Flicker rate

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Offline Pupil

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Flicker rate
« on: August 30, 2007, 12:59:30 pm »
Hello Alex,

I've heard you, Jeff Rense, and others mention that the "flicker rates" on the television are specifically timed to cause people to become more susceptible to suggestion. I have no reason to doubt you or Jeff Rense, but this one has me puzzled a bit.

I work in the television industry.  I have never heard in my industry that a 30 Hertz flicker rate makes people especially susceptible to suggestion. The reason that we use 30 frames per second is because we use two interlaced fields to make a frame, and the fields are timed on the 60 Hertz AC power that is generated on the continent.  In Europe, they generate power at 50 Hertz, and they therefore have a 25 frames per second rate (which is why you need to convert European shows before you can view them here).

My question is: Where did you find the research that indicates that certain frame rates make people more susceptible to suggestion? I don't doubt you, but I'd love to see the data and interpret it as someone on the inside of that industry.

Thanks for a great show!

Offline mr anderson

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Re: Flicker rate
« Reply #1 on: August 30, 2007, 09:01:45 pm »
I doubt that too, I know when I see bullshit and it's 99% of the time and besides I've watched 24, The unit, Battlestar Galactica, Stargate, Simpsons, Family Guy, South Park, Heroes, Prison break and know that it's fiction and not to take it seriously.

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Offline nothingtohide

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Re: Flicker rate
« Reply #2 on: August 30, 2007, 11:10:49 pm »
Don't forget that when you watch/read fiction your "reason defences" are down because you think you are being entertained. So down the road when you see something come into being that you have already accepted into your subconscious, IE.; brain chips, eugenic reasoning, overpopulation etc you just think it's just the next natural step. It's called predictive programming.
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Offline Joe(WI)

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Re: Flicker rate
« Reply #3 on: August 30, 2007, 11:15:15 pm »
It is true. The flicker rate of pokemon characters caused seizures in children in Japan, that will google for you.
A strobe will do the same exact effect when set near 60-30 cps.
Btw, you are counting the FIELD rate not FRAME rate, each frame is presented at 60 cps, a whole FIELD at 30.

Rather, look up "refresh rate" and "eye strain", see what you come up with. The eye can sense rapid changes, but the brain cannot process anything faster than, oh say, 40 cps. There is something called a sample error when you have input(eye) going faster than processor(brain), called Nyquist frequency. Normally to avoid this effect, technicians chose a sample frequency 2Xfaster than system processing. For example, humans have hearing range of 20khz, so sample would sound "perfect" at 40khz. If a sound sneaks in at 30khz, you get something called a beat frequency, at 10khz which we can hear, but couldn't say why. Same thing with brain, it tries to process the higher frequency, but can only synchronize to parts of it, causing a flicker to appear, but not process.

Try at home!
Lights out your tv room, tv on, stand as far back as you can, possibly outside at night works great, then eat a crunchy cookie staring at screen, and tell me there ain't no flicker! Same for a flouescent light at 60 cps, causes funny strobe like effect.
If you really want to have fun, look through a fan moving different speeds at the screen, chops pics up nicely.

Remember when you were a kid and watched the wagon wheels spin backwards? Same type of effect, but in that case the wheel spokes move faster than frame rate, so it animates backwards.

When I have time I will fwd an excell sheet with the effect on it.

Tell you what, I will work on more graphics to show you when I get time, gtg.
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Offline freethought

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Re: Flicker rate
« Reply #4 on: August 31, 2007, 02:08:11 am »
I agree with Pupil, I would like to read some more information too. Anecdotally I know that I am quite succeptible to
it myself. I shudder to think of how many years of my childhood were wasted infront of the gogglebox!
here is a somewhat connected story that I found, Hypnosis and tv, but no mention of the flicker rate.

http://www.time.com/time/magazine/article/0,9171,833859,00.html?promoid=googlep

I remember seeing a documentary in the 1980s in the UK basically doing similar tests. They made a recording of hypnotic suggestion and without expliaining what they would see they asked volunteers to watch it. Apparently 40% went into trance. which is a bit worrying.
But Im very sorry I couldnt find it on the web. I think the show might have been called Q.E.D or maybe it was horizon.

on a related bit of strange trivia AC frequency, I read that its inventor Nicola Tezla chose 60hz because of his esoteric beliefs.
Whatever they were.   

anyone know any further information??

Hey Ken,I just wanted to let you know how Spankful mike and I are...  (  Spankful?!? )

Offline mr anderson

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Re: Flicker rate
« Reply #5 on: August 31, 2007, 02:22:30 am »
Don't forget that when you watch/read fiction your "reason defences" are down because you think you are being entertained. So down the road when you see something come into being that you have already accepted into your subconscious, IE.; brain chips, eugenic reasoning, overpopulation etc you just think it's just the next natural step. It's called predictive programming.

I know most tv shows are for entertainment and I do not take the shows I watch seriously at all. I've seen shows about your examples and there's still no way I'd accept any of them. I guess I'm one of the lucky few who can differentiate between propaganda and reality. There are probably things that do slip through subconciously no doubt but researching the NWO's agenda and listening to fellow Earth patriots (As I'm not American lol) helps me identify shows to avoid. Certainly I will give 24 next year a miss...the torture I saw will never make me accept it seeing that I knew that television and reality are seperate BUT I now realise that television, in 24's case is trying to make the link by trying to get people to accept torture.

Battlestar Galactica does have drug induced torture and did have suicide bombings; some said the producers are making a statement about the Iraq insurgency with the human insurgency using suicide bombers to kill human collobarators with the machines. I think they are highlighting it and not glorifying it.

I also stopped watching Australia's 2 main 'Current affairs programs' which constantly run plugs for their own shows, endless celebrity pieces and downright gutter journalism. 'Today Tonight' is the racist, anti-immigrant 'A current affair' is the celebrity, make millions easy one.

There needs to be a Global channel 24/7 of Alex Jones type programming. Addressing things like North American Union, The United nations, APEC summit, G8, G20, Iraq war, Iran, NWO etc etc.



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Offline other one

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Re: Flicker rate
« Reply #6 on: August 31, 2007, 02:58:44 am »
Besides the flicker that goes on, part of your sight perception is outline and small changes from one frame of sight to the next.    When I was in the tv production business back in the mid to late 60's we used to play around with things in the background of shows and commercials.

You can have those things going on in the background and your sub-conscious will pick up on them and plant things into your conscious mind that you really can't tell where it came from.

I have also played around with recording meetings and playing them backwards and have learned many things about people who use a reverse speech that is multiplexed onto their regular speech and sends simple thoughts to others sub-consciously.   Most people only do it when they are emotional about something and protocol does not let them say what they think deep down.

Offline Joe(WI)

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beat frequencies
« Reply #7 on: August 31, 2007, 10:43:05 am »
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Beat_(acoustics)

Wiki, its not just for definitions anymore!

The graph shows two waves at near frequencies, and the effective output. The faster one could be flicker rate, and slower brain response time. What's end result? Your brain filters the higher frequency off, leaving the lower, red outline frequency. It is a percieved frequency, like subliminal.

The reason they wont tell you "Hey, we WANTED it to do that!", is because evil enjoys the luxery of messing around in the dark. They would say something like "Oh, really? it does that? I don't believe you, tv my friend.*drool*" When was the last time you heard ANYBODY say "Yeah, I'm evil, want to kill you all, whatchoo gonna do about it?" The flicker rate does effect how well those tv ads are working! Ever hit a commercial break, and you tear yourself away from the zombie state?
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Offline zlater

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Re: Flicker rate
« Reply #8 on: August 31, 2007, 10:50:20 am »
err.. my 2 Hertz on this..

flickering is dependant on refresh rate on comp screens both TFT  and CRT. for televisions the national electric grid voltage and frequency is of course what defines it but also the Hertz of the tv itself. The old glass screen diode cannons have the worst flicker rate since they work at 30 or 50 Hz depending on us or eu location. newer tvs however to give a EU example..

glass tube screens for 100 Hz were introduced in the 90s. They had to be connected to the max 75Hz TV-signal outlet so they weren't/aren't 100Hz without a special tv antenna cable that has resistors in both ends. They were black cables that dampen the frequency from the outlet to 100Hz. more resistance higher frequency. LCD TVs are to compare with comp screens and using settings above 75Hz is recommended imho because the eye reacts to flicker under about 70 Hz. I think 30Hz is very dangerous because it will easily affect the mind through subliminal picture attacks to our subconsciousness. The 50 Hz tvs of course operated only at 50 Hz.

The brain or CNS collects much more information than we perceive ourselves so we can not understand the impact ourselves but can get symptoms of fatigue, sore eyes, headaches. Those are true warning signs. Watching tv in a dark room without back lighting can also be dangerous since the changes are violent to the retina of the eye.

pictures or subliminal messages embedded in any program like the experiment posted earlier aren't possible to see or understand if they don't appear in the time of which the consciousness can react and understand it. these reaction times are individual of course but can be trained and in a informative society like the present peoples reaction times are pretty fast. gamers etc can have as low as 18 ms reaction times, drummers even less. using that is possible then to understand how many frames it must be for actually seeing the message yet perceiving it. if a person is tired and maybe daydreaming or concentrating on a specific task at hand like a show or similar it's easier to embed manipulative suggestions..

light, colour and contrast also play a role of their own. one can often see aggressive advertisements or action movies very colourful and "flickering" in a matter of speaking. Visual violence combined with sounds to make a conscious rhythm for perception can also cause damage or effect.

i'm sure it's possible to scroogle and investigate to find research done on this. One psychology test that comes in mind is a old test of dreams and perception. one test person was in an empty room with lights off and nothing but a faint air conditioning sound and was allowed to dream. the other person was forced to wake up before any R.E.M. state as in not being allowed to dream or feel anything. his arms and legs were also confined with plast caster (?) to avoid moving. This later person was a total wreck while the first one was energetic and rested. Dreams are a state of subconsciousness in which the mind deals with the remains of it's after-awakened-state to re-energize and rest in it's own way. dreams deal with earlier events that might have affected the mind somehow and also coming events.. the conscious state with timebound regulations and systematic behaviour is powerconsuming.

There are very high frequencies that can hurt hearing, very low and loud or combined. The visual violence can be a reaction to bright colours, contrast or low refresh rate (flickering).

to see the flickering that a below 70 hertz screen outputs you should try see it through the side of the eye looking at the screen while facing either side. looking straight at a low refresh rate screen won't let you see the flickering in itself.
Another example a game that is on very low quality graphics and minimal settings hurts the eyes a lot more than on high resolution/refresh rate/coulour depth and quality.

EDIT: to set your refresh rate on a computer "rightclick desktop background - properties - settings - advanced - monitor" There you should see the Hz options. I recommend 75Hz or more. It can also be found in the graphics properties.

Offline In_Formation

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Re: Flicker rate
« Reply #9 on: August 31, 2007, 11:50:13 am »
Maaan, as fascinating as I find the nature of electronics to be, I couldnt help but to come up with a simplified solution for the flicker rate of my television set. And it involved the local land fill.  =P
Waking up each day in this place is like falling asleep and having the same nightmare over and over again...... Why oh why didnt I take the "blue" pill???

Offline zlater

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Re: Flicker rate
« Reply #10 on: August 31, 2007, 11:55:33 am »
I like the land fill agenda, but it's not only tvs that can flicker. a fan, comp screen, movie, lightbulb etc.
there are pretty simple solutions though (one of them land fill.. lol).. over 70Hz is ok. below is bad and it's a fact because it's where the eye can't no longer perceive it as flickering. :P

Offline Pupil

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Re: Flicker rate
« Reply #11 on: August 31, 2007, 12:09:50 pm »
Quote
Btw, you are counting the FIELD rate not FRAME rate, each frame is presented at 60 cps, a whole FIELD at 30.

No offence, and not that it matters beyond semantics, but you've got it backwards: there are 60 interlaced fields per second that make up 30 frames. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/NTSC#Technical_details  - I just wanted to get that straight.

My question is really, if NTSC (the North American TV standard) is based on 60Hz power, and the generation of power in North America was established at 60Hz before TV was invented, how is it that 30 frames per second was specifically established to increase subliminal suggestivity?

Another thing that Alex and Jeff might be referring to is the pacing of edits.  In other words, is it the timing and frequency of cuts within a scene that cause increased brain zonkification?

As a TV and film producer, I'm curious, because if it's the editing, I want to know what to avoid, and if possible, I'd like to expose it further within the industry as something we should be avoiding instead of using.

zlater, you mention that:
Quote
I think 30Hz is very dangerous because it will easily affect the mind through subliminal picture attacks to our subconsciousness.

Can you provide me with some source material on that? I'm interested.  

You see, if I insert one frame of something in a timeline while editing, it only appears for 1/30th of a second.  But I guarantee that people who don't know it's there will notice it - it's on too long for it to be truly subliminal. They may not fully register what it said/was but they'll know it was there and be able to resist it.

Anyway, it's something that has piqued my interest, because I work in that field and have never come across anything about this. Of course, a lot of masons have no idea what THEY're into either :)

Quote
simplified solution for the flicker rate of my television set. And it involved the local land fill

LOL.. I agree. I barely watch TV unless I'm working on a program.

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Re: Flicker rate
« Reply #12 on: August 31, 2007, 12:15:37 pm »
bump

Offline TimeLady

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Re: Flicker rate
« Reply #13 on: August 31, 2007, 12:17:10 pm »
I'm not sure if this applies here or not, but my best friend and her g/f were watching TV a couple times, and they saw a subliminal ad for the US Army in it. They saw it for a second or two, and it vanished.

Possible attempt to get people to join the Army?
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Re: Flicker rate
« Reply #14 on: August 31, 2007, 12:19:50 pm »
Speaking of flicker rates.... I can hear from my "we the people" radio feed (windows media player feed) i low level beeping sound in the background of Alex Jones. It almost sounds like a busy signal to me... anyhow, for someone with bionic hearing like i have, its annoying! Anyone else here this low level beeping in the background of his broadcast???

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Re: Flicker rate
« Reply #15 on: August 31, 2007, 12:31:04 pm »
ahhh.. its gone now.

Offline lord edward coke

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Re: Flicker rate
« Reply #16 on: August 31, 2007, 01:02:32 pm »
YOU ARE DUMBED DOWN BY WATCHING THE IDIOT-BOX. THE MILATARY HAS A "FLASHLIGHT"THEY SHINE IN YOUR EYES AND IT CONFUSES YOUR MIND AND YOU RALPH ON YOURSELF.SHRINKS ALSO HAVE A"VEIW BOX"THAT HYPNOTIZES YOU AND  REGRESSES YOUR BRAIN FOR CHILDHOOD TRAUMA VICTIMS.FURTHER THEY HAVE GOGGLES THAT ARE PUTTING PEOPLE TO GIVE  A OUT OF BODY EXPERIENCE.THERE IS MORE BUT THATS GOOD FOR NOW.
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Offline zlater

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Re: Flicker rate
« Reply #17 on: August 31, 2007, 03:44:23 pm »
...
...

zlater, you mention that:
Can you provide me with some source material on that? I'm interested. 

You see, if I insert one frame of something in a timeline while editing, it only appears for 1/30th of a second.  But I guarantee that people who don't know it's there will notice it - it's on too long for it to be truly subliminal. They may not fully register what it said/was but they'll know it was there and be able to resist it.

Anyway, it's something that has piqued my interest, because I work in that field and have never come across anything about this. Of course, a lot of masons have no idea what THEY're into either :)

LOL.. I agree. I barely watch TV unless I'm working on a program.

I've worked with home appliances, i got the education for the degree of electrician and i went to the equiv of college with psychology as a part.. but ok.. lets see..
First of all as i said or might not have mentioned properly i'm in EU.. Finland. so the 30Hz phenomena is not really familiar of course but subliminal messages are frequent in most advertisements or commercials. even at low rate. low rate it catches up more easily and more over the frequent periods of long commercials distract the mind into a disarray to be more unprepared.

30 Hz = 1/30 seconds = 1000ms / 30 = 33.3 ms.. now a average person has the reaction time of 25 - 50 ms when they are alert.. In traffic it is mentioned a reaction of 0.5 - 1.5 seconds even. so when one watches tv one tries to stay relaxed, yes? one tries to focus and enjoy on what one is watching, yes? so one is not at a very hightened state of alertness on something sudden or surprising. this seems logical to me and sounds pretty obvious.

there was an example earlier on the hypnosis case. there are several to be found involving subliminal messaging. in a 50Hz tvworld the time would be 1000ms / 50 = 20ms.. so much harder for the subconscious to react to it the higher the Hz.. so that's my point. i'll find sources for you if you rather not want to do the research for examples yourself. i found this needed more explaining..

The time on 30Hz is therefore not too long and they surely don't want people to find out about it though it is used every day through commercials to get people to buy stuff. using psychology in ads is one of the most common ways to get a product sold. images of women, images of action, technology, bait in all forms and a message to make the coming customer to remember and to get appealed by. commercials can be easy to remember especially when they get "current of the situation". Hope you get my point.

subliminal messages are hidden for a reason and it's not guaranteed to be found because the whole point is the subliminality.. a form of legal and illegal visual brainwash.

I'm a bit surprised you got hooked up on this minor detail but glad you asked to straight it out.. what about the rest in the post? did it make any sense?

Offline r00tman

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Re: Flicker rate
« Reply #18 on: August 31, 2007, 03:50:29 pm »
I agree the trash is the only place for the tv.
I threw mine out years ago.

rm

Offline Salem

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Re: Flicker rate
« Reply #19 on: September 01, 2007, 03:10:54 am »
well wen you think of it they want your mine thel go to any lengths every where from the food we eat[even if it high grade organic] to just siting there and pullsating waves every where think from a drive around how many radio/phone/phone poles do you see theres a lot of ways they can infilitrate
just work on building up your own mental defence
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Offline Pupil

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Alex: Flicker rate
« Reply #20 on: February 21, 2008, 12:16:48 pm »
Just bumping this, because I still haven't found anything nefarious about the framerates in television media, and Alex just mentioned this on the show again.

I agree we're manipulated with the tube (which I never watch anymore), but I'm just confused as to why the NTSC 30 frames per second standard is especially effective, considering it isn't a universal standard.

Offline Joe(WI)

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Re: Flicker rate
« Reply #21 on: February 21, 2008, 04:14:25 pm »
Zlater is being totally disingenuous, mark as cointelpro, I would. He is twisting concepts to fit "harmless". Somethings he is saying is correct, but it is based on faulty numbers.

THIS is what happens when it becomes blatantly obvious.
http://www.cnn.com/WORLD/9712/17/japan.cartoon/
Dr. Yukio Fukuyama, a juvenile epilepsy expert, said that "television epilepsy" can be triggered by flashing, colorful lights. Though the phenomenon was observed before television, photosensitive epilepsy, as it is also called, has become far more common as TV has spread. The same symptoms have also been observed in children playing video games.

*paste*
Btw, you are counting the FIELD rate not FRAME rate, each FIELD is presented at 60 cps, a whole frame at 30.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/NTSC
Other technical standards in the final recommendation were a frame rate (image rate) of 30 frames per second consisting of two interlaced fields per frame (2:1 interlacing) at 262½ lines per field or 60 fields per second

Where someone mentions 30Hz, kick them in the frickin' head and ignore them, THEY ARE LYING TO YOU.
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Offline CANADIAN-guerilla

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Re: Flicker rate
« Reply #22 on: February 21, 2008, 04:20:22 pm »
i don't know what the proper name is
flashing colored lights, whatever

i know it's real
because my neice has it
food shortages and/or near starvation
will be the tactic/strategy used by TPTB to get america's guns

Offline Pupil

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Re: Flicker rate
« Reply #23 on: February 21, 2008, 04:58:39 pm »
Personally, I find this is pretty close to the mark:
http://www.5min.com/Video/The-Truth-Behind-Commercial-Television-9716

Generally, it has more to do with being lulled into a relaxed, receptive state before messages are introduced. I really don't think it has much to do with the frame/field rates. In some instances you have the wild flashing colours which give people seizures, but there are rules against doing that where I come from.

Offline Joe(WI)

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Re: Flicker rate
« Reply #24 on: February 21, 2008, 06:29:43 pm »
My point is/was it does effect behavior quite negatively. All mainstream will say is technical data, they will not admit it lowers brainwave activity, and yes, it does.

The offending cartoon came out in 1997, and the TV standard has been around since 1950s, you would think someone would/should have known better ;)

The chart I posted could use some better explaining...\

There are 2 frequencies at work here, the one your eye works at, and the one your brain works at. When your eye sees something, it fires off a message to your brain to process it. If it fires too quickly, it will most likely be ignored. Sometimes though, it will rise up to a threshold where the brain knows something happened, but cannot react quick enough to know what.
TV is a repeated traced dot 60 times per second, it doesn't matter how you slice the numbers, THE DOT REPEATS 60X/SECOND. Every 40X/second(maybe), your brain processes flickering the eye sees. Anything faster appears to be continuous, slower is flickering. If you point a videocam at a tv picture, you see the blackbars scrolling up and down the screen, because by the time the camera "sees" the same dot being drawn, it has already gone back up, down again, and a little past where it was the first time, so what the camera "sees" are bars moving down.

Sample frequency
A technical term we need to throw in to make better sense of what happened. The dot on the tv moves from top to bottom every 60th of a second, the camera sampled it when it moved down, so it appears to be moving down. If the tv and camera could agree exactly when the top and bottom was, it would be a stationary bar. Same type of thing happens when you look at a brick wall through a screen, those weird bendy lines that don't really exist, but when you move your head, they move too.
Your brain can't make sense of what the eyes see faster than a certain point, but it will respond. In a quite unexpected way. Just like the camera thought the bars were going down on the screen, the brain thinks the flicker is at a rate your brain synthesizes from its own speed and what the eye is sending. The graph shows those two signals, and the red line is what gets interpreted. The red curve is quite slow compared to the originals though, and in this case it's around 1/30th, or 2 times per second. I'm not saying this is math exactly what happens, but the closer those two inputs(eye and comprehend), the lower output will be. At a rate of 4 times per second, it is at a sleep state I believe.
Or try listening to two near tones, they seem to "hum" at a some point, that is a beat frequency.

I can try to make an example of the effect, but I imagine it would grate on your eyeballs terrible. I would also need to know the refresh rate of whatever you are viewing it on, so it gets all involved.

Lets just say anything too fast to be properly comprehended will turn into a much slower signal. In the same way the camera saw a bar moving down, your eye does indeed see the dot being traced, but the brain can't and copes by thinking "sleep".
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Offline ramicio

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Re: Flicker rate
« Reply #25 on: March 29, 2013, 05:12:42 pm »
I have seen some stuff that's correct here, and a lot of it is wrong.

Here's how tube TVs work.  Pick or choose top field first or bottom field first.  It does not matter.  I will use top field first because it would be zero.  A particle beam is shot from behind the screen and scans every even line from left to right, top to bottom, in 1/60 second.  It then comes up to the first odd line and scans all of those in between the even lines in 1/60 second.

The way modern TVs, or flat panels, act, or are supposed to act is like this.  Let's say we're dealing with 1080i.  Your first/even fields are 1920x540.  This is stretched to 1920x1080 and displayed for 1/60 second.  Then your second/odd fields are given the same treatment and displayed for 1/60 second.  If you see a combed image something is not deinterlacing it properly.

With both systems you have full vertical resolution on a still picture, but motion details are cut in half.  This doesn't matter much to the untrained eye because motion usually has blur.  You would think the tube system would result in a combed image, but it doesn't because the phosphors don't react fast enough to go black before the next set of fields are drawn.  Tubes flicker, and flat panels don't.  Flat panels hold the image there and draw only the changes from the last image.  This is a problem for motion because your eye tracks the movement, but the old image is still on the screen.  With displays that flicker, you do not have this problem.  This is only really a problem for 24 FPS (frames) stuff (movies) and stuff that is really only 30 FPS and not even 60 fields per second.  With our now-large displays it's becoming a problem at 60 FPS.  I personally think all material should just be 120 FPS these days, movies and TV.  There's no excuse to keep this old technology.

Online jerryweaver

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Re: Flicker rate
« Reply #26 on: March 29, 2013, 05:51:33 pm »


Plot Summary for
Flicker (2008) More at IMDbPro »
 
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Artist Brion Gysin developed the Dream Machine. The device has in its core a 100-watt light bulb, which is surrounded by a spinning open column with windows to allow the light to shine through. To be experienced with ones eyes closed, the Dream Machine has a flickering effect of light and dark, much like a strobe light. The experience has been described as hypnotic or hallucinogenic. Some have called the Dream Machine a drug-less high. Gysin, through archival interviews, many of the Dream Machine's users, some of whom are friends of Gysin, and scientists tell of their experiences with the machine and speculate on its physiological effects. Written by Huggo
http://www.imdb.com/title/tt1236194/plotsummary?ref_=tt_ov_pl

For as long as but a hundred of us remain alive, never will we on any conditions be brought under English rule. It is not for glory, nor riches, nor honours that we are fighting, but for freedom — for that alone, which no honest man gives up but with life itself.
From The Declaration of Arbroath 132

Online jerryweaver

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For as long as but a hundred of us remain alive, never will we on any conditions be brought under English rule. It is not for glory, nor riches, nor honours that we are fighting, but for freedom — for that alone, which no honest man gives up but with life itself.
From The Declaration of Arbroath 132

Offline OpenSight

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Re: Flicker rate
« Reply #28 on: March 29, 2013, 07:13:59 pm »
I first learned about this effect (not specifically on televisions) from a physics teacher way back in high school.  According to him, there was a specific stretch along the autobahn somewhere over in Germany where they had a high number of fatal accidents at a certain time of the day.  Besides the fact that they all occurred around the same time of day, the only other thing they had in common was the fact that there was no obvious cause for all these cars to suddenly veer off the roadway. No bad weather conditions, no dangerous curves, no intersections, nothing.  After much investigation, it was discovered that in the late afternoon on sunny days, the sun would shine through the beautiful trees along the side of the road, casting shadows at specific intervals onto the roadway and the cars as they drove by.  As cars drove "through" these shadows, the drivers were, in effect, "strobed" by alternating shadow and bright sunlight, and if they were traveling at exactly the correct speed (sorry, high school was a long time ago, I can't remember the exact calculation) this strobe effect would cause them to go into some sort of trance and consequently lose control of their automobiles right in the middle of trying to get somewhere.  Of course, once this was discovered and explained, the P'sTB took the information and came up with ways to use the data to further their own agenda. So there is the story of flicker rate...
Reality is real, existence exists.