What's left to hack ?

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Offline Deca

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What's left to hack ?
« on: March 09, 2017, 12:12:56 PM »
What's left to hack ?

 no problem just have a computer not connected to the Internet problem solved right ?

 Unfortunately even that can be  hacked....

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tempest_(codename)

Tempest Keyboard Eavesdropping carried out by a Security and Cryptography Lab in Switzerland
https://youtu.be/AFWgIAgMtiA

TEMPEST - BBC report on Van Eck Phreaking
https://youtu.be/mcV6izFG3vQ

just leave your smart phone at home ....problem solved right ?

well no ...they can use wifi/mobile phone signals as a passive radar
your smart phone just acts like a aircraft transponder to these passive radars ...but if you don`t have a mobile they can still track you ok

 How mobile phones let spies see our every move
Government's secret Celldar project will allow surveillance of anyone, at any time and anywhere there is a phone signal

https://www.theguardian.com/uk/2002/oct/13/humanrights.mobilephones

Secret radar technology research that will allow the biggest-ever extension of 'Big Brother'-style surveillance in the UK is being funded by the Government.

The radical new system, which has outraged civil liberties groups, uses mobile phone masts to allow security authorities to watch vehicles and individuals 'in real time' almost anywhere in Britain.

The technology 'sees' the shapes made when radio waves emitted by mobile phone masts meet an obstruction. Signals bounced back by immobile objects, such as walls or trees, are filtered out by the receiver. This allows anything moving, such as cars or people, to be tracked. Previously, radar needed massive fixed equipment to work and transmissions from mobile phone masts were thought too weak to be useful.
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The system works wherever a mobile phone can pick up a signal. By using receivers attached to mobile phone masts, users of the new technology could focus in on areas hundreds of miles away and bring up a display showing any moving vehicles and people.

An individual with one type of receiver, a portable unit little bigger than a laptop computer, could even use it as a 'personal radar' covering the area around the user. Researchers are working to give the new equipment 'X-ray vision' - the capability to 'see' through walls and look into people's homes.

Wi-Fi technology can "see" people through walls
https://youtu.be/PnvcjKXo-AY

and it just gets worse

Noncontact Sleep Monitoring (Somnography) Using an IR UWB Radar Sensor, August, 2016
https://youtu.be/OhqyGHQlFZo

and this is done with admitted off the shelf technology by civvy street ....

yep time to invest in a magneto helmet 

Offline Deca

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Re: What's left to hack ?
« Reply #1 on: March 09, 2017, 12:35:15 PM »
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/NSA_ANT_catalog

Quote
The NSA ANT catalog is a 50-page classified document listing technology available to the United States National Security Agency (NSA) Tailored Access Operations (TAO) by the Advanced Network Technology (ANT) Division to aid in cyber surveillance. Most devices are described as already operational and available to US nationals and members of the Five Eyes alliance. According to Der Spiegel, which released the catalog to the public on December 30, 2013, "The list reads like a mail-order catalog, one from which other NSA employees can order technologies from the ANT division for tapping their targets' data."[1][2][3][4][5][6][7][8][9] The document was created in 2008.[10]

DEF CON 22 - Michael Ossmann - The NSA Playset: RF Retroreflectors
https://youtu.be/mAai6dRAtFo


also

"The Mind Has No Firewall" -- Psychotronic Warfare, from the US Army War College -- Alan Watt
https://youtu.be/5vtDfEFmHkE

http://strategicstudiesinstitute.army.mil/pubs/parameters/Articles/98spring/thomas.htm

Quote
The human body, much like a computer, contains myriad data processors. They include, but are not limited to, the chemical-electrical activity of the brain, heart, and peripheral nervous system, the signals sent from the cortex region of the brain to other parts of our body, the tiny hair cells in the inner ear that process auditory signals, and the light-sensitive retina and cornea of the eye that process visual activity.[2] We are on the threshold of an era in which these data processors of the human body may be manipulated or debilitated. Examples of unplanned attacks on the body's data-processing capability are well-documented. Strobe lights have been known to cause epileptic seizures. Not long ago in Japan, children watching television cartoons were subjected to pulsating lights that caused seizures in some and made others very sick.

Defending friendly and targeting adversary data-processing capabilities of the body appears to be an area of weakness in the US approach to information warfare theory, a theory oriented heavily toward systems data-processing and designed to attain information dominance on the battlefield. Or so it would appear from information in the open, unclassified press. This US shortcoming may be a serious one, since the capabilities to alter the data- processing systems of the body already exist. A recent edition of U.S. News and World Report highlighted several of these "wonder weapons" (acoustics, microwaves, lasers) and noted that scientists are "searching the electromagnetic and sonic spectrums for wavelengths that can affect human behavior."[3] A recent Russian military article offered a slightly different slant to the problem, declaring that "humanity stands on the brink of a psychotronic war" with the mind and body as the focus. That article discussed Russian and international attempts to control the psycho-physical condition of man and his decisionmaking processes by the use of VHF-generators, "noiseless cassettes," and other technologies.

An entirely new arsenal of weapons, based on devices designed to introduce subliminal messages or to alter the body's psychological and data-processing capabilities, might be used to incapacitate individuals. These weapons aim to control or alter the psyche, or to attack the various sensory and data-processing systems of the human organism. In both cases, the goal is to confuse or destroy the signals that normally keep the body in equilibrium.

This article examines energy-based weapons, psychotronic weapons, and other developments designed to alter the ability of the human body to process stimuli. One consequence of this assessment is that the way we commonly use the term "information warfare" falls short when the individual soldier, not his equipment, becomes the target of attack.

Offline Deca

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Re: What's left to hack ?
« Reply #2 on: March 11, 2017, 02:08:28 AM »





http://www.itsinternational.com/categories/detection-monitoring-machine-vision/features/wireless-traffic-data-in-real-time/
Quote
Operating principles
Celldar achieves location and classification by detecting passive cell phone transmissions that echo off the surfaces of an object (for example, a vehicle, motorcycle, pedestrian, animal, train, ship and so on). It does not rely on any special equipment being mounted on the object or on the object having some form of cellular connectivity.

When a vehicle (or pedestrian, or any other moving object) enters a detection region, the reflected cell phone transmissions are detected by one or more Celldar signal receivers (Figure 1). The moving vehicle causes changes to the frequency and path length of the reflected signals. Based on these changes relative to the positions of the base station and receiver, characteristics such as speed, position and direction of motion can then be calculated. This provides the material for processing into traffic data. Information may be extracted from the signals using off-the-shelf equipment including standard cell phone components, although the signal processing software is bespoke.