Government Wants to Control the Water; The new "Oil"

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Offline Satyagraha

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Re: WATER: The new "Oil"
« Reply #40 on: June 27, 2009, 09:23:51 AM »
100 countries vow to provide clean water, sanitation
http://www.dawn.com/wps/wcm/connect/dawn-content-library/dawn/news/world/countries-vow-to-provide-clean-water-sanitation--za
Monday, 23 Mar, 2009 | 05:19 AM PST

ISTANBUL: A seven-day focus on the world’s water crunch wound up here on Sunday with a pledge by more than 100 countries to strive for clean water and sanitation for billions in need.

However some countries criticised the cornerstone outcome of the fifth World Water Forum as flawed while activists dismissed the event itself as a ‘trade show.’

The declaration, coinciding with World Water Day, was issued at the end of a three-day ministerial meeting, climaxing the biggest conference on the planet’s crisis of freshwater.

‘The world is facing rapid and unprecedented global changes, including population growth, migration, urbanisation, climate change, desertification, drought, degradation and land use, economic and diet changes,’ the statement said.

It set out a roster of non-binding recommendations, including greater cooperation to ease disputes over water, measures to address floods and water scarcity, better management of resources and curbing pollution of rivers, lakes and aquifers.

Some countries tried to beef up the statement so that it recognised access to safe drinking water and sanitation as ‘a basic human right’, rather than a ‘basic human need’, which was what the final text said. They were blocked by Brazil, Egypt and the United States, delegates said.

Around 20 dissenting countries signed on to a separate statement to spell out their position after the conference’s close. They included Spain, Switzerland, Bangladesh and South Africa.

The textual difference, which has political and legal ramifications, is being debated under the UN Convention on Human Rights. Numerous countries, led by Latin America, have already enshrined access to water as a right in their constitution.

The World Water Forum is held every three years, and has gained in importance as a meeting place for debating the globe’s amplifying problems of freshwater.

At least 25,000 policymakers, water specialists and grassroots workers took part in this year’s event, a record attendance.

Campaigners representing the rural poor, the environment and organised labor on Saturday attacked the Forum as a vehicle for water privatisation and called for it to be placed under the UN flag. ‘We demand that the allocation of water be decided in an open, transparent and democratic forum rather than in a trade show for the world’s large corporations’ said Maude Barlow, senior advisor to the president of the UN General Assembly.

The Forum is staged by the World Water Council, a French-based organisation whose funding comes in large part from the water industry.

Providing access to drinking water and sewerage, conserving resources and building reservoirs and dikes to cope with water stress and water excess would cost rich countries alone around $200 billion per year.

‘Mobilising the resources ... is likely to be one of the greatest challenges we face,’ said US delegate Alonzo Fulgham.

The ministers said they would ‘promote effective use of financial resources from all sources’ but did not state a preference for whether water should be in public or private hands.

This is a thorny issue, because campaign groups say utilities that are in private hands ramp up tariffs, hitting the poor especially. However, the ministers said they ‘acknowledged’ that the costs of recovering water investment had to be ‘fair, equitable and sustainable.’

Around 880 million people do not have access to decent sources of drinking water, while 2.5 billion people do not have access to proper sanitation. —AFP
And  the King shall answer and say unto them, Verily I say unto you, 
Inasmuch as ye have done it unto one of the least of these my brethren,  ye have done it unto me.

Matthew 25:40

Offline Satyagraha

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Re: WATER: The new "Oil"
« Reply #41 on: June 27, 2009, 09:27:23 AM »
KENYA: Water shortage increases cholera toll
http://www.irinnews.org/Report.aspx?ReportId=84885

GARBATULLA , 17 June 2009 (IRIN) - An acute water shortage in parts of eastern and northeastern Kenya is fuelling the spread of acute watery diarrhoea (AWD) and cholera, with deaths from new cases being reported, a senior health official has said.

"People are resorting to drinking water from anywhere because of the shortage," Shahnaaz Sharif, director of public health in the Ministry of Public Health, told IRIN.

"Recently, four deaths have been reported in Garbatulla [District] where about 280 AWD cases have been reported in the last three weeks," Sharif said, adding that samples from those affected had been collected for laboratory testing.

Three new cholera cases have also been reported in Laisamis District and two in Moyale District.

"In total, 24 cholera deaths and 1,452 cases of diarrhoea have been recorded since January," he said. Cholera is an acute, diarrhoeal illness. Although infection is often mild, death can occur within hours without treatment, due to dehydration.

According to a resident of Laisamis, Mohamed Kochalle, some of those affected are self-medicating using traditional herbs, as they cannot access health facilities.

Hundreds treated

Hundreds of patients have been treated for diarrhoea and vomiting in Malkadaka in Garbatulla District and Bullesa in Isiolo, according to the Kenya Red Cross Society (KRCS) and health officials.

This is worsening the plight of the region's inhabitants who are already facing a severe drought, said KRCS communications manager Titus Mung'ou, adding that medical drugs, health personnel and volunteers have been mobilized to help contain the outbreak in Garbatulla.

"Our organization has recruited volunteers to support the relief teams in Garbatulla... We have provided drugs and consumables but our efforts are faced with a lot of challenges including [a] shortage of personnel and financial resources..." he said.

Mung'ou said the disease is increasing the number of people in need of relief assistance and worsening food insecurity in the region.

A lack of food is also affecting adherence to treatment regimes. "We have requested food aid; it must be provided urgently for the control measures to work... Food assistance will also encourage treatment," Lordman Lekulkulai of the Arid Lands Resource Management office in Isiolo said.

Inadequate sanitation

Inadequate sanitation has exacerbated the situation. "We only have one toilet for 600 pupils. It is the main reason why our school has been affected," Sora Boru, a head teacher at Bullesa primary school in Isiolo, told IRIN. "Many children have [not] reported for school... Parents are keeping them at home."

Hygiene awareness campaigns have been intensified in the water-scarce region.

According to Yussuf Ali, a trader, the price of bottled water has increased. "A half litre [bottle] of water is selling at Ksh.100 [about US$1.3]... even higher than petrol."

And  the King shall answer and say unto them, Verily I say unto you, 
Inasmuch as ye have done it unto one of the least of these my brethren,  ye have done it unto me.

Matthew 25:40

Offline Satyagraha

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Re: WATER: The new "Oil"
« Reply #42 on: June 27, 2009, 09:42:14 AM »
Water shortage to badly impact crops in Sindh
By Mohammad Hussain Khan
Friday, 26 Jun, 2009 | 06:25 AM PST
http://www.dawn.com/wps/wcm/connect/dawn-content-library/dawn/news/pakistan/provinces/13+water+shortage+to+badly+impact+crops+in+sindh-za-09

HYDERABAD: The projected 40 per cent shortfall in water flows for ongoing Kharif season is bound to have serious impact on crops and make growers of Sindh to suffer more in economic terms.

The growers believe that after cut in water flows Sindh will receive hardly 3,500 cusec from Taunsa-Panjnad link canal which has a discharge of around 7,000 cusec and projected 40 per cent shortfall can be calculated at between 45,000 to 46,000 cusec in Sindh in view of dip being experienced in the system.

The Sindh Abadgar Board (SAB) president Abdul Majeed Nizamani said that in actual terms, Sindh would get relief of just 3,500 cusec, which had been cut from Taunsa-Panjnad link canal.

He maintained that 40 per cent shortfall in Sindh spelt very serious consequences in view of losses suffered by growers in the outgoing season especially in paddy and sugarcane.

‘Cotton has now entered harvesting stage. Nurseries have just started to be prepared in upper Sindh after opening of Rice Canal under a court directive. So, it’s a big issue as far as the production of cash crops is concerned,’ he said.

He blamed Wapda and Irsa authorities for failing to judge likely impacts of abnormal shortfall in the system. ‘The Sindh government has acted very belatedly to contain the situation,’ said Mehmood Nawaz Shah, general secretary of SAB.

He said that flood canals like Taunsa-Panjnad and Chashma-Jehlum and Chashma Right Bank Canal could not be operated without permission of Sindh government, which should have raised its voice at least between June 12 and 15.

If Sindh had raised the issue at the right time and got the canals that diverted water from the Indus in Punjab closed the situation would have been quite different and water shortfall would not have been beyond 10 per cent.

‘Now we fear Punjab will not only use additional releases from Mangla dam but it will also not close its link canals as has been seen historically,’ he remarked.

The water that is to be released to the Punjab from Mangla dam will take considerable time and in the meantime the link canals will not be closed, which means a deficit of around 45,000 cusec for Sindh.

The agriculturalists consider behaviour of the River Indus as abnormal and stress the Indus River System Authority (Irsa) and Wapda should have taken notice when Sukkur Barrage downstream inflow was recorded at around 22,000 cusec at the end of March or early April.

Wapda should have anticipated that there could be a dip in the entire system and should have worked out its plans during that period, he said.

According to SAB general secretary, the indent of Sindh for the first 10 days will be 170,000 cusec but it has started experiencing the dip, reducing its flow to 100,000 cusec at the Guddu Barrage upstream.

‘The fact that we had abnormal availability of water in the river is not a new phenomenon historically and the Sindh government should have put its house in order at that time to effectively respond to the situation.

‘Only then it would have been able at least to get half of flood canals closed,’ he pointed out.

He said that it reflected that in fact it was this province, which was bearing overall shortfall in the system notwithstanding the fact that sowing season in Sindh was at its peak whereas there was still some time before started in the Punjab.

‘In fact overall 40 per cent water shortage means there will be a 60 to 70 per cent shortfall as far as crop cultivation is concerned because even during normal supply of water around eight to 10 per cent of shortfall is always reported, so, we will have to face the brunt of 60 to 70 per cent of shortage,’ he said.

Paddy-sowing has been completed in lower Sindh and in upper part of the province where the crop is dependent on Rice Canal that has been allowed to open under court orders, work on preparation of nurseries have already started.

Paddy growers are already groaning thanks to the crisis that had hit the crop during last season due to abnormal rains and Pakistan Agriculture Storage and Supplies Corporation (Passco). The corporation multiplied their miseries when it delayed procurement of the crop.

The then Sindh government announced the Passco would purchase the rain-damaged crop but the growers did not receive any encouraging response.

The SAB estimated 39 per cent shortage in sugarcane production in the outgoing season when the sugar mills did not pay them the actual amount and forced them to switch to other crops for better returns.

The growers did get some relief in shape of an attractive support price of wheat. The Sindh government is reported to have set a target of 650,000 hectares – around 1.7 to 1.8 million acres – for current year and nurseries of paddy are ready to be sown in Sindh.

Besides, there is an area of 52,000 acres meant for chillies cultivation while cultivation of sugarcane – a high delta crop - is altogether a separate issue.
And  the King shall answer and say unto them, Verily I say unto you, 
Inasmuch as ye have done it unto one of the least of these my brethren,  ye have done it unto me.

Matthew 25:40

Offline ownoiz

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Re: WATER: The new "Oil"
« Reply #43 on: June 30, 2009, 06:42:44 AM »
Yes i believe it is the new oil. So much so i have it as my sig on another forum  :-[

And its apparent shortage is a great way to control the masses and also charge them more for it.

Not everybody uses oil, most but not everybody...everybody uses water...CHA CHING

Offline Satyagraha

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Re: WATER: The new "Oil"
« Reply #44 on: June 30, 2009, 07:19:57 AM »
Yes i believe it is the new oil. So much so i have it as my sig on another forum  :-[

And its apparent shortage is a great way to control the masses and also charge them more for it.

Not everybody uses oil, most but not everybody...everybody uses water...CHA CHING

Thank you Ownoiz - please feel free to add your info to this thread!
And  the King shall answer and say unto them, Verily I say unto you, 
Inasmuch as ye have done it unto one of the least of these my brethren,  ye have done it unto me.

Matthew 25:40

Offline ownoiz

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Re: WATER: The new "Oil"
« Reply #45 on: June 30, 2009, 07:54:42 AM »
Thank you Ownoiz - please feel free to add your info to this thread!

Hello Pilikia, if people want to follow the links in my sig they can see some of the things that have happened in Australia in regards to water control.

In summary...Water rights have been seperated from land and made tradeable in Australias biggest food producing irrigation region, then corporations and governments have moved in and bought massive amounts of water rights, while at the same time not allowing irrigators to access their entitlements (because of so called drought) . This has made the food producers businesses unviable, so even more are forced to sell water.

Lack of government intervention for many years in the upper tributaries that feed the system with water has ensured that upstream developments are allowed to continue unhindered on a massive scale...resulting in lack of water downstream...the perfect problem-reaction-solution scenario for the governments to then cry "drought" and sell its agenda to the masses...water buybacks from food producers for environmental flows.

The water is also very well controlled on the east of Australia where most of Australias population is located, it can be diverted away from the lower lakes where it meets the sea...resulting in an image that also creates a problem-reaction-solution scenario for governments to take advantage of...

Image of The Murray River Lower Lakes


Of course this all ties in nicely with the claim that man-made Co2 emissions are creating global warming, and therefore the drought...so the government can push its emmissions trading system also.

Corporations like KBR Halliburton however are free to extract this water from the river system and profit from urban water sales, however we are told water is scarce and we must pay more for it.

Macquarie Bank is another big water buyer, they have links to Texas tollroads, people in the former bush administration and an executive married to a member of the Rockefeller family.

Politicians are saying things like "worst drought ever" and so on all the time on MSM...
but this isnt entirely true, see the link - The Murray Darling Basin - the worst rainfall ever?

Food production has been severely dented, the suicide rate in affected food producing areas is double the national average.

Offline ownoiz

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Re: WATER: The new "Oil"
« Reply #46 on: June 30, 2009, 06:13:37 PM »
In an unprecedented move for a Labour politician in Australia, The Rann government allowed a National Party state MP, Karlene Maywald, to side with his government in order to gain control of parliament over the Liberal party after a close election.

Karlene is the the current South Australian Minister for the River Murray and Minister for Water Security. She also represents the electoral district of Chaffey in the South Australian House of Assembly. Chaffey encompasses the major food producing region that is The Riverland.

Food producers in this region are currently allowed to take only 2% of 100% water entitlement, making their businesses economically unviable.

Heres Karlene Maywald on WIN Riverland news this week with a masonic symbol around her neck. Apologies for the quality (bad TV reception) but if you look closely you can see its one of these masonic compass and square deals



link: Karlene Maywald models a masonic symbol as she delivers more bad news on TV

Offline ownoiz

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Re: Government Wants to Control the Water
« Reply #47 on: June 30, 2009, 06:29:19 PM »
Water is the new oil...the trial run has succeeded in Australia, from what i can see in California and other parts of the US you guys wont be far behind.

See my sig links as to what they have done in Australia, and how they target food production, while at the same time ensuring that the masses in the cities still have water when they turn their tap on, so they dont complain...however they are told water is hard to come by so the bills will rise.

Quote
WHILE the federal Government is spending $3 billion to buy back water licences in the drought-stricken Murray-Darling, farmers in the Queensland portion of the basin are expanding irrigation works in a challenge to Canberra's newly acquired powers.

However, federal Water Minister Penny Wong said she would not intervene to block the works.

THIS IS AN IMPORTANT PIECE OF THE PUZZLE...upstream developments are allowed to continue unchallenged by the governments ON PURPOSE...it results in images such as this downstream



The perfect PROBLEM-REACTION-SOLUTION scenario the governments and politicians like Mike Rann , Karlene Maywald and Anna Bligh (who work for 'The Crown') want to achieve.

Then its easier to sell their intended actions to the masses.

Food takeovers all tie into it also...drought and lack of water makes it easier for the likes of Monsanto to push their agenda.



Offline mr anderson

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Australian town bans bottled water (Story updated)
« Reply #48 on: July 08, 2009, 10:17:42 AM »
Australian town bans bottled water

July 8, 2009
Anne Barrowclough in Sydney

http://www.timesonline.co.uk/tol/news/environment/article6665855.ece


Quote
ABC News - http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JfgaIJ_LQzY

Until yesterday the town of Bundanoon (population 2,500) was best known as the host of Australia’s version of the Highland Games. Now it has become the world’s first place to ban bottled water.

At a public meeting last night its people agreed to back the ban, which will mean local businesses will stop selling bottled water and visitors will be discouraged from drinking it. Instead, they will be provided with bottles labelled “Bundy on tap” that can be refilled with water from taps and filtered water fountains on the main street.

“It’s a moral thing,” said Huw Kingston, the owner of a coffee-and-bicycle shop who had already stopped selling bottled water. “It’s not easy to do when you’re running a business in a small country town — a thousand dollars is a thousand dollars.

“But the sale of still bottled water is a fantastic con by the beverage industry — convincing people to spend A$3.50 [£1.70] to buy essentially the water that comes out of a tap.” Until recently it seemed that the world’s love affair with bottled water would never end.

Sales in Australia increased by 10 per cent last year, with Australians spending more than A $500 million on still and sparkling water.

This goes against the trend in the northern hemisphere, where sales have begun to fall.

In April Nestlé, whose brands include Perrier and San Pellegrino, nicknamed the “champagne of waters”, reported that sales of its water fell by 4.1 per cent in the first three months of the year, with Western Europe particularly badly hit. Sales of bottled water in Britain — which had rocketed from 30 million litres in 1980 to 1.3 billion litres in 2007 — fell by 9 per cent last year as consumers reacted to high prices and the environmental impact.

Millions of plastic bottles fill landfill sites and litter the oceans.

What went down the wrong way in Bundanoon was when the beverage company Norlex Holdings announced plans to tap an aquifer in the town and transport the water 120 miles to Sydney for bottling.

The proposal was turned down after residents objected — giving rise to the “Bundy on tap” movement. The company appealed and the case is awaiting a ruling.

“Norlex wanted to truck millions of litres of water out of the bore here, stick it in bottles and bring it back to sell to us,” said Mr Kingston. “It became a big issue in this town.”

John Dee, an environmental activist who was behind a ban on plastic bags in Tasmania, said: “The main idea is to get people thinking about their usage of bottled water — environmentally, it makes no sense.”
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Offline Biggs

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Re: Government Wants to Control the Water
« Reply #49 on: July 10, 2009, 09:50:49 PM »
Australia town bans bottled water
 
Campaigners say bottled water is bad for the environment

http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/asia-pacific/8141569.stm


A rural town in Australia has voted overwhelmingly to ban the sale of bottled water over concerns about its environmental impact.

Campaigners say Bundanoon, in New South Wales, may be the first community in the world to have such a ban.

They say huge amounts of resources are used to extract, package and transport bottled water.

The discarded plastic bottles then end up as litter or go into landfill sites, the "Bundy on Tap" campaign says.

More than 350 residents turned out to vote at the public meeting in the town hall.

Only one resident voted against the ban, along with a representative from the bottled water industry, ABC news reported.

The BBC's Nick Bryant in Sydney says locals have promised not to set upon visitors if they ignore the ban, but they will be encouraged to fill a reusable container from water fountains in the main street.

The reusable bottles will bear the slogan "Bundy on Tap".

Campaigner John Dee said local opinion had been incensed when a drinks company announced plans to tap an underground reservoir in the town.

Environmental impact

"The company has been looking to extract water locally, bottle it in Sydney and bring it back here to sell it," he said.

"It made people look at the environmental impact of bottled water and the community has been quite vocal about it."

The ban has been supported by shopkeepers in the town, which has a population of about 2,500.

"We believe Bundanoon is the world's first town that has got its retailers to ban bottled water," said Mr Dee. "We haven't found it anywhere else."

New South Wales Premier Nathan Rees has backed the cause, ordering government departments to stop buying bottled water and use tap water instead.

Mr Rees says it will save taxpayers money and help the environment.
STOP THE KILLING NOW
END THE CRIMINAL SIEGE OF GAZA - FREE PALESTINE!!!!!!!

Offline egypt

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Re: Government Wants to Control the Water
« Reply #50 on: July 10, 2009, 10:11:31 PM »
The water as been privatized by corporations & they are creating scarcity and monopoly to control and get as much money out of us as they can!

Every 3-5 families should invest together in an ecolo blue!  Then, go from there in getting more of them.   I'm getting one as soon as it is possible!  I think with 7 gallons a day, I could bath a little, drink a little and even grow a bit of food!

Offline mr anderson

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Eltham North Primary School bans bottled water
« Reply #51 on: August 25, 2009, 10:10:53 PM »
Eltham North Primary School bans bottled water

By John Masanauskas | Herald Sun | August 26, 2009

http://www.news.com.au/story/0,27574,25983763-421,00.html


    * School bans water, soft drink bottles
    * Says ban will help educate students
    * Vote in our Green Awards 2009

A MELBOURNE school has banned commercially bottled water in what is believed to be a Victorian first. Pupils at Eltham North Primary School are being told to drink tap water and use only environmentally friendly re-useable containers. Principal David Foley said the ban was part of the school's green policy, which includes re-useable containers for lunches.

"We have good water in Melbourne," he said.

"It's a waste of money buying plastic bottled water and most of the bottles end up in our waterways or in landfill.

"We don't want students to come to school using soft drink or bottled water."

It is estimated Australians spend about $500 million each year on bottled water. A bottled water ban was introduced in the NSW town of Bundanoon last month. But Mr Foley said his school had been moving towards the policy since installing waste-cutting water fountains last year.

"It's the way to go," he said.

"We're also using it as an education process to see what can happen if water goes off and what can happen if you're using a poor bottle like a soft drink container."

Mr Foley said bags wouldn't be checked for dodgy bottles, but staff would monitor the use of drink containers in class and in the playground. Brendan Lynch, from water dispenser firm Aqua-bubbler, said his company had supplied eco-friendly products to hundreds of schools in Victoria.

"Kids are a lot more discerning about where they drink from these days," he said. "A lot of water troughs at schools are unhygienic."

Mr Lynch said it was crazy that people were buying so much bottled water during the economic crisis.

"A lot of those bottles can't be recycled and end up as landfill, it's a no-win situation," he said.

Opposition education spokesman Martin Dixon said he had no problem with the bottle ban.

"It's something that they have weighed up carefully," he said. "It's good to allow schools to do something innovative and environmentally friendly."
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Offline g1rlg0ne

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Re: Eltham North Primary School bans bottled water
« Reply #52 on: August 25, 2009, 11:08:55 PM »
Yep. The water is fluoridated. Drink up, kiddies!

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United Water sued for overcharging
« Reply #53 on: August 31, 2009, 09:41:54 AM »
United Water sued for overcharging

August 31, 2009
http://www.abc.net.au/news/stories/2009/08/31/2672109.htm


The taxpayer-owned SA Water is suing private company United Water for tens of millions of dollars for alleged water overcharging.

The South Australian Government is alleging deceptive and misleading conduct and breach of contract against United Water in the years after the negotiation of a water contract in 1995.

That was when management of water was privatised by the former Liberal government. United Water is owned by French company Veolia which has operations in 64 countries. The Treasurer, Kevin Foley, says a review of pricing in 2006 has revealed serious concerns about the contract.

"It is our view and our strong case that will be argued, that the effect of this behaviour by United Water leads into the tens of millions of dollars in terms of overcharging for services, that is South Australian taxpayers paying more for water services than they otherwise should have," he said.

"The former Liberal government when it signed this contract in 1995, in this particular aspect of the contract, really performed very badly in terms of how they negotiated the transparency."

The Water Security Minister, Karlene Maywald, says if damages are awarded, it would offset future residential water price increases.

"It will come off the prices that we will need to increase prices in the future, we're on a pathway to double our price of water, so any return of dollars will reduce the need the quantum of that increase," she said.

'Unfair'

The State Opposition says criticism by the Government over its negotiation of a water contract is unfair.

Opposition finance spokesman Rob Lucas says the alleged breaches by United Water are not its fault under the contract, which was negotiated by the former Liberal government in 1995.

"If the Government is suing United Water for a breach of contract then it would appear to me that the problem is not with the contract but it's with actually why Mr Rann and Mr Foley have not required over the past eight years United Water to abide by the contract," he said.

United Water says it is surprised and disappointed by the legal action but understands SA Water has only filed the claim and currently does not intend to serve it.
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Offline Brocke

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The End of Cheap Water?
« Reply #54 on: September 01, 2009, 03:28:21 PM »

The End of Cheap Water?

Aug 20th, 2009 | By Chris Mayer | Category: Emerging Markets

The price of water is starting to rise in a big way, at least in China. I’ve expected this for a few years.

To set the table, water rates in China have been so far below the global average it’s ridiculous. Especially when you consider the severe water problems in China. The graphic below is from The Wall Street Journal (“China Cities Raise Water Price in Bid to Conserve” by Andrew Batson):

The Chinese are water-poor. They are sucking their aquifers dry. It is particularly bad in the north of China. The groundwater under the North China Plains is draining away quickly. By some estimates, China will exhaust this water supply in the next ten years.

phpqsQvV0

You probably know that the city of Venice is sinking a fraction of an inch per year. But that’s nothing compared to what is going on in Beijing. Parts of Beijing are sinking 8 inches a year! According to Andrew Lees (The Right Game), it is the world’s largest cone of depression (an underground hole created by a depleted water table) at over 15,000 square miles. The second largest cone of depression is around Shanghai.

So finally, many cities are raising the price of water. The WSJ points out several places where water prices could rise 25-48%. Shanghai, for instance, raised water rates 25% in June and plans another 22% increase next year.

The second event that caught my eye was the collaboration between China and India to monitor the health of Himalayan glaciers. This area is very important to both countries. They fought a war over it in 1962. So, the fact that they are getting together on the Himalayan glaciers is meaningful.

Here is why it is so important: Seven of the world’s largest rivers, including the Ganges and the Yangtze, are fed by the glaciers of the Himalayas. They supply water to about 40 per cent of the world’s population.

Well, those glaciers are shrinking. The Indian Space Research Organization, using satellite images, has studied the changes in 466 glaciers. It found they had lost more than 20% of their size between 1962 and 2001.

This melting increases the water flow at first, but eventually slows dramatically as the glaciers either melt completely or reform. These observations have given rise to a kind of “Peak Himalaya” where people wonder if we have not seen the maximum water flow from the mountains.

We know the current run rate on demand is already well above what is sustainable given annual rainfall and river flows. That’s why you have those depressions. That explains the depleted aquifers and the rivers that don’t reach the sea. Now throw into that ugly brew a decline in water supply from the Himalayas. The situation is worse than it seems, if that is possible, because much of the existing fresh water in both countries is so polluted it is unfit for human consumption.

As if all of that weren’t bad enough, the demand for water is still rising rapidly in China and India. The water use per capita in China and India are still well below global averages. As these countries industrialize, they’ll consume exponentially more water. It takes water to make just about everything. For example, to make a 1 tonne passenger car takes more than 100,000 gallons of water. Just to make a cotton shirt takes over 1,000 gallons of water. And most of our water goes into making our food.

So, population growth by itself guarantees increased water demand. (Globally, water consumption increases at more than twice the rate of population growth.) These two countries already have big populations and both will get bigger. When you look at demographic trends, China and India alone will add close 600 million people over the next 30 years. That’s two present-day United States.

Fresh water, like oil, is getting a lot harder to find for 40% of the world’s population. It will get worse before it gets better. The days when we think of water as a cheap resource are coming to a close. That’s especially true for China and India.

Bottom line: We need to create more fresh water. You do that by finding new sources either through new supplies (drilling deeper, desalination, etc.) or by using existing supplies more efficiently (irrigation and other efficiency gains).

All of that takes time and energy. Desalination is energy intensive. Drilling deeper for water or going to more distant source requires energy to pump and move the water. Replacing older, less efficient plants and equipment takes time and energy again. (Detect a theme here?)

Countries, companies and people will find ways to make this transition. The companies that can solve these problems will do well.

http://www.contrarianprofits.com/articles/the-end-of-cheap-water/20043


That men do not learn very much from the lessons of history is the most important of all the lessons of history.
~Aldous Huxley

He who has a why to live can bear almost any how. - ~Friedrich Nietzsche

Offline Brocke

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Re: Government Wants to Control the Water; The new "Oil"
« Reply #55 on: September 27, 2009, 01:52:40 AM »
Govt needs to tackle water corruption

By Kellie Tranter, lawyer and writer

Posted Fri Apr 17, 2009 1:09pm AEST
Updated Fri Apr 17, 2009 1:12pm AEST
Water is a necessity, not a luxury.

Water is a necessity, not a luxury. (ABC News: Giulio Saggin)

In my recent article "Will water corruption trump water security?" I refered to Transparency International's Global Corruption Report 2008: Corruption in the Water Sector (GCR) because Australia received an "honourable" mention. The GCR was "the first of its kind to explore the impact and scope of corruption in different segments of the water sector".

I also urged the Government not only to release immediately the National Land and Water Resources Audit Final Report: 2002-2008 to see how the nation is really faring, but also to "kick its army of salaried officialdom into action to examine firstly, the potential for and consequences of water (and wastewater) corruption; secondly, how government's ability to provide water security notwithstanding water scarcity will be hindered if the management and control of water is in the hands of global marketeers (like investment firms, banks, private-equity firms, hedge funds, pension funds, technology corporations and sovereign wealth funds) and, last but not least, the extent to which water corruption, privatisation and state capture has already occurred".

Since then - during last week alone - we heard about the "bush exodus"; questions being raised about South Australia's water security for next year; the Murray inflows being at record lows; experts raising sustainability concerns over industrial use of 18,000-year-old groundwater on New South Wales' central coast; and an environmental campaigner attempting to highlight to the NSW Government the competing interests between the granting of yet another mining licence and the Murrumbidgee catchment system. These concerns no doubt would resonate with those concerned citizens who are aware that the 2008 update of The Audit Office of New South Wales's 2003 Protecting our rivers audit seems to confirm that there are currently no "comprehensive arrangements in place or operating for monitoring water quality in our rivers, so that the NSW Government is hardly in a position to openly assure the public that industries operating near NSW river systems, as well as more remote 'diffuse source' potential polluters, comply fully with their licence requirements and their environmental management responsibilities".

On top of that, one thing you may not have heard about is the 5th World Water Forum, held recently in Istanbul, where it was publicly acknowledged for the first time that corruption in the water sector is an issue.* I am reliably informed that Australia's Dr James Horne, Deputy Secretary, Department of the Environment and Water Resources, was in attendance, so the Australian Government undoubtedly would have a copy of the 5th World Water Forum Istanbul Ministerial Statement dated 22 March 2009 which includes objectives to:

    * ...improve at the national level the governance of the water sector...prevent corruption and increase integrity in implementing water-related policies, plans and practices; ensure transparency in decision making processes; and strengthen public participation from all water stakeholders ...
    * ...support scientific research, education, development and adoption of new technologies and broadening of technical choices in the field of water...
    * ...improve water demand management, productivity and efficiency of water use for agriculture ...
    * ...support country-led development projects in different sectors related to water, especially with regard to energy and food security and poverty eradication...
    * ...strengthen the prevention of pollution from all sectors in surface and groundwater, appropriately applying the polluter pays principle, while further developing and implementing wastewater collection, treatment and reuse...

And the list goes on.

As I said in my earlier article it is our Government's role to calculate and make provision for raising the public capital required for water research and technology and the replacement and creation of water infrastructure; if it fails to do that you can bet that the water investment opportunities for the marketeers will come thick and fast as the financial crisis deepens. Could it be that Senator Nick Minchin hit the nail on the head last week when he said, commenting on the government's proposed $43 billion broadband network, "... now we've got a $43 billion plan with no business case attached to it; no evidence that people actually want 100 megabits per second of download speed, that there'll be a demand for this service to warrant a $43 billion investment. And as I say, there are any other number of infrastructure priorities in this country. As I say, here in Adelaide, we'd love it if we could get reliable water supplies, which we can't get."

Water is a necessity, not a luxury. Instead of propping up ailing share and property prices and probably doomed financial institutions, what about our superannuation fund managers use our compulsory savings to buy water infrastructure bonds our Government could issue to finance the necessary infrastructure? I'd be much happier to see my superannuation funds there, doing something constructive for our country, than where they are now.

Kellie Tranter is a lawyer, writer and immediate past chairperson of the standing committee on legislation for BPW International. Since establishing her own legal practice seven years ago she has dedicated much of her time to promoting social, environmental and political responsibility.

* Editor's note: Since the publication of this article, Ms Tranter has submitted the following clarification:

    My Opinion piece 'Govt needs to tackle water corruption' posted Fri Apr 17, 2009 1:09pm AEST refers to the '5th World Water Forum, held recently in Istanbul, where it was publicly acknowledged for the first time that corruption in the water sector is an issue'.

    In fact the first prominent public discussion of the issue of corruption in the water sector, as far as I'm aware, was during the Stockholm Water Week in 2007 (see the report).

    In that year also the Water Integrity Network was established and launched its new website to fight corruption in the water sector.

http://www.abc.net.au/news/stories/2009/04/17/2545722.htm


That men do not learn very much from the lessons of history is the most important of all the lessons of history.
~Aldous Huxley

He who has a why to live can bear almost any how. - ~Friedrich Nietzsche

Offline jeremiahshine

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Re: Government Wants to Control the Water; The new "Oil"
« Reply #56 on: January 01, 2010, 01:17:41 PM »
When, in the course of human events, it becomes necessary for one people to dissolve the political bonds which have connected them with another, and to assume among the powers of the earth, the separate and equal station to which the laws of nature and of nature's God entitle them, a decent respect to the opinions of mankind requires that they should declare the causes which impel them to the separation.

We hold these truths to be self-evident, that all men are created equal, that they are endowed by their Creator with certain unalienable rights, that among these are life, liberty and the pursuit of happiness.

How can one live without water?


Offline Brocke

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Re: Government Wants to Control the Water; The new "Oil"
« Reply #57 on: January 13, 2010, 03:56:37 PM »

North India's groundwater use raising sea levels by 5%

5 Oct 2009, 0148 hrs IST, Amit Bhattacharya, TNN

NEW DELHI: The amount of groundwater pumped out by Delhiites and others across northern India is highest in the world and is contributing as much
as 5% to the total rise in sea levels.

A new study using satellite data has found that the region — a swathe of over 2,000km from west Pakistan to Bangladesh along north India — extracts a mindboggling 54 trillion litres from the ground every year, a figure that's likely to cause serious concern over the future of water availability.

The study, conducted by Virendra Mani Tiwari from National Geophysical Research Institute in Hyderabad, along with scientists from University of Colorado, US, found that the average depletion of groundwater level in the Indian part of the region was an alarming 10cm a year.

"We found the region of maximum groundwater loss centred around Delhi and included Rajasthan, Punjab, Haryana and west Uttar Pradesh," Tiwari told TOI. The study was published on September 17, 2009 in the prestigious US-based Geophysical Research Letter.

The research for the first time puts hard numbers to the water loss due to groundwater extraction in the region that’s home to around 10% of humanity. And the scenario is scary. The study found that the net loss of ground water was around 25 trillion litres a year.

The water that is pumped out eventually reaches the sea through rainfall or runoff from the land. ‘‘We found that the 54 trillion litres that’s extracted from the ground in this region leads to a sea-level rise of 0.16mm. That’s roughly equivalent to the contribution to sea level rise from melting Alaskan glaciers which is around 5%. This is also the largest rate of groundwater loss in any comparable-sized region on Earth,’’ Tiwari said.

The study combined data from GRACE (Gravity Recovery And Climate Experiment) satellite with hydrological models from 2002 to 2008 to reach their conclusions. They used gravitational field changes detected by GRACE, corresponding to gain or loss of mass, to compute the groundwater levels. The satellite is sensitive to water level changes of up to 1cm.

Tiwari pointed out that high level of groundwater depletion should also be seen in the context of climate change models which predict increase in extreme weather event in the region. ‘‘Extreme weather events like heavy spells of rain do not recharge groundwater level. This means the region is likely to witness acute shortage of water in the foreseeable future,’’ he said.


Interestingly, the study found significantly less groundwater exploitation in south India. It says, ‘‘The trends are considerably smaller than the negative trends in the north, and could be due to a combination of increased reservoir impoundment, mis-modelled naturally varying storage and (along the southeast coast) tectonic signals related to the Dec 26, 2004 Sumatran earthquake.’’

http://economictimes.indiatimes.com/environment/the-good-earth/North-Indias-groundwater-use-raising-sea-levels-by-5/articleshow/5087912.cms


That men do not learn very much from the lessons of history is the most important of all the lessons of history.
~Aldous Huxley

He who has a why to live can bear almost any how. - ~Friedrich Nietzsche

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Melbourne Water Authority Spied on Critic/Activist
« Reply #58 on: August 23, 2011, 05:59:26 PM »

If an individual did this it would be considered stalking!



Melbourne Water apologises for spying on pipeline protest farmer
 
Melissa Fyfe
August 24, 2011


Yea farmer Jan Beer. Photo: Craig Sillitoe

MELBOURNE Water has conceded it collected ''a large amount'' of personal information about one of its most vocal critics and will make a public apology for causing her distress.

A year-long legal battle ended yesterday when the water authority agreed to publish an apology to 63-year-old Yea farmer Jan Beer, a lead campaigner against the north-south pipeline. The apology will be published on its website and in two regional Victorian newspapers next month.

The apology says in part: ''Melbourne Water acknowledges that the collection of her personal information has caused Mrs Beer to feel that she was being continually monitored and to feel that her privacy had been invaded. Melbourne Water apologises to Mrs Beer for any distress experienced by her in relation to its collection of her personal information.''

The Sunday Age last year revealed Melbourne Water had spied on, filmed and photographed Mrs Beer, as well as tailed her while driving. Her activities were tracked, noted and shared with police over two years. The information came to light after Melbourne Water released 88 documents to Mrs Beer under freedom of information laws.

The information collected included notes on Mrs Beer's protest activities and her movements away from pipeline sites, such as a talk she gave to students at a local wetland.

Mrs Beer, who ran unsuccessfully as an independent for the seat of Seymour in the state election, was pleased yesterday with the outcome in the Victorian Civil and Administrative Tribunal. ''We've pursued them for a year through VCAT without giving up because I felt I was in the right all along,'' Mrs Beer said. ''I am really pleased.''

More: http://www.theage.com.au/victoria/melbourne-water-apologises-for-spying-on-pipeline-protest-farmer-20110823-1j8gg.html


That men do not learn very much from the lessons of history is the most important of all the lessons of history.
~Aldous Huxley

He who has a why to live can bear almost any how. - ~Friedrich Nietzsche