UN / US Gov. Subsidized DynCorp Coverup of Global Child Sex Slave Ring

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Charity: Aid workers raping, abusing children
http://edition.cnn.com/2008/WORLD/europe/05/27/charity.aidworkers/?imw=Y&iref=mpstoryemail

By Stephanie Busari
For CNN

    
LONDON, England (CNN) -- Humanitarian aid workers and United Nation peacekeepers are sexually abusing small children in several war-ravaged and food-poor countries, a leading European charity has said.

Children as young as 6 have been forced to have sex with aid workers and peacekeepers in return for food and money, Save the Children UK said in a report released Tuesday.

After interviewing hundreds of children, the charity said it found instances of rape, child prostitution, pornography, indecent sexual assault and trafficking of children for sex.

"It is hard to imagine a more grotesque abuse of authority or flagrant violation of children's rights," Jasmine Whitbread, chief executive of Save the Children UK, said.

In the report, "No One To Turn To" a 15-year-old girl from Haiti told researchers: "My friends and I were walking by the National Palace one evening when we encountered a couple of humanitarian men. The men called us over and showed us their penises.

"They offered us 100 Haitian gourdes ($2.80) and some chocolate if we would suck them. I said, 'No,' but some of the girls did it and got the money."

Save the Children says almost as shocking as the abuse itself, is the "chronic under-reporting" of the abuses. It believes that thousands more children around the world could be suffering in silence.

According to the charity, children told researchers they were too frightened to report the abuse, fearful that the abuser would come back to hurt them and that they would stop receiving aid from agencies, or even be punished by their family or community.

"People don't report it because they are worried that the agency will stop working here, and we need them," a teenage boy in southern Sudan told Save the Children.

The charity's research was centered on Ivory Coast, southern Sudan and Haiti, but Save the Children said the perpetrators of sexual abuse of children could be found in every type of humanitarian organization at all levels.

Save the Children is calling for a global watchdog to tackle the problem and said it was working with the U.N. to establish local mechanisms that will allow victims to easily report abuse.

"We are glad that Save the Children continues to shed a light on this problem. It actually follows up on a report that we did in 2002 with Save the Children. I think every population in the world has to confront this problem of exploitation and abuse of children," said Ron Redmond, chief spokesman for the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees in Geneva, Switzerland.

"The United Nations has a zero-tolerance policy. It's one that UNHCR takes very, very seriously. In refugee camps, we have implemented very strong reporting mechanisms so that refugees can come forward to report any abuses or alleged abuses."

In 2003, U.N. Nepalese troops were accused of sexual abuse while serving in the Democratic Republic of Congo. Six soldiers were later jailed.

A year later, two U.N. peacekeepers were repatriated after being accused of abuse in Burundi, while U.N. troops also were accused of rape and sexual abuse in Sudan.

Last year, the U.N. launched an investigation into sexual abuse claims in Ivory Coast.

The vast majority of aid workers were not involved in any form of abuse or exploitation, but in "life-saving essential humanitarian work," Save the Children's Whitbread said.

But humanitarian and peacekeeping agencies working in emergency situations "must own up to the fact that they are vulnerable to this problem and tackle it head on," she said.

The aid agency said it had fired three workers for breaching its codes and called on others to do the same. The three men were dismissed in the past year for having had sex with girls aged 17 -- which the charity said is not illegal but is cause for loss of employment.

Other UK charities said they supported Save the Children's call for a global watchdog.

"Oxfam takes a zero-tolerance approach to sexual misconduct by its aid workers. All our staff across the world are held accountable by a robust code of conduct," Jane Cocking, Oxfam charity's humanitarian director said.

"We support Save the Children's calls for a global watchdog. We will do all we can to stamp out this intolerable abuse."
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Charity: Aid workers raping, abusing children
Story Highlights
Aid workers and UN peacekeepers are sexually abusing vulnerable children
Children as young as 6 have been forced to trade food for sex and raped
Charity: A grotesque abuse of authority and violation of children's rights
http://edition.cnn.com/2008/WORLD/europe/05/27/charity.aidworkers/?iref=hpmostpop

By Stephanie Busari
For CNN

LONDON, England (CNN) -- Humanitarian aid workers and United Nation peacekeepers are sexually abusing small children in several war-ravaged and food-poor countries, a leading European charity has said.

Children like this 15-year-old girl have suffered abuse at the hands of some UN soldiers and aid workers.

Children as young as 6 have been forced to have sex with aid workers and peacekeepers in return for food and money, Save the Children UK said in a report released Tuesday.

After interviewing hundreds of children, the charity said it found instances of rape, child prostitution, pornography, indecent sexual assault and trafficking of children for sex.

"It is hard to imagine a more grotesque abuse of authority or flagrant violation of children's rights," Jasmine Whitbread, chief executive of Save the Children UK, said.

In the report, "No One To Turn To" a 15-year-old girl from Haiti told researchers: "My friends and I were walking by the National Palace one evening when we encountered a couple of humanitarian men. The men called us over and showed us their penises.

"They offered us 100 Haitian gourdes ($2.80) and some chocolate if we would suck them. I said, 'No,' but some of the girls did it and got the money."

Save the Children says almost as shocking as the abuse itself, is the "chronic under-reporting" of the abuses. It believes that thousands more children around the world could be suffering in silence.
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According to the charity, children told researchers they were too frightened to report the abuse, fearful that the abuser would come back to hurt them and that they would stop receiving aid from agencies, or even be punished by their family or community.

"People don't report it because they are worried that the agency will stop working here, and we need them," a teenage boy in southern Sudan told Save the Children.

The charity's research was centered on Ivory Coast, southern Sudan and Haiti, but Save the Children said the perpetrators of sexual abuse of children could be found in every type of humanitarian organization at all levels.

Save the Children is calling for a global watchdog to tackle the problem and said it was working with the U.N. to establish local mechanisms that will allow victims to easily report abuse.

"We are glad that Save the Children continues to shed a light on this problem. It actually follows up on a report that we did in 2002 with Save the Children. I think every population in the world has to confront this problem of exploitation and abuse of children," said Ron Redmond, chief spokesman for the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees in Geneva, Switzerland.

"The United Nations has a zero-tolerance policy. It's one that UNHCR takes very, very seriously. In refugee camps, we have implemented very strong reporting mechanisms so that refugees can come forward to report any abuses or alleged abuses."

In 2003, U.N. Nepalese troops were accused of sexual abuse while serving in the Democratic Republic of Congo. Six soldiers were later jailed.

A year later, two U.N. peacekeepers were repatriated after being accused of abuse in Burundi, while U.N. troops also were accused of rape and sexual abuse in Sudan.

Last year, the U.N. launched an investigation into sexual abuse claims in Ivory Coast.

The vast majority of aid workers were not involved in any form of abuse or exploitation, but in "life-saving essential humanitarian work," Save the Children's Whitbread said.

But humanitarian and peacekeeping agencies working in emergency situations "must own up to the fact that they are vulnerable to this problem and tackle it head on," she said.

The aid agency said it had fired three workers for breaching its codes and called on others to do the same. The three men were dismissed in the past year for having had sex with girls aged 17 -- which the charity said is not illegal but is cause for loss of employment.

Other UK charities said they supported Save the Children's call for a global watchdog.

"Oxfam takes a zero-tolerance approach to sexual misconduct by its aid workers. All our staff across the world are held accountable by a robust code of conduct," Jane Cocking, Oxfam charity's humanitarian director said.
"We support Save the Children's calls for a global watchdog. We will do all we can to stamp out this intolerable abuse."
All eyes are opened, or opening, to the rights of man. The general spread of the light of science has already laid open to every view the palpable truth, that the mass of mankind has not been born with saddles on their backs, nor a favored few booted and spurred, ready to ride them legitimately

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Child abuse by aidworkers, peacekeepers rife: study
http://news.yahoo.com/s/nm/20080526/ts_nm/peacekeepers_abuse_dc
By David Clarke
Mon May 26, 7:11 PM ET

LONDON (Reuters) - Sexual abuse of children by aid workers and peacekeepers is rife and efforts to protect young people are inadequate, said a report published on Tuesday. ADVERTISEMENT



The study by charity Save the Children UK said there were significant levels of abuse in emergencies, much of it unreported and unless the silence ended, attempts to stamp out exploitation would "remain fundamentally flawed."

Accusations of sexual abuse by U.N. peacekeepers and aid workers around the world have increased in recent years and the United Nations is investigating claims against its soldiers in hotspots such as Haiti, Liberia, Ivory Coast and the Democratic Republic of Congo.

The report said while the U.N. and some non-governmental organizations were stepping up efforts to address the problem, a global watchdog should be established this year to monitor attempts to tackle abuse and champion effective responses.

Save the Children based its findings on visits last year to Haiti, Southern Sudan and Ivory Coast. It held 38 focus group discussions with 250 children and 90 adults, followed up by in-depth interviews with some and desk-based research.

The study found a huge range of exploitation and abuse: children trading sex for food, forced sex, verbal sexual abuse, child prostitution, child pornography, sexual slavery, sexual assault and child trafficking.

The focus groups identified children as young as six as having been abused, although most were aged 14 to 15.

U.N. peacekeepers were identified as the most likely perpetrators by 20 of the 38 groups, although a total of 23 humanitarian, peacekeeping and security organizations were associated with sexual abuse in the three countries.

"All humanitarian and peacekeeping agencies working in emergency situations, including Save the Children UK, must own up to the fact that they are vulnerable to this problem and tackle it head on," said Jasmine Whitbread, chief executive of Save the Children UK.

YOUNG GIRLS

More than half of the participants in the study identified incidents of sexual touching and forced sex. Of these, 18 and 23 percent respectively recalled 10 or more such incidents.

"They especially ask us for girls of our age. Often it will be between eight and 10 men who will share two or three girls. When I suggest an older girl, they say that they want a young girl," a 14-year-old boy who works at a peacekeeping camp in Ivory Coast told the Save the Children research team.

And the report said official U.N. statistics appeared to underestimate the scale of abuse, probably because so much of the exploitation was not reported by victims.

"Clearly there is a significant disparity between the low levels of abuse cited in these statistics and the high levels suggested in field investigations and other evidence," it said.

Save the Children said there were many reasons why abuse was not reported: fear of losing material assistance, threat of retribution, stigmatization, negative economic impact, lack of legal services, resignation to abuse, lack of information about how to report abuse and, crucially, lack of faith in a response.

Anecdotal evidence from all 38 focus groups suggested there was an endemic failure to respond to reports of abuse.

"Many U.N. agencies and NGOs working here feel they cannot be touched by anyone," said an aid worker in Ivory Coast.
All eyes are opened, or opening, to the rights of man. The general spread of the light of science has already laid open to every view the palpable truth, that the mass of mankind has not been born with saddles on their backs, nor a favored few booted and spurred, ready to ride them legitimately

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Sexual abuse of children by aid workers too often unreported
http://www.reliefweb.int/rw/RWB.NSF/db900SID/SHIG-7F2GD3?OpenDocument

Save the Children UK calls for new global watchdog

A new report released today by Save the Children UK shows that children living in conflict-affected countries fear to report sexual exploitation and abuse by UN peacekeeping troops and humanitarian aid workers.

Despite recent political commitments by governments and international organisations to tackle this problem, the report exposes the chronic under-reporting of such abuse, which leaves many children around the world suffering in silence.

Children told Save the Children UK that they were too afraid to report the abuse, frightened that if they did the abuser might come back and hurt them, that aid agencies might stop helping them, or that they might be stigmatised by their family and community, or even punished by them. This suggests that for every case of abuse that is identified, there are likely to be many more that go unreported.

Save the Children UK's research in Ivory Coast, Southern Sudan and Haiti shows that children as young as six are being abused by adults working for the international community. The children interviewed highlighted many different types of abuse, including trading food for sex, rape, child prostitution, pornography, indecent sexual assault and trafficking of children for sex.

"People don't report it because they are worried that the agency will stop working here, and we need them", explained a teenage boy in Southern Sudan.

To combat the problem, Save the Children UK makes three recommendations that are under discussion with the UN Task Force on protection from sexual exploitation and abuse:

- Effective local complaints mechanisms to be set up by the UN in the countries in which there is a significant international presence, so that children and/or their parents are able to report abuses carried out by those acting on behalf of the international community and get decisive action taken against the perpetrators.

- The establishment of a new global watchdog to monitor and evaluate the efforts of international agencies to tackle this abuse and to champion more effective responses

I- ncreased investment in tackling the underlying causes of sexual abuse, for example support for legal reforms, public education and awareness raising, and the development of national child protection systems.

Jasmine Whitbread, chief executive of Save the Children UK, said:

"This research exposes the despicable actions of a small number of perpetrators who are sexually abusing some of the most vulnerable children in the world, the very children they are meant to protect. It is hard to imagine a more grotesque abuse of authority or flagrant violation of children's rights.

"In recent years, some important commitments have been made by the UN, the wider international community and by humanitarian and aid agencies to act on this problem. But welcome as these are, in most cases statements of principle and good intent have yet to be converted into really decisive and concerted international action."

The report reveals that the perpetrators of sexual abuse of children can be found in every type of humanitarian, peace and security organisation, at every grade of staff, and among both locally recruited and international staff.

Whitbread continued:

"Obviously the vast majority of aid workers are not involved in any form of abuse or exploitation, but in life-saving essential humanitarian work. However all humanitarian and peacekeeping agencies working in emergency situations, including Save the Children UK, must own up to the fact that they are vulnerable to this problem and tackle it head on."
All eyes are opened, or opening, to the rights of man. The general spread of the light of science has already laid open to every view the palpable truth, that the mass of mankind has not been born with saddles on their backs, nor a favored few booted and spurred, ready to ride them legitimately

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Aid Workers Are Said to Abuse Girls
http://www.nytimes.com/2006/05/09/world/africa/09liberia.html

By SARAH LYALL
Published: May 9, 2006

LONDON, May 8 — Liberian girls as young as 8 are being sexually exploited by United Nations peacekeepers, aid workers and teachers in return for food, small favors and even rides in trucks, according to a new report from Save the Children U.K.

The report said the problem was widespread throughout Liberia, a small country struggling to get back on its feet after a long and bloody civil war.

Save the Children based its findings on interviews with more than 300 people in camps for displaced people and in neighborhoods whose residents have returned after being driven away by war. They said men in positions of authority — aid workers and soldiers, government employees and officials in the camps — were abusing girls.

"All of the respondents clearly stated that the scale of the problem affected over half of the girls in their locations," the report said. "The girls reportedly ranged in age from 8 to 18 years, with girls of 12 years and upward described as being regularly involved in 'selling sex,' commonly referred to as 'man business.' "

In a statement from Liberia, the United Nations said that eight cases of sexual abuse and exploitation involving its workers had been reported since the beginning of the year and that one staff member had been suspended, Reuters reported.

"It's unacceptable behavior," Jordan Ryan, the United Nations' humanitarian coordinator in Liberia, said in an interview with BBC radio from Monrovia, the Liberian capital.

Save the Children said Liberia and the United Nations should set up an office to investigate cases of the sexual exploitation and to work to ensure that the behavior stops, prosecuting the offenders, among other steps.

It also said United Nations workers accused of sexual exploitation should "go through judicial proceedings," and if found guilty, should not be sent elsewhere as peacekeepers.
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Aid workers 'sexually abusing children'
http://www.stuff.co.nz/4562103a12.html
Tuesday, 27 May 2008

Sexual abuse of children by aid workers and peacekeepers is rife and efforts to protect young people are inadequate, said a report published today.


The study by charity Save the Children UK said there were significant levels of abuse in emergencies, much of it unreported and unless the silence ended, attempts to stamp out exploitation would "remain fundamentally flawed".

Accusations of sexual abuse by United Nations peacekeepers and aid workers around the world have increased in recent years and the UN is investigating claims against its soldiers in hotspots such as Haiti, Liberia, Ivory Coast and the Democratic Republic of Congo.

The report said while the UN and some non-governmental organisations were stepping up efforts to address the problem, a global watchdog should be established this year to monitor attempts to tackle abuse and champion effective responses.

Save the Children based its findings on visits last year to Haiti, Southern Sudan and Ivory Coast. It held 38 focus group discussions with 250 children and 90 adults, followed up by in-depth interviews with some and desk-based research.

The study found a huge range of exploitation and abuse: children trading sex for food, forced sex, verbal sexual abuse, child prostitution, child pornography, sexual slavery, sexual assault and child trafficking.

The focus groups identified children as young as six as having been abused, although most were aged 14 to 15.

UN peacekeepers were identified as the most likely perpetrators by 20 of the 38 groups, although a total of 23 humanitarian, peacekeeping and security organisations were associated with sexual abuse in the three countries.

"All humanitarian and peacekeeping agencies working in emergency situations, including Save the Children UK, must own up to the fact that they are vulnerable to this problem and tackle it head on," said Jasmine Whitbread, chief executive of Save the Children UK.

More than half of the participants in the study identified incidents of sexual touching and forced sex. Of these, 18 and 23 per cent respectively recalled 10 or more such incidents.

"They especially ask us for girls of our age. Often it will be between eight and 10 men who will share two or three girls. When I suggest an older girl, they say that they want a young girl," a 14-year-old boy who works at a peacekeeping camp in Ivory Coast told the Save the Children research team.

And the report said official UN statistics appeared to underestimate the scale of abuse, probably because so much of the exploitation was not reported by victims.

"Clearly there is a significant disparity between the low levels of abuse cited in these statistics and the high levels suggested in field investigations and other evidence," it said.

Save the Children said there were many reasons why abuse was not reported: fear of losing material assistance, threat of retribution, stigmatisation, negative economic impact, lack of legal services, resignation to abuse, lack of information about how to report abuse and, crucially, lack of faith in a response.

Anecdotal evidence from all 38 focus groups suggested there was an endemic failure to respond to reports of abuse.

"Many UN agencies and NGOs working here feel they cannot be touched by anyone," said an aid worker in Ivory Coast.
All eyes are opened, or opening, to the rights of man. The general spread of the light of science has already laid open to every view the palpable truth, that the mass of mankind has not been born with saddles on their backs, nor a favored few booted and spurred, ready to ride them legitimately

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U.N. 'peacekeepers' rape women, children
http://www.worldnetdaily.com/news/article.asp?ARTICLE_ID=42088
Posted: December 24, 2004 1:00 am Eastern © 2008 WorldNetDaily.com



With the United Nations already under fire for the Oil-for-Food mega-scandal and other corruption, sensational allegations of rampant sexual exploitation and rape of young girls and women by the U.N.'s so-called "peacekeepers" and civilian staffers in the Congo is dragging the global body's reputation to an all-time low.

In a new report referring to the widespread sex scandal as "the U.N.'s Abu Ghraib," the London Times provides some specific examples, including:

A French U.N. logistics expert in the Congo shot pornographic videos in his home, in which he had converted his bedroom into a photo studio for videotaping his sexual abuse of young girls. When police raided his home, the man was allegedly about to rape a 12-year-old girl sent to him in a law enforcement sting operation. As the Times reported, a senior Congolese police officer confirmed the bed was surrounded by large mirrors on three sides, with a remote control camera on the fourth side.

U.N. officials are worried that the scandal, which already has netted 150 allegations of sex crimes by U.N. staffers, will explode if the pornographic videos and photos, now on sale in Congo, becoming public

"It would be a pretty big problem for the U.N. if these pictures come out," one senior official told the Times.

Two Russian pilots paid young girls with jars of mayonnaise and jam to have sex with them, the report adds.

U.N. "peacekeepers" from Morocco based in Kisangani – a secluded town on the Congo River – are notorious for impregnating local women and girls. In March, an international group probing the scandal found 82 women and girls had been made pregnant by Moroccan U.N. staffers and 59 others by Uruguayan staffers. One U.N. soldier accused of rape was apparently hidden in the barracks for a year.

Congo's Minister of Defense Maj.-Gen. Jean Pierre Ondekane told a top U.N. official that all U.N. "peacekeepers" in Kisangani would be remember for would be "for running after little girls," the Times reported.

And at least two U.N. officials – a Ukrainian and a Canadian – have been forced to leave the African nation after getting local women pregnant.

Most of the sexual abuse and exploitation, says the report, involves trading sex for money, food or jobs. However, some victims say they were raped, but later given food or money to make the incident appear to have been consensual – "rape disguised as prostitution."

U.N. Under-Secretary-General for Peacekeeping Jean-Marie Guehenno told the London paper: "The fact that these things happened is a blot on us. It's awful. What is important is to get to the bottom of it and fight it and make sure that people who do that pay for what they have done."

Despite the fact that the U.N.'s sexual code of conduct is prominently displayed on U.N. facilities Congo – forbidding sex with prostitutes or women under 18 – the U.N. continues to hand out free condoms to "peacekeepers" to protect them from AIDS.

The U.N. has promised to investigate and prosecute the widespread allegations. But, as WND reported last month, the global organization is not known for its forthrightness and candor in such internal investigations. The agency has been criticized for ignoring evidence or wrongdoing in the past – including accusations of rape and murder by "peacekeepers."

In fact, previous revelations of peacekeeping abuses have only been revealed by news organizations. Such was the case in Cambodia in the early 1990s and later in Somalia, Bosnia and Ethiopia.

"I am afraid there is clear evidence that acts of gross misconduct have taken place," Secretary-General Kofi Annan admitted. "This is a shameful thing for the United Nations to have to say, and I am absolutely outraged by it."

Annan said the allegations concerned a small number of U.N. personnel and promised to hold those involved accountable.

"I have long made it clear that my attitude to sexual exploitation and abuse is one of zero tolerance, without exception, and I am determined to implement this policy in the most transparent manner," Annan said.

But Jordan’s Prince Zeid Raad Al Hussein, a special adviser to Annan and who led one investigative team, said in a confidential report obtained by The Times: "The situation appears to be one of 'zero-compliance with zero-tolerance' throughout the mission."

The new charges of rape and pedophilia by U.N. troops and workers in Congo are not the first scandal involving U.N. workers and troops in Africa.

Former United Nations Secretary-General Boutros Boutros-Ghali's tenure was marked by scandalous charges that he played a leading role in supplying weapons to the Hutu regime that carried out a campaign of genocide against the Tutsi tribe in 1994.

As minister of foreign affairs in Egypt, Boutros-Ghali facilitated an arms deal in 1990, which was to result in $26 million of mortar bombs, rocket launchers, grenades and ammunition being flown from Cairo to Rwanda. The arms were used by Hutus in attacks which led to up to a million deaths. The role of Boutros-Ghali, who was in charge at the U.N. when it turned its back on the killings in 1994, was revealed in a book by Linda Melvern. In "A People Betrayed: The Role of the West in Rwanda's Genocide," Boutros-Ghali admits his role in approving an initial $5.8 million arms deal in 1990, which led to Egypt supplying arms to Rwanda until 1992. He says he approved it because it was his job as foreign minister to sell weapons for Egypt.

Back in 1997, there were reports Belgian U.N. troops roasted a Somali boy. A military court reportedly sentenced two paratroopers to a month in jail and a fine of 200 pounds for the offense.

Another Belgian soldier reportedly forced a young Somali to eat pork, drink salt water and then eat his own vomit. Another sergeant was accused of murdering a Somali whom he was photographed urinating upon. Another child, accused of stealing food from the paratroopers' base, died after being locked in a storage container for 48 hours. Fifteen other members of the same regiment were investigated in 1995 for "acts of sadism and torture" against Somali civilians.

The pattern of abuse was not confined to Belgian troops. Belgium was actually the third country in the peacekeeping group to charge troops with serious crimes against Somali citizens -- including rape, torture and murder. In 1995, a group of Canadian paratroopers were investigated for torturing a Somali to death and killing three others.

Gruesome photos were published in a Milan magazine of Italian soldiers torturing a Somali youth and abusing and raping a Somali girl. Paratroopers claim they were specifically trained in methods of torture to aid interrogation. According to one witness, Italian soldiers tied a young Somali girl to the front of an armored personnel carrier and raped her while officers looked on.
All eyes are opened, or opening, to the rights of man. The general spread of the light of science has already laid open to every view the palpable truth, that the mass of mankind has not been born with saddles on their backs, nor a favored few booted and spurred, ready to ride them legitimately

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'Disaster Zone Kids Are Victims Of Abuse'
http://news.sky.com/skynews/article/0,,30100-1317179,00.html
Updated:08:32, Tuesday May 27, 2008
An international watchdog is needed to deal with widespread cases of child sex abuse by aid workers and peacekeepers, the charity Save The Children says.
Charity is warning of child abuse

The call comes after the charity found children as young as six trading sex for food, money, soap and even mobile phones in war zones and disaster areas.

It said all organisations had workers involved in "some of the most despicable abuse against some of the world's most vulnerable children".

The scale of abuse was "significant" and victims were being let down by "endemic failures" in responding, it concluded.

Better reporting mechanisms should be introduced, it said, as well as efforts made to strengthen child protection systems across the globe.

Hundreds of young people from Ivory Coast, southern Sudan and Haiti were involved in the research behind the conclusions.

Publication of the findings comes amid two massive international aid efforts - for the victims of the Chinese earthquake and the cyclone in Burma.
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"This research exposes the despicable actions of a small number of perpetrators who are sexually abusing some of the most vulnerable children in the world, the very children they are meant to protect," said Save the Children UK chief executive Jasmine Whitbread.

"It is hard to imagine a more grotesque abuse of authority or flagrant violation of children's rights.

"Obviously the vast majority of aid workers are not involved in any form of abuse or exploitation but in life-saving essential humanitarian work.

"However, all humanitarian and peacekeeping agencies working in emergency situations, including Save the Children UK, must own up to the fact that they are vulnerable to this problem and tackle it head on."

Liberal Democrat international development spokesman Michael Moore said: "This shocking report has brought to light to an issue which many would rather ignore.

"The British Government should champion a global watchdog on this issue and the United Nations must ensure that all peacekeepers and aid workers acting on its behalf are held to the highest moral standards."
All eyes are opened, or opening, to the rights of man. The general spread of the light of science has already laid open to every view the palpable truth, that the mass of mankind has not been born with saddles on their backs, nor a favored few booted and spurred, ready to ride them legitimately

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Peacekeepers Trading Food for Sex
http://www.foxnews.com/story/0,2933,194655,00.html
Monday, May 08, 2006
 


MONROVIA, Liberia —  Aid workers and U.N. peacekeepers are trading food for sex with young girls in Liberian camps housing those left homeless by years of war, an aid group said Monday.

Save the Children, which surveyed nearly 160 children and about 170 adults who were either living in camps or had recently returned home, said they were repeatedly told of girls having sex with older men in exchange for money, food and other goods.

The accused included peacekeeping troops, aid workers and other powerful men in the community. The report did not give the nationality of the aid workers or peacekeepers involved. About 17,000 U.N. peacekeepers are based in Liberia.

Despite some initiatives to reduce sexual exploitation and abuse, the report said there had been "little change" in the lives of vulnerable children since 2002.

CountryWatch: Liberia

Liberia is just starting to recover from years of civil war and many of its citizens still live in camps set up after they were forced out of their villages.


The U.N. humanitarian coordinator in Liberia, Jordan Ryan, said the survey was outdated because it was conducted nine months ago and much has improved since then. The camps that are the primary subject of the report are now closed, he said.

"There are good things that are now happening in Liberia," he said. U.N. staff who engage in such "unacceptable behaviors" are fired, Ryan added.

President Ellen Johnson-Sirleaf took office in January, promising reconstruction and peace.

"With the coming in of a new government, mechanisms are being put in place to limit these kinds of things," said Mohammed Sheriff, Liberia's deputy health minister.

But Sheriff cautioned that preventing sex transactions is a difficult task for a poor country still recovering from years of violence.

"We have parents that have so many children — eight to 10 — that are not able to cope with the meager amount of money they have," he said. "People live below 25 cents (per day); so you can look at reasons why these thing may happen."
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Re: UN Peacekeepers and Aid Workers are Sexually Abusing Small Children
« Reply #10 on: May 27, 2008, 11:41:59 AM »
Aid staff abusing Liberian children, charity says
http://www.guardian.co.uk/world/2006/may/08/westafrica.davidfickling
David Fickling
guardian.co.uk, Monday May 8 2006

 
Liberia is facing an epidemic of child prostitution, with more than half of children engaged in selling sex in some parts of the country, a children's charity warned today.
The Save the Children report found that girls as young as eight were selling sex for items such as food, beer, clothing, perfume or mobile phones.

Others were reported as having sex with adults in return for good school grades, video screenings or rides in cars.

Investigators were told that wealthy and powerful men were the main abusers, among them UN peacekeepers and aid agency staff.

Save the Children's UK chief executive, Jasmine Whitbread, said the situation must not be tolerated. "This cannot continue. It must be tackled," she said.

"Men who use positions of power to take advantage of vulnerable children must be reported and fired. More must be done to support children and their families to make a living without turning to this kind of desperation."

The study interviewed more than 300 people in resettlement camps and found that the presence of foreign troops and aid workers often exacerbated the problem because of their comparatively high wages.

"Sex with underage girls by humanitarian workers continues openly," the report stated. Employees of non-governmental organisations "are carrying out awareness on sexual exploitation, HIV and Aids," one camp resident said, "but during the night hours they are the same people running after these 12-year-old girls".

One teenager told the investigators that having sex with soldiers from the Unmil peacekeeping force was a good way of earning extra income.

"If you 'go out' with men you can get money to buy the things you need. My friend had no money before. Now she is selling because she is loving to Unmil," she said.

"Many parents are happy to get the money from the girl," another respondent said, "but if she gets pregnant and the man disowns her, then the parents blame the child and may turn their backs on her and put her out of the home."

Recent years have seen a spate of accusations about abuse of local women and children by non-governmental organisations in developing countries.

In neighbouring Sierra Leone last year, the chief investigator of the UN special court investigating war crimes in the country's civil war was jailed for 18 months for abusing his 13-year-old maid.

The following month the UN mission in the Democratic Republic of Congo established an internal office to tackle sexual abuse of local civilians by its staff, following a string of reports about employees abusing children in the war-torn country.

The British army is also investigating more than 2,000 complaints from Masai women in Kenya, who claim that British soldiers raped them over a 20-year period.

Liberia is struggling to emerge from the chaos of a decade-long civil war in which 150,000 people were killed and 850,000 driven from their homes.

Camp residents interviewed for the Save the Children report said the dislocation caused by the war and the widespread poverty in its aftermath had fuelled the problem.

"People don't really accept it [sexual abuse] but, because of the financial constraints, people just have to do so," one respondent said.

"Most of them are in households headed by only the mother, catering for children. Their fathers got killed in the war. Or some fathers are living but can't afford to care for their children; they have to accept the situation, as there is no way out."

Boys as young as 14 were also reported to be involved in the trade, although such reports were rare.

Last year Liberians voted in Eleanor Johnson-Sirleaf, the first elected female leader of an African country. She promised to tackle sexual violence and exploitation, passing a new rape bill soon after her election and promising: "Nobody will abuse our girls and women and get away with it."

Last month the Jesuit Refugee Service (JRS) reported that there had been a sharp growth in prostitution among Liberian refugee children in Guinea after the UN shifted its development funding back to Liberia.

It reported that staff had been told about girls turning to prostitution to pay newly imposed school fees in Guinean refugee camps.

"This is not a healthy situation ... They think that prostitution is the fastest way to get money and ... become increasingly vulnerable to HIV/AIDS and infections," one refugee mother told the JRS.
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Re: UN Peacekeepers and Aid Workers are Sexually Abusing Small Children
« Reply #11 on: May 27, 2008, 11:43:25 AM »
UN Child Sex Slave Scandals Continue
Wave after wave of child abuse reports pour forward from all over the globe
http://www.infowars.net/articles/january2007/030107UN_Sex.htm
Steve Watson
Infowars.net
Wednesday, January 3, 2007

The UN is to investigate itself again after it was revealed by the London Telegraph today that more than twenty different cases of child sex slavery involving UN staff have been reported in southern Sudan.

The Telegraph reports that it has learned of dozens of victims’ accounts claiming that some peacekeeping and civilian staff based in the town are regularly picking up young children in their UN vehicles and forcing them to have sex. The Telegraph states that it is thought that hundreds of children may have been abused.

The UN has up to 10,000 military personnel in the region, of all nationalities and the allegations involve peacekeepers, military police and civilian staff.

The Telegraph also states that the Sudanese government, which is deeply opposed to the deployment of UN troops to Darfur, has evidence of child sex slavery, including video footage of Bangladeshi UN workers allegedly having sex with three young girls.

Stating that such events are ultimately the work of "a few bad apples", a UN spokesperson promised that they will be thoroughly investigated.

Over the past few years, however, there seems to have been a hell of a lot of rotting fruit in the UN barrel.

Last November a BBC Investigation found that children as young as 11 have been subjected to rape and prostitution by United Nations peacekeepers in Haiti and Liberia. A previous BBC investigation in Liberia discovered systematic abuse, involving food being given out to teenage refugees in return for sex. In both instances the UN promised to investigate.

In 2003 the AP reported that UN officials were identified as using a ship charted for 'peacekeepers' to traffick young girls from Thailand to East Timor as prostitutes.

In the same year it was also revealed that UN staff were guilty of raping women on a systematic scale in Sierra Leone.

Previous to this, in early 2002 a massive pedophilia scandal within the UN was uncovered involving sexual abuse against West African refugee children in Sierra Leone, Liberia and Guinea. UPI reported that Senior U.N. officials knew of the widespread pedophilia and not only did they not take action against the perpetrators, they covered up the atrocities.



It was later reported that after The UN's' investigating arm had cleared several U.N. workers of charges of sexual abuse against West African refugee children, it substantiated 10 new cases against aid workers.

Damning cases involving workers making home porn movies and so called weapons inspectors having bizarre sadomasochistic, pansexual and leather fetishes also emerged at this time.

In 2004 The New York Post reported that the UN was trying to block the publication of a book by three United Nations fieldworkers that detailed sex, drugs and corruption inside multiple U.N. missions. "Emergency Sex and Other Desperate Measures: A True Story from Hell on Earth" chronicles the experiences of a doctor, a human-rights official and a secretary in U.N. operations in Cambodia, Somalia, Haiti, Rwanda, Liberia and Bosnia. It also alleged that the UN knowingly hired freed criminals to serve as peacemakers.

We have also previously reported on the intimate involvement of Dyncorp, the contractors of the international police force, in such sex scandals. One Dyncorp employee, Kathryn Bolkovac, was sacked for detailing UN workers’ involvement in the sex trade in Bosnia. Bolkovac was sacked after disclosing that UN peacekeepers went to nightclubs where girls as young as 15 were forced to dance naked and have sex with customers, and that UN personnel and international aid workers were linked to prostitution rings in the Balkans.

Dyncorp was ordered to pay Kathryn Bolkovac £110,000 by an employment tribunal, yet both the British and the US governments as well as the UN continue to contract Dyncorp.

It was later revealed by the Chicago Tribune that Halliburton subsidiary KBR and Dyncorp lobbyists are working in tandem with the Pentagon to stall legislation that would specifically ban trafficking in humans for forced labor and prostitution by U.S. contractors.

On March 11th 2005, Representative Cynthia McKinney grilled Secretary Rumsfeld and General Myers on the Dyncorp scandal.

"Mr. Secretary, I watched President Bush deliver a moving speech at the United Nations in September 2003, in which he mentioned the crisis of the sex trade. The President called for the punishment of those involved in this horrible business. But at the very moment of that speech, Dyncorp was exposed for having been involved in the buying and selling of young women and children. While all of this was going on, Dyncorp kept the Pentagon contract to administer the smallpox and anthrax vaccines, and is now working on a plague vaccine through the Joint Vaccine Acquisition Program. Mr. Secretary, is it [the] policy of the U.S. Government to reward companies that traffic in women and little girls?"

The response and McKinney's comeback was as follows.

Rumsfeld: "Thank you, Representative. First, the answer to your first question is, is, no, absolutely not, the policy of the United States Government is clear, unambiguous, and opposed to the activities that you described. The second question."



McKinney: "Well how do you explain the fact that Dyncorp and its successor companies have received and continue to receive government contracts?"

Rumsfeld: "I would have to go and find the facts, but there are laws and rules and regulations with respect to government contracts, and there are times that corporations do things they should not do, in which case they tend to be suspended for some period; there are times then that the - under the laws and the rules and regulations for the - passed by the Congress and implemented by the Executive branch - that corporations can get off of - out of the penalty box if you will, and be permitted to engage in contracts with the government. They're generally not barred in perpetuity."

McKinney: "This contract - this company - was never in the penalty box."

Rumsfeld: "I'm advised by DR. Chu that it was not the corporation that was engaged in the activities you characterized but I'm told it was an employee of the corporation, and it was some years ago in the Balkans that that took place."

Watch the video here.

Rumsfeld's effort to shift the blame away from the hierarchy at Dyncorp and onto the Dyncorp employees was a blatant attempt to hide the fact that human trafficking and sex slavery is a practice condoned by companies like Dyncorp and Halliburton subsidiaries like KBR.

Why should the UN be continually allowed to investigate itself and, those that it contracts, on these issues? The UN has an abysmal track record on this issue and a long history of covering up such cases. It is time for a thorough independent inquiry of the UN and its agencies and affiliates to be carried out.
All eyes are opened, or opening, to the rights of man. The general spread of the light of science has already laid open to every view the palpable truth, that the mass of mankind has not been born with saddles on their backs, nor a favored few booted and spurred, ready to ride them legitimately

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Re: UN Peacekeepers and Aid Workers are Sexually Abusing Small Children
« Reply #12 on: May 27, 2008, 11:44:13 AM »
Thursday, November 25, 2004
http://belmontclub.blogspot.com/2004/11/united-nations-un-peacekeeping.html
The United Nations

UN peacekeeping personnel have recently been accused of using their positions to coerce sex, often from minors, in impoverished African countries. The perpetrators have included relief workers according to the BBC:

The United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees has sent a team of investigators into refugee camps in west Africa following the revelation that large numbers of children have been sexually exploited by aid workers there. The scale of the problem - revealed in an overview of a report by the UNHCR in conjunction with the British-based charity Save the Children - has surprised relief personnel. ... Over 40 aid agencies - including the UNHCR itself - were implicated, and 67 individuals - mostly local staff - named by the children. Some under-age girls said United Nations peacekeepers in the West African region were involved.

But it said that poverty was the principle cause, with parents feeling compelled to offer their children to aid workers for sex in order to survive. "They want us to love to them (sic) so they can give us money," one refugee told the BBC.

The unstated implication was that the problem was limited to 'local staff' in Africa and therefore understandable (wink-wink) though this last conclusion had to remain unsaid. But then it transpired that the problem was not limited to Africa, but present in many places where the UN had a peacekeeping mission. The Scotsman described the widening extent of the sexual predation problem:

Linked in the past to sex crimes in East Timor, and prostitution in Cambodia and Kosovo, UN peacekeepers have now been accused of sexually abusing the very population they were deployed to protect in Congo. And while the 150 allegations of rape, pedophelia and solicitation in Congo may be the UN’ worst sex scandal in years, chronic problems almost guarantee that few of the suspects will face serious punishment. ...

In the case of Congo, the accusations seem as bad as anything the UN has ever seen. Women and children have reportedly been raped, and there is said to be video and photographic evidence of crimes. Similar allegations have been directed at UN peacekeepers and officials in East Timor. And, in Cambodia and Kosovo, local officials and human rights group charge that the presence of UN forces has been linked to an increase in trafficking of women and a sharp rise in prostitution.

Archival research suggests the problem has neither been confined to Africa nor to 'local' staff. It has involved personnel from First World countries perhaps contracting security companies. Global Policy carried this article in the summer of 2001.

A former United Nations police officer is suing a British security firm over claims that it covered up the involvement of her fellow officers in sex crimes and prostitution rackets in the Balkans. Kathryn Bolkovac, an American policewoman, was hired by DynCorp Aerospace in Aldershot for a UN post aimed at cracking down on sexual abuse and forced prostitution in Bosnia.

She claims she was 'appalled' to find that many of her fellow officers were involved. She was fired by the British company after amassing evidence that UN police were taking part in the trafficking of young women from eastern Europe as sex slaves. She said: 'When I started collecting evidence from the victims of sex trafficking it was clear that a number of UN officers were involved from several countries, including quite a few from Britain. I was shocked, appalled and disgusted. They were supposed to be over there to help, but they were committing crimes themselves. When I told the supervisors they didn't want to know.'

DynCorp sacked her, claiming she had falsified time sheets, a charge she denies. Last month she filed her case at Southampton employment tribunal alleging wrongful dismissal and sexual discrimination against DynCorp, the British subsidiary of the US company DynCorp Inc. DynCorp has the contract to provide police officers for the 2,100-member UN international police task force in Bosnia which was created to help restore law and order after the civil war.

The extent and duration of the problem suggests that far from being isolated instances, the United Nations has longstanding and fairly widespread institutional defects which allowed these crimes to take place. How high these defects went was illustrated by a sex scandal in Geneva involving a former Dutch Prime Minister, Ruud Lubbers. The BBC again:

A senior UN official was cleared of sexual harassment earlier this year because the secretary general rejected the verdict of an internal watchdog. High Commissioner for Refugees Ruud Lubbers, 65, a former Dutch prime minister, escaped censure in July when Kofi Annan dismissed a complaint. But a revised report issued by UN watchdogs on Thursday revealed that investigators supported the allegation.

Mr Annan refused to take action, saying the allegations were "not sustainable". Mr Lubbers was cleared of improper conduct after a 51-year-old woman on his staff claimed he had groped her. The UN's Office of Internal Oversight Services investigated the complaint and backed the woman's complaint, it has now been revealed.

 The plaintiff will likely wait years before her accusations are reinstated. According to Reuters:

A senior U.N staffer has appealed against Kofi Annan's decision to dismiss her sexual harassment accusations against refugee agency chief Ruud Lubbers, but the case could take years to conclude, her lawyer said on Monday. The woman, a 51-year-old American, accused Lubbers earlier this year of groping her as she left a meeting at the agency's Geneva headquarters in late 2003. ...

The appeal will be heard by the Geneva office of the U.N.'s Joint Appeals Board, a five-member tribunal made up of two representatives of U.N. employees, two from management and a chairman appointed by Annan. But the board's backlog of work is such that it could be two to three years before any conclusion is reached and its findings can in their turn be referred to a higher U.N. tribunal. "The internal U.N. system is in the Dark Ages. This could take four or five years," Flaherty said.

The possible existence of an institutional problem was practically articulated by disgruntled UN employees. CBS News reported:

Angered at Secretary-General Kofi Annan's dismissal of allegations against the U.N.'s top investigator, union leaders representating over 5,000 U.N. employees met for a second day on Friday to decide what action to take. A statement from the United Nations Staff Union said a draft resolution proposed by one group of employees that was discussed Thursday expresses a "lack of confidence" in the U.N.'s senior management.

American diplomat-bloggers with knowledge of UN operations have concluded that corruption is a way of life in the 'world organization'. (Via Instapundit)

On its official website, the UN modestly states, "United Nations. It's Your World." We at The Diplomad are here to ask you to forget all that misty-eyed blather. Our Diplomads have served at the UN, in New York, Vienna and Geneva, and worked with the UN in a variety of other posts, and can tell you from experience that the UN is a massive, expensive hoax that needs to be ended once and for all. ... The "oil-for-food" scam, huge as it is, flows logically from the ruling ethos at the UN. The UN system is built on corruption, on the principle of the shake-down; whatever lofty objectives might have existed at its creation, for the UN corruption now provides the means and reason to exist.

The institutional nature of the problem means even a zealous and reforming Secretary General, such as Vaclav Havel, would be hard pressed to clean it out. The root of the problem may be that the UN bureaucracy reports only to itself.

The UN as an institution is the purest of pure bureaucracy: it is the thirty-year single malt of bureaucracies. ... It exists to exist. To do that it has going one of the best scams imaginable. While most media and ordinary folks focus on the occasionally contentious UNSC resolutions and debates on Iraq or Iran, in fact, 99% of UN "work" has nothing to do with such high-visibility issues. No, it deals with scores, hundreds, in fact, of resolutions passed every year in the UN General Assembly, its main Committees, and in bodies such as the Human Rights Commission. It lives off those resolutions.

Slightly simplified, this is how it often works. A UN bureaucrat gets hold of a delegate from a sympathetic country and gets that country's delegation to propose some often innocuous sounding resolution ... Normally such a resolution gets adopted by consensus by the appropriate committee, and then goes to the UNGA where its hammered through ASAP. Under the Reagan Administration, the US delegation made a specialty of finding these little gems and trying to kill them or at least make clear that they would not pass by consensus. That is tough and frustrating work; it takes up incredible amounts of time and effort and burns up lots of political capital. Such efforts offend the MSM, powerful US NGOs and other lobby groups. The UN bureaucracy knows that at most only the US will fight these resolutions; the UN uses its allies in the MSM and the NGO "community" to savage the US and make the US look uncaring about deforestation and poverty, etc. As a result, often the US will back off as the politicial costs are seen as too great to be alone and on the "wrong" side of such an issue.

The air of UN sanctity has in the past been so high that whatever its bureaucracy wanted was ipso facto desirable, a clarion signal for Oxfam to go out and solicit  and for 'concerned' individuals swarm out onto the streets and rally for it. But even if the UN is swept off its pedestal it hard to imagine what mechanisms of accountability could be brought to bear on it. The problem was illustrated by the Oil For Food scandal investigations. The Washington Post carried a fascinating riposte from Edward Mortimer, Kofi Annan's Director for Communications, chiding columnist Robert Novak for criticizing the Oil For Food Programme because nothing has been proved and nothing could be proved because no one could be subpoenaed -- even by the UN's own investigators. It was an instance of a bureaucrat unwittingly proving a point he wished to refute.

Robert D. Novak was mistaken when he said that I "sneered" at the letter to U.N. Secretary General Kofi Annan from Sens. Norm Coleman (R-Minn.) and Carl M. Levin (D-Mich.). I said that I found it "awkward and troubling" that two distinguished legislators thought the United Nations was trying to cover up corruption or obstruct justice.

Mr. Annan responded to allegations about the U.N. oil-for-food program in Iraq by asking Paul A. Volcker to head an independent inquiry. That inquiry does not have subpoena power, because the United Nations does not have that power to pass on to Mr. Volcker, but all U.N. staff members have been ordered to cooperate with the inquiry on pain of dismissal. If the inquiry finds evidence of criminal acts by U.N. officials or others, national courts with the right to subpoena will pursue these people. Also, Mr. Annan has said that any U.N. official found guilty of wrongdoing will not be allowed to claim immunity from prosecution.

Mortimer's entire argument may be fairly summarized in four words: 'come and get us'.
All eyes are opened, or opening, to the rights of man. The general spread of the light of science has already laid open to every view the palpable truth, that the mass of mankind has not been born with saddles on their backs, nor a favored few booted and spurred, ready to ride them legitimately

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Re: UN Peacekeepers and Aid Workers are Sexually Abusing Small Children
« Reply #13 on: May 27, 2008, 11:45:10 AM »
U.N. Finally Forced to Probe Its Pedophilia Scandal
http://archive.newsmax.com/archives/articles/2002/5/6/151901.shtml
NewsMax.com Wires and NewsMax.com
Tuesday, May 7, 2002


GENEVA, Switzerland – The United Nations' massive pedophilia scandal has not received 1 percent of the media attention given to the Catholic Church's homosexual priest scandal. Finally some attention is being paid, now that the U.N.'s cover is blown.

As world leaders converge on New York for the controversial conference on children this week, U.N. investigators and relief agencies say they are finally trying to stop recurrence of sexual abuse against West African refugee children by U.N. "peacekeepers" and aid workers.

The scale of allegations, partly revealed Feb. 26, sent shock waves through the "international aid community" and led to calls from U.N. Secretary-General Kofi Annan and governments for an urgent investigation in Sierra Leone, Liberia and Guinea.

Calls were raised for measures to ensure that refugee children were protected worldwide from abuse.

About a half-dozen investigators from the U.N. Office of Internal Oversight Services in New York, plus investigators from the office of the inspector-general of the U.N. High Commissioner of Refugees, were still examining the allegations, senior U.N. officials told United Press International.

The U.N. investigating team also includes a medical doctor, the same sources said.

It was unclear how long the investigation will last. "We're all waiting for the results of the inquiry to take action," said an official from one of the agencies under investigation.

After formal moves by UNHCR last December, a preliminary OIOS investigation was initiated in January, but it only moved into full gear in March, said a U.N. official.

Not Much Progress

The U.N.'s investigating arm, however, also came under heavy criticism by senior Western diplomats for the slow pace of its work on the ground in the three countries. The limited number of investigators at the oversight office, less than 20, partly explains the grinding pace of the inquiry.

"We can barely cope with the cases that are being referred to us," Dileep Nair, U.N. undersecretary general and chief of OIOS, told UPI.

In 2001, the burdened OIOS had more than 400 cases referred to it ranging from petty to serious alleged breaches linked to U.N. matters.

Some officials close to the investigation reckon a final report could be ready by the end of the month.

Parallel investigations in the field have also been initiated by many of the nearly 40 non-governmental organizations such as Save the Children-UK and Doctors Without Borders.

Brendan Paddy, a spokesman for Save the Children-UK, told UPI on Sunday that the agency has conducted its own investigation and sacked one staff member in Guinea and stopped two community volunteers from participating in its aid work.

Similarly, a spokesman for Doctors Without Borders, Rafael Vilasanjuan, told UPI the group has also been conducting an investigation into the allegations but so far "we have not found any concrete evidence.

"If there is any evidence, we will take all the measures." He said Doctors Without Borders had "no tolerance" for such behavior.

In the meantime, U.N. agencies and many of the NGOs were busy at work putting in place new checks and balances in the field to prevent sexual abuse of refugee children.

Some of the measures have included beefing up staff by more than 35 in areas such as UNHCR emergency, protection and community services in the three countries, including 12 solely to respond to sexual exploitation.

Rotation of staff to different camps has also been expanded.

Moreover, the U.N. World Food Program has increased the number of female monitors and held meetings with all staff and NGOs to highlight the agency's "zero tolerance" policy over sexual abuse, said WFP spokeswoman Christiane Berthiaume.

Reactionary U.N. Knew of Atrocities

However, the United Nations has not always been that proactive on this issue.

A full copy of the joint study sponsored by the UNHCR and SC-UK, obtained by UPI, notes that during debriefing sessions in all three countries:

"UNHCR staff, government representatives and the agency staff, including senior managers, acknowledged that they knew such practices happened. Regrettably, even in situations where such information had been brought to their attention in the past, no action had been taken to monitor or redress the situation."

The number of allegations documented "is a critical indicator of the scale of this problem," it said.

U.N. Workers Among 'Worst Sexual Exploiters of Children'

"Agency workers from the international and local NGOs as well as U.N. agencies were ranked as among the worst sex exploiters of children, often using the very humanitarian aid and services intended to benefit the refugee population as a tool of exploitation."

The assessment team listed sexual allegations and called for further investigation against workers from 42 agencies and 67 individuals.

"The details of these allegations were submitted to UNHCR in confidential lists as the mission was ongoing," the report said.

Some 'Peacekeepers'

The U.N. agencies identified included UNHCR and WFP and the international "peacekeepers" from nine countries stationed in Sierra Leone.

United Nations Mission in Sierra Leone (UNAMSIL) battalions whose "peacekeepers" are alleged to be involved in sexual exploitation include those from Britain, Kenya, Ghana, Guinea, India, Nigeria (Ecomog force before 2000), Pakistan, Bangladesh and Zambia.

In addition, the assessment mission report identified staff from 10 NGOs in Liberia, 10 NGOs in Sierra Leone and 16 NGOs in Guinea for alleged sexual abuse.

Besides Doctors Without Borders and Save the Children-UK, other NGOs listed for alleged abuses by their mainly locally employed staff included, among others:

The Red Cross in Trouble Yet Again

The American Refugee Committee; the International Federation of the Red Cross and Red Crescent Societies/Guinean Red Cross; Lutheran World Service/World Federation; Norwegian Refuge Council; Council of Churches, Sierra Leone; Germany's BMZ; and Medical Relief International (MERLIN); and Family Empowerment Program.

In July 2001, children accounted for about 45 percent of the world's refugees and others of concern assisted by the U.N. refugee agency. The percentage of children, the report said, was even higher in Guinea and Liberia: at 63 percent in Guinea or 426,140; and 50 percent in Liberia, or 33,766.

The full 84-page report, written in January after a six-week mission to the three countries, has not yet been published.

BBC Exposes the Cover-up

It was only after the British Broadcasting Corp. revealed the contents of the assessment mission that UNHCR and Save the Children group revealed some of report's findings and recommendations.

The initial refusal by UNHCR and Save the Children-UK to furnish to other NGOs, confidentially, the names of the alleged 67 individuals created tensions among the normally close-knit "humanitarian community." The UNHCR cited legal concerns, fears about the safety of child victims still living in camps, and the limitations of anecdotal information, for its stance.

After a number of heated closed-door meetings, however, the NGOs were furnished with the confidential information they had been seeking in March.

But humanitarian officials familiar with the brief said many sex abuse victims are afraid to take part in a formal investigation and don't come forward for fear of vengeance and recrimination.

The report notes that most "incidents of sexual violence go unreported," and concludes that the incidence of the problem may be much higher than the numbers cited in the report suggest.

Indeed, sources close to the investigation said early indications were that they had difficulties to get firsthand accounts from victims.

Observations in the report highlight the problems victims face.

"In order for a refugee to make a report, they would have to go through the same persons who themselves are perpetrators of sexual exploitation. Most staff appear to connive to hide the actions of other staff."

Sickening Double Standard

So let's see: Senior U.N. officials knew of the widespread pedophilia. Not only did they not take action against the perpetrators, they covered up the atrocities.

And even after the scandal comes to light, most media give this major news event little or no coverage.

Imagine the screaming headlines and worldwide outrage if the Catholic Church or any other church allowed sexual abuse of children on such a massive scale. Could the media establishment's pro-U.N., anti-religious bias have anything to do with the stunning discrepancy?
All eyes are opened, or opening, to the rights of man. The general spread of the light of science has already laid open to every view the palpable truth, that the mass of mankind has not been born with saddles on their backs, nor a favored few booted and spurred, ready to ride them legitimately

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Re: UN Peacekeepers and Aid Workers are Sexually Abusing Small Children
« Reply #14 on: May 27, 2008, 11:47:11 AM »
PEACEKEEPING WATCH:
MONITORING SEXUAL EXPLOITATION AND ABUSE BY UN PEACEKEEPERS AND THE EFFORTS OF THE
INTERNATIONAL COMMUNITY TO RESPOND
http://www.peacewomen.org/un/pkwatch/pkwatch.html
Last updated: July 23, 2007

 

Report of the Ad Hoc Open-ended Working Group on Assistance and Support to Victims of Sexual Exploitation and Abuse
December 2007 (A/62/595)
The Ad Hoc Open-ended Working Group on Assistance and Support to Victims of Sexual Exploitation and Abuse held several meetings at United Nations Headquarters on 19 December 2007. A Draft Resolution on Assistance and Support to Victims of Sexual Exploitation and Abuse was subsequently adopted.

To read the full report, including the draft resolution, please click here

Recommendations on Peacekeeping operations approved by fourth committee, including proposed ‘United Nations standards of conduct’
July 17, 2007 -(UN press release) The Fourth Committee (Special Political and Decolonization) this morning approved the proposals and recommendations of the Special Committee on Peacekeeping Operations contained in its annual report, and recommended that United Nations standards of conduct be included in the revised draft model memorandum of understanding between the United Nations and troop contributing countries.

Joint UN-Sudan Government task force to deal with issue of sexual exploitation
January 18, 2007 –(UN News Center) As part of the United Nations zero tolerance policy towards sexual exploitation, the world body’s mission in Sudan today agreed with the Government and the UN Children’s Fund (UNICEF) to set up a joint task force to foster coordination, information-sharing and action to stamp out the problem wherever it may occur.

To read the full story, click here

PRESS CONFERENCE BY ASSISTANT SECRETARY-GENERAL FOR PEACEKEEPING OPERATIONS
ON ALLEGATIONS OF SEXUAL EXPLOITATION AND ABUSE BY PEACEKEEPERS
January 5, 2007
The reputation of United Nations peacekeeping was one of its most powerful assets, which was why the Organization had responded so strongly to the issue of sexual exploitation and abuse by its peacekeepers, and addressed it structurally and systemically, the Assistant Secretary-General for Mission Support in the Department of Peacekeeping Operations, Jane Holl Lute, said today.

To read the full UN press release, click here

Making the standards contained in the Secretary-General’s bulletin binding on contingent members and standardizing the norms of conduct so that they are applicable to all categories of peacekeeping personnel
December 2006 (A/61/645)
Following the report released by the initial Group of Legal Experts appointed by the Secretary General in August of 2006 regarding conduct and accountability, a second Group of Legal Experts was formed. The second Group reviewed the processes that the United Nations undertakes togenerate a force for a peacekeeping operation. From that review, it identified a number of ways by which a troop-contributing country could be placed under an obligation at international law to ensure that the standards in the Secretary-General’s bulletin bind contingent members in the period prior to the conclusion of a memorandum of understanding or similar document. A number of recommendations are made in that regard.

To read the report, click here

SECRETARY-GENERAL APPOINTS LEGAL EXPERT GROUP AIMED AT STRENGTHENING PEACEKEEPING ZERO TOLERANCE POLICY ON SEXUAL EXPLOITATION
October 13, 2006
United Nations Secretary-General Kofi Annan has appointed a second Group of Legal Experts to conduct a study on the best ways to ensure that the Secretary-General’s bulletin on sexual exploitation and abuse (ST/SGB/2003/13) is binding on contingent members, and that United Nations norms of conduct are applicable to all categories of peacekeeping personnel.

To read the full UN press release, click here

Ensuring the accountability of United Nations staff and experts on mission with respect to criminal acts committed in peacekeeping operations
August 2006, (A/60/980)
This report contains the findings and recommendations of a Group of Legal Experts appointed by the Secretary General in October 2005 to conduct a study on the best ways to ensure that United Nations staff members and experts on mission who serve in peacekeeping operations and who commit crimes during their peacekeeping assignments can be held criminally accountable.The study was among a wide range of recommended actions proposed by Prince Zeid Ra’ad Zeid Al-Hussein, the Secretary-General’s Adviser on Sexual Exploitation and Abuse by United Nations Peacekeeping Personnel, in his March 2005 report “ A comprehensive strategy to eliminate future sexual exploitation and abuse in UN peacekeeping Operations” (A/59/710)

To read the report, click here

UN's legacy of shame in Timor
July 22, 2006 (The Age)
United Nations peacekeepers have abandoned at least 20 babies fathered with poverty-stricken Timorese women.A UN investigation has also uncovered a culture of cover-up, in which babies born to peacekeepers and sex crimes committed by UN staff in the past seven years have been kept secret because of a "fear of shame and embarrassment' in the deeply religious country.

To read the rest of the news story, click here

New strategy aims to help victims of sexual exploitation committed by UN staff
13 July 2006
As part of further efforts by the United Nations to enforce its “zero tolerance” policy for sexual exploitation and abuse, Secretary-General Kofi Annan has put forward a draft strategy on assistance and support to victims of such behaviour by UN staff and related personnel, including recommendations for medical care and child maintenance.The strategy represents more than 12 months of wide-ranging consultations involving UN operations, Member States and various organizations, and offers a number of specific proposals to the General Assembly on ways for the UN to deal with the issue of sexual exploitation and abuse.

To read the draft strategy on assistance to victims of sexual exploitation, please click here

•Security Council HOLDS Public Meeting on Sexual Exploitation and Abuse in Peacekeeping Operations
23 February 2006
On 23 February 2006, a public meeting focused on the issue of sexual exploitation and abuse in peacekeeping operations was convened by the United States, in its capacity as president of the Security Council in the month of February. During this meeting, the Council received briefings from the Under-Secretary- General for Peacekeeping Operations and the Adviser to the Secretary-General on Sexual Exploitation and Abuse by UN Peacekeeping Personnel. Council members and other states also made statements addressing the issue.

For more about this meeting, including links to statements delivered during the session, please CLICK HERE

• UN PeacekEEping chief addressES security council in open debate on women peace and security
October 27 2005
Around the fifth anniversary of the adoption of Security Council Resolution 1325, the Security Council, under the Presidency of Romania, held an Open Debate on Women, Peace and Security. In addition to all 15 Security Council members, 26 other UN Member States, 3 UN entities, 2 intergovernmental bodies and 2 civil society representatives made interventions throughout the day's proceedings. Those addressing the council included Jean Marie Guehenno, Under-Secretary-General for Peacekeeping Operations. To read his statement, please CLICK HERE

To see a compilation of statements made during the open debate addressing sexual exploitation and abuse and related themes in gender and peacekeeping, please CLICK HERE

•Eradicating sexual abuse by peacekeeping personnel among main concerns in Fourth Committee debate
21 October 2005
Sustained peacebuilding, inter-regional cooperation and the need to eradicate sexual abuse by United Nations peacekeeping personnel were the main concerns of delegates, as the Fourth Committee (Special Political and Decolonization) began its general debate on "A Comprehensive Review of the whole question of peacekeeping operations in all their aspects."

For more on the debate and a summary of delegates' statements, CLICK HERE

•UN PEACEKEEPING CHIEF URGES STATES TO POLICE THEIR TROOPS AGAINST SEX ABUSE
21 October 2005
In a speech to the General Assembly's Fourth Committee as it began its annual comprehensive review of peacekeeping operations, Jean-Marie Guéhenno, Under-Secretary-General for Peacekeeping Operations, stressed that the eradication of sexual exploitation and abuse in United Nations peacekeeping missions depended on the enforcement of established standards by troop-contributing countries. He noted that the Department of Peacekeeping Operations would need the continued commitment of Member States so as to rid United Nations peacekeeping of sexual exploitation and abuse, including the solicitation of prostitutes.

For more on the speech by Jean-Marie Guéhenno, Under-Secretary-General for Peacekeeping Operations, CLICK HERE

• Secretary-General's statement on the recall of a Nigerian unit from MONUC
15 September 2005
Following allegations of sexual exploitation and abuse by some members of a Formed Police Unit from Nigeria in Kinshasa, the Government of Nigeria has decided to recall the unit from the United Nations Mission in the Democratic Republic of the Congo (MONUC), without prejudice to the decision of the United Nations investigation and review process.

For the related news story : "Nigeria recalls UN Peacekeepers" CLICK HERE

•SECURITY COUNCIL HOLDS FIRST-EVER PUBLIC MEETING ON SEXUAL EXPLOITATION AND ABUSE
31 May 2005
On 31 May 2005, the Security Council, under the Presidency of Denmark, held its first-ever public meeting devoted exclusively to sexual exploitation and abuse. The Council heard from Prince Zeid Ra’ad Zeid Al-Hussein (Jordan), the Secretary-General’s Special Adviser on Sexual Exploitation and Abuse, and Jean-Marie Guéhenno, Under-Secretary-General for Peacekeeping Operations. The Presidential Statement, issued at the end of the session, was read by Council President Ellen Margrethe Løj (Denmark).

For the presentation by Prince Zeid Ra’ad Zeid Al-Hussein (Jordan), the Secretary-General’s Special Adviser on Sexual Exploitation and Abuse, CLICK HERE.

For the presentation by Jean-Marie Guéhenno, Under-Secretary-General for Peacekeeping Operations, CLICK HERE.

For the Security Council Presidential Statement (S/PRST/2005/21), CLICK HERE.

For the Security Council's Press Release, "Security Council Condemns 'In Strongest Terms' All Acts of Sexual Abuse, Exploitation by UN Peacekeeping Personnel" (SC/8400), CLICK HERE.

• Comprehensive review on a strategy to eliminate future sexual exploitation and abuse in United Nations peacekeeping operations
Programme budget implications of draft resolution A/C.4/59/L.20
Statement submitted by the Secretary-General in accordance with rule 153 of the rules of procedure of the General Assembly
Available 11 May, document dated 20 April 2005
The present report outlines the budgetary implications and/or consequential changes in the proposed programme budget for the biennium 2004-2005 and the proposed programme budget for the biennium 2006-2007, as well as the budgets for the support account for peacekeeping operations, the United Nations Organization Mission in the Democratic Republic of the Congo, the United Nations Operation in Côte d’Ivoire, the United Nations Operation in Burundi, the United Nations Mission in Liberia, the United Nations Stabilization Mission in Haiti, the United Nations Mission in Sierra Leone and the United Nations Mission in the Sudan for the period from 1 July 2005 to 30 June 2006.

For a related UN news story, "Additional Staff Needed to Stop Sexual Exploitation and Abuse in Peacekeeping-UN Report," CLICK HERE.

• NEWS: GLOBAL: UN REFORMS AIM TO END SEXUAL ABUSE BY PEACEKEEPERS
10 May 2005 (IRIN)
When Roxanna Carrillo came to work at the new United Nations peacekeeping mission in Burundi in September 2004, she knew she needed to clarify the standards of behaviour expected of personnel.

• NEWS: Complaints of Sexual Infractions at UN Last Year Doubled from 2003
5 May 2005 (UN News)
The number of allegations of sexual abuse and exploitation made by and about United Nations personnel in 2004 was more than double the number reported in 2003, a development that is deeply distressing, even though contributing factors include clearer reporting procedures and new response measures, United Nations Secretary-General Kofi Annan says in a report to the General Assembly.

• NEWS: UNMIL Investigating Alleged Sexual Misconduct by Peacekeepers in Four Incidents
3 May 2005 - (IRIN)
Allegations of sexual misconduct by UN peacekeepers serving in Liberia have been substantiated in four incidents and investigations launched, the United Nations Mission in Liberia (UNMIL) told IRIN on Tuesday.

• NEWS: UN Probes Allegations of Sexual Exploitation by Peacekeepers in Liberia
29 April 2005 – (UN News)
The United Nations peacekeeping mission in Liberia has been investigating allegations of sexual exploitation and abuse by its personnel and has sought cooperation from the troop contributing countries, a UN spokesman said today.

• Report of the Secretary-General on Special measures for protection from sexual exploitation and sexual abuse
15 April 2005
The present report is submitted in compliance with General Assembly resolution 57/306 of 15 April 2003, in which the Assembly requested the SecretaryGeneral to maintain data on investigations into sexual exploitation and related offences. The report presents data on allegations of sexual exploitation and abuse in the United Nations system in the period from January to December 2004. It also describes progress made in the creation and implementation of measures designed to prevent sexual exploitation and abuse, and measures for processing allegations.

• Report of the Special Committee on Peacekeeping Operations and its Working Group on the 2005 resumed session (A/59/19/Add.1)
15 April 2005
The Special Committee on Peacekeeping Operations met in a 2005 resumed session (4-8 April 2005) to review Prince Zeid's report “A comprehensive strategy to eliminate future sexual exploitation and abuse in United Nations peacekeeping operations” (see A/59/710). This report is the outcome document of the resumed session and outlines those recommendations introduced by Zeid which the C-34 has adopted, as well as the C-34's own proposals and recommendations in response to the actions proposed in Zeid's report.

For the draft General Assembly resolution on a "Comprehensive review on a strategy to eliminate future sexual exploitation and abuse in UN peacekeeping operations" (A/C.4/59/L.20), CLICK HERE.


For the Programme budget implications of the draft resolution A/C.4/59/L.20 (A/C.4/59/L.21), CLICK HERE.

• Presentation by Jean-Marie Guéhenno, Under-Secretary-General for Peacekeeping Operations, to the 2005 resumed session of the Special Committee on Peacekeeping Operations regarding their review of the report “A comprehensive strategy to eliminate future sexual exploitation and abuse in United Nations peacekeeping operations” (A/59/710)
4 April 2005


• Presentation by H.R.H. Prince Zeid Ra'ad Al-Hussein*, Permanent Representative of Jordan to the UN to the Special Committee on Peacekeeping Operations regarding their review of his report “A comprehensive strategy to eliminate future sexual exploitation and abuse in United Nations peacekeeping operations” (A/59/710)
4 April 2005
*Prince Zeid is the Secretary-General's Advisor on sexual exploitation and abuse by UN peacekeeping personnel.


• NEWS: SPECIAL COMMITTEE ON PEACEKEEPING OPERATIONS BEGINS REVIEW OF REPORT ON SEXUAL EXPLOITATION
4 April 2005 - (UN Press Release, GA/PK/186)
Meeting today in a reconvened 2005 session to consider the United Nations first-ever comprehensive report on the problem of sexual exploitation and abuse by United Nations peacekeeping personnel, the Special Committee on Peacekeeping embarked on a tight timetable for reviewing the report and submitting its findings to the Fifth Committee (Administrative and Budgetary) before the end of May to enable appropriate action by the General Assembly at its fifty-ninth session.


• un special committee on peacekeeping operations (C-34) begins discussion on prince zeid's report
4 April 2005
The C-34 reconvened on 4 April to review Prince Zeid's report on "A comprehensive strategy to eliminate future sexual exploitation and abuse in UN peacekeeping operations," which the C-34 had requested in their February 2005 report. "The 113-member team is scheduled to complete the review and submit its findings to the Assembly's administrative and budgetary committee before the end of May, to enable "appropriate action" to be taken by the 59th session of the General Assembly" (source: IRIN).


After hearing from Under-Secretary-General for peacekeeping operations, Jean-Marie Guéhenno, the C-34 reconvened its Working Group which will be meeting until 8 April 2005.


• NEWS: "No Go" Zones to Prevent Sex Abuse by U.N. Peacekeepers
4 Apri 2005 (IPS)
As charges mount of sexual abuse and child molestation by U.N. peacekeepers, the Department of Peacekeeping Operations (DPKO) has drawn up a list of "no go" zones barring visits by blue-helmeted soldiers and civilian staff.

• Report released on "A comprehensive strategy to eliminate future sexual exploitation and abuse in UN peacekeeping operations"
24 March 2005
This report was prepared by the Secretary-General's Special Advisor on addressing sexual exploitation and abuse, Jordan's UN Ambassador Prince Zeid, upon the request made by the Special Committee on Peacekeeping Operations in its 2005 report.

The report in the 6 official UN languages is available at: http://www.un.org/Docs/journal/asp/ws.asp?m=a/59/710

To read the Secretary-General's statement, delivered after he forwarded the report to the General Assembly, CLICK HERE.

• secretary-general's REPORT: In larger freedom: towards development, security and human rights for all
- references to sexual exploitation and abuse
21 March 2005
... 113. Since the rule of law is an essential element of lasting peace, United Nations peacekeepers and peacebuilders have a solemn responsibility to respect the law themselves, and especially to respect the rights of the people whom it is their mission to help. In the light of recent allegations of misconduct by United Nations administrators and peacekeepers, the United Nations system should reaffirm its commitment to respect, adhere to and implement international law, fundamental human rights and the basic standards of due process. I will work to strengthen the internal capacity of the United Nations to exercise oversight of peacekeeping operations, and I remind Member States of their obligation to prosecute any members of their national contingents who commit crimes or offences in the States where they are deployed. I am especially troubled by instances in which United Nations peacekeepers are alleged to have sexually exploited minors and other vulnerable people, and I have enacted a policy of “zero tolerance” towards such offences that applies to all personnel engaged in United Nations operations. I strongly encourage Member States to do the same with respect to their national contingents.

For the full report, visit: http://www.un.org/largerfreedom/contents.htm

• NEWS: UN Turns on the Heat in Congo Abuse Probe
18 March 2005 (Reuters)
The United Nations fired one employee and suspended six without pay among 17 civilian staff being investigated on allegations of sexual abuse in the Congo, a UN spokesperson said on Thursday.

• STATEMENT: United States Outraged at Abuses by U.N. Peacekeepers in DRC [Printer-friendly version]
1 March 2005
Prepared Remarks of Kim Holmes, Assistant Secretary of State Bureau of International Organization Affairs, Department of State before the Subcommittee on Africa, Global Human Rights and International Organizations, of the International Relations Committee, U.S. House of Representatives

• DEPUTY SECRETARY-GENERAL ON ZERO-TOLERANCE MISSION IN WEST AFRICA
March 2005
Louise Frechette, the UN Deputy Secretary-General, is currently touring the UN's peacekeeping missions in Liberia, Sierra Leone and Ivory Coast to "drive home the secretary-general's zero-tolerance policy on sexual exploitation and abuse."

For UN news coverage of her tour of UNMIL in Liberia, CLICK HERE.
For UN news coverage of her tour of UNAMSIL in Sierra Leone, CLICK HERE.

• NEWS: UN PROBING RAPE ALLEGATIONS AGAINST PEACEKEEPERS IN HAITI
24 February 2005 (UN News)

For more media coverage of the rape allegations in Haiti, CLICK HERE.

• NEWS: How the UN was Forced to Tackle Stain on its Integrity
11 February 2005 (The Independent)
Kate Holt of The Independent was the first to write about the cases of sexual exploitation and abuse by UN peacekeepers in DRC. This article recounts her experience of 'breaking the story'.

• PROSECUTIONS FOR SEXUAL EXPLOITATION AND ABUSE IN DRC
10 February 2005
To-date, the only known prosecution has been by South Africa against two of its soldiers, and by France against a U.N. staff member (civilian) who has been jailed on charges of rape and making pornographic videos of children. [Source: Reuters]

• LETTER FROM THE SECRETARY-GENERAL TO THE SECURITY COUNCIL INTRODUCING NEW MEASURES FOR UN peacekeeperS IN DRC TO ADDRESS ALLEGATIONS OF WIDESPREAD SEXUAL EXPLOITATION AND ABUSE
9 February 2005
In a 6-page letter to the UN Security Council, the Secretary-General presented a set of new measures, put in place last week by MONUC, in response to the allegations of widespread sexual abuse and exploitation by UN peacekeepers. The measures include a non-fraternization policy - a ban on sex with the local population - a curfew for military contingents, comprehensive training and awareness-raising for all mission personnel, and proposals for improving recreation and welfare facilities for peacekeepers. These new measures apply only to MONUC peacekeepers, and within the mission, they apply exclusively to military personnel. However, the Secretary-General does intend for these new measures to have some impact on the other peacekeeping missions; in an interview with The Independent, he remarked "I want to use this to send a message to all the 17 UN peacekeeping missions around the world." Also, within MONUC, there is a possibility the new measures may be extended to civilian personnel as well.

In his letter to the Security Council, the Secretary-General made a special appeal for 100 extra military police and French-speaking qualified investigators with special skills in sexual exploitation and abuse cases.

In addition, the letter from the Secretary-General reviews the different initiatives implemented to-date by MONUC, DPKO, and other UN actors. These initiatives include the deployment of a multidisciplinary investigative team currently in DRC, led by Assistant Secretary-General Angela Kane (see below), and the establishment of a multidisciplinary Task Force, based at Headquarters, currently undertaking a variety of Headquarters and field-oriented initiatives.

RELATED NEWS STORIES: The Independent | Reuters | UN News story | BBC news story


•MONUC REVISES THEIR CODE OF CONDUCT
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Re: UN Peacekeepers and Aid Workers are Sexually Abusing Small Children
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February 2005


• Remarks by Under Secretary-General for Peacekeeping Operations to the Special Committee on Peacekeeping Operations (C-34) on sexual exploitation and abuse  
- Printer-friendly version -
31 January 2005, UN Headquarters, New York
Under-Secretary-General for Peacekeeping Operations, Mr. Jean-Marie Guehenno, opened the C-34 Session with his reflections on the most important developments in UN peacekeeping in 2004 and their implications for 2005. One of the three developments he highlighted concerned the allegations of sexual exploitation and abuse by UN peacekeepers in the UN peacekeeping mission in DRC (MONUC).

• REPORT RELEASED: Investigation by the Office of Internal Oversight Services into allegations of sexual exploitation and abuse in the United Nations Organization Mission in the Democratic Republic of the Congo
Report of the Secretary-General on the activities of the Office of Internal Oversight Services
11 January 2005


• NEWS: Peacekeepers' Sexual Abuse of Local Girls Continuing in DRC, UN Finds
7 January 2005 (UN News)
United Nations peacekeeping troops have continued the sexual abuse of girls in the Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC), the UN's watchdog office says, but peacekeeping officials say Member States providing the soldiers must send sterner commanders and toughen the punishment for perpetrators.

For more news on the investigations of sexual abuse by MONUC peacekeepers in DRC, CLICK HERE.

• Press Briefing on OIOS Investigation in DRC
7 January 2005 (UN)
The Office of Internal Oversight Services (OIOS) investigation into allegations of sexual exploitation and abuse of local Congolese women and girls has concluded that the problem was serious and ongoing, Barbara Dixon, Director of OIOS’s Investigations Division, told correspondents today.  Equally disturbing, she said, was the lack of a protection and deterrence programme even now.  Briefing correspondents on the findings of the investigation, Ms. Dixon described the investigation as a difficult process, especially because of the very general nature of the allegations investigated.


• Press Breifing on DRC Report (excerpts)
7 January 2005 (UN)
The press briefing by Under-Secretary General for Peacekeeping Operations, Jean-Marie Guehenno, and the head of MONUC, William Lacy Swing, included a discussion of the findings of the OIOS investigation in MONUC.

To read the relevant section of the Secretary-General's report on MONUC addressing exploitation and abuse issues, CLICK HERE.


• Special investigative team CURRENTLY in DRC headed by the Assistant Secretary-General for General Assembly and Conference Management, Angela Kane. The team, which includes highly specialized civilian police investigators, will address outstanding allegations against military and civilian personnel in MONUC (S/2004/1034).
January 2005


2004

• NEWS: UN probing charges of sex abuse in drc peacekeeping official says
23 November 2004 (UN)
The United Nations has dispatched two teams to investigate 150 charges of sexual exploitation and abuse by civilian and military personnel serving in the Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC), according to a senior UN official.

• Secretary-General’s Statement on Allegations of Sexual Exploitation and Abuse in MONUC (DRC)
19 November 2004


• NEWS: BURUNDI: UN MISSION SETS UP UNITS TO CHECK SEXUAL ABUSE
15 November 2004 (IRIN)
Following reports of sexual exploitation of host populations in several peacekeeping missions in Africa, the UN Mission in Burundi, known as ONUB, has established a Code of Conduct Unit and appointed a gender adviser to make sure this problem does not arise in Burundi.


• CONFIDENTIAL REPORT ON SEXUAL EXPLOITATION AND ABUSE IN DRC prepared by Prince Zeid Raad al-Hussein, Jordan's ambassador to the UN, and the Secretary-General's advisor on the question of sexual exploitation. Based on a trip to DRC in October 2004, he observed that the exploitation "appears to be significant, widespread and ongoing." The report details allegations of sexual misconduct by peacekeepers from Nepal, Pakistan, Morocco, Tunisia, South Africa and Uruguay, and lists incidents in which some soldiers tried to obstruct investigators.
8 November 2004


• Department of Peacekeeping Operations/Office of Human Resources Management investigation to DRC
to examinespecific allegations made against several civilian personnel, suspended pending further investigations.
November 2004


• Sub-section on "Preventing and responding to sexual exploitation and abuse by humanitarian and peacekeeping personnel in the Secretary-General's Report on women, peace and security (IV B)
13 October 2004
Accompanying recommendation: (103.) I reaffirm my conviction that sexual exploitation and sexual abuse are totally unacceptable forms of behaviour and reiterate my commitment to the full implementation of the special measures for protection from sexual exploitation and sexual abuse as set forth in my bulletin. I further urge Member States, intergovernmental and regional organizations, international and national aid and civil society organizations to apply the same standards to peacekeeping personnel, including military and civilian police.


• UN'S OFFICE OF INTERNAL OVERSIGHT SERVICES (OIOS) carries out an investigation of allegations of sexual exploitation and abuse in Bunia, DRC by MONUC peacekeepers
June-September 2004


• Secretary-General appointed Prince Zeid Ra'ad Zeid Al-Hussein, the Permanent Representative of Jordan, as HIS adviser on ADDRESSING sexual exploitatiON AND ABUSE COMMITTED BY ALL CATEGORIES OF PERSONNEL IN PEACEKEEPING CONTEXTS
July 2004


• ANALYSIS: UN Peacekeeping Mission Personnel and Trafficking in Women
1 July 2004 (last updated)
Stop Violence Against Women Website (STOPVAW) ‘Explore the Issue’
As covered in the Explore the Issue section of this website, military and post-combat operations in transitioning states can create ideal environments for trafficking to flourish, a phenomenon which has been documented through reports in numerous countries. In recent years, UN- and NATO -led international peacekeeping missions stationed in post-conflict zones have been targeted by the media and human rights watch groups for their failure to adequately confront the issue of trafficking in their assigned countries. The current criticisms leveled at UN peacekeeping operations are twofold. First, in response to evidence that individual peacekeepers have patronized establishments linked to trafficking networks, human rights groups have charged that UN peacekeepers do not face rigorous standards of legal accountability for their actions. Second, rights advocates argue that UN missions have not done enough to actively combat trafficking networks. Below is a summary of current UN standards of accountability and jurisdiction for peacekeeping missions, and accounts of the UN Missions in Bosnia-Herzegovina and Kosovo.

• FINAL REPORT of the Special Committee on Peacekeeping Operations (C-34) - Comprehensive review of the whole question of peacekeeping operations in all their aspects: References to Disciplinary Issues
Summer 2004
The final report of the 2004 session of the Special Committee on Peacekeeping Operations (29 March -16 April 2004) includes proposals, recommendations and conclusions on disciplinary issues.
For a compilation of all gender references found in the 2004 C-34 report, CLICK HERE (PeaceWomen compilation, August 2004)

• FINAL REPORT TO THE INTER-AGENCY STANDING COMMITTEE WORKING GROUP ON THE ACTIVITIES OF THE IASC TASK FORCE ON PROTECTION FROM SEXUAL EXPLOITATION AND ABUSE IN HUMANITARIAN CRISES
June 2004
"The IASC Task Force on Protection from Sexual Exploitation and Abuse in Humanitarian Crises was established in May 2002 and mandated with a finite set of tasks by the Inter-Agency Standing Committee and the Executive Committee on Humanitarian Affairs (ECHA). These tasks have now been completed, and the Task Force is set to close at the end of June 2004...4. This report highlights some of the key achievements in addressing the grave failure of protection that has led to sexual exploitation and abuse and outlines some of the concrete steps still needed to prevent such abuses in the future."

• TOOLS AND GUIDELINES ISSUED FOR IMPLEMENTATION OF SECRETARY-GENERAL'S BULLETIN
May 2004
The IASC Task Force, working on behalf of the Executive Committee for Humanitarian Affairs, has been tasked with coordinating implementation of the Secretary-General's Bulletin in the field, including peace operations. To this end, the IASC Task Force issued a number of tools and guidelines for use in the field. These include:
- Terms of Reference for In-country Focal Points on Sexual Exploitation and Abuse  
- Terms of Reference for In-country Network on Sexual Exploitation and Abuse
- Model Information Sheet for Local Communities
- Model Complaints Referral Form
- Scenarios Covering Prohibited Acts
- Implementation Guidelines

• REPORT of the Secretary-General on the protection of civilians in armed conflict
28 May 2004
This is the Secretary-General's fourth report on the protection of civilians in armed conflict, which was requested by the President of the Security Council in his statement of 20 December 2002 (S/PRST/2002/41). In his report, the Secretary-General provides a brief update on the implementation of his bulletin on "special measures for protection from sexual exploitation and sexual abuse" (ST/SGB/2003/13) and recommends actions to be taken by the Security Council and UN Member States:

"14. The deeply disturbing issue of sexual exploitation and abuse of women and children in armed conflict by United Nations personnel — both civilian staff and uniformed peacekeeping personnel — has been the focus of considerable attention since my last report. In October 2003 a Secretary-General’s bulletin on special measures for protection from sexual exploitation and sexual abuse (ST/SGB/2003/13) was promulgated. The bulletin sets out minimum standards of behaviour expected of all United Nations personnel, as well as measures necessary to maintain an environment that prevents sexual exploitation and abuse. Since its issuance, all parts of the United Nations system with a field presence have been working to establish a coherent system for implementation of the bulletin at the field level. Human trafficking, which is a related issue of increasing concern, is being addressed by the Department of Peacekeeping Operations as a policy priority.

...30. In such violent and distressing circumstances, peacekeepers and United Nations staff must demonstrate exemplary personal conduct and behaviour. As a follow-up to the Secretary-General’s bulletin on sexual exploitation and abuse, transparent monitoring and accountability structures will be established to ensure a gender-sensitive response to allegations of sexual exploitation and abuse, as well as complaint, reporting and follow-up procedures. The bulletin should also inspire the inclusion of gender considerations as a priority in peacekeeping and humanitarian missions. The bulletin is not binding on uniformed personnel, however, as they fall under the jurisdiction of their own Governments. In order to be truly effective, therefore, the efforts within the United Nations system need to be reinforced by demonstrated action on the part of national Governments whose military and police personnel serve in peacekeeping operations, including punitive measures against offending personnel. I encourage the Security Council to urge personnel contributing countries to cooperate fully in this effort. Minimum standards of behaviour required of peacekeepers, based on the Secretary-General’s bulletin, should be incorporated into the standards and codes of conduct for national armed forces and police forces, and information should be provided on any legal action taken against those charged with violations, an area in which the Department of Peacekeeping Operations has received woefully inadequate information.

• NEWS: The United Nations mission in the Democratic Republic of the Congo (MONUC) is currently investigating allegations of sexual abuse and exploitation of civilians, including minors, by its staff serving in the northeastern town of Bunia.

• REPORT of the Secretary-General on "Special measures for protection from sexual exploitation and sexual abuse"
23 April 2004
The present report is submitted in compliance with General Assembly resolution 57/306 of 15 April 2003 (on "Investigation into sexual exploitation of refugees by aid workers in West Africa), in which the Assembly requested the Secretary-General to maintain data on investigations into sexual exploitation and related offences. The report sets out data collected on the occurrence of cases of sexual exploitation and abuse within the United Nations system and on the efforts under way to prevent such acts. The report also describes the progress made in the development of guidelines and tools to establish a reporting process that is sensitive to the needs of victims and towards the promotion of a culture in which sexual exploitation and abuse are not tolerated.

• BRIEFING on Disciplinary Issues: Sexual Exploitation and Sexual Abuse
19 March 2004, DPKO
This briefing was delivered by the Peacekeeping Best Practices Unit to the Special Committee on Peacekeeping Operations at the Briefing on Disciplinary Issues on 19 March, 2004. It describes key elements and definitions of sexual abuse and exploitation, provides DPKO’s responses to them, and outlines the implementation of disciplinary directives related to these issues. From: http://www.un.org/Depts/dpko/lessons/

The Department for Peacekeeping Operations officially presented a compilation of “Guidance and Directives of Disciplinary Issues for All Categories of Personnel Serving in UN Peacekeeping and Other Field Missions,” in the form of a CD-ROM, to all peacekeeping-contributing countries during this briefing.

2003

• SECRETARY-GENERAL'S BULLETIN ON "Special measures for protection from sexual exploitation and sexual abuse (ST/SGB/2003/13)
October 2003
The bulletin sets out minimum standards of behaviour expected of all staff of the UN, including staff of "separately administered organs and programmes of the UN," as well as measures necessary to maintain an environment that prevents sexual exploitation and abuse.

The SGB is based on the "6 Core Principles of a Code of Conduct" developed by the IASC Task Force on Protection from Sexual Exploitation and Abuse as minimum standards of behaviour for all humanitarian staff.

While DPKO has said that it expects uniformed personnel to abide by the standards set out in the Secretary-General's Bulletin (2003), strictly speaking, as a UN regulation, it only applies to civilian personnel. Yet, while the directives for uniformed personnel list sexual exploitation and abuse as a form of serious misconduct, one of the major weaknesses is that the directives do not define sexual exploitation for uniformed personnel in the same way that the Secretary-General's Bulletin on sexual abuse and exploitation does for civilians.

• GENERAL ASSEMBLY RESOLUTION on "Investigation into sexual exploitation of refugees by aid workers in West Africa" (57/306)
15 April 2003
In this resolution, the General Assembly requested the Secretary-General to maintain data on investigations into sexual exploitation and related offences.

2002

• INTRODUCTION OF THE MISSION-SPECIFIC CODE OF CONDUCT FOR THE UN MISSION IN THE DEMOCRATIC REPUBLIC OF THE CONGO (MONUC)
December 2002
Democratic Republic of the Congo
Relevant to all members of the civilian and military components of MONUC, the MONUC Code of Conduct is meant to "provide guidance on the particular conditions and sensitivities in MONUC's area of operations." It "strictly prohibits...any act of sexual abuse and/or exploitation of members of the local community, including children." In addition, unlike the generic Code of Conduct, the MONUC Code of Conduct provides a detailed definition of sexual exploitation and abuse.

• COMBINED RECOMMENDATIONS FROM THE UN SECRETARY-GENERAL AND UNIFEM
October 2002
This list compiles the recommendations made by the UN Secretary-General in his Report and Study on Women, Peace and Security, and in UNIFEM's Independent Experts' Assessment entitled Women, War and Peace to address the issues of peacekeeper violations and discipline.

• IASC Task Force Mission Report: Liberia and Sierra Leone
21-31 October 2002
On Peacekeeping Forces: "The original report identified the behavior of Peacekeeping troops as a concern. Despite what we learnt from UNAMSIL, we believe that more could be done to issue clear guidelines prohibiting exploitative sex, including sex with children. We were encouraged by efforts made to prevent abuse and exploitation by peacekeepers. The Mission acknowledges that responsibility for discipline of PK troops lies with their national governments and not with the UN system. It is vital that the UN system at global level, from DPKO as well as at country level engage in dialogue with troop contributing countries to advocate for and uphold the same standards of behavior being adopted by the international humanitarian community. The Mission was encouraged by the establishment of a telephone hotline to report misconduct by peacekeepers. However it suspects that few victims will have the means to make use of such a system. Continued monitoring will be essential."

• REPORT OF THE Secretary-General on the activities of the Office of Internal Oversight Services: Investigation into Sexual Exploitation of Refugees by Aid Workers in West AfricA
11 October 2002
"Late in November 2001, the Office of Internal Oversight Services (OIOS) was asked by the Office of the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR) to review allegations of sexual exploitation of female refugees by international and national aid workers, specifically regarding United Nations and non-governmental organization (NGO) staff and peacekeepers in three West African countries: Guinea, Liberia and Sierra Leone. The allegation of widespread sexual exploitation arose from a report by two consultants who had been commissioned by UNHCR and Save the Children (UK) to study the question of sexual exploitation and violence in the refugee communities in the three countries..."

• REPORT OF THE IASC TASK FORCE ON PROTECTION FROM SEXUAL EXPLOITATION AND ABUSE IN HUMANITARIAN CRISES
13 June 2002
"This report reflects the deliberations and analysis of the members of the Task Force, as well as the opinions and experience of other actors from the UN system, NGOs, donors and other Member States, gathered through a series of consultations...The attached Plan of Action outlines a number of steps that the Task Force believes must be taken by the humanitarian community towards preventing sexual exploitation and abuse and responding to survivor needs. This plan is not a blueprint. It is part of an ongoing effort of the humanitarian community and will be refined on the basis of experience, pilot activities in selected countries and field visits to affected locations...Once approved by the IASC, the Plan of Action will apply to all IASC members and standing invitees. However, it is hoped that the Plan of Action will also have broader application. It will be an important guide for monitoring and evaluating progress made in efforts to eliminate sexual exploitation and abuse. It is hoped that it will form the basis for further discussions within the humanitarian community, with host governments, donors, peacekeepers and others engaged in working with and for populations affected by humanitarian crises, on the long-term measures and changes that need to be introduced to address the problem of sexual exploitation and abuse. It could also be used by donors for establishing requirements to be eligible..."

• ESTABLISHMENT of the UNAMSIL Personnel Conduct Committee (UPCC)
March 2002
UN Mission in Sierra Leone (UNAMSIL)
The role of the UPCC is to promote awareness among all national and international staff - civilian and military - of the UN Code of Conduct and issues of Sexual Exploitation and Abuse (SEA) and Gender-Based Violence (GBV), respond to all reported allegations and ensure that "appropriate action is taken." The UPCC was established in response to a set of complaints from three women to UNAMSIL in April 2000 that "uniformed peacekeepers were going around the houses in the Aberdeen area offering US $1 notes to under-aged individuals in exchange for sexual favours."
(From Paul Higate, Gender and Peacekeeping Case Studies: DRC and Sierra Leone, March 2004 )

For a press release announcing the UPCC, CLICK HERE.

• establishment of the Inter-Agency Standing Committee (IASC) Task Force on Protection from Sexual Exploitation and Abuse in Humanitarian Crises
March 2002
The Inter-Agency Standing Committee (IASC) established this Task Force following allegations of sexual abuse and exploitation by aid workers and peacekeepers in refguee camps in West Africa. "The Task Force was mandated, within the overall objective of strengthening and enhancing the protection and care of women and children in situations of humanitarian crisis and conflict, to make recommendations that specifically aim to eliminate sexual exploitation and abuse by humanitarian personnel and the misuse of humanitarian assistance for sexual purposes."

The Task Force is co-chaired by OCHA and UNICEF and comprises WFP, UNHCR, OHCHR, DPKO, UNOPS, UNDP, OSAGI, InterAction and SCHR (Oxfam and Save the Children/UK).

• REPORT on Sexual Violence and Exploitation: The Experience of Refugee Children in Liberia, Guinea and Sierra Leone
Unofficially released February 2002, Geneva
UN High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR) and Save the Children Fund UK (SCFUK)
This report detailed cases of sexual exploitation and abuse and gender-based violence, experienced by children in refugee camps in Liberia, Guinea and Sierra Leone, perpetrated by humanitarian and UN peacekeeping personnel...

In the case of Sierra Leone, documented cases of Sexual Exploitation and Abuse (SEA) being committed by humanitarian workers and peacekeepers go as far back as 1995 (Paul Higate, Gender and Peacekeeping Case Studies: DRC and Sierra Leone, March 2004 )

• Guidelines for the conduct of peacekeepers were not circulated until 1995. From 1948-1995, there was no formal code of conduct.

 
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Re: UN Peacekeepers and Aid Workers are Sexually Abusing Small Children
« Reply #16 on: May 27, 2008, 11:48:00 AM »
Trafficking in Persons Report   -Report Home Page
Released by the Office to Monitor and Combat Trafficking in Persons
http://www.state.gov/g/tip/rls/tiprpt/2007/86207.htm
June 12, 2007

Stopping Human Trafficking, Sexual Exploitation, and Abuse by International Peacekeepers


In response to a Congressional mandate, this section summarizes actions taken by some key international organizations to eliminate trafficking in persons or the exploitation of victims of trafficking. This is the second year of reporting on the United Nations (UN), the North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO), and the Organization for Security and Cooperation in Europe (OSCE). Beginning with the 2008 Trafficking in Persons Report, the Department of State will also assess the efforts of national governments to prevent their nationals, deployed abroad as part of a peacekeeping or similar mission, from engaging in or facilitating human trafficking. Governments are ultimately responsible for holding their own nationals accountable.

UNITED NATIONS (UN)

Situation
In 2002, humanitarian personnel in West Africa were accused of sexually exploiting refugee children, primarily girls. Sixty-seven aid workers from more than 40 agencies were accused of offering children money, food, and promises of education in exchange for sex. While many of the allegations were anecdotal it was clear that there was a problem which had to be addressed. The wide publicity given to these allegations led humanitarian organizations to implement strict standards of conduct for their employees and volunteers. UN Secretary-General Kofi Annan issued a 2003 bulletin entitled Special Measures for Protection from Sexual Exploitation and Sexual Abuse (ST/SGB/2003/13) for all UN personnel. The bulletin characterizes sexual exploitation and abuse as acts of serious misconduct and subject to disciplinary action.

Unfortunately, similar reports came to light. In 2004 some 150 additional allegations of sexual misconduct were made against UN military and civilian peacekeepers in the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC). As a result, Secretary-General Annan designated Prince Zeid Ra'ad Al Hussein, Jordanian Ambassador to the UN, to be his Special Advisor on Sexual Exploitation and Abuse by UN Peacekeeping Personnel. Prince Zeid and his team traveled to the DRC in October 2004, and reported that there was "zero compliance with zero tolerance" in response to the 2003 policy against sexual exploitation. Congo's Minister of Defense, Major General Jean Pierre Ondekane, was quoted in a December 23, 2004 article in The Times (UK) as saying that "peacekeepers" in Kisangani would be remembered for "running after little girls."

Prince Zeid's final report, released in March 2005, contained extensive recommendations for top-down reform of the UN system to address problems of sexual misconduct by UN peacekeepers. The 2005 UN General Assembly endorsed and broadened Prince Zeid's recommendations, making them applicable to civilian as well as to military peacekeeping personnel. In addition to the steps being taken to eliminate sexual exploitation and abuse of vulnerable populations by UN peacekeepers, UN agencies system-wide have developed or are developing standards of conduct for their personnel. Non-governmental organizations (NGOs) involved in humanitarian programs are taking similar steps.

Below is the status of key UN reforms that have been completed or are on-going, and those that have not been finalized.

STATUS OF REFORM

Protection
UN Staff Regulations now classify sexual exploitation and abuse as a form of serious misconduct subject to disciplinary action, including summary dismissal.
Non-UN Personnel: Consultants, individual contractors, volunteers, military observers and civilian police are legally bound by the standards of the Secretary-General's 2003 bulletin. All contracts and "letters of undertaking" now include these standards.
Conduct and Discipline Teams: The Department of Peacekeeping Operations (DPKO), which is charged with implementing the UN's comprehensive strategy on addressing all aspects of sexual exploitation and abuse, has "Conduct and Discipline Teams" (CDTs) in place at UN headquarters and at almost all UN peacekeeping missions, with some CDTs covering more than one mission.

The CDTs are charged with informing local communities of the UN's zero-tolerance policy on sexual exploitation and procedures for reporting abuse, receiving complaints, carrying out initial assessments of allegations, and determining whether specific allegations should be reported to the Office of Internal Oversight Services (OIOS) as Category I (serious offenses) warranting full OIOS investigations. Category II (less serious) allegations are handled by the peacekeeping mission itself.

Prevention
Mission Prevention Measures: Where there have been allegations of sexual exploitation and abuse, UN peacekeeping missions have instituted additional prevention measures such as "off-limits premises and areas," curfews, telephone hotlines, and the requirement that all mission personnel must wear their uniforms at all times.
Case Tracking System: DPKO established a secure Web-based software program to track all sexual exploitation and abuse cases, and to ensure that those personnel who have been dismissed or repatriated for sexual exploitation and abuse violations are barred from serving in future UN missions. A comprehensive database that will be accessible to all UN missions is in the final stages of development.
Training Modules: DPKO implemented three training modules for different levels of personnel. DPKO's pre-deployment training modules on preventing sexual exploitation and abuse are mandatory for all UN military and civilian personnel; however, DPKO is not able to verify that troop contributing countries (TCCs) have carried out the training. All personnel arriving at UN missions are made aware of the UN's standards of conduct and "zero tolerance" policy, and receive sexual exploitation and abuse prevention training.
Women Peacekeepers: DPKO is encouraging TCCs to increase the number of women peacekeepers at all levels, in part to facilitate the UN's task of encouraging the local communities to report allegations and to promote an environment that discourages sexual exploitation and abuse. In January 2007, India was the first country to deploy an all-female civilian police unit to the UN mission in Liberia. In March 2007, DPKO convened a small conference at the UN's Logistics Base in Brindisi, Italy with 30 gender experts to discuss approaches for increasing the number of women police officers in UN peacekeeping missions.
Implementation by Management: Heads of UN peacekeeping missions must now task civilian managers and military commanders with implementing the programs and policies of the UN to eliminate sexual exploitation and abuse. Civilian managers' efforts to implement the UN's zero-tolerance policy on sexual exploitation are formally evaluated.
High-Level Discussion: In December 2006, DPKO organized the "High-Level Conference on Eliminating Sexual Exploitation and Abuse," attended at senior levels by UN agencies, funds, programs, Member States, TCCs and NGOs. The conference revealed an impressive level of attention to the issue, across the spectrum of international responders to conflict.

Prosecution
Recommendations by Legal Experts: A panel of legal experts completed its report on steps that could be taken to ensure that UN staff and experts on mission are held accountable, in accordance with due process, for criminal acts committed at their duty stations. A second panel of legal experts examined the question of whether the Secretary-General's 2003 Bulletin can bind national military and civilian contingent members until negotiations are completed in a revised memorandum of understanding (MOU) between the UN and the TCCs on standards of conduct. Member States are currently reviewing the recommendations of both legal panels.
OIOS has investigative personnel in the field covering 12 peacekeeping missions, and will hire additional staff.

Reform not finalized
MOU between UN and TCCs: The proposed model MOU for use between the UN and TCCs has been revised to include provisions for addressing sexual exploitation and abuse; however, the MOU has been in negotiation among members of the Special Committee on Peacekeeping Operations (C-34) since January 2006.
Standards of Conduct: While the model MOU is under negotiation, the UN is also discussing with current TCCs ways to incorporate standards of conduct into existing MOUs.
Welfare and Recreation Reform: The UN has not finalized a comprehensive strategy on welfare and recreation reform for mission personnel to prevent sexual exploitation and abuse. This draft document is expected to go to Member States for approval. In July 2005, UN headquarters instructed its missions to improve welfare and recreation facilities within existing budgets.
Victim Assistance Strategy: The UN has not finalized a comprehensive victim assistance strategy, which was to have been completed by the end of 2005 and presented to the UN Security Council for approval. The issue of how and what assistance should be given to alleged victims without it being construed as admission of peacekeeper misconduct attributed to the delay. In the interim, the UN advised its missions to refer victims to local medical and psycho-social services.

Discipline and Accountability:
According to the UN Secretary-General's report on Special Measures for Protection from Sexual Exploitation and Sexual Abuse (A/60/861) released in May 2006, seven UN agencies received 373 new sexual exploitation and abuse allegations during 2005, of which 340 involved UN peacekeeping personnel. This report notes that the annual total was considerably higher than the 121 allegations reported for 2004. The former Secretary-General attributed the dramatic increase, in part, to greater awareness and use of the UN's reporting mechanism. In 2006 there were 357 allegations reported, but declined each month. In January 2006 there were 97 allegations and by December 2006 there were 12 allegations. This change may be due in part to introduction of Conduct and Discipline Teams to all missions in early 2006.

Discipline and accountability of accused members of national military and civilian contingents ultimately rests with the TCCs. France, India, Morocco, Nepal, Pakistan, Tunisia, and Uruguay have taken some form of disciplinary or criminal action against a total of 29 repatriated military and civilian personnel. However, there are many other repatriated personnel from these and other countries who have faced no further penalties for their abuse of power in cases of sexual exploitation and abuse. The UN is working with TCCs to ensure that staff and volunteers, and approximately 90,000 military and civilian peacekeepers serving in the UN's 18 missions do not add to the suffering of women and children in conflict or humanitarian crises. TCCs must take action to ensure 100 percent compliance with the UN's zero tolerance policy on sexual exploitation and abuse.

For further information on the UN's sexual exploitation and abuse prevention measures please go to http://www.un.org/Depts/dpko/dpko.

NORTH ATLANTIC TREATY ORGANIZATION (NATO)

Situation
NATO is proactively undertaking measures to prevent military or civilian personnel assigned to NATO-led missions from engaging in human trafficking or sexual exploitation and abuse. There are no known allegations of sexual misconduct against NATO officials or staff. NATO currently has seven on-going missions with tens of thousands of soldiers, and undertakes numerous other activities throughout the year. In June 2004, NATO Allies and Partners adopted a Policy on Combating Trafficking in Human Beings. Among its provisions, NATO Allies and Partners committed to provide appropriate anti-human trafficking training to personnel taking part in NATO-led missions, support host-country law enforcement in anti-trafficking investigations, incorporate contractual provisions prohibiting contractors from engaging in trafficking, and evaluate implementation of efforts as part of on-going reviews. Anti-human trafficking directives are incorporated in all NATO operational plans. NATO employs three anti-human trafficking awareness training modules for troops, commanders, and military police. These modules are available online to personnel and are also offered at NATO's two training facilities. NATO Allies and Partners committed to provide anti-trafficking training for personnel and international staff prior to deployment. Officials and staff are subject to disciplinary action including dismissal. NATO Allies and Partners are responsible for taking any legal action against nationals participating in NATO missions. Personnel taking part in NATO missions are instructed to refer victims to local NGOs in order to receive legal or social services, and to work cooperatively with local law enforcement officials if they encounter a human trafficking situation.

Update
Since the release of the 2006 Trafficking in Persons Report, staff from NATO Allies and Partner nations have spent several months reviewing practical aspects of the implementation of NATO's anti-human trafficking policy to identify areas for improvement. A report with recommendations was submitted to senior-level NATO representatives in November 2006. NATO has appointed its Assistant Secretary-General for Defense Policy and Planning as Senior Coordinator on Counter-Trafficking in Human Beings to oversee its anti-human trafficking implementation efforts.

For further information on NATO's anti-human trafficking prevention measures please go to http://www.nato.int/issues/trafficking/.

ORGANIZATION FOR SECURITY AND COOPERATION IN EUROPE (OSCE)

Situation
The Organization for Security and Cooperation in Europe is proactively undertaking measures to prevent personnel from engaging in human trafficking or sexual exploitation. There are no known allegations of sexual misconduct against OSCE officials or staff. The OSCE has 19 field missions and approximately 3,450 personnel, including contractors, seconded staff, and international and locally-based employees. The OSCE Secretary-General is responsible for overseeing OSCE's efforts to prevent misconduct by personnel. The OSCE's Code of Conduct For Staff and Mission Members (Appendix 1 to Permanent Council 550/Corr.1, 27 June 2003) addresses general conduct of officials and staff while on mission, and "Staff Instruction 11" specifically focuses on preventing trafficking in persons. Both documents are incorporated into OSCE training modules provided during orientation training for all OSCE personnel, including for locally-hired staff at missions. Officials and staff are subject to disciplinary action including dismissal. However, OSCE member states and partners are ultimately responsible for taking any legal action against nationals participating in OSCE missions who violate the policy. Personnel at field missions are instructed to refer alleged victims to local NGOs for legal or social services and to work cooperatively with local law enforcement officials if they encounter a human trafficking situation.

Update
Since the release of the 2006 Trafficking in Persons Report, the 2006 OSCE Ministerial Council issued a decision on Combating Sexual Exploitation of Children (MC/DEC/15/06). Among the various provisions, the Ministerial Council tasked the OSCE executive structures to ensure the issue of child sexual exploitation is incorporated in code of conduct trainings and awareness-raising materials targeted at OSCE Officials.

For further information on the OSCE's anti-trafficking prevention measures please go to http://www.osce.org/activities/13029.html.
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Re: UN Peacekeepers and Aid Workers are Sexually Abusing Small Children
« Reply #17 on: May 27, 2008, 11:50:28 AM »
Congo's Desperate 'One-Dollar U.N. Girls'
Shunned Teens, Many Raped by Militiamen, Sell Sex to Peacekeepers
http://www.washingtonpost.com/ac2/wp-dyn/A52333-2005Mar20?language=printer
By Emily Wax
Washington Post Foreign Service
Monday, March 21, 2005; Page A01


BUNIA, Congo -- She's known in the community as a "one-dollar U.N. girl." At night, she sleeps on the cracked pavement outside a storefront. In the mornings, she sashays through the dusty streets, clutching a frayed parasol against the blinding sun.

Yvette and her friends are also called kidogo usharatis, Swahili for small prostitutes. They loiter outside the camps of U.N. peacekeepers, hoping to sell their bodies for a mug of milk, a cold soda or -- best of all -- a single dollar. 


"I'm sad about it. But I needed the dollars. I can't go farm because of the militias. Who will feed me?" asked Yvette. At 14, she has a round face with wide eyes beneath a cap of neatly shorn hair, and her hands rest on her hips in an older girl's pose.

When Yvette was 10, a militiaman raped her, leaving her without clothes, she recalled. She cried a lot, wrapped her body in rags and then got up. She sought counseling at a women's organization, where she was told that she had done nothing wrong but that the theft of her virginity made her worthless as a bride. She should understand, the counselors said, that now no man would marry her.

"From time to time, I still do it. I am obligated," Yvette said. She and the other teenage girls interviewed for this article agreed to be identified provided only their first names were used. "Sometimes it happens in U.N. cars, other times at the camp. But at least they paid us. I was worthless anyhow. My honor was lost."

Yvette's story is not uncommon. The United Nations is investigating 150 instances in which 50 peacekeeping troops or civilians in the Congo mission are suspected of having sexually abused or exploited women and girls, some as young as 12.

Often, the victims were vulnerable, poverty-stricken girls engaged in what Congolese call "obligation" or "survival" sex. In this war-shattered society, aid workers and counselors said, a breakdown of cultural norms, combined with extreme poverty, has driven hundreds of kidogo usharatis to the soldiers' doorsteps.

Similar charges have been made about U.N. missions in Sierra Leone and Liberia, as well as Kosovo and Bosnia in Europe.

The United Nations is also investigating reports of rape or sexual assault in Congo, including one case in which a French logistics employee was found with hundreds of videotapes that showed him torturing and sexually abusing naked girls. Last week, U.N. officials announced they had fired one employee and suspended six others from among 17 civilian staff members being investigated in the Congo abuses.

Secretary General Kofi Annan on Sunday unveiled new rules for the United Nations that, in part, address the reports of sexual misconduct by its personnel.

But the problem of sex for money is more widespread, officials and health experts said. The U.N. scandal, they added, highlights a far larger problem in lawless societies such as Congo where young girls, some the victims of previous sexual attacks by militia fighters, sell their bodies for cash or food.

In Congo, moreover, the widespread incidence of sexual violence by roving militias during the civil war that raged from 1997 to 2003 has created a crisis in many families where long-standing marriage and sexual customs are revered.

In much of rural Africa, as in many other traditional societies, a girl's virginity has high monetary value. If a prospective bride is proved not to be a virgin, she cannot fetch a traditional bride price. Even if virginity has been lost through rape, the price can no longer be demanded by her family and the girl is considered unworthy of marriage.

According to health experts, the sale of sexual services by girls and women who may have lost their chance for a marriage payment has become common across the region.

"There are cases of rape by the U.N. But much more than that, there are many cases where girls negotiated obligation sex. In war, it is only soldiers who have money," said Petronila Vaweka, the district administrator of Ituri. "These girls have absolutely no way to make a living. This is their reality, and in some cases, the parents even push it."

Vaweka said she has considered starting a U.N. victims' association for young girls left with children, and in some cases venereal diseases or HIV/AIDS. U.N. officials expressed concern that poor, desperate girls would make up stories to claim cash. But so far, few have come forward at all because of the deep scorn involved.

"We can try the compensation idea," Vaweka said. "But I want to know, can you have compensation for a wound in the heart?"

'So Much Abject Poverty'

Five years ago, more than 10,000 U.N. peacekeeping troops came to Congo to help end a six-nation war that had left over 3 million people dead. Contingents from Morocco, South Africa, India, Nepal and Bangladesh erected camps that looked quite posh to the Congolese. They had shiny trailers and roomy tents, satellite dishes, and kitchens and bathrooms with electricity and running water -- amenities rarely seen in the impoverished bush.

To Congolese girls living in squalid camps or squatting in abandoned buildings, the peacekeepers were wealthy men they wanted to know.

Even though the war officially ended in 2003, life in Congo remains violent and precarious, especially in the volatile Ituri region where seven militia groups are still fighting. In Bunia, the regional capital, people grab at any opportunity to survive. Orphaned boys sleep in filthy gutters. A medical student peddles dried meat to pay his school fees. Girls and women beg foreign workers to let them perform any chore -- washing laundry, polishing shoes, hauling water or providing sex -- for a few coins.

"Abuse always stems from an unbalanced power relationship. There is so much abject poverty here, and people come in with economic leverage. That's a recipe for this to happen if we don't have a specific policy," said Kemal Saiki, a spokesman for the U.N. mission, who was visiting Bunia from his base in the capital, Kinshasa.

But even after the United Nations established a curfew for its troops and a strict policy of non-fraternization with the local population, the girls have continued to linger outside the U.N. camps.

Chantal, 17, stood sullenly outside a Moroccan troop camp one recent evening, clutching a tray of bananas. She was hawking the fruit -- and her body -- to soldiers perched inside a lookout post. Her high heels sank into the dusty street; her skirt clung to her thin legs.

"To us they are the town's best employer," she said with a shrug. "I know everyone is saying it's bad. But why don't they come and give us jobs? Tell me, who will feed me?"

Earlier in the day, Moroccan soldiers inside the camp said any illicit behavior that might have taken place is now over. Moroccan officials recently fired two unit commanders and said they sent six soldiers home to be prosecuted after finding allegations against them to be credible.

There also have been tensions between the small group of soldiers who buy sex and the majority who don't, the peacekeepers said.

"As a human being, I feel there is too much poverty here, and maybe some people took advantage of that," said Lt. Charaf Arsalane, 23. "But I feel really affected by this. We are out here working hard, and a few people ruin the reputations of all. It has to stop completely, and that means turning away from some of the girls even if it's an innocent interaction."

Even so, Chantal and Yvette said that if they ran out of food, they would head back to the U.N. camps.

Most people in rural Congo are farmers, but they can no longer tend their fields because militiamen roam the countryside. As a result, food shortages are rampant. A study by the humanitarian group Doctors Without Borders found that clean water and food rations from international aid agencies were insufficient to meet the people's needs.

But Congo's suffering, the group said, has fallen low on the world's priority list. Last year, according to the International Rescue Committee, $188 million was spent on humanitarian aid in Congo. That amounted to just over $3 per person, compared to $89 per person in Sudan and $138 per person in Iraq the previous year.

"The ugly fact is, many girls engaged in obligation sex when the war got really bad in 2003, and it was mainly with U.N. soldiers because they have the money," said Antoine Tambwe, a Congolese pediatrician at the International Red Cross hospital here.

Many girls told Tambwe they were "really sorry they did it, some even in U.N. cars, but they were too hungry," he said. "Sometimes they said many peacekeepers would have sex with one girl in the same night, and she would get one dollar from each. It's not rape, but it's close, because it's exploitation of children. This is really sad, but this is the truth."

'No Other Choice'

On a recent night, Yvette and her friend Francine, 16, sat side by side, giggling, on the veranda of an abandoned business. Swinging their legs back and forth and singing a Congolese song, they seemed like young girls anywhere.

But once they stopped singing, Francine seemed troubled.

She looks much younger than her age and speaks in a shy voice. When she sleeps, she said, she has a recurring nightmare. In the dream, she has been raped and finds herself in a graveyard where her uncle is buried.

"I am just standing there," Francine said. "I don't know why."

Francine's father died in the war, and she had to leave school after the fourth grade. After that her uncle protected her. One day in 2003, she went into the fields to collect food and was raped by a militiaman. Like Yvette, she was told she had been spoiled for marriage, but her uncle still treated her kindly.

Then the uncle was killed in an attack, and the nightmares started. Many families fled the region; Francine lost her mother in the confusion. After a time she came to Bunia because she heard that U.N. troops were guarding the town and that it was safe. At first she collected cassava roots and tried to sell them, but she made very little money.

Meanwhile she met and became friends with Yvette, whose mother was sick with typhoid and had run out of food. Yvette, she said, told her about another way to earn money. After that, she began having sex with peacekeepers.

"There was no other choice," Francine said, as Yvette laughed uncomfortably beside her.

One recent evening, Francine recounted, a deal was negotiated and she went into the Moroccan camp. There, she said, she had sex with one man, but the situation got out of control. Five more lined up and began to take her by force, she said.

"I feel bad about what I did. I don't want to go through that again," Francine said quietly.

After the incident, Yvette and Francine went to an aid group that works with the victims of sexual violence, but they did not reveal the full story.

"I was afraid of trouble, so I just told them about the rapes by militias. We never said anything about the U.N.," Yvette said.

The counseling helped a little. The girls liked being with others, and they learned a song that they found soothing to sing. In it, a boy asks for his inheritance and receives it. He goes abroad, has an affair with a girl and spends all the money. Then he returns home to face his father.

"Please, father," Francine and Yvette sang sweetly into the hot night air. "Please forgive me. I have undergone poverty, and I have lost my worth. Please accept me back."
All eyes are opened, or opening, to the rights of man. The general spread of the light of science has already laid open to every view the palpable truth, that the mass of mankind has not been born with saddles on their backs, nor a favored few booted and spurred, ready to ride them legitimately

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Re: UN Peacekeepers and Aid Workers are Sexually Abusing Small Children
« Reply #18 on: May 27, 2008, 11:51:48 AM »
U.N. Raping Children Again, This Time Girls As Young As 8 In Liberia!
Posted by Randy on May 10, 2006 07:10 AM
http://www.rightwinged.com/2006/05/un_raping_children_again_this.html
***UPDATE 5/11 10:10 AM CT***
Hot Air's latest Vent With Michelle Malkin hammers the UN for all of what was discussed in this post, and more.

***UPDATE***
Not surprisingly the UN has elected Cuba, among other human rights abusers to the Human Rights Council. At least Iran and Venezuela didn't get in.

***UPDATE***
A former UN worker gives her first hand testimony in RightWinged.com comments. In case you missed it, I've added it to this actual post. Scroll down to read it

***SCROLL FOR MORE UPDATES***

Whether you agree with me about the need to disband United Nations or not, you would have to admit that they are the most corrupt and disgraceful organization in existence today. No I'm not just talking about the biggest scandal of all time, Oil for Food, I'm talking about the habit their "peacekeepers" have of raping small children in war torn and third world countries.

It's actually kind of interesting that the latest story comes out just a day after I posted on the rape of thousands of little girls in the Congo at the hands of the UN. That post of course was about Eric Shawn's new book The U.N. Exposed : How the United Nations Sabotages America's Security and Fails the World, and I mentioned the underreported story of mass child rapes occuring at the hands of the UN, when saying that I hoped it has it's own chapter in the book. I also mentioned a similar story from a few years back in Bosnia, but if you do a few quick searches you'll see the UN is doing this all over the world.

Well today's story that should be, but I suspect won't be front page NY Times material, and probably won't get mentioned at all by most of the media, just piles on and shows that the United Nations are by no means cleaning up their act. In this article you'll learn that in one confirmed case, they "supsended" the official involved. If I recall, when I heard the limited reporting on the rapes in the Congo, similar actions were taken. SUSPENDED!? Are you kidding me!?

Reuters has some coverage (that again, I doubt many will pick up) and I couldn't help but notice that they left "UN" and "United Nations" out of the headline that reads: Peacekeepers, teachers prey on Liberia girls: report. Peace keepers huh? Doesn't sound like they're worried as much about peace, so why not mention that it's the "United Nations" in the headline?
MONROVIA (Reuters) - U.N. peacekeepers, aid workers and teachers are having sex with Liberian girls as young as 8 in return for money, food or favors, threatening efforts to rebuild a nation wrecked by war, a report said on Monday.

Save the Children UK said an alarming number of girls were being sexually exploited by men in authority in refugee camps and in the wider community, sometimes for as little as a bottle of beer, a ride in an aid vehicle or watching a film.

Such a classy operation... why are we part of this group again?
The 20-page document said local people reported sexual exploitation by peacekeepers in every location where a contingent of the UNMIL peacekeeping force was stationed, highlighting the continuing problem of sex abuse by U.N. forces.

Allegations of sexual misconduct have dogged U.N. operations in Liberia, Ivory Coast, Haiti and especially in the Democratic Republic of Congo, where the world body has accused members of its biggest peacekeeping force of rape, pedophilia and giving children food or money in return for sex.

Well, that's only a partial list of countries where this is and has happened, but I guess minimal reporting is better than no reporting.
The U.N. force in Liberia said in a statement eight cases of sexual exploitation and abuse involving U.N. personnel had been reported since the start of 2006. One of those had been substantiated and the member of staff suspended.

Way, way to go UN, that's really throwin' the book at 'em! By the way, eight cases may have been "reported", but I would guess, like in the other countries, there are probably thousands of occurances. Keep in mind that this is the UN statement saying that there have been eight cases reported, and they obviously have an interest in downplaying what is clearly a worldwide scandal.
The report's compilers spoke to more than 300 people in camps for displaced people and communities where people had recently returned to their pre-war localities.

"All of the respondents clearly stated that they felt that the scale of the problem affected over half of the girls in their locations," it said, adding aid workers, teachers, camp and government employees, policemen and soldiers were involved.

"The girls reportedly ranged in age from 8 to 18 years, with girls of 12 years and upwards identified as being regularly involved in 'selling sex'," commonly referred to as "man business," it said.

It did not give a total number for estimated cases of sexual exploitation in Liberia.

Yeah, those bastards in the Congo thought they were really something when they raped 12 year olds... let's seem 'em top this! Read the rest here.

Rumor has it that the UN's new motto is going to be "Just when you thought you war torn country couldn't suck any more, we come in and rape your elementary school aged children!"

Again, I have links to the Congo and Bosnia stories in my previous post, but I'm sure if you dig around you could find more coverage, despite the fact that you probably never heard about it from the NY Times or on the network news. I just did a quick Yahoo! (not Yahoo! News) search on 'United Nations Rape', and the number one result of course is from the "alternative media", a World Net Daily article dated March 1, 2005 with the headline: U.N. targeting own sex abuse. But don't let the headline fool you, because without any media coverage to drive public outcry, he United Nations just really sweeps it all under the rug, and of course continues this peacekeeping outrageous behavior, now in Liberia.

Again, you can dig up all kinds of underreported information on the UN's rape and child rape problem, but here's just a bit from that WND article that was about the empty claims that Annan was going to crack down on people over this continuing problem:
As it currently stands, many peacekeepers accused of wrongdoing are never punished, since they're simply sent home to be handled by their own governments.

"We are taking very firm measures – changing some of the commanders, some of the civilian staff have been disciplined – and we've come up with very strict instructions that they should not fraternize the way they have done in the past," U.N. Secretary-General Kofi Annan said yesterday.

(sarcasm) Whoa, cool your jets bub! That's a little harsh wouldn't you say? "Changing commanders", "disciplining staff" (why do they remain "staff" at all!? And why are they not being prosecuted?!). Boy, I don't want to get on your bad side! (/sarcasm)

By the way Kofi, did these people really need "strict instructions" to know not to rape women and small girls? I don't think anyone on the planet needs "instructions" not to do that, and I should expect the UN has an employment screening process that would allow them to determine if someone was legally retarded, as they would have to be to not know better than to rape women and children!

Now here's something really interesting:
As WorldNetDaily previously reported, the widespread sex scandal came to be known as "the U.N.'s Abu Ghraib," with the London Times providing some specific examples, including:

That got me thinking.... Where are the 45 front page NY Times stories in 50 days (or whatever it was)? I mean, we have prosecuted something like 8 or 9 people for the abuses at Abu Ghraib and the media coverage continues to this day, despite there being nothing really new since the first month the story broke. We've had the ACLU sue for the release of more pictures that stood to do nothing but spark more muslim outrage, and added nothing to the story... But I haven't heard jack about this, and the raping of 8 year old girls is certainly worse than making a bunch of captured insurgents get naked and stand in a cheerleader pyramid, wouldn't you agree?

When will Human Rights Watch and all the others will be attacking the United Nations relentlessly over this? When will the media overcover this until they are doing nothing but repeating the same exact information all day every day?

Now for the handful of examples mentioned in that last excerpt:
* A French U.N. logistics expert in the Congo shot pornographic videos in his home, in which he had converted his bedroom into a photo studio for videotaping his sexual abuse of young girls. When police raided his home, the man was allegedly about to rape a 12-year-old girl sent to him in a law enforcement sting operation. As the Times reported, a senior Congolese police officer confirmed the bed was surrounded by large mirrors on three sides, with a remote control camera on the fourth side.

* U.N. officials are worried that the scandal, which already has netted 150 allegations of sex crimes by U.N. staffers, will explode if the pornographic videos and photos, now on sale in Congo, becoming public

"It would be a pretty big problem for the U.N. if these pictures come out," one senior official told the Times.

* Two Russian pilots paid young girls with jars of mayonnaise and jam to have sex with them, the report adds.

* U.N. "peacekeepers" from Morocco based in Kisangani – a secluded town on the Congo River – are notorious for impregnating local women and girls. In March, an international group probing the scandal found 82 women and girls had been made pregnant by Moroccan U.N. staffers and 59 others by Uruguayan staffers. One U.N. soldier accused of rape was apparently hidden in the barracks for a year.

Congo's Minister of Defense Maj.-Gen. Jean Pierre Ondekane told a top U.N. official that all U.N. "peacekeepers" in Kisangani would be remember for would be "for running after little girls," the Times reported.

* And at least two U.N. officials – a Ukrainian and a Canadian – have been forced to leave the African nation after getting local women pregnant.

In backwards order...

"Forced to leave", again way to bring the hammer down Kofi.

Impregnated 82 women and girls? Can you imagine how many they actually had sex with?! Can you remember ever reading a headline that said "UN Workers Impregnate 82 Women and Girls In the Congo"? I don't.

Condiments for sex? Way to help out these poor people UN, great job as always! I just can't even imagine how cruel and evil must these men are. And are they rotting in jail? The story doesn't say but my guess is they are still working in the same capacity as they were when they commited these acts, since the UN hasn't even done anything that could be called a slap on the wrist in any of these cases.

Now, the first example in the list is where see the extreme double standard. Remember just before those examples I told you how they call this the "UN's Abu Ghraib", but obviously the media hasn't had the same interest. Well that first example in that list is very telling. Where have the ACLU and far left groups been? Why are they not demanding the release of these images?! Obviously they wouldn't want to print them, but shouldn't they be as outraged, or actually much more outraged than they were over Abu Ghraib story?

Wondering what the human rights groups are saying? The UN is obviously not saying anything about it, so let's see if anyone else is.

Human Rights Watch doesn't mention this story... But they do have "U.S.: Bush Should Close Guantanamo Now" as their top story. I checked their "news" page, and nothing there either.

Amnesty International is as silent as HRW, but of course they managed to squeeze in a dig at America in their latest news section, with a headline that reads: US: Government creating "climate of torture". Also like HRW, they have nothing on their news page.

Would you believe it's the same situation at Human Rights First? And of coures, the obligatory America bashing headlines are there: U.S. Must Abide by Ban on Cruel Treatment and Groundbreaking Research Shows Over 600 U.S. Personnel Implicated in Widespread Abuse

I think you get the point. If you would like to express your outrage, there is only one way to contact the UN on their web site, through this contact form. But I think you'd be better off contacting the media with your outrage because it's only through their coverage that pressure will be put on the UN to do something.

I'm surprised to see that the blogosphere hasn't even really picked up today's Liberia story. There are a couple LiveJournal people who's copied the whole story without anything further, and this genius who's headline reads: So we're in Iraq fighting for human rights...what about Liberia? Darfur?. I know if you follow the link, you'll see that this text is small, but it is the headline. It's the headline in Technorati, and the rest of the post is the copied and pasted article. I think it's pretty clear that this girl didn't bother to read the article to find out that the UN is the guilty party here. I'm sure if we asked her if we should go to war against the UN in Liberia she'd be a little confused.

More from Gateway Pundit

***UPDATE***
Others:
Expose the Left has video of Eric Shawn on Hannity and Colmes, and Independent Conservative has audio of him on Hannity's radio show, discussing his new book: The U.N. Exposed : How the United Nations Sabotages America's Security and Fails the World

***UPDATE***
A lot of bloggers are up in arms over Cuba being given a Human Rights Council seat. While I certainly completely agree with their outrage, at the same time I'm kind of like "what did ya expect?" The UN is a horrible institution that was even entertaining the idea, and it looked likely for a while, to let Iran on the council. So yes, this is deserving of everyone's outrage, but at the same time I never expected anything better from the UN. For more on this check out:
Michelle Malkin (thanks for the link), Captain's Quarters, Gateway Pundit, Publius Pundit, Babalou Blog, Stop the ACLU

***UPDATE***
It seems the UN has similar problems to this elementary school. At least in this school, where 12 boys aged 6-8 sexually assaulted an 8 year old girl, they were suspended. A teacher who should have been watching has been fired, and another suspended. It's sad that the UN can't even be this harsh with their ADULT employees repeatedly raping little girls, impregnating them, trading tiny amounts of food for sex, etc.

***UPDATE***
I received the following in a comment from someone calling herself Mishka. Of course I have not verification of whether this is true or not, but I suspect it is. Basically she gives a first hand account of being witness to these shameful UN activities:
I am very sorry to tell you that UN corruption and rape is not limited to the countries you've listed. I was personally a UN officer in Eastern Sudan and the biggest difficulty of my job was not the harsh environment we lived and worked in, but dealing with other fellow officers, predominantly from other African countries. These gentlemen not only abused girls in the refugee camps, but ended up raping a UN volunteer in our compound. I was quite new at the job and quite young. My attempts to do something about these abuses lead to my contract being discontinued. The gentleman who raped my friend was quite high on the chain of command in the UN and was far more powerful. Before my contract ended, I left voluntarily because I was harrassed and threatened by some of my fellow UN officers. There was only one other female in the camp, the rest were all men. The UN has some very hard working and dedicated people who have done an amazing job in relief and development, but they are a minority. The organization as a whole is quite corrupt and needs to be dissolved and replaced by another body that is made accountable to donor countries. I went to Sudan with the most idealist and naive mind. I wanted to make my contribution towards making the world a better place. I left my job in Sudan emotionally scarred for life. My friend who got raped was never able to bring this bastard to justice. God knows how many other victims he's leaving behind. Disgusting, just disgusting!!!

 
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Re: UN Peacekeepers and Aid Workers are Sexually Abusing Small Children
« Reply #19 on: May 27, 2008, 12:12:26 PM »
All eyes are opened, or opening, to the rights of man. The general spread of the light of science has already laid open to every view the palpable truth, that the mass of mankind has not been born with saddles on their backs, nor a favored few booted and spurred, ready to ride them legitimately

Offline Dig

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Re: UN Peacekeepers and Aid Workers are Sexually Abusing Small Children
« Reply #20 on: May 27, 2008, 12:13:07 PM »
All eyes are opened, or opening, to the rights of man. The general spread of the light of science has already laid open to every view the palpable truth, that the mass of mankind has not been born with saddles on their backs, nor a favored few booted and spurred, ready to ride them legitimately

Offline chris jones

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Re: UN Peacekeepers and Aid Workers are Sexually Abusing Small Children
« Reply #21 on: May 27, 2008, 02:50:25 PM »
The threat of castration might give these creatures food for thought.
From the numbers it looks as though we should do the humitarian thing and turn these guys into eunichs.

Cruelty knows no bounds, imagine offering a starving child food for sexual favors in turn for abuse.

Bush will hear about this and get his gang together and head over there if this keeps up. I take that back his collegues have their child sex slaves locked up in the basement of Halliburton.

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Re: UN Peacekeepers and Aid Workers are Sexually Abusing Small Children
« Reply #22 on: May 27, 2008, 08:58:53 PM »
UN in nothing but the elite's global gestapo of pervs and criminals that do their bidding and kill people in the name of peace. They let them do it because they need the training for more heinous crimes to come. That stuff gets the death penalty here, but is OK because they are "peacekeepers".  The problem with humans is that they are humans. Give a gun to one and now he thinks he's a god.

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Re: UN / US Gov. Subsidized DynCorp Coverup of Global Child Sex Slave Ring
« Reply #23 on: September 10, 2010, 11:08:24 AM »
UN – U.S. Government Subsidized DynCorp Cover Up :
Government Child Pedophile Sex Slave Scandals
Continue To Break Forward From All Over The Globe!

UN Promotes Child Sex Slave Market for Pedophiles


http://politicalvelcraft.org/2010/08/28/un-along-with-u-s-government-subsidized-dyncorp-cover-up-child-pedophile-sex-slave-scandals-continue-wave-after-wave-of-child-abuse-reports-pour-forward-from-all-over-the-globe/
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it's an instrument for the people to restrain the government.” – Patrick Henry

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