Is this happining here?

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Offline striker1981208

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Is this happining here?
« on: June 05, 2008, 01:17:35 PM »
 Study secretly tracks cell phone users

BY SETH BORENSTEIN, AP Science Writer

WASHINGTON - Researchers secretly tracked the locations of 100,000 people outside the United States through their cell phone use and concluded that most people rarely stray more than a few miles from home.
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The first-of-its-kind study by Northeastern University raises privacy and ethical questions for its monitoring methods, which would be illegal in the United States.

It also yielded somewhat surprising results that reveal how little people move around in their daily lives. Nearly three-quarters of those studied mainly stayed within a 20-mile-wide circle for half a year.

The scientists would not say where the study was done, only describing the location as an industrialized nation.

Researchers used cell phone towers to track individuals' locations whenever they made or received phone calls and text messages over six months. In a second set of records, researchers took another 206 cell phones that had tracking devices in them and got records for their locations every two hours over a week's time period.

The study was based on cell phone records from a private company, whose name also was not disclosed.

Study co-author Cesar Hidalgo, a physics researcher at Northeastern, said he and his colleagues didn't know the individual phone numbers because they were disguised into "ugly" 26-digit-and-letter codes.

That type of nonconsensual tracking would be illegal in the United States, according to Rob Kenny, a spokesman for the Federal Communications Commission. Consensual tracking, however, is legal and even marketed as a special feature by some U.S. cell phone providers.

The study, published Thursday in the journal Nature, opens up the field of human-tracking for science and calls attention to what experts said is an emerging issue of locational privacy.

"This is a new step for science," said study co-author Albert-Lazlo Barabasi, director of Northeastern's Center for Complex Network Research. "For the first time we have a chance to really objectively follow certain aspects of human behavior."

Barabasi said he spent nearly half his time on the study worrying about privacy issues. Researchers didn't know which phone numbers were involved. They were not able to say precisely where people were, just which nearby cell phone tower was relaying the calls, which could be a matter of blocks or miles. They started with 6 million phone numbers and chose the 100,000 at random to provide "an extra layer" of anonymity for the research subjects, he said.

Barabasi said he did not check with any ethics panel. Hidalgo said they were not required to do so because the experiment involved physics, not biology. However, had they done so, they might have gotten an earful, suggested bioethicist Arthur Caplan at the University of Pennsylvania.

"There is plenty going on here that sets off ethical alarm bells about privacy and trustworthiness," Caplan said.

Studies done on normal behavior at public places is "fair game for researchers" as long as no one can figure out identities, Caplan said in an e-mail.

"So if I fight at a soccer match or walk through 30th Street train station in Philly, I can be studied," Caplan wrote. "But my cell phone is not public. My cell phone is personal. Tracking it and thus its owner is an active intrusion into personal privacy."

Paul Stephens, policy director at the Privacy Rights Clearinghouse in San Diego, said the nonconsensual part of the study raises the Big Brother issue.

"It certainly is a major concern for people who basically don't like to be tracked and shouldn't be tracked without their knowledge," Stephens said.

Study co-author Hidalgo said there is a difference between being a statistic — such as how many people buy a certain brand of computer — and a specific example. The people tracked in the study are more statistics than examples.

"In the wrong hands the data could be misused," Hidalgo said. "But in scientists' hands you're trying to look at broad patterns.... We're not trying to do evil things. We're trying to make the world a little better."

Knowing people's travel patterns can help design better transportation systems and give doctors guidance in fighting the spread of contagious diseases, he said.

The results also tell us something new about ourselves, including that we tend to go to the same places repeatedly, he said.

"Despite the fact that we think of ourselves as spontaneous and unpredictable ... we do have our patterns we move along and for the vast majority of people it's a short distance," Barabasi said.

The study found that nearly half of the people in the study pretty much keep to a circle little more than six miles wide and that 83 percent of the people tracked mostly stay within a 37-mile wide circle.

But then there are the people who are the travel equivalent of the super-rich, said Hidalgo, who travels more than 150 miles every weekend to visit his girlfriend. Nearly 3 percent of the population regularly go beyond a 200-mile wide circle. Less than 1 percent of people travel often out of a 621-mile circle.

But most people like to stay much closer to home. Hidalgo said he understands why: "There's a lot of people who don't like hectic lives. Travel is such a hassle."



On the Net:

Nature: http://www.nature.com/nature

  :o

Offline preid2

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Re: Is this happining here?
« Reply #1 on: June 05, 2008, 01:50:35 PM »
This article is written with the attitude of "Yeah we did it and what are you gonna do about it punk"?

Offline Sasha

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Re: Is this happining here?
« Reply #2 on: June 05, 2008, 03:03:31 PM »
Whether or not they are following your footsteps or not there are far more dire reasons to discard that cell.

http://www.brain-surgery.us/mobilephone.html
Mobile Phone-Brain Tumour Public Health Advisory
Vini G. Khurana, MBBS, BSc(Med), PhD, FRACS

FOR THE READER's CONVENIENCE, THE THREE MOST IMPORTANT AREAS TO VISIT ON THIS PAGE ARE:

1.  The "KEY MESSAGES" of this review, given immediately below
2.  The "LATEST UPDATE" to this Site (Multimedia, including discussion on Larry King Live Show; updated May 29, 2008) -- http://www.brain-surgery.us/mobilephone.html#multimed
3.  The "SAFETY TIPS" section -- click on the Safety Tips link in the CONTENTS section -- http://www.brain-surgery.us/mobilephone.html#topcont

May 27, 2008: LARRY KING: "Doctor Khurana, you say that the danger of cell phones could have far broader health ramifications than asbestos and smoking. What do you base it on?" VINI KHURANA: "I base it on the fact, Larry, that at this point in time, there's just over three billion users of cell phones worldwide. So that's half of our world population, or almost half. We've reached saturation points. For example, in Australia, there are 22 million cell phones and 21 million people. And the concern is not just brain tumors, but other health effects associated or reported to be associated with cell phones, including behavioral disturbances, salivary gland tumors, male infertility and microwave sickness syndrome. So we're not just talking about tumors, and I was not just implying brain tumors, but there are other health effects. And with so many users and users starting at the age of three and up now, we should be concerned. And I stand by those comments." [transcript courtesy CNN]



Key messages of this work:

Mobile phones are convenient and frequently invaluable, yet exposure to their electromagnetic radiation is invisible. Therefore, any danger this exposure poses may be easily dismissed.
 
Exposure is long-term and its effects on the body, particularly its electrical organ, the brain, are compounded by numerous other simultaneous long-term exposures including continuous waves from radio and TV transmitter towers, cordless phone base stations, power lines, and wireless/WiFi computing devices.
 
A malignant brain tumour represents a life-ending diagnosis in the vast majority of those diagnosed. There is a significant and increasing body of evidence, to date at least 8 comprehensive clinical studies internationally and one long-term meta-analysis, for a link between mobile phone usage and certain brain tumours.
 
Taken together, the data presented below compellingly suggest that the link between mobile phones and brain tumours should no longer be regarded as a myth. Individual and class action lawsuits have been filed in the USA, and at least one has already been successfully prosecuted, regarding the cell phone-brain tumour link.
 
The "incubation time" or "latency" (i.e., the time from commencement of regular mobile phone usage to the diagnosis of a malignant solid brain tumour in a susceptible individual) may be in the order of 10-20 years. In the years 2008-2012, we will have reached the appropriate length of follow-up time to begin to definitively observe the impact of this global technology on brain tumour incidence rates.
 
There is currently enough evidence and technology available to warrant Industry and Governments alike in taking immediate steps to reduce exposure of consumers to mobile phone-related electromagnetic radiation and to make consumers clearly aware of potential dangers and how to use this technology sensibly and safely.
 
It is anticipated that this danger has far broader public health ramifications than asbestos and smoking, and directly concerns all of us, particularly the younger generation, including very young children.
 
Scientists and physicians from academic centres and independent organizations in the USA, Europe and Asia, came together in mid-2007 to form the Bioinitiative Working Group (Dr Khurana is not a member of this group).
The group's goal was to document proposals for safer standards regarding public exposure to electromagnetic fields based on their comprehensive review of the literature. In its Report, which reviewed over 2000 published studies in the area of electromagnetic radiation and health, substantial evidence is cited for human disease-associations with electromagnetic fields (cell phones, transmission towers or "masts", power lines and Wi-Fi) - particularly leukemia and brain tumours. The group makes its evidence-based recommendations to the Public, Governments and Industry in terms of immediately revising current "exposure standards" to come into line with more contemporary research -- particularly with regard to children, pregnant women, and occupational exposures.

For a list of Bioinitiative participants and their affiliations
http://www.bioinitiative.org/participants/index.htm

For its Complete Report (610 pages).  Note that Report pages labelled 1 - 25 represent the summary of the full report, and in this summary the most important findings and recommendations are bolded in boxes. The peer-reviewed references are given in each of the chapters.
http://www.bioinitiative.org/report/index.htm

For persons with cell phone mast/transmission tower-related health concerns, please visit...
http://www.mast-victims.org/
...[a Site recommended by Dr Gerard J. Hyland, a British physicist previously nominated for the Nobel Prize in Medicine; author of "Physics and biology of mobile telephony", Lancet (2000); a scientific adviser to the British Government's Stewart Report].

For evidence relating to the key messages, visit www.bioinitiative.org or...
http://www.brain-surgery.us/mobilephone.html#topcont

Morality is contraband in war.
- Mahatma Gandhi

Offline ES

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Re: Is this happining here?
« Reply #3 on: June 05, 2008, 03:28:42 PM »
They could just have easily done a similar study by paying 1000 volunteers to have their movements tracked by cell phone. You don't need a sample of 100,000 people to get reliable data. Seems like there is some other motive for this study.
"My heroes are people who monkey wrench the new world order". - Jello Biafra

Offline Sasha

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Re: Is this happining here?
« Reply #4 on: June 05, 2008, 03:33:07 PM »
They could just have easily done a similar study by paying 1000 volunteers to have their movements tracked by cell phone. You don't need a sample of 100,000 people to get reliable data. Seems like there is some other motive for this study.

That's a very good point.  100,000 is overkill for use as a representative sample, and best believe someone paid for that study's scope intentionally.
Morality is contraband in war.
- Mahatma Gandhi

Offline chris jones

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Re: Is this happining here?
« Reply #5 on: June 05, 2008, 05:46:50 PM »

I have heard of this before, sorry but just can't be sure of the read.
Can't remember but it had to do with having the cell number and being able to locate the caller, on posistion or off. The article said it was in use, not experimental.
Ill try to search it.

TheGoodFight1984

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Re: Is this happining here?
« Reply #6 on: June 05, 2008, 05:53:07 PM »
Talk of EU-wide ID card/Mobile phone combo

Quote
http://rinf.com/alt-news/sicence-technology/eu-wide-id-card-scheme-could-use-mobile-phones/3700/

EU-wide ID card scheme could use mobile phones

Tuesday, June 3rd, 2008

The European Commission is testing cross-border electronic identity systems in an effort to create pan-European recognition of the 30 million national ID cards currently used in 13 member states.

The European Commission has announced that EU citizens will be able to prove their identity and use national electronic identity systems - which includes electronic passwords, ID cards, PIN codes and others - throughout the EU, not just in their home country.

National electronic ID (eID) cards are used by citizens to access a variety of public services such as claiming social security and unemployment benefits or filing tax returns. The plan is to align and link these systems without replacing existing ones.

The project, called Stork (Secure idenTity acrOss boRders linKed), is being led by the UK Identity & Passport Service and the Government Gateway.

The Stork project will run for three years and receive €10m funding from the European Commission and an equal contribution from the participating partners.

The European Commission has said the new system would allow citizens to identify themselves electronically in a secure way and deal with public agencies either online or “ideally” from mobile devices.

“Electronic Identities do not yet do enough for mobile EU citizens,” said Viviane Reding, Commissioner for Information Society and Media. “By taking advantage of the development in national eID systems and promoting mutual recognition of electronic identities between Member States, this project moves us a step closer to seamless movement between EU countries that Europeans expect from a borderless Single European Market.”

While only 13 of the 27 EU member states are participating in the pilot, the solutions developed and the experience gained by the project team will be shared with all states with the view to establish a number of trans-border pilot projects based on existing national systems.

Offline striker1981208

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Re: Is this happining here?
« Reply #7 on: June 05, 2008, 05:56:57 PM »
On the real id card, I know everyone here prob feels the same, RESIST IT EVEN IF ITS YOUR DRIVERS LICENSE!!!!!!!! Don't let the government push you one step closer to being a slave!!

Offline striker1981208

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Re: Is this happining here?
« Reply #8 on: June 05, 2008, 05:58:36 PM »
Sasha, thanks for the info, I don't have a cell phone and refuse to use one!!!!!

Offline Sasha

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Re: Is this happining here?
« Reply #9 on: June 05, 2008, 06:31:59 PM »
Sasha, thanks for the info, I don't have a cell phone and refuse to use one!!!!!


My pleasure, truely.  I too refuse to own or use them.
Morality is contraband in war.
- Mahatma Gandhi

Offline GoingEtheric

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Re: Is this happining here?
« Reply #10 on: June 05, 2008, 07:14:06 PM »
They could just have easily done a similar study by paying 1000 volunteers to have their movements tracked by cell phone. You don't need a sample of 100,000 people to get reliable data. Seems like there is some other motive for this study.
agreed. the same percetages and numbers would have popped up in a much smaller sample

Offline David Rothscum

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Re: Is this happining here?
« Reply #11 on: June 05, 2008, 07:28:04 PM »
Makes me think about something I heared about a while ago. Someone was murdered in a night club in the city I live, so the police responded by sending everyone who had been within a certain distance of the crime scene a text message on their mobile phone to ask them what they had seen. This means that they could keep track of where these people went, even recalling data from a while ago, which thus must be stored somewhere.

The mobile phone is your personal tracking device. In return for being a good sheeple they give you a brain tumor, to show you how much they care about you.

Offline Sasha

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Re: Is this happining here?
« Reply #12 on: June 05, 2008, 09:08:40 PM »
Makes me think about something I heared about a while ago. Someone was murdered in a night club in the city I live, so the police responded by sending everyone who had been within a certain distance of the crime scene a text message on their mobile phone to ask them what they had seen. This means that they could keep track of where these people went, even recalling data from a while ago, which thus must be stored somewhere.

The mobile phone is your personal tracking device. In return for being a good sheeple they give you a brain tumor, to show you how much they care about you.

Now that's a control grid even the Wachowski's might be suprised by.  Welcome to the Matrix.
Morality is contraband in war.
- Mahatma Gandhi

Offline Sasha

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Cell Phones POP CORN!!! - videos
« Reply #13 on: June 06, 2008, 08:44:43 AM »
You will not fully believe this unless you see this:

French Test
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kAd0aWxs7kQ

Thx to Pan Man
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=V94shlqPlSI

What do you think they do to your brain?!?
Morality is contraband in war.
- Mahatma Gandhi

Offline birgit

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Re: Is this happining here?
« Reply #14 on: June 07, 2008, 09:43:53 PM »
The mobile phone is your personal tracking device. In return for being a good sheeple they give you a brain tumor, to show you how much they care about you.
100% Correct!
Here we struggle to keep real id chip out of our lives, and this gadget will do it for BigBrother and we pay for it , track us like merchandise.
 I only take along on travel ,  in case of emergency..People have a hard time understanding I do not answer or return calls on the cell.
Besides I see how people drive while yakking on the phone, I need to be able to react,  for my own survival.

.


TRUTH  is  INCONTROVERTIBLE

  Malice   may  attack it
Ignorance  may  deride it
     But in the  end...
             HERE  IT IS ! 
                      ~ unknown

Offline Truthseeker93

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Re: Is this happining here?
« Reply #15 on: January 27, 2015, 04:58:49 PM »
Sure it happens, they wish to track you everywhere. In my country you have to buy a card for public transport and check in and out when you travel. Even when you are a student and are allowed to travel free! Just to control you.
"From the darkness we fight the darkness"