s new civilian government is wrestling with these very issues, and there is concern in Washington that the civilian leaders will be unable to end a longstanding relationship between members of the ISI and militants associated with Al Qaeda.

Spokesmen for the White House and the C.I.A. declined to comment for this article. Pakistan’s ambassador to the United States, Husain Haqqani, did not return a call seeking comment.

Further underscoring the tension between Pakistan and its Western allies, Britain’s senior military officer said in Washington on Thursday that an American and British program to help train Pakistan’s Frontier Corps in the tribal areas had been delayed while Pakistan’s military and civilian officials sorted out details about the program’s goals.

Britain and the United States had each offered to send about two dozen military trainers to Pakistan later this summer to train Pakistani Army officers who in turn would instruct the Frontier Corps paramilitary forces.

But the British officer, Air Chief Marshal Sir Jock Stirrup, said the program had been temporarily delayed. “We don’t yet have a firm start date,” he told a small group of reporters. “We’re ready to go.”

The bombing of the Indian Embassy helped to set off a new deterioration in relations between India and Pakistan.

This week, Indian and Pakistani soldiers fired at each other across the Kashmir frontier for more than 12 hours overnight Monday, in what the Indian Army called the most serious violation of a five-year-old cease-fire agreement. The nightlong battle came after one Indian soldier and four Pakistanis were killed along the border between sections of Kashmir that are controlled by India and by Pakistan.

Indian officials say they are equally worried about what is happening on the Pakistan-Afghanistan border because they say the insurgents who are facing off with India in Kashmir and those who target Afghanistan are related and can keep both borders burning at the same time.

India and Afghanistan share close political, cultural and economic ties, and India maintains an active intelligence network in Afghanistan, all of which has drawn suspicion from Pakistani officials.


Offline Optimus

  • Globalist Destroyer
  • Global Moderator
  • Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 12,802
    • GlobalGulag.com
Re: Coming War With Pakistan??? - Post News About Pakistan Here
« Reply #75 on: August 01, 2008, 10:22:18 AM »
Pakistan denies intelligence aided in Kabul blast
http://afp.google.com/article/ALeqM5j7OaLsRk2CiYXmI0Dd0QqeYMt_jA
August 1, 2008

ISLAMABAD (AFP) — Pakistan on Friday angrily rejected a report that the United States has accused Islamabad's main spy agency of helping to plan a fatal bombing at India's embassy in Kabul last month.

The New York Times report comes amid growing signs of a rift between Washington and Pakistsan's Inter-Service Intelligence that could affect efforts to tackle Taliban and Al-Qaeda militants.

Citing unnamed officials, the Times said intercepted communications had provided clear evidence that the ISI was involved in the July 7 suicide attack on the Indian mission, which killed around 60 people.

"It's rubbish. We totally deny it," foreign ministry spokesman Mohammad Sadiq told AFP.

"This is a baseless allegation that the New York Times keeps on recycling using anonymous sources. These stories always die afterwards because there is no proof," Sadiq said, speaking from a regional summit in Sri Lanka.

Pakistani military spokesman Major General Athar Abbas said the report was "malicious propaganda".

"It is meant to defame ISI," Abbas told AFP. "This is a national institution which is vital for security. The ISI's role in fighting terrorism and extremism is exceptional."

India and Afghanistan have already accused Pakistan's shadowy spy agency, which backed the hardline 1996-2001 Taliban regime, of masterminding the embassy bombing.

Amid the rising tensions, the prime ministers of India and Pakistan are set to meet at the eight-nation South Asian Association for Regional Cooperation (SAARC) summit opening on Saturday.

The Times and Wall Street Journal reported that US officials believe the embassy attack was conducted by forces loyal to Afghan militant Jalaluddin Haqqani, who is tied to Al-Qaeda and based in Pakistan's tribal belt.

The Times did not specify what assistance ISI allegedly provided to Haqqani but said that intelligence officals involved appeared to be acting on orders from above.

"The Indians are absolutely convinced it's true, and they're right," an unnamed US official told the Wall Street Journal.

The Times said intercepts had provided "the clearest evidence to date that Pakistani intelligence officers are actively undermining American efforts to combat militants in the region."

Officials also told the paper that the ISI was feeding militants in the tribal areas information about the US military efforts, helping them avoid missile strikes.

On Wednesday, the Times reported that a senior CIA official confronted Pakistani officials this month with evidence of ties between the ISI and Haqqani.

Pakistan's army also denied that report, saying it was "unfounded, baseless and malicious."

The ISI has long been accused by Kabul and New Delhi of maintaining ties to militant groups it supported during fights against the Soviets and India, while also helping the Americans with the occasional arrest of a top Al-Qaeda figure.

Any rift between the US and Pakistani intelligence agencies reflects deepening US frustration over Islamabad's role in a worsening insurgency in Afghanistan, analysts said Thursday.

"We need to know whose side the army and the ISI really are on," Bruce Riedel, a former CIA officer who has long experience with Pakistani intelligence, told AFP.

The new intelligence "confirmed some suspicions that I think were widely held," one State Department official told the Times of the intercepted communications. "It was sort of this 'aha' moment. There was a sense that there was finally direct proof."

The paper said Pakistan was "no longer a fully reliable American partner" and that President George W. Bush on Monday confronted Prime Minister Yousuf Raza Gilani about the divided loyalties of the ISI.

According to the Times, Defence Minister Chaudhry Ahmed Mukhtar told a Pakistani television network that Bush asked Pakistani officials, "Who is in control of ISI?"
“The Constitution is not an instrument for the government to restrain the people,
it's an instrument for the people to restrain the government.” – Patrick Henry

>>> Global Gulag Media & Forum <<<

Offline Dok

  • Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 21,269
    • end times and current events
Re: Coming War With Pakistan??? - Post News About Pakistan Here
« Reply #76 on: August 02, 2008, 07:04:47 AM »
CIA Accuses ISI Of Kabul & India Bombings
08-01-2008
NY Times




 


American intelligence agencies have concluded that members of Pakistan’s powerful spy service helped plan the deadly July 7 bombing of India’s embassy in Kabul, Afghanistan, according to United States government officials.

The conclusion was based on intercepted communications between Pakistani intelligence officers and militants who carried out the attack, the officials said, providing the clearest evidence to date that Pakistani intelligence officers are actively undermining American efforts to combat militants in the region.

The American officials also said there was new information showing that members of the Pakistani intelligence service were increasingly providing militants with details about the American campaign against them, in some cases allowing militants to avoid American missile strikes in Pakistan’s tribal areas.

Concerns about the role played by Pakistani intelligence not only has strained relations between the United States and Pakistan, a longtime ally, but also has fanned tensions between Pakistan and its archrival, India. Within days of the bombings, Indian officials accused the Directorate of Inter-Services Intelligence, or ISI, of helping to orchestrate the attack in Kabul, which killed 54, including an Indian defense attaché.

This week, Pakistani troops clashed with Indian forces in the contested region of Kashmir, threatening to fray an uneasy cease-fire that has held since November 2003.

The New York Times reported this week that a top Central Intelligence Agency official traveled to Pakistan this month to confront senior Pakistani officials with information about support provided by members of the ISI to militant groups. It had not been known that American intelligence agencies concluded that elements of Pakistani intelligence provided direct support for the attack in Kabul.

American officials said that the communications were intercepted before the July 7 bombing, and that the C.I.A. emissary, Stephen R. Kappes, the agency’s deputy director, had been ordered to Islamabad, Pakistan’s capital, even before the attack. The intercepts were not detailed enough to warn of any specific attack.

The government officials were guarded in describing the new evidence and would not say specifically what kind of assistance the ISI officers provided to the militants. They said that the ISI officers had not been renegades, indicating that their actions might have been authorized by superiors.

“It confirmed some suspicions that I think were widely held,” one State Department official with knowledge of Afghanistan issues said of the intercepted communications. “It was sort of this ‘aha’ moment. There was a sense that there was finally direct proof.”

The information linking the ISI to the bombing of the Indian Embassy was described in interviews by several American officials with knowledge of the intelligence. Some of the officials expressed anger that elements of Pakistan’s government seemed to be directly aiding violence in Afghanistan that had included attacks on American troops.

Some American officials have begun to suggest that Pakistan is no longer a fully reliable American partner and to advocate some unilateral American action against militants based in the tribal areas.

The ISI has long maintained ties to militant groups in the tribal areas, in part to court allies it can use to contain Afghanistan’s power. In recent years, Pakistan’s government has also been concerned about India’s growing influence inside Afghanistan, including New Delhi’s close ties to the government of Hamid Karzai, the Afghan president.

American officials say they believe that the embassy attack was probably carried out by members of a network led by Maulavi Jalaluddin Haqqani, whose alliance with Al Qaeda and its affiliates has allowed the terrorist network to rebuild in the tribal areas.

American and Pakistani officials have now acknowledged that President Bush on Monday confronted Pakistan’s prime minister, Yousaf Raza Gilani, about the divided loyalties of the ISI.

Pakistan’s defense minister, Chaudhry Ahmed Mukhtar, told a Pakistani television network on Wednesday that Mr. Bush asked senior Pakistani officials this week, “ ‘Who is in control of ISI?’ ” and asked about leaked information that tipped militants to surveillance efforts by Western intelligence services.

Pakistan’s new civilian government is wrestling with these very issues, and there is concern in Washington that the civilian leaders will be unable to end a longstanding relationship between members of the ISI and militants associated with Al Qaeda.

Spokesmen for the White House and the C.I.A. declined to comment for this article. Pakistan’s ambassador to the United States, Husain Haqqani, did not return a call seeking comment.

Further underscoring the tension between Pakistan and its Western allies, Britain’s senior military officer said in Washington on Thursday that an American and British program to help train Pakistan’s Frontier Corps in the tribal areas had been delayed while Pakistan’s military and civilian officials sorted out details about the program’s goals.

Britain and the United States had each offered to send about two dozen military trainers to Pakistan later this summer to train Pakistani Army officers who in turn would instruct the Frontier Corps paramilitary forces.

But the British officer, Air Chief Marshal Sir Jock Stirrup, said the program had been temporarily delayed. “We don’t yet have a firm start date,” he told a small group of reporters. “We’re ready to go.”

The bombing of the Indian Embassy helped to set off a new deterioration in relations between India and Pakistan.

This week, Indian and Pakistani soldiers fired at each other across the Kashmir frontier for more than 12 hours overnight Monday, in what the Indian Army called the most serious violation of a five-year-old cease-fire agreement. The nightlong battle came after one Indian soldier and four Pakistanis were killed along the border between sections of Kashmir that are controlled by India and by Pakistan.

Indian officials say they are equally worried about what is happening on the Pakistan-Afghanistan border because they say the insurgents who are facing off with India in Kashmir and those who target Afghanistan are related and can keep both borders burning at the same time.

India and Afghanistan share close political, cultural and economic ties, and India maintains an active intelligence network in Afghanistan, all of which has drawn suspicion from Pakistani officials.

When asked Thursday about whether the ISI and Pakistani military remained loyal to the country’s civilian government, Adm. Mike Mullen, the chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, sidestepped the question. “That’s probably something the government of Pakistan ought to speak to,” Admiral Mullen told reporters at the Pentagon.

Jalaluddin Haqqani, the militia commander, battled Soviet troops during the 1980s and has had a long and complicated relationship with the C.I.A. He was among a group of fighters who received arms and millions of dollars from the C.I.A. during that period, but his allegiance with Osama bin Laden and Al Qaeda during the following decade led the United States to sever the relationship.

Mr. Haqqani and his sons now run a network that Western intelligence services say they believe is responsible for a campaign of violence throughout Afghanistan, including the Indian Embassy bombing and an attack on the Serena Hotel in Kabul earlier this year.

David Rohde contributed reporting from New York, and Somini Sengupta from New Delhi.
 

HOW TO BE SAVED
http://www.jesus-is-savior.com/how_to_be_saved.html

Ye Must Be Born Again!
http://www.jesus-is-savior.com/Basics/ye_must_be_born_again.htm

True Salvation & the TRUE Gospel/Good News!
http://www.contendingfortruth.com/?p=1060

how to avoid censorship ;)

Offline Optimus

  • Globalist Destroyer
  • Global Moderator
  • Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 12,802
    • GlobalGulag.com
Re: Coming War With Pakistan??? - Post News About Pakistan Here
« Reply #77 on: August 02, 2008, 10:28:39 AM »
Pakistan resists pressure from U.S.
http://seattletimes.nwsource.com/html/nationworld/2008087492_pakistan02.html
Saturday, August 2, 2008

WASHINGTON — The Bush administration and its allies are pressing Pakistan to end its support for Afghan insurgents linked to al-Qaida, but Pakistani generals are unlikely to be swayed because they increasingly see their interests diverging from those of the United States, U.S. and foreign experts said.

The administration sought to ratchet up the pressure last month by sending top U.S. military and intelligence officials to Pakistan to confront officials there with intelligence linking Pakistan's Inter-Services Intelligence to the Taliban and other militant Islamist groups.

U.S. move

When that failed to produce the desired response, U.S. officials told news organizations about the visit, and then revealed that the intelligence included an intercepted communication between ISI officers and a pro-Taliban network that carried out a July 7 bombing of the Indian Embassy in Kabul, the Afghan capital.

The U.S. and Britain privately have demanded that Pakistan move against the Taliban's top leadership, which they contend is based near Quetta, the capital of Pakistan's Baluchistan Province, said a State Department official and a senior NATO defense official, who both requested anonymity because they weren't authorized to speak publicly.

On Friday, however, Pakistan vehemently rejected the allegations of ISI involvement in the Indian Embassy blast, which killed 41 and injured 141.

U.S. officials and experts said there's little chance that Pakistan will take any of the actions it's been asked to take.

"The fact that we're reduced to trying to send messages to the Pakistanis by putting stories in [newspapers] tells you we don't have any good options," said a former senior intelligence official knowledgeable about South Asia. "The trouble is, these kinds of public threats are likely to backfire."

For one thing, the Taliban and other groups allied with al-Qaida could respond to any Pakistani crackdown by stepping up attacks inside Pakistan, which is battling Islamic extremist violence, U.S. officials and experts said.

Furthermore, they said, Pakistan's feud-riddled civilian government has little power over the army and the ISI.

The latest evidence was a botched attempt under U.S. pressure to put the agency under the Interior Ministry before Prime Minister Yousaf Gilani's visit to Washington, D.C., this week.

Pakistani generals and other leaders are also infuriated by President Bush's pursuit of a strategic relationship with India, their foe in three wars, as embodied by a U.S.-Indian civilian nuclear-cooperation pact that won United Nations approval Friday, the U.S. officials and experts said.

"One thing we never understood is that India has always been the major threat for Pakistan," said former U.S. Ambassador to Pakistan Wendy Chamberlain, now the president of the Middle East Institute.

Pakistan is alarmed by India's close ties to Afghan President Hamid Karzai and its growing influence in Afghanistan, where a $750 million Indian aid program includes the construction of a strategic highway that will open the landlocked country to Indian goods shipped through ports in Iran.

Pakistan has long coveted Afghanistan as a market, a trade route to Central Asia and a rear area for its army in any new conflict with India.

For these reasons, Pakistan's military leaders may have decided to scale back their cooperation with the Bush administration's war against terrorism and boost support for the Taliban and other militant groups.

"Perverse incentives"

"We have created a set of perverse incentives for the Pakistanis to continue their support for the Taliban," said a U.S. defense official, who requested anonymity to speak frankly. Without a strategy to allay Pakistan's fears, U.S. officials and experts warned, there's little point in sending more U.S. and NATO troops to Afghanistan as Bush, Democratic presidential candidate Barack Obama and his GOP rival, John McCain, all advocate.

Pakistan denies backing the Taliban and other insurgents.

Bush, anxious to maintain Pakistani support in the hunt for Osama bin Laden and other al-Qaida leaders, apparently believed that Pakistan President Pervez Musharraf, the former army chief, would rein in the ISI.

But that hope has proved to be misplaced. Truces forged by the ISI and the Pakistani army freed Taliban and other fighters to fight in Afghanistan, where the worst violence since the 2001 U.S. intervention is claiming higher U.S. casualties than in Iraq for the first time.

On Friday, five more NATO troops were reported killed in eastern Afghanistan, a sector where U.S. troops are stationed.

“The Constitution is not an instrument for the government to restrain the people,
it's an instrument for the people to restrain the government.” – Patrick Henry

>>> Global Gulag Media & Forum <<<

Offline Optimus

  • Globalist Destroyer
  • Global Moderator
  • Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 12,802
    • GlobalGulag.com
Re: Coming War With Pakistan??? - Post News About Pakistan Here
« Reply #78 on: August 03, 2008, 01:37:24 PM »
US not convinced with Pak's war on terror
http://www.ndtv.com/convergence/ndtv/story.aspx?id=NEWEN20080059833
Press Trust of India
Saturday, August 02, 2008, (Washington)

The Pakistani government has not been able to convince elements within the establishment that the war against terror is basically in the interest of the country, a leading US newspaper commented.

The worst thing that can happen to Pakistan is an attack on the United States that is traced back to its tribal areas, it said.

"The new prime minister, Yousuf Raza Gilani, who was in Washington this week to meet President Bush, says he is doing his best to convince his country that 'this is Pakistan's war.' But he seems not to have won the argument within his own government," The Washington Post has said in a lead editorial.

"This complex situation calls for a careful and flexible response from the United States and, to its credit, the outgoing Bush administration is making a relatively good start at fashioning that response," the paper has said.

The editorial clearly said that that Bush did in fact blindly back Pakistan President Pervez Musharraf at the expense of the support of most of the common people in that country.

The media opinion comes at a time when there an ongoing debate between Washington and Islamabad on unilateral strikes with Pakistan making the point that it has the wherewithal to acting on its own provided it has been given information.

“The Constitution is not an instrument for the government to restrain the people,
it's an instrument for the people to restrain the government.” – Patrick Henry

>>> Global Gulag Media & Forum <<<

Offline Optimus

  • Globalist Destroyer
  • Global Moderator
  • Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 12,802
    • GlobalGulag.com
Re: Coming War With Pakistan??? - Post News About Pakistan Here
« Reply #79 on: August 03, 2008, 01:43:24 PM »
US warns Pakistan of serious action
http://www.hindustantimes.com/StoryPage/StoryPage.aspx?sectionName=&id=20f7a227-d40f-45af-bd34-f7ce939c469f&&Headline=US+warns+Pakistan+of+serious+action&strParent=strParentID
Vijay Dutt, Hindustan Times
London, August 03, 2008

Blaming the ISI for “masterminding” the suicide attack on Indian embassy in Kabul, US President George W Bush has warned Pakistan of “serious action” if one more attack in Afghanistan or elsewhere is traced back to it.

Bush confronted Pakistan Prime Minister Yusuf Raza Gilani last week during his Washington visit with evidence of involvement by the ISI in the deadly July 7 attack on Indian embassy in Kabul which left nearly 60 people, including four Indians, dead, The Sunday Times reported.

Christina Lamb who is the most knowledgeable of western analysts of Pakistan’s internal affairs wrote: “Gillani on his first official US visit since being elected in February, was left in no doubt that the Bush administration had lost patience with the ISI’s alleged double game.

Bush warned that if one more attack in Afghanistan or elsewhere were traced back to Pakistan, he would have to take ‘serious action’.

Gillani also met Michael Hayden, director of the CIA, who confronted him with a dossier on ISI support for the Taliban.

An intercepted telephone conversation apparently revealed that ISI agents masterminded the operation. The United States also claimed to have arrested an ISI officer inside Afghanistan.
“The Constitution is not an instrument for the government to restrain the people,
it's an instrument for the people to restrain the government.” – Patrick Henry

>>> Global Gulag Media & Forum <<<